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The Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1872-1878, November 24, 1872, Image 1

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JOHN II OBEULY, PUBLISHER
CAIRO, ILLINOIS! SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1872.
our churches.
I'ltKSIlYI KUIAfl-'fitSt'i Street.
Preaching, Sabbath nt 1.1 a.m. and 7) p.m
I'rnver uicctlntr, WcUnqsiJay at "J J. in.
.Sabbath School, H p.m. .1. M. Latisden, Su
perintendent. lti:v. II. Tiiaykii, I'astor
MKTIIOII.ST.-Oor. Khththund Walnut His.
Prcachlm?, HaMmih at 10 n.m., ntnl 7 p. m
I'rnyur liioflliiv', Wrdnctday.71 p.m.
falifpalli .School, II. p.m. I.. V. ijtltlwcll,
superintendent. Kkv. K. I.. Thompson,
l'astor.
CUl'IICH OK TIIK ItKIKK.ll.K-l.pl'ico-
.1
Morning prayor". S'aMi.illi inj a.m.
evening prayers, 7J p.m.
Siabbath School, II a. in.
Kkv. I), (,'oa.v, Kcctor.
ST. PATRICK'S ClltlltCII Ninth St. and
WiiMiliitnii A emit!.
Public service, Sabbath 8:10 and 10 a.m.
VftiiiT, 7 p.m.
f-nhbath School. 'J p.m.
frnlcc eery day, a.m.
IU:v. I. .1. O'IIai.i.oiian, PrlcM.
.s'r..iO"r.i,ir.s cnuti n.-cnuan.) tor.
ner of Wuluut ntnl Cross utrcctf.
Mas, eery sjahb.ilh at 10 o'tlockji. in.
Vespers, a p. in.
Man during week day, m o'clock a. in.
Kkv. C. IlntTM.iN, PrleM.
(1 HUMAN IXTIIKKANCIIlltCII-lllth
street hidwecu V-IiIiiUiii Atuiiue and
t anna Kircci
I I ..1. I
i i-ii(:!iifi .Minimi mulling
Sabbath School at 2 o'clock p.m.
Sunday morning at JO o'clock.
Thlelecke, Superintendent
II. C.
Kkv. Koii't. IIki.iiio, Pastor.
voi'Nd mi:ns christian a.vociA'
I ION. Ilrnlar iiicctliiy second Jlouda
r;
STON EWALL ,1 A C K SON'S
DEATH.
IVom " Keel awl Saddle "bv Hen. W'.Ste-
cr(!.j
Arriving at New Orleans, in 1852, I
was soon on my w'ny'iip the .Mississippi
ii ml Ohio. Anions my follow passen
gers on the Htoaiuof was Lieut. Thom
as . I.. luekson, ol" lliu L'ufted Slates
army, who (coined, at first, a retnarka
bly quiet, reserved, although vcrv tin
tclligcnl officer, ami with whom 1 sdon
became acquainted j f'orthero is every
where a port of eoinraileriu among the
officers of the two services which attract
them In each other in a crowd of
stranger. For several days the in
land vnyuj:(! continued; mid our nights
were partly spent upon the hurricane-
deck of (he steamer, engaged in con
versation. Onoofthesu conversations
was so peculiar that he fixed itself iu
my memory ; nod subsequent events
proved itself worthy of record , al
though I confess I hciitato to jmt in
writing anything which borders ,sp
nearly on the marvelous.
One clear, starlight night, as we
glided along the elear river, our con
versation turned upon the firmament
rarh month at their room over Kockwcll and its counties' orbs that looked
u-.'i"ii,'!,.k;,nrP' ."""lS' ?' 'n.c1""e' . down upon u. .lackon asked mc if I
Weekly Prayer meeting,! rlday, ,j p.m.ut . , , ' ,n . , , . , , ... . ,
from the study of nautical astronomy,
practiced by nil naval officers, into the
realms of astrology. I rcjilicd that I
had always been interested more or less
in those inniheumtic.il studies, required
in nautical calculations , an J that Irom
the exact rules demanded for working
the various problems of the cphemeric,
I had sometime-", to amuse the idle
'lours ofn sca-lifc, worked out the na
tivities of iny shipmates. I bad even
taken .udkicl's almanac, and used his
rule, but without believing in the sci
ence ol judicial aitrolopy. Jackson,
however, was not so incredulous ; nl
thoughit was evident that he had not
then decided fully within himself as to
the truth or falsehood of this exploded
science.
Before we parted at Pittsburg, a day
or two after this conversation, f had
givci .lack' on tiic necessary data for
calculating a horoscope , and, in the
eouren of a few months, 1 received
, from him a letter, which I preserved,
inclosing a scheme of nativity. As
any one who may have calculated
the.-e scheme? by the rules must know,
a horn-cope may he interpreted in vari
ous, even contradictory terms, by dif
ferent persons; and this was no excep
tion to the rule. The only rea.ou L
had for remembering it at all was, that
our destinies seemed to run in parallel
lines ; and, .-o far, it was remarkable.
It wan this peculiarity that caused
.Jackson to communicate with me, and
the ronton why I laid it carefully aide
for a re-examination.
The several planets were placed in
tceir respective houses above and be
low the horizon, and Saturn being near
the meridian, and . .approaching a
square with the moon, great danger
was to bo apprehended by the native
at the period when the aspect became
complete. Mars also bore a threaten
ing aspect, while Jupiter was below the
horizon, and heuii-sextile, which was
not altogether unfavorable. There
was no trine, and the sextile was weak.
Altogether from the evil a-pect of the
square of .Saturn, which threatened an
oppoitiou that most dreaded of all
tho evil aspects of the heavens the
scheme was not dangerous and malign,
Tho precise time and nature of the
threatened danger, requiring a second
calculation, accompanied tho Hchemo,
prognosticating the culmination of the
malign aspect within sonic teu yoars,
or during the first days of May, 18011,
at which time the nativo ran great risk
of life and fortunes, but, in case be sur
vived the peril, the ominous period
would never again recur.
In his letter Jackfeou say: "I
have gono over those calculations sev
eral times, as their result is almost on
exact reproduction of my owu.
It is clear to mo that wo shall both be
exposed to a common danger at the
the room
I.. V. Stiijavkm., 1'rcMdent
SKCONII illSsIONAKV KAI'TIST
i III KCII. :onif r Sycamore and I ort
llrrt etui!-. I'M-itchliiK Sabbath at
o clock a. m. and 3 o clock p. in,
Sunday School I oVIwV'p, in.
The church ii connected with the IllinoU
Ar-ochUon, by the Kind MJs-lomry Hap-ti-t
lunch ol ( alro.
Ill . Sol.'DION I.KONAI'.l), fa-tor.
KKK'AN MirniOlllST.-Koiirlecnlh, be
wccii Walnut and Cedar,
enter. Sabbath, II a.m.
Miath School, l p.m.
,3h incctn at " p.m.
iccoNi) n:i:i: wn.i. iiAi'Tisp-Kir-
venth ytrcet., between Walnut and Cedar,
sen ken Sabbath, lj and -i p. tit.
Ki:v. N. Uh:k.s, Tailor.
iiini: wn.i. KAI'TIST iiomi: mission
.SA1IKATH nCIIOOI.. Ounor Walnut
and C ed.r Streets.
snbbalh M hoot. U a.m.
r ll'S T KKi;i: WILL, KAl'TlsT f'UL'KC'll
i urr" llarrackt.'
-crvi'iTj, -jablnlh 1 1 a.m.. 8 p.m. A 7 J p. in.
Kkv. Wm. Kki.i.kv. I'aMor.
MUST Mls,-IONAKV KATTIT ( llt'lU II.
- filar, between Ninth and Tenth ?K
l'rvachiuirabbath. 10 n.m. and ' p.m.
I'rayer muetliiL', Wcilneday enliijf,
I'rcuchiu, Friday ewuin.
rabbath school, 1) p.m. .lobn V.inllaxtcr
and Marv stciibcn., Miperiutt:udci.
JtKV, T. .1. llulits, 1'a-tor.
MX'ONH KAI'TIST IIL'KCII-Kourt. ciith
street, bvtMreli Cod.iZ atut Wiilnilt. 'I he
onlv Kaptl't church rccot,nifd by the A
-uclatlon.
scrvlc. r, .-abhath, II a.m. ::p,m.and7 p.m.
lU'V. .lACOIt llKAUI.KV, Klder.
SKCUCT OllUKKS.
TUP. MASONS.
AlltO COMMANDKKV, NO. 13.-Ptated
A-finblv at the A-ylum Mai.'n)e Mall, llr-t
and thtnl Satunl.i lu each uiouth.
rVIKO COfNtll., No. il.-ItcK'UUr Convo
cation at Mnle Hall, the second Friday
in each mouth.
'AIKO CUAl'TKK No. 7I.Kel;ular Con
vocation at MaMinIc Hall, on tho third
'niendayoi every month.
CAIKO U)I)UK, .Vo.'iU K.4 A.L-Kefu-lar
Communication- at Maoulc Hall, the
second and routlliluiulttysurcach uiouth.
Till: OOM.KKM.OWS.
AI.K.VANMKIt UjDtiK,Ua-Meets In Odd
Fellow' Hall, In Artri Ijii 1I1I lit;, every
Thursday evening at S o'clock.
STATK ('j'fFICKKS.
Hovenmr .lohu M. I'almer;
l.tciitenant-Covcniur lohn Douijucrty ;
secretary or otatc IMmuud Ituiiimcl ;
Auditor or State 0. K. l.llplncott :
aUtlu Treasurer K. N. Kate:
aupt.l'ubllc liixtnictloti-.Scwton Kateuan
CoNCilttXSMKN.
Senator I.yman Trumbull and John A.
Logan.
Itcprcacutalitt for the Statcst-LarKc S.
L. Ilcveridge.
Itcpre-cntatlvo Thirteenth Olttrict .lohn
M. Croix.
Mi:MKKIS (;KNi:iCL A.sSK-MKI.Y.
Senators, First Ml-trict T. A. H. Holcomb,
bf I'nlun, and a. K. (iibxiu, of (ialliitlu.
Kepre-cntatlM!, Fht Uj-tritt H. Watson
Webb.
COrN'l'Y OKKICKKS.
CII1C01T COUKT.
Judye O. .1. llakcr, of Alexander. ,
I'niM'cutlii Attorney.!. K. McCartney, '
of Mii'-ac.
Sberlir-A. H. Irvin.
Wm. Martin Asiecor and Trea-urcr.
rolf.VTY COt'ltT. ,
Jildfc V. Kros.
i:. McCrito and S. Marcliil.
A"Ociatc-r.I
IIOII.
Clerk Jacob 0. Lynch.
Coroner .lohn II. (io-tnan.
MrNICII'AL "noVL'KNMKNT.
Mayor John M. LatiMlen.
Trea-urcr It. A. CunuliiKham.
Comptroller K. A. Kurnclt.
Clerk Michael Howloy.
Jlarlial-Andrew Cuin.
Altoruiiv I'. II. l'ope.
l'ollce Magl-trates K. Kross and K. Shan-
I1C--V.
Chlel of l'ollce I,. II. Myers.
hKMXT rOllXCI..
Mayor John M. Lan-dcu.
Kll.t War.l-1'. 0. Suhuh.
.Second Ward C. It. Woodward.
Third Ward .Ino. Wood.
I.'niirlh Wnnl si. StniiU Tuvlor.
Cltv.at-I,ari,'c-W. 1. Hafliday
llurd.
I10A1IP OK AI.J1KHMKX,
First Ward -James Kcardcn, A.
lord, luuu Walder.
Second Wnnl It. II. ciiuulnham, K. Un
der, (). Staneel, James Swayne.
Third Ward Will. Stratum, J, 11. l'liillls.
Fourth Ward-Jim. II. Kobinson, ti. 11.
Scaxo, J. H. Mctenlf.
and 0.
li. Saf-
I'll VNH'IANN.
It. S. lIKIflHAM, M. 0.,
Homeopathic l'liyidclau and Surj-'con. Of
(Ice p; Cnilimeiclal uveiiiin. ltcldeiice on
Tdlilli klKHit, Unco iloors west of
Woodward. 1Q.'J,V2iii.
DIt. II. (J. TAHKH,
Will rcMimu tho practice or his profession
with ccpccliil rcl'erenca to tho clectrlca
tieutmelit ol dlteiihcs In all tliu new unit im
proved metluMls of application.
In all caM's of icmalu complaints a lady
will bu in attendance.
OlUcc, 128 Commercial avenue, up stairs,
WILLIAM U. SMITH, M. 1).
IKSIUKNOr) No. tl Thirleenih stroet, be.
IV twron WimhiiiKion nvcauuuDil Wnliiut strft.
OIHue liiOoininen hluvcnuc, up utalra.
O.W. DUNNING, M.I).
OKRIHUNCK-oornerNinlh Dil Walnut sta,
IVOdice corner hlxtli street and Ohio levee.
Olflcw lioiim from w n.m. to i in., nml 9 p.in
H. WAHDNKIl, H, D.
IIIPKNOK.-Corncr Nlnetionth street and
I V Wfudil'ifton Hvenue, near court nonce. )!
llctiovorirler'sOroefrysitoro, Oltlce llnurslrom
JO n.m. ti U in. and '-oin 'i to 4 n, in.
' DR. R, BLUM,
Burgeon ami Mechanical
X) EIsT TIS T!
Oltlcc, Commercial Avcnuo bctweon Ninth
unit 'I'entli streets
. time indicated." Having hut littlt
I faith in the almost forgotten and nil-
together-repudiated hcicuce of astrology,
I 1 took little heed ot either his scheme
I of nativity on his letter, regarding the
former as ingenoius, but as merely a
proof of an ardent und somewhat" en-
thttsiastio temperament; while- I littlo
imagined, at that time, that tl.e rather
unpolished and rugged exterior of
Lieut. Jackson concealed u character
destined to become famous anion.r his
countrymen,
I served in the army in lS01-'2-'3
until after the battle of Chancellorvillc,
participating in all its important en
gagements, and tho greater part of the
time comniaudiug n brigade. At the
battle above named I was an iiivoluu
tary witness of an event which had an
important bearing on tho issues of tho
war, and which had been tlo subject
of prolouged controversy. refer to
tho death of Stonewall Jackson. The
circumstances under which 1 acquired
the right to givo testimony in tho mat
ter were somewhat remarkable ; and I
here givo ti full statement of thorn.'
Tho left of my brigade lino lay near
tho plank road at Chaneellorsvillo ;
and, alter night had fallen, I rodo for
ward, according to my invurinblo habit,
to inspect my picket-line. Tho moon
had rifieii, and partially illuminated tho
woods. I began my iiispeetiot on tho
right ol tho picket-line, progressing
gradually to tho loft, where I stopped
to rectify tho post ofn sentinel not far
from tho plank road. While thus en
gaged I heard the sound of hoofs from
the direction of tho onomy's lino, nid
paused to listen. Soon n cavalcado op
icarcd approaching us. Tho foremost
horseman detached himself fr0ni tho
main body, which halted not far from
us, and, riding cautiously nearer,
seemed to try to piorco tho jdooni. Ho
was bo oloso to us that tho soldior
nearest mo leveled his riflo for n shot
clatter of hoofs soon ceased to bo audi
blc, and the ailencu of the night was
unbroken, nave by the melancholy cries
-I .1. Ml I.I .
oi uio wuippourwiii, nnicu were licaru
in one continued wail, liko snirit-.
voices ; when the horizon was lighted ud
1 l.i.... a. i. :.. .t. ... ... .5
uj .i ruuucii na.-n iu uio direction 01
the enemy, succeeded by the well-
known rattle of a volly of musketry
irom at least a battalion. A second
yolly quickly followed the lirst. and
heard cries in the direction. Fearing
mat some ot our troops might bo in
that locality, and that there was danger
..1 I . I Tin.
oi our iiring unou iricnus, i icit my
orderly and rods toward tho confeder
ate lines. A riderless horse dathed
jiast mo toward our lines ; and I reigned
up luprcsencc ot u group ol rcvcral
pcrsous gathered arouud a man lying
on uiu ground, apparently badly
wounueu. i saw at once tnese wore
confederate officers, and visions of the
Libby began to Hit through my mind,
but reflecting that 1 was well armed
and mounted, and that I had on tke
great coat of a private soldier, suck-an
was worn by both parties I tnl still re-
garding the group in hilence, but pre;
jtareu io use ciiner my fpurs or my sa
bre, as occasion mit'lit demand. Tho
silence was broken by one of tho con
federates, who appeared to regard me
with astonishment; then, speaking in a
tone ol authority, he ordered me to
ride up there and see what troons
tho-e were, " indicating the rebel po
sition. I instantly made a trcsturc of
awent and rode slowly iu the direction
indicated, until out of sight of tho
group, then made a circuit round it and
returned within my own lines. Just
as I had answered the challenge of our
picket, the section of our artillery pos
ted on the plank road be-rau firinir. and
l could plainly hear the grape crush
ing through tho trees near the spot oc
copied by the group of confederate
officers.
About a fortuiuht afterward. I saw
a Richtuond newspaper at the camp at
ruiuiouui, in wnicn were uctaiieu the
circumstanced of 'ho death of Stone
wall Jackson. Thcie left no doubt in
. . i .i . .i ...
my miuu uiu i me person i Had seen
lying on the L'rotind was that officer.
aim mat iim singular prcUicticr. men
tioned previously had been verified
1 he lollowing is an extract from the
newspaper account : " Ocu. Jackson,
having gone some distance in front of
Ins line oil Saturday uveniug, was re
turning about 8 o clock, attended by
his staff. 'I ho cavalade was, in the
darkness, mistaken for a body of the
enemy's cavalry, and fired on by a
regiment of his'own corp." Then af
ter detailing what took place after the
general fell from his horse, the account
proceeds : " Tho turnpike was ut
terly deserted with the exception of
Capts. ilbouru and Wynn; but, iu
the skirtiuL' of the thicket on the left.
some person was oWrved by "the side
oi me woou, sitting on Ins horse mo
tionless and silent. The unknown in
dividual was clad in a dark dress,
which strongly resembled the federal
uniform ; but it seemed impossible that
he could have penetrated to that spot
without being discovered, and what fol
lowed seemed to prove that he belonged
to the confederates. C'apt. Wilbourn
directed him to ride up thcro and see
what troops those were, the men who
lired on Jackson, and the stranger rodo
slowly in the direction pointed out,
but never returned with any answer.
Who this silent personago was is left
to posterity, " &c.
or
ILLINOIS.
OFFICIAL KETURNS. OP VlIE
VOTK IN THKCONOKKSSIONAL
DISTRICTS.
Sphinufikmj, November 19. Tho
following aro the official, returns of tho
vote for congressmen iu this state, and
inav be relied upon as correct. The
fulf returns on president, Governor
nnd state officers are not yet received,
and consequently nil who are interested
in the exact result must wait a day or
two lousier' 1
MUST DISTRICT.
J. Ii. Rico. L. II. 0th,.
0,401
870
Randolph
Terry.....
Jackion
Union...
Wllllamton..
Johcion
Pope
Manac
Pulaikl....
Alexander
rtOIITISKSTII DISTRICT.
I. Ulomonu. O. W. Wall
1,00
1,331
1,784
1,410
50,
024
73o
70
1,01
1,U38
1,351;
1,8'J'J
, 8R:t
1,381
1.'47
1,185
1,013
....l.OIP
l.'Jlo
.11,282
,.1,58(4
7,271
Cook county....
uu rago.
Total 12,870
RicoV, Had , majority, 6,6'J'J.
SECOND HISTRICT.
.1. D. Ward. C. 11. Harrison
Cook .'..12,1811 8,873
Ward's Rid., majority, 3,U10
THIRD DISTRICT.
C. U. Farwoll. J. V. LeMoyno,
UOUK. 0.44J 4.067
I.nko
. . .2,2-M
TuUl 0,202
Farwcll's, JUd.,- majority, 4,2
fOURTH DISTRICT.
8.A. Hurlbut. S. (
Kane 4.541
DKnlb 2.91:1
Mcllunry 2,872
lloonc l,C0O
Winnebago 3,010
10.
805
1,903
llromon.
1,740
060
1,131
279
1,304
Total 15,532 6,134
llurlbut'i, Kud., miijorlly, 10,'J3.
rirrn district-
H. C. Durchard. Ja. Dinsmoor.
Total 12,'JOO 11,278
uicmcnis, una., majority, I,7ZI.
NI.Vr.TI!KJTIt DISTRICT.
O. 0. It sum. H. S. Mnr.liall
Richland.
Avayne
Kd wards.
abash .
Jcflerion.
Franklin
Hamilton
White
Saline
Gallatin..
Hardin....
1.S08
..1,010
... 880
.... 803
..1,233
... H50
.. 870
..1,232
1,071
, 822
. 422
1,398
1,731
422
1,820
1,10
1,28,
1,700
1,104
1,174
IS8
Total 11,282
Marahall's, Mb., majority, 2,015.
13,20'
ON
Stephenson .
Jo Davieia.
Carrol
Whiteside..
Ogle
Total.
ISnrchurU's Had.,
SIXTH
J. 1)
Lcc
liurcmu.
I'utnnm
Henrv
Hock Island.
...2.88S
...2,712
...1,982
...3,321
....3,133
.14,030
majority, C,499.
DISTRICT.
Haw ley.
2,720
3,259
.023
3,680
2,818
2,189
2,041
074
1,307
1,327
7,638
A LIJvKNKSS OF DAVY CHOCK
ETT. There is to be seen nt tho rooms of
the Historical Society, Second aveuue,
corner of Eleventh street, an origiual
portrait of exceptional interest, a like
ness from life of tho colebrutcd Davy
Crockett or Kcutucky, painted by A.
L, DeHosc, and subsequently engraved
by A. ). Durand. It is in water color,
but is done with wouderful boldness
and spirit, and is one of those pictures
in which the beholder feels suro he
sees the faithful image of the person
represented. This is Davy Crockett,
ueyonu an perauventure ; cTery linea
ment is his, the whole man is before us
nnd for its accuracy of portraiture wj
do not ueed the autograph authentica
tion of it which the cartoon bears
I lenvu thi rule lor others when I nm
dead
lie always sure you're right, then go
ahead !
Hut undoubtedly tho famous dis
tich and apothegm of Crockett in his
own handwriting gives a great addi
tional value to this powerful present
incut of tho man, nnd for a genuine
Auioricau iuterest wo know of no other
picturo extatit which is of greater value
than this. Tho thought interposes,
however, that it is not iu its right placo
in the New York Historical Society,
hospitable as .Mr. Mooro certainly is,
and houorablo custoJy as ho gives
to tho many treasures of tho Historical
Society Hutlding. Tho work, indeed,
docs not belong to the Society and is
only left iu its rooms temporarily.
The proper owner of this picturo is the
stato of Kentucky, and tho placo whore
it should bo kept is iu tho Capitol nt
Frankfort. Kentucky has a very ar
dent state piido (sho took it naturally
from her mother Virginia,) nnd does
herself credit in honoring her dis
tinguished sons, nnd Kentucky never
hud a son more distinctly American, of
a moro original typo of character, than
Davy Crockett. "Ho was a rough-hewn
specimen ; but ho was fearless, honest,
warm-hearted, clear-headed, who acted
on his motto mid adhorod to prinoiplo,
while ho contemned tho oxactious of
otirnietto. Tho only harm ho did iu
life was to grammar, but ho rospeotod
truth while ho outraged conventionality
and his picturo should ho huug up in
tho Kentucky Capitol as a precious
treasure.
. . -
FnKKcu Hoi,i,8 on Twist, Ono
'jtiart of luko-warm milk, a teaspoon
lul of salt, a tcacupl'ul of yeast, and
C. Truedalo.
1,342
1,882
340
1,674
1,008
7,215
Total 13,122
Hawlev's Had., majority, 5,008
SEVENTH DISTRICT.
V. Corwin. O. I. A. Parks.
5,280 4,002
1,588 752
. 1,007 400
.8,92.1 3,130
I.tSatle
Grundy,
Kendall
Will
a atta-l
Total
Corwfn's Kad.
12,404
majority, 4,111.
EIQUT1I DISTRICT.
Oreenhury I.. Fort. Geo. 0.
Kankakee..
Iroquois
Ford
Livingston
Voodford
Marshal.....
Total.
, ..2.57C
..3,125
...1,200
..3.15H
...1,618
.13,402
Fort's Rad., majority, fi,097.
'MSTit distict:
8,293
Barnes.
901
1,800
671
2,111
'1,802
1,059
8,804
Stark..
Peoria,
Fulton
Kuox.
O. Harriere. ' N. E. WorihingtonH
.1,210
..3,573
..3,331
..4,381
.12,000
Total
Uarriero's, Rad., majority, 1,801
TENTH DISTRICT.
W. II. Ray. W
677
4,253
3,840
2,029
10,799
Mercer.... 1.095
Henderson 1,205
Warren 2,438
Hancock 3,110
McDonouuh 2.720
Schuyler 1,061
Total 13,188
Ray'i, Rad., majority, 1,519.,
JELEVE.VTI! DISTRICT.
11. M. Knapp, A. C, Matthews.
0,271 4,380
II,
N ecca.
1,175
928
1,712
.1,020
1,790
1,435
Adams
Urown
Piko...
Calhoun
Orcon .
ilcrsy ...
1,371
2.819
.... 597
. ..2,240
1,484
824
2,729
430
1,085
1,191
12,060
Durrab,
82
62
105
ill
Total.13,818 10,939 205
Knapp's, Lib., mulorily over Matthew,
Rad., 2,870.
Knapp's majority over Matthews, Rad,,
and Darrah, llourbon, 2,014.
TWELVTH DISTRICT.
M. H. Cambcrlain. .1.0
Scott 959
Morgan 2,770
Cass 1,302
Menard 850
Sangamon 4,107
Christian 2,251
Robinson
1,100
MR. LINCOLN DECIDES
EMANCIPATION.
Tleforc reading the proclamation tho
president again said ho felt the great
responsibility of the step he was taking,
both to himself and tho country. It
had oppressed him, and not till all
other measures and expedients failed
had ho to come to the conclusion that this
element, which was arbitrarily used
against tt, must be brought into the
Union cause. Ifavinir reached that
conclusion, his decision was fixed and
unalterable. The act and all its re
sponsibilities were his alone. He had
prepared tho paper which he was again
about to read without advice or assis
tance had pondered over it ior weeks,
and been more confirmed in the recti
tude of the measure as time passed on.
Thcro had been moments when he felt
awed and overwhelmed by the gravity
and magnitude of the snbjcct and of
j what might follow, but his way was
i now clear lie knew ho was right,
i - .i .i i i . i
jiinoug oilier tilings, nc saiu, iu a euo
diied tone, he had looked to a Higher
rower for aid and direction. Ho bad
made a vow that if God gave us the
victory in the impending battle he
would receive it as an indication of the
Divine Will that it was his duty to go
lorwaru in the work ot emancipation.
In a manner half apologetic, he said
this might seem strange, but there
I were occasions when, uncertain how to
( proceed when it was not clear to his
initid what be should do he had in
this way submitted the disposal of a
subject to a Higher Power, and abided
by what seemed tho Supreme Will.
Events at Sharpsburg had confirmed
and strengthened his original purpose
iu regard to emancipation, and he had
no hesitation iu issuing this prelimin
ary order; the states interested would
deeide for themselves as to its consum
mation. This was not the only occasion when
he manifested the peculiar faith or
trait here exhibited. It was doubtless
to bo attributed in a great measure to
the absence of early religious cul
ture a want of educational advantages
in his youthful, frontier life. In the
wilderness of Indiana fifty years ago
there were fow churches, and only an
occasional wandering prcacl er fur
nished the sparse population with rude
religious instruction. Although his
early opportunities for religious im
provement had been few, there wns
deep-seated within htm a feeling of de
pendence and trust in that Supremo In
telligence which rules nnd governs
all.
Some general conversation followed
the reading of the document, when the
president handed it to tho secretary of
state, with directions to publish it
forthwith." Tho History of Emanci
pation," by the Hon. Gideon Wells, in
December Galaxy.
NOVEMHElT!
IJoom for tho athlete ! room for the
broad-shouldered, deep-chested, and
vigorous November, who leaps with an
clastic bound into the arena ! He has
divested himself of all suporflnus cloth
ing ; every limn is bare, and ins braw
l 140 ruu'i stands iu glorious majesty,
1,140
1,188
4,510
2,713
Total 12,311 lil.234
Jiocinson , Ltl., majority, 923.
TIIIRTKKNTIl DISTRICT.
McNiilta. C.H.Moore. Loeds. llou.
J
Mason... 1,403
Tazewull 2,350
McLean..5,f 90
Lonan.... 2,423
DeWilt.. 015
1,659
2,168
3,403
1,014
1,050
10,850
Total..l3,400
McNulta's, Rad., majority, 2,040
roiRTKB.NTH DISTRICT.
1
257
34
48
1
344
Jos. G. Cannon.
Macon 2,701
Piatt 1,387
Champaign 3,724
Douglass 1,410
Coles 2,035
Vermillion 3,301
W. E. Nelson
2,453
1,000
2,124
1,317
2,497
1,954
11,405
Total .15,101
Caunon's, Rad., majority, 3,700.
ilfTEK.NTH DISTRICT.
Goorgo Hunt. John R. Kdon.
Sholby 1,009 2,784
Jasper 919 1,118
Cumborland 1,110 1,227
Kdgar 2,288 2,314
Klllngham 1,110 4,099
Crawford 1,108 1,242
Clark 1,719 1,844
Moultrie 900 1,280
Lawrenco 1,116 i,H5
14,053
Total 12,298
Eden'f, Lib., majority, 2,358.
SIXTEENTH DISTRICT.
J. 8.
Montgomery...
Fayutto
Ilond
Clinton
Washington
.nariuii
Clay
Martin.
2,247
.. .1,733
....1,345
1,1180
1)784
2,200
I, UIO
3.L.
Total ,, 12,200
Martin's, Rail., majority, 250.
Bryan.
2 005
1,832
056
1,797
1,258
2,231
J.347
12,010
while his head, encircled by n coronet
of the purple viuo ond scarlet berries.
proclaims him tho King of tho Aut
umn ! Doomed ns he is, deserted by
his fleeting brethren, pressed by the
advancing legions of gloomy A inter,
he still looks "every inch n king!"
lie has gathered about him his vas
sals, who neither tremble with fear nor
look pale at tho portents arouud them,
but every ono has thrown do.vu his
leafy gauntlet and bent his branchy
lanco to await tho coming storm !
Liko tho last King of Assyria, he has
surrounded himself with all tho lux
urious garnituro ot naturo and tho
voluptuous revelry of tho season, and
looks to his parent Sun to scud down
his fires to consumo them nil before
he will surrender. Abovo nnd around
him the winds sing n witching song,
and tho bright plumagooftho clouds
glows with wired lustre as their winged
(locks soar to the zenith or sweep maj
estically to rest upon tho bosom of the
horizon. Typo of tho regal month
symbol of tho pendiuir fato of No
vember around tho goldou couch of
tho setting huh tho curtains of royal
purple are drawn, ana carta and sky
aro hushed und mute, lest a breath
should disturb his sleep, while stars
that spangle the measureless dome
abovo sing lowly and softly their lul
laby. So will Novombur sink to ro
poso after a life of majesty nnd of
strung action to tho mellow cadences
of the Indian Summor, amid the
blazonry of tho goldcu maple, the
gcorgcous crimson of tho forests, and
tho bright scarlet of the runuing vines
which girt his study guard of mon
arch oaks. Who then can assent to tho
poet's idea that with November, " tho
uieluncholy days have 'corce the sad
dest of tho year ?" Now wo I Thore
la no sadness in any work ot liod i
ONE OK ENGLAND'S QUEENS.
Glorious as the spectacle was, per
haps, however, it passed unheeded.
Those eyes were watching all for
another object, which now drew near.
In an open space behind the Constable
there was seen approaching "a white
chariot," drawn by two palfrics in
white damask which swept the ground;
a golden canopy borne abovo it making
music with silver bells; and in the
chariot sat the observed of all obser
vers, the beautiful occasion of all this
glittering homage fortune's play
thing of the hour, the Queen of Eng.
land queen at last ! borne along up
on thci waves of this sea of glory,
breathing the perfumed incenso of
greatness which she had risked her
fair name, her delicacy, her honor, her
self-respect, to win ; and she had won
it.
There she sat, dressed in white tis
sue robes, her fair hair flowing loose
over her shoulders, and her tcmnlcs
circled with a light coronet of gold
nnd diamonds most beautiful love
liest moM favored, perhaps, as she
seemed at that hour, of all Englund.s
laughters. Alas! "within the hollow
round of that coronet
"Kept Death hl court, and there the an-
tick sate,
Scoffing her state and grinning at her pomp
Allowing Her a little hrcath, a little secne
lo monarehize, he feared, and kill with
look".
Infu-lnghcr wlih elf and vain conceit.
As Ifthu t!ch which walled about her life
Were bras iinnreirnahle : nnd. humored
thus
llorad through her catlc walls ; and fare-
wclKiiieen!"
Fatal gift of greatness ! so danger
ous ever ! so more than dangerous in
those tremendous times when the
fouutaius are broken loose of the orent
deeps of thought, and nations aro in
the throes of revolution ; when ancient
order and law and traditions arc split
ting in tho social earthfiuake : and as
the opposing forces wrestle to and fro,
those unhappy ones stand out above
the crowd become thu symbols of the
struggle, auu tall Uio victims ot Us
alternating fortunes. And what if in
to an unsteady heart and brain, intoxi
cated with splendor, "tne outward r linos
should find its way, converting tho
poor silly soul into an image of the
same confusion, if conscience should
bo deposed from her high place, and
the Pandotajbox be broken loose of
passions and sensualities and follies;
and at length there be uothing left of
which man or woman ought to value,
save hope of God's forgiveness.
Three short years have yet to pass,
and again on a summer morning,
Queen Anno Boleyn will leave the
Tower of London, not radient then
with beauty ou a gay errand of corona
tion, but a poor wandering ghost, on a
sad tragic errand, from which sho will
never more return, passing away out
of an earth where sho may stay no
longer, into a presence where, never
theless, we know that all is well for
all of us and therefore for her.
Dtit let us not cloud her short
lived sunshine with the shadow of the
future. Sho went on in her loveli
ness, the peerless following iu their
carriages, with the royal guard in their
rear. Tu Fenchurch street she was
met by the children of tho city schools :
and at the corner ol Gracechurch street
a masterpiece had been prepared for
the pseudo-classic art, then so fashion
able, by tho merchants of tho Styllv-
ard. A Mount Parnassus had been
constructed, nnd a Helican fountain
upon it playing into a basin with four
jots of Rhenish wine. On the top of
the fountain sat Apollo with Callior.o
at his feet, and ou cither side the re
maining muses, holding lutes or harps,
and singing, each of them some "posy"
or epigram in praise of the Queen.
winch was presented, alter it had been
sung, wntteu m letters ot gold.
From Gracechurch street the pro
cession passed to Lcadcnliall, where
there was a spectaclo in better taste of
the old English kind, quaint perhaps
and forced, but truly and even beauti
fully emblematic. There was a " little
mountain " which was huuir with red
ami
Ho
Mrl
in
tori
raai
sclll
inn I
tUlJ
lor
A railway had been laid with car
pets across Palace Yard and tho Sanc
tuary to tho Abbey gates, nnd when
all was ready, preceded by tho peers in
their robes of Parliament, the Knighta
of the Garter in tho dress of the order,
sho swept out under her canopy, the
ht-hops and monks " solemnly sing
ing." Tho train was borne by tho old
Duchess of Norfolk, her aunt, tho
Hishon of London and Winchesinr nn
cither side "bcarniL'tip tho lapels of tbn
i.ui iuuc, uiu r.an oi wxioru car
ried the crown on its cushion imnicdi-
l...n I til . .
iiiuijf ueiorc ner. ono was uresscd m im,
..... n.nti, iuiii'u nun ermine, ner con
nair escaping lotse, as she usually r,
wore it, under a wreath of diamonds, tell
v;n entering the Abbev, she was led wh
lu uiiruuaiiuii cuair, wiicre sue sat ag t
wiiiiu tnu tram tell uito their places
and the preliminaries of the ceremoni
al were dispatched. Then sho was
conducted up to the high altar, and
aunoiuted Queen of Engiaud, and she
received from the hands of Cramer,
fresh come in haste from Dunsialiln.
with the last words of his sentence upon thes
V..IIUCIIIII; si-un-ui- snum upon ins lips, i tics
uiu goiucn scepter and at. J-Jdward s
cow n.
Dili nm. .tt!n nt' .....
.t. .iu, imu ui icuiursu, any paug niOS
ot paintut recollection, pierce at that Hoi
moment the incense of glory which she i bro;
iiiuaiiiiK . "lu visiuii uu now.
Disrl
pel lij
and
on tl
maul
I pad
lv, 1
IrisH
hov
mac
deli
last I
crM
ton!
proM
ougl
AtW
was
across her of a sad, mourning figure
which once had stood where she was
standing, now desolate, neglected,
sinking into the darkening twilight of
a life cut short by sorrow l Who can
tell ? At such a time, that figure
would have weighed hcavilv upon a
noble mind, and a wise mind would
have been taticht bv the thou!ht of it.
mat, amioticii ate be Jlcctinir as a o.ln
dream, it is long enough to expenenco 0fth
rii.iiiu t ii-issuuuis oi loriune. hind
Hut Anno Holcyn was not noble and bo a
was not wise too probably she felt been
nothing but tlio delicious, nil-absorb- j)crh
ing, ali intoxicating present and if that only
I ... 3 ii.ci;iiii;u uruii lu CneTI
ner memory at all, wo may lear that0fa
it was rather as a foil to her own sur- Tho
passing lovliness. Two years later
she was able to exult over Catherine's (
death ; she is not likely to have thought
of her with gentler feelings in feelings
in tho first glow and flush of tri
umph. Selection from Saturday
Might. ' I
with
Conn!
is ond
chand
P'Sol
JustiJ
axy.
Tin
Thl
and
never!
tions.l
Jews
j (since
ana wmte roses ; u gold ring was
placed ou the summit, ou which, as the
Queen appeared, a whito falcon was
made to " descend as out of the sky, "
" and tho incontinent came down an
angel with great melody, and so1 a
close crown of gold upon the fulco ffe
head j and in tho same pageant sat
Saint Anno with ali her issue beueath
her ; and Mary Cleophas, with her
four children, of the which children
one mado a goodly oration to tho
Queen of the fiuitfulness of St. Auue,
trusting that liko fruit should come of
her."
With such " pretty conceits, " at
that time the honest tokens of tho
honest tokens of an English welcome,
tho new Queen was received bv the
citizens oi Loudon. These scenes
must bo multiplied by the number of
tho streets, where some fresh fancy
met her at every turn. To preserve
tno lestivmes trom Mugging, every
fountain aim conduit within tho walls
rau ull day with wine, thu bolls of
every steplo were riuciiiir ; children
lay in wait with sonus, and ladies with
posies, in which all tho resources of
fantastio extravagance wero exhausted ;
and thus in au unbroken triumph and
to outward appearance received with
tho warmest affection sho passed un
der Temple Rar, dewn tho Straud, by
Charing Cross to Westminister Hall.
The King was uotwith her throughout
tho day ; nor did ho intoud to bo with
her iu any part of the ceremony. Sho
was to reign without a rival tho undis
puted sovereign of tho hour.
Saturday-being passed in showing
herselt to the people, nho retired
for the night" to " tho King a anor
IIouso at Westminister," where, nhe
slept, On th following morning, 'be
tween eight and nine o clock, she re-
NAPOLEON II, D(TKE OF
REICHSTADT.
There is something exceedingly
touching iu the history of the uu
fortunate duke, who, during his final
illness, thus composed his own epitath :
"Napoleon rrancois Josenh Charles
Uonoparte ; born King of Rome died i whic
.ii.i,iv.i,umi. iu tuu .iiimuuu aimiery. 1 and 6
natidsome, accomplished, brave, the race,
iuheritor of a spleudid nauio and daz- j llaVe'
ziiug giory; iovcu almost to idolatry , l,im
. 1.1 I" 11.1
uy uiu couutry in wnicn ins cuuunood to ari
ways passed ; a magniticcnt tuturc
stretching before him fate frowned
upon his brilliant prospects, gave him
a weak constitution, wretched health,
bitter disappointment, and was only
kind iu leading him to an early grave.
lie breathed his last at Schonbrunn,
in the chamber once occupied bv his
father, and in the neighborhood of the
imperial chateau where he was wont to
take his solitary walks.
.Ho seems to hive been completely
blase from his childhood, and so mel
ancholy n temperament that scarcely
auythiug gave him pleasure. Every
thing was done to cure him of his
gloomy indifference, and, when all else
had failed, he met iu one of his lonely
rambles a beautiful peasant girl, with
whom he fell iu love nt first sight.
Sho appeared to return hi) affection.
Her society aroused him with new life,
ho first taught him, it is said, the
naturo of happiness, and by her pres
euce the dreary emptiness of his being
wns delightfully filled. Peasant as she
was, sho was graceful, accomplished.
witty, and to his fond fancy sho was as ' bascml
.1.. ,1 IT- III 1
a goddess on the earth. He revealed
to her all tho sources of his discontent,
poured into her confiding ear tho so
crets of his thoughts and the sacrcdest
of his feeling. Sho was tho single
break of blue in his clouded sky, end
iu that blue was set the star of hope.
Ono evening he was in the city, and
attended the opera. When the ballet
came ou, among all tho dancers sud
denly flashed a form of wondrous beau
ty and graco, agile as a fawn, htho as
a spirit, and the theatro echoed and re
echoed with welcome to tho new di
vinity of the dance. The palo youth
flushed, and his heart beat quick,
Was ho dreaming, or was tho sylph
liko creature bouudint: and whirliut:
on tho stago his beloved Marin, whom
he had preferred before all the ladies
of tho court V
Ho rubbed bis eyes and loaned for
ward, his very soul burning iu his face.
Ho could not be mistakcu. Tho lovo-
ly and guileless peasant whom ho had
worshiped and admitted to tho inner
most sactuary of his spirit and tho
niaguificont dancer of the opera were
one and tho same. The blazing the
atro grew dim ; the tumultous applause
was no longei heard ; tho unhappy
prince gasped, strubblcd, swooned, and
amidst much excitement was boruo to
his carriaue.
Tho charming dancer who had fas
cinated him was the famous Fanny
Elssler, then at tho beginiug of her ex
traordinary conquests and career.
Sho had allowed herself to he used by
his relatives an a bait to ensnare the
young duke's nffrctions, in the hope
that though her some interest iu life
might bo uwakaned. The ink'cnuoua
aud haudsome boy pleased her. no
loubt. Her vanity was uratified at the
.expense of hla -final faith." He Mver
recovered, it la id. from Ui awl
den and terrible alioct, ad W '.
UDeraiiy paid. rnm " UowiiftlM
Danube in narper'a. VtwT'
man ol
ural
Jews rl
Palest!
their
ill s
ivuocieu
Ani
street";
been
Orleat,
save
mule1
j ordinal
rcscrvM
steel,
Jn'l'K
The
presstcj
being
er at tl
with
stem il
I nCLnil
tho tin
iu tho I
prcssul
Thcrel
plosioi
can ne
ofchai
is the j
is its i
requir
mule.
Wl
little I
potato
fine, b
into ci

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