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The Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1872-1878, January 16, 1873, Image 2

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THE CAIRO DAILY BULLETIN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 183.
1 tttiUk,Himm6iitiammrm
THE BULLETIN.
JOHN II. OIIKHLY, Editor and l'ublliho
TKItMS OF THE DAlLx HULLET1N:
On woe, by can Icr I 23
One rear br carrier. In advance 10 00
Ob rear by carrier l( not pild In
.advance. 12 00
Una montb.br matt 100
forte month a II 00
Six month"..... f 2ft
Ono year 10 00
THE DOLLAU WKKKJ.Y 1WLI.KTIN
John II. Obcrly has reduced tlio aubscrlp
on price of the Wkkkly Cahio Htn.t.r.TiN
o Ono Dollar per annum, making It tno
ebeapcit paper published In Southern llllnol
INAUGURAL ADDRESS OP GOV.
OGLESDY.
Feltow-ctlixons of tlio Sonnto and Homo
of Koprcjontntlvct :
Ono of tho nio.U imposing features of
our form of government is tlio recurrence,
at itatod period, of elections, by which
tlio for rants clioscii by tho pooplo to nid
In tho administration of public ntfalrj,
though ovor so compotnnt nnd fiiithfnl nro
reiiovod irom tlio ro."i)onllUity or oiiicial
dutioa and permitted to return to tho pur
eulUof private lllo, and other nro chotcn
to supply tho vacanclos thui created, who,
in turn, nrooxpocted to perform tho same
or similar uuiic.
To tho recent coneral oloction am 1 In
dob ted for tho groat honor of again being
clothed with tho supremo oxncullvo pow
er of tho atato of Illinois. Unablo milu-
bly to oxpross my appreciation of this
ronowod manifestation of the public con
fidence, 1 trust it will not ho supposed I
am unaflbctod by It, or that t nm Insonni-
uio lowio jusi obligations il imposes.
With you, gentlemen, so recently choen
by your immodlalo constituents to reprn
aont them in all matters of stato legisla
tion. I oxporionco tho natural anxioty
arising from tho imposition of duties so
important which, however performed, do
inand tho ceaseless cam and attontion of
those whoso fortuno it must bo, in somo
aonso and to soma oxlont, to discharge
tbom.
Although your attention will bo chiefly
directed to tho consideration ofmattors of
purely ttato concorn, it Is not to bo forgot
ten that our stato (Ills hor appropriate
placo in tho national Union, nnd that our
pooplo tako doep interest in national af
fairs. "Vo may, therofuro, give thorn u
passing notice, and violate no propriety In
doing so. If I may vviituro for n momont
to call your attention to tho rosultB of tho
recent national oloction, I shall say no
moro than it again vindicated tho just and
Intelligent expectation of tho friends of
the presont administration, that tho wio
and humane nioasures of tho party in
powor would commond themselves to tho
approval of tho American pooplo. Thus
sanctioned and indorsed by an unusually
large majority, substantially frood from
tho usual bitterness of party strife, and to
an unusual oxtont enjoying the conlldouco
ofthewholo peoplo, tho party in power
must go forward calmly, prudontly, but
firmly, in its groat duty to administor tho
affairs of tho nation on tho basis of the
prosperity of tho whole country, nnd thu
substantial and enduring happiness of all
its people. It is pleasant to wltnoss the
urbanity of our political opponents, and
tho good cheer with which they accept the
result; a good oxample, whoso wholesoino
lesson wo may sincoroly hopo will always
lioreaftor be imitated by minorities.
"Wo hold that tho national union is para
mount In tho oxorciio of Its granted
powers, that it is Absolutely a govern
ment with certain clearly defined powers
granted in tho charter of Its croution, and
that between it nnd tho stato governments
tboro is, and of necessity can bo, noconflict
otaumorlly or jurisdiction; or-, if in any
event, such a conflict may,from any cause,
soeui to ariso, tho means for the peace
ful and proper pottolmont of it will bo
found in tho judicial authority or finally
in a resort poaccably to tho tribunal o'f
the people That our character as citizens
of tho United States is at leat oipial to
our character as citizens of n state, anil
that in all fair minds there can rest no
just ground of suspicion that tho citizens
of the United States will seel; at any timo
to circumvent or contrailzo any right or
powor of tho citizen of tho elate, to long
at least as tho Haino human nature enloys
tho two citizonshlps'iu one person. That
national government, state government
nnd municipal government nro but
emanations from the people; that at least
all power will bo found thore; from them
it comes, to them it must return ; and ho
who is thoroughly imbued with respect
for, and confidence ln,thclr patriotism, in
telligence and good sense, need tako no
special uneasiness to himself as to whether
this or that grant of political power will
trench upon, oat up or devour all others
in tlio common country.
If this devouring process should over
mako any alarming or porceptiblo head
way this American pooplo will promptly
take the aggressive spirit in baud and ef
fectually thwart It. Laying aside all ap
prehension as to any purpose or design to
aHjuino or invade tho rights of tho states
or the poople, wisely reserved to them,
ono may naturally have solicltudo as to
tho wise and expedient exercise of thore
known nnd acknowledged powors which
the national congress is constantly fulled
upon to put into practical operation, in
meeting the demand of ever growing and
expanding interosts, of increasing wealth,
population and intelligence, and tho diver
sified enterprises of an intelligent peoplo,
never at rc9t and never desiring to be.
J do not bo much dread tho reaching after
forbiddeu power, as possibly tho reaching
after enterprises, or the inaugurating of
measures, probably within the grant of
powor, but which it may bo unwiso for
the nation toomlmrl; in.
In our land and by our pooplo it is held
to be the wiser course to rely upon indi
vidual enterprises where capital and labor
are to bo the chief instruments of opera
tion, not necessary for the national defence
or national welfare. I would, therefore,
restrain rather than e ncourago enterprises
by tho government which would llouriih
most efficiently In tho hands of the people.
After all, who can foreseo that tho proper
exorcise of powors which many allect to
rogara witu distrust, may not Hereafter,
provo tho means of tho greatest bleyini:
to our people, should the future develop
tho unpleasant fact that through tlio in
discreet exercise of state legislation, very
dear and valuablo interosts had been sac
rificed under the excitements of putt years
or the too eager deslro for local advantages
in tho dovclopemcnt of coveted wealth i
For my part, free from tho anxieties of
mote who seem to live in dread of the com
plex naturo of our government and the
possihlo betrayal of Its proper and well do
unod purposes, J tako It to be a great
advantage wo have il as it is, anduow and
here renew mv acknowledgements bofnrn
this honorablu body aud tho people of the
uvo, w mo great wisaom, mo oxliaulled
patriotism, and the subllmo courauo of the
fathers of tho republic for tho priceless
heritage
' Returning to tho consideration of those
matters wtiicu more Immediately concern
ui as citizens of tho statu, 1 commend to
yonr earnest attention the information
laid before you in tho recent tmusagii of
my distinguished predecessor, vdioo large
experience and familiarity with mMt
affairs entitle hit recommendations to
the candid considerations of the leglsla-
turo, It is a ploasuro to congratulate yon,
that in that general senso in which all tho
Interests of a peoplo aro considered, it
may bo correctly said our attain are in a
satisfactory condition ; in a moro limited,
and yet largoty in a gonoral sonte, it Is
hardly no. All those products, tho result
of tho labor of tho farmer, nro ranging nt
prices scarcoly remunerative; tho pro
ductions of othor branches of industry nro
noarcr tho prices of moro recent years ;
corresponding changes bavo not for somo
cause allocted other Industries. This state
of allalrs cannot last long ; the equilibrium
will come, nnd thou wo shall bo on bettor
torms. While laws may bo passed to
facilitate commercial transactions, I do
not beliovo tho laws of trade nro to bo
materially nlmctcd by tho laws of legisla
tures. Hut il is truo, when any great In
terest or enterprise is hasod upon and
created by legislative onnctmont, nnd owes
Its origin to such a source that it can
never justly outgrow and escape from
tho restraining power nnd Influence ol
that law. It will, howovor, In nil cases,
bo bettor to harmonize conflicting Inter
ests according to thousntros of trade, fair
dealing nnd it just regard for tho rights of
others, minor than seem to outrage ami
defy ono Interest by another, on come ns
siimed superiority of right or granted
privilege. Tho law never meant to glvo
olio Interest tho right to oppress another,
nnd no created or trumped up nocesslty
will ever bo accepted as an oxcuio lor tho
imposition of odious discriminations by
one Industry ngaluil another, lly our
peoplo it Is felt to bo a hardship to pay the
present rates for the transportation of
their farm products to market, aud to sub
mit to the discriminations levied upon
them. If it ho truo that railroads are
charging higher rates than they nro rea
sonably entitled to, upon freights and pas
sengers, it will be strange if they shall not
speedily make them conform to tho sensi
ble demands of trade In this respect. If
the laws of trade will not bring nboul this
result, somo other law will.
Fifty-four years have passed away since
tho admission of Illinois into tho union.
Wo have in that time twico altered and
remodeled our constitution, so that II may
bo raid wo have had three constitutions.
It is safe to say, taken nil together, each
has been an improvement on tlio ono it has
supplanted. Vo now have n compact
framework ofgovoriiuiont, In which is em
bodied the experience ot years, and tho
general views of a majority of our peoplo
upon tho more general principles of gov
ernment to bo found In state constitutions.
Tho last general assoinhly addressed Itsolf
tu tlio laborious duly ol putting It Into
complete operation, by providing the
necessary legislation lor that purpose.
Experience will dollbtle's hIiow that modi
fications of those laws will, from time to
time, become necessary. This, Indeed,
is tho great purpose of legislation to fol
low after the deliberations of preceding
bodios, and mend up and alter .vhat has
beon inconsiderately acted upon ; repeal
what subsequent experience shows to bo
improper or useless; modify and amend
that which seems Injudicious, as woll as hy
original enactment to create new laws for
and in response to new demands, or to
moot iucroasllig necessities of the peoplo,
1 doubt net a candid and impartial view
of thu legislation of tho state would show
that the splendid progress made in tho
last fifty years bv our peoplo in the sul.
Ktantlal elements of human happiness is
largely auriimiauiu lo tins agency. J
know of no country whuro tho rights of
property, tho Bafety of privnto intorosts
and tho enjoyment of poronal liberty nro
more securely guarded than umongst our
own people ly our own Inws.
Thoro nro sensible principles of govom
ment which, so far as they atl'uct us in our
political relation as a state, aro regarded
ui fixed and of constant application. All
property shall be taxed according lo valu
ation. Tho moans to carry on thu govern
ment shall be raised by taxation. The
revenue cannot bo expended, save by an
propriations made by law. haws for al
most all purposes shall be general and uni
form. Thu course of education, too. ns well
as the fostoring of charitable and benevo
lent Institutions, are now recognized ns
necessary sulijects ol legislation. In regard
to these latter subjects I shall have occa
sion to no moro than call your attention
to the presont condition of our school sys
tem, including, of course, our normal and
imluitrhil schools, our established chari
table anil honevolont institutions, as well
as the penal and reformatory establish
ments, and to urge upon your notice and
commend to your earn thu importance of
continuing all of Ilium as useful means of
improving Ihe public inlelllgunce, allevi
ating tho public misery and correcting
nnd puiil'hing the violators of public law.
Especially in regard to our bonevolent in
stitutions, I would go further, indued
I would not stop until suitable ac
commodations shall ho provided for nil
who sutler from mental disease, or habits,
in our state, who aro the ceaseless objects
of pity and commiseration. Ily every at
tainable means, 1 would provide for test
ing the Pest mollioiH ol treatment and
euro, so that no misery may be found in
llio slalo without thu Hopes ol alleviation.
X would not provide costly and showy
structures, but would, whenever necessary,
erect plain aud Inviting homos, where
comfort and health ulono should he con
sidered. I know when wo look at the
cost of now buildings for institutions, and
tho sum or thu annual appropriations
to carry Ihcmott, wo are naturally enough
besot with hesitation, mid doubt if wo
shall bo Mistalned bv our constituent".
We must not forget, liowuvcr, that our
population is rapidly lncroalnt;. our
wealth augmenting and our enterprise
expanding, bringing with them not only
tno glories ol an advancing civilization,
but the over attendant companions of mis
ery, misfortune and wo.
Tho range of cubjects to cinuo before
you for legislative ililiheratiou are almost
illimitable. Changes in existing laws fre
quently hccoimi necessary where a general
principle, accepted and settled ns such,
mtut he made to conform to the public
convenience by the simple .alteration of
somo section, or tho addition of some now
provision. Tho circumstances of a state,
iiko thoso of an individual, aro constantly
changing in what may be called tho com
mon ntl'iilrs of life. Experience establish
es this great truth, however, that well
settled laws, like well-settled rules of life,
ought not to bo changed for light causes,
nor upon slight and iminattiro rellection.
Stability Is one of the most doslrable ele
ments of good government. Once the
pooplo habituate themselves to the estab
lished ordor of things and generally con
form to and siitt.iln existing dlatutes, 1
doubt that expediency which suggests
change not based upon what would seem
to bo a general and intelligent demand.
Uniformity is not moro desirable than
stability in the municipal regulations of
a Sgroat peoplo, bo too n deal he- with
the revenues of a peoplo who have ulwavs
shown a commendable willingness to fur
nish means of goveriiiiienl,Hnd who grum
ble as little as anv community to bo found
anywhoro in paying necessary taxation for
the obvious purpose of self-government.
Too much caution cannot be exorcised In
selecting the objects of its uso. too much
caro cannot bo bostowed in considering tho
purposes for which It may bo sought, nor
In tho mode ot its expenditure where pos
itively domauded for tlie'niihllc L'ood. You
must In all cases bo tho Judges of what
appropriations aro or shall bo necostary,
what objects of common or projocts of Im
provement uomanil support Irom the trens
ury; what amount of revenue shall bo
raito.f nnd axpondod. You will fearloialv
meet ovary obligation of good government
and pas's upon tho merits of every schomo
to como boforo you demanding legislative
action, nnd doubtless will not heiltato to
moot In n liberal spirit every just and rea
sonable domand to bo mado upon your
deliberations, ir a recommendation woro
noccsiary, I would hoartily recommend
ush action ; but this suggestion occurs to
mo, Isubmitittoyourconsidorntlun: Just
now, nnd indeed for somo years to como,
many of our countlos, towns nnd cities
aro laboring undor tho solf-lmposcd in
fliction of local indobtodnoss, contracted
largoly in oncouraglng tho construction
of railroads leading to or running through
tholr limits. Tho botujs issued to meet
tho Indebtedness, and tho constantly ac
cruing interest upon them must bo paid.
In order to discharge those obligations nnd
prcsorvo good faith, heavy local taxation
will bo necessary for somo time. Pru
donco may thercforo dictate, that while ns
guardians of the whole stato you must
look first nt tho publlo welfare, you ought
not entirely, in imposing taxos for Stato
purposes, to loso eight of tho local burdens
which Aro to bo mot and homo by tho
same pooplo who also furnish tho moans)
to moot appropriations for tho general ob
jects of State caro and control.
Uentlomen, I respectfully invito your
attontion to the consideration of another
subject, I think tho circumstances of tho
times will permit n brief discussion ot it,
us 1 hellevo tho public feeling and Judg
ment will sanction tho charges recom
mended in regnrd lo it. There is, or thore
ought to be, no excuse for mob violonco in
a froo government. No pains shall ho
spared in providing against any oxcusu
for this abhorrent method ot settling
grievances. It is a dgngorotis expedient,
one lo be condomod nt all hazards, nnd in
no event and under no circumstance!!,
though aver so Aggravating, to bo excused,
palliated or resorted to. Tno law must
govern. 11 must therefore bo mado to
meet every condition of society, to define,
regulate and punish every crime and out
rage. It must bo cortaiu in its definitions,
consistent but unrelenting in Its punish
ments, and everywhere under nil circum
stances, in overy community, punctually,
fearlessly nnd scrupulously ex
ecuted. A too louder regard for
human lifo must not allow tho criminal
code to be so written or executed as to en
courage or indulge daring violations of
either its letter or spirit, or to ull'ord tho
means tinder thu iudulgenco of mere
technical constructions of it for tho oscapu
of criminals. There Is always u feeling of
insecurity in tho public breast and to
somo oxtont a los of conlldonco in tho of
Helacy of law, whon tho community learns
that ono of its violators has been permitted
to escape punishment through somo mere
form, technicality or improvident delay.
A deliberate violator of tho law may bo
entitled to our sympathy and eventually
lo our mercy, but not until aflor justice
shall have been substantially served. So
long as willful crlino continues to be a
feature of human society, it must be pun
ished; ami if malignant and cruel it must
bo severely punished. Our solicitude fur
tho innocent will not excuse us from a sys
tem of criminal jurisprudence which may,
howovor faithfully executed, yet bo so le
nient ns to laclliato tho escape of tho
guilty. Instead of enlarging, we must
limit nnd restrain from tlio oppor
tunities of escape That humanity
which is based upon justice will out
weigh, in tlio long racoof life, in advant
ages and blessings to mankind, that
humanity which Is basod upon mercy
alone. 1 adoru that principle of justice
which holds ovory man innocent until his
guilt shall bo proved by competent evi
dence, nnd that other equally Important
provision of our American law which
guarantees every porson n trial by a jury
of his countrymen; but 1 would, in prac
tice, decline to carry tlio indulgence of
this constitutional right to such extremes
ns to ull'ord a prolext for bullllng that
othor principle of human justico ns well
as divine, which demnnds that tho guilty
shall sullor. In this enliglitonod age of
tho world, and in our now generally
largoly populated counties, tilled with the
activo industrious nnd energetic nnd edu
cated people, it would hardly seem possi
ble any criminal for any oll'onso or crime
may not receivo a fair nnd impartial
trial, in the county whore thoollense may
have been committed. The policy of
our law was for yoars to indulge
the caprice of every criminal who, under
any pretense, would sook to delay justico
and thwart tho sanctions of tho law, by
lllling his affidavit, full of periuiv, to se
cure a change of veiiUe. It was tlio nec
essary part of every desperate case to resort
to tins practice, l.aleiy tlio policy lias been
modified. 1 think the timo lias now' arrived
when wo may safely, in tho Interests of
justico, entirely abandon it. I therefore
recommend to your honorable body tlio
passage of a law disallow'ing changes of
venue in all criminal cases. I do not see
but that wu may nlso wisely disallow
changes of venue in civil cases. It is not
true, in any civil case, that parties may
not receivo amide justice in the county
where the cause of action arises, or whore
the suit may be begun. 'I' I in re may possibly
be causes in wmeli the court may be in
terested or of kin to the parties; ovon in
such cases 1 tl.lnk it would bo far bettor
for all parties to abide by a law which will
provide a competent per.on skilled in law
to sit in the case, and thus save to patties
enormous hills of costs, to witnesses great
inconvenience, ami to tno administration
of justico much loss of timu nnd embarrass
ment. If any apprehension may exist that in
tiny possible uvunt competent Jurors may
not bo found In criminal eases, this may
lie removed by enlarging tlio list of com
petent jurymen. A man In all other re
spects deemed qualified to sit as a juror in
u criminal case, ought not to be doomed
dbqualllled because as a render of the
news of the day a habit, 1 beliovo, rather
creditable in llio public estimation he
may have read newspaper accounts of tho
case, no may ho called as a juror to decide
upon. Thu law should go further, nnd de
clare every person competent as a juror
who may Mate in open court that he has
an opinion based upon rumor, or oven rep
resentations of the facts made to him by
lliose who may bo supposed to know some
thing of them, provided that any bias or
opinion he may have will not prevent him
from rendering a verdict according to the
evidence given in tlio case. It is my
opinion, under these changes of tho law
there will bo much less delay, far less ex
pense, and therefore, moro certainty ami
surely in llio administration of criminal
law in our ftato.
1 trust 1 shall not bo going beyond tho
proper hounds of executive propriety to re
lnarl; that the judicial department of our
government, by thu general intelligence
the education and (.landing, the sterling in
tegrity and gonoral Illness of those honor
able persons whoso duty It is to nduilnistor
this department of tho statu government,
merit, I beliovo 1 may say recolve, the
confidence of our people. " 1 cannot con
template without shuddering the possibili
ty of a coming time when the respect duo
to the tribunals of Justice might be for
feited, and this firm stay of our country
josllud and weakened. 'When wo contem
plate tho vust Interests at stake, tho deep
concern of our people, and the deservedly
high rank our courts have taken In the
country, wo may congratulate ourselves
and accept it as a harbinger
of permanent good to thoso to
come after us, that no stain rests upon tho
judicial arm of our service, no suspicion of
improper influence has thus far invaded
its high products, and no cause for suspl.
don rests on it in its broad field of useful,
ness throughout our slate. If I may take
so much liberty seeing it ploda along In
too rear, overiooauig mo acilolis ot men,
tho changing aspect of things, and the de
liberations of loglslatlvo Miembliet, a tort
of last resort, to which wo all look for lui
tlco and right, whon they aro belloved to
bavo fallod evrywhere elio, slow to wrath,
but firm as a rock may not the judicial
arm of tho sorvlco bo called tho resorvo
corps, nnd being so, must it not keep in
balling distance of and respond to the ad
vancing columns?
ltako it, gentlomon, your obiorvatiom
led yoi to tho conclusion to which all ro
llocting minds at last como: that all
changes of constitutions, modifications of
laws, as woll ns nil roforms sought by
legal onactment amount to but little, and
effect substantially no real improvement
in thu administration of publio alfalrs, nor
tho regulation of publlo conduct, unless
built upon and sustainod by a boaltby and
corresponding public sentiment. Good
laws materially assist in promoting tho
general prosperity whon based upon, up
hold nnd sustained by a propor publlo
morality. I beliovo oxporionco will
show that legislation, In ndvanco of public
necessity, thrust forward boforo its day,
upon mere expectation, or to moot empir
ical notions of morally orroform, will not,
In tho end, prove wise or usoful. March
ing sldn by side with tho oxporionco of tho
ago, ns wo shall comprohond it, end tho
necessities of tho times at wo shall under
stand thorn, wo shall como nearor tho
standard of prudont legislation, and most
likoly fulfill tho reasonable expectations
of our constituents, promote tho gonoral
prosperity of tho stato, and dosorvo the
favor of the ruler of the universe
It. .1. OlIt.CSllY.
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SIP tIAIKII.
DANir.I. llllltt), VtMl.lenli
lUMIF.UT. MII...KII. Vi-M.I'rn-il loit
I). N. IlllOIIKH, :H(ilr.
COLLECTIONS IMIOMITLY MADE,
'ITSXRIIANOK, coin, bank notch anil United
.IX Htalori mteiirllin bought and ol.
Iiilr-at AIIowimI iinT'meliflpoiil
IIIM.IAItDN.
HlIWMHiMSMiMHlNMHiWH'titirHi'lliltl'
ST. NICHOLAS j
MLLLIARD HALL
IIAHKY "WALKHH l'rop'r.
.This bouso is ilewly lilted up with two
excellent,
MILLIARD TABLES
And two lino
JENNY LINE) TABLES
The H.iloou Is Mocked with the ilest
HraniUnf
WINKS,
L1QUOKS,
and CIGARS
are compounded in tho most approved fctyle
tSTtJoino and see for yourself. j
WUUJi I WOOD 1 1 WOOD 1 1
Tlis underalitnoil will furnish
IIARD AND DRY WOOD
Aa t'lirup, It not 'hepr
had any wood dealer In Cairo, i.eavo order
en the dates at the Poitoltlco ami at Uokh
coal yard, on Uomuiorc lal avenue, between
Tenth and twelfth streets, Cairo. Illinois, 1
give good mcHNiiro and will cord tho wood
up If desired,
auKlOtf OKNN1H 1IA1.KY.
i,K)Ar
TlnTfflE
Ii horoby given that default having been
mado for more than sixty days in the pay.
tnent of a portion or the
amount Kccurcd to be paid by a
certain mortgage executed by Frank llan
camp to .Samuel StaaU Taylor ami Kdwln
Parsons, trustees of the Cairo City Property,
dated March 10, 1804, and recorded In the
rccordcr'a oillce, In and for Alexander
county, In the state of ".Illinois, In book I. of
deeds, on pago 037, etc, we, Ihe under
slirnnil. ii-ibl fniwin.,. .,fu .... L..i.in.. .....
2lth day of January next, A. D. 187.1, at 10
te.cK hi uio forenoon or mat ilay, under
and bv virion . , r I , , . r..i. ....... ..i... ,i
"juald mortgage, nelfnt public auction Lithe
highest bidder, forcash.attheolllco building
1 1 f -1, 1 1 1 I V. ... I . . w ... O
....... ..iiiiM.n, eiiroer Ol Y nsnillL'ioll live-
iitlo mid Eighteenth street, In the ( lly of
Cairo, In Alexander county nnd stato of till,
nols, all the right, title and Interest or said
trunk ll.nnviiiiii n, ,.ti... i.. ...
, . .....,r, ... ,11.1 M-nitllf-, III llllll UJ
'l "'""""'n'! 3 (three,) In block numbered
40 (lorty,) In said city of Cairo, according to
the recorded plat thereof, with the appurte
nances, lo xallsfy Ihe purposes and eondl-
S. STAATS TAYI.OK,
KDWIN 1'AIISONS.
. '"'"'pes ol tho Cairo City Property,
'a'e'' lro, Illinois, December w'i.
rj-yidui.
NOTIOK
Is hereby given that doraillt haWng been
made for more fh.ni sixty dayn in the pay.
mentor a portion or the amount secured to
be paid by n certain mortgage executed by
i',0,11", 1 : 1 aKmt lo Samuel StaatH Taylor nnil
Kdwln Parsons, Iructecs or tho Cairo Clly
Properly, dated Nov. It, IKH. mid recorded
In the recorder's olllee.lnii.idlor Alexander
county, In tho Mate ol Illinois, in honk 1' ol
deeds on page 102, etc., we, the undersigned
..in on runny, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 nay or .mil
itary next. A. I. 187:1, at 10 o'clock In the
. 4 - '. .wtii, hi, ,v tini-l. I,, mi;
forenoon of that day, under and by virtue or
the powerorsaleioiitalnedln said innrtirago.
fell at public auction, to the highest bidder,
Tor cash, at the ollb e building or mild tnia
tees, corner or Washington nvenuo nnd
KUhteenlh street, In the city of Cairo, in
Alexander county and state or Illinois, nil
the right, title and Interest or "aid John P.
laggait, or Ids assigns ' and to lots num
bered III (nineteen,) "0 (Uvciity.) l (twenty
one,) (twenty-two.) 'it (tiveiity-three.)and
til (tweiity-iour,) in block to (nlty-clehl,) in
the First Addition to the city of Cairo, ac
cording to the recorded plat thereof, with
the appurtenance, to nallsfy the purpo-e
and condition of said mortgage.
S.bTAAThTAY!.OIl,
"i:i)WINPAIt.SON,
Trustees of the Culm City Piopcrty.
Dated Cairo, Illinois December :iu, ls7'.
l'-'-;ildld. '
NOTIOH
Is hereby given that derault hating been
made for more than sixty da)H In thu pay
ment ol a portion or thu amount M'cured lo
liu paid bv a certain mortgage executed bv
Joeph JfcKenzle to Samuel Slants Taylor
and hdwlu Patoiis trustees of the Cairo
Clly Properly, dated September l.'l, IHOS. ami
recorded In the recorder's olllec, In ami riir
Alexander county, In the stale or Illinois, in
book P or deeds on page till, etc., we. the
undersigned said trustees, will on Friday,
the'JIth day or.laiiuaiy next, A. D. 1S7.I. at
lUo'tloek In the forenoon of that day, under
and by li llio ol'llio power of sale contained
In said liiorlgaL'o, sell nt public aiiellon to the
highest bidder, lor ea-li, at the otllce build
ing of xald triiitccs corner ol' Wadilngtoii
avenue and Klghteeiith ctreet, in the cltv of
(.'alio, in Alexander eoiintv ami Male of'llll.
nols, all the rjirlit, title and Interest or said
Joseph .MeKfliie or his aslgns lllalid to lots
numbered 10, (lllteeli,) 111 (sixteen,) and 17
(seventeen,) in block numbered 'J (two,) in
the Fourth addition to the said city ol Cairo,
according to the recorded plat thereof, with
the appurtenances, to nitisry the purposes
and condition of said mortgai.'r
S. -STAATSTAYLoU,
KDWIN PAItSONS,
Trustees of the Cairo City Property.
Dated Cairo, Illinois, December 30, la?-.'.
llWIldtd.
Our Homo Advertisers.
COMMINMian AMD rawABiaaj.
HALLIDAY BROTHERS,
GENERAL AGENTS
VOUWARDINQ and COMMISSION
IE 11(1 II A NTH.
DEALERS IN PJ OUR;
Anl Agent of
into RIVKR ANti KANAWHA
70 Ohio Lkvkk,
Cairo. Illinois.
NOTIOK
Is hereby given that default halng been
made for more than sixty days In the pay
ment of a portion or the amount secured to
be paid by a certain mortgage ;exccuted bv
Knlu Maxwell to Samuel Maats Taylor anil
Kdwln l'arfont, trustees of the Cairo City
Property, dated September 10, INK), and
recorded 111 the recorder's oillce, In and for
Alexander county, In the stale ol Illinois in
book K, ot deeds, on page i!IH, etc., we, the
undersigned said trustees, will, on Friday,
the tilth day of January next, A. D 187II, at
10 o'clock in the loreiioou of that day, uiidcr
aiid by lrtuu of the power or sale contalnce"
in Mid morU'.igc, self, at public auction, to
the highest bidder, for cash, at the oillce
building of said Trustees, corner or Wash
ington avenue and Klghteeiith street, In the
iMlf .if'l'llll-.. 1,1 A I..V..I..I..H I......
v..j ..-w, ... .......(iii.-i iuiiiii. .iiiu piie
lttl....I ..II .1... .1... 1. . . .
i.i .iiiiiiii-, mi .He ijkiii. line ami inieicsi oi
"aid Hrvfn .Maxwell or Ills assigns, In and to
nt lillliiltiir.ii I !l rl4irii.,l I.. 1. 1... I- : i
tS(roiiy-elght), in thu llrst addition to said
iij ii i-nii, ..eeuiuiiiK io uiu recorded plat
thereof, with thu appurtenances: to satisfy
the ptlipoius mid condition of nalil MortL'aee.
H.STAATSTAYt.OU. b
r.wwiM rAUKONS,
Trustees of thu Cairo (.'lly Piopcrty.
Dated, Cairo, Ills., December!!!), 187:2.
f.'-ll-dtd '
MOTIOK
Is hereby given that default having been
madu for more than sixty d.iyN in the pay
ment of a portion of the amount secured to
be paid by a certain mortgage executed hy
Warreu O. Dunning to Samuel hlaals Taylor
and Kdwln Parsons, trustees or the Cairo
City Property, dated November llth, imi,
and recorded In the recorder oillce, In and
ror Alexander county, In the state or Illinois,
in Hook F, of dee is on page 'Mi, etc., no,
the undersigned said trustees, will on Fri
day, thu tilth day of January next, A. D
I8(:i, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon of that
day, under and by vlituu of the power of
salu contained;!!! said mortgage, sell, at pub
He auction, to thu highest bidder, tor cash,
at the oillcu building of wild trustees, corner
or Washington avenue and Klghteeiith street,
lit tno city or Cairo, In Alexander county
and state of Illinois, all the right, tltlo and
Interest of hald Warren C. Dunning or ItU as
signs, in ami to lots numbered ill (thlrly-one),
and .TJ (thirty-two), In block numbered 7:!
(seu'iity-thrce,) in said city or Cairo, accord
ing to tho recorded plat thereof, with the
appurtenance, to satisfy the piirpo-os and
condition of said mortgage.
H. STAATS TAYLOIt,
KDWIN PAItSONS,
Trustees of the Cairo City Property,
Dated, Cairo, Ills, December U0. I&7'J.
lli-UI-dtd '
NOTIOK
Ih hereby gien that default Having been
mado for more than sixty days in the pay
ment ofa poitlon ol tlio amount secured lo
recorded iii mo recorder' oillce. In and lor
Ale xandcrcoiiuty, in the state of Illinois in
book P, of deeds on page lKi, etc.. we, tho
undersigned sal 4 trustees, will, on Filday,
thu tilth day ol January, next, A. D., 187a,
at 10 o'clock In the foienoou of lliat day, im
derand by virtue of the power of sale con
tained in said mortgage, sell, at public auc
tion, to tlio highest bidder, for cash, at Ihe
oillce building of said trustees, corner of
Washington avenue and Kigliteeuth street,
In the clly of Cairo, in Alexander county
and statu of Illinois, all the right, title mil
Inteivslofsalil Joseph MeKeiiie or his as
signs, in and to lots mimliercd !!'J (tidily
two), !tl (thlily-thrce), and III (thll ty-foiu),
in block numbered 1 (two), In (he foiuth ad
dition to said clly of Cairo, according lo tho
recorded plat thereof, with the appurtenan
ces to satisfy the purposes aud condition of
said inoitgage.
S. STAATS TAYI.Olt,
KDWIN PAItSONS,
Trustees or the Cairo City Pi opcrty,
Dated, Cairo, Ills December SO, lBi'J.
12-!)l-dtd '
FRED ROSE
jvcBjHiCUA.niT'r t-A-IIiOir
No. 104 COMMKBOIAT. AYKNUK,
French, Scotch and American casslinercs
of all colors, aud beaver and broadcloths
CONSTANTLY ON HAND,
And mado up In the
LATEST STYLE,
And at the lowest price, A line lit and first
class woik guaranteed. Satisfaction in cv
respect warranted.
t. II. MATH USH.. K. O.UH1
MATHUSS.V UHL,
t
A Nit tlKMEHAI.
C O M M I 3 S I ON M K 11 C HANTS
11K.U.KIW ,ti
IAY AND WESTERN PRODUCE
ft! II It Id I.KtBK.
J. M. PHILLIPS & CO.,
(Hurciissors to K. II. lloodrtcits A Co,)
Forwarding and Commission
MERCHANTS,
WOAKK-HOAT PKOl'KIKTOJia.
rrr- I.I b ml AdfMicomxijlii nit-lo
riBt upon CondftammUi. ilTei
Aro prcpartil to muni, (torn nil forward
freirthta lo ll poInU and buy ul
ell on cotunilsmon,
eriiosine an alUimldd to irnmttlr;
S. D. AYElts.
K. J. AYKKe.
A VERS & CO.,
FLOUR
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS
No. "8 Onto Levkk, C'aiiio, III.
l-7tf,
J. A. 'JUNNINGHAM,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANT
AMI IIKAI.EIl IN
HAY, OATS- COIRIN
AND MILL FEED.
OAIHO, - - - ILLINOIS
M ILLEK k PARKER,
GENERAL COMMISSION
FOKWAKDINO MEKOHANTS,
AMI.
DEALERS IN FLOUR, CORN
Oats, Hay, etc.,
AOENTS for FAIRBANKS HOALKS
Ohio Levee, C'AIIIO. ILLINOIS.
JOHN R. PIILL1S & SON,
iHiiecoio-orHto John II. 1'till 1 1 .)
GENERAL COMMISSION
FOUWAllDINO AIKK0IIANT8
4SI)
DEALERS IN HAY, CORN, OAT
Flour, Moal, Bran, &c,
t'ou. TENTll-BT. ami OHIO LKVK
OA I HO, ILI.H.
(i. M. A i I) E N,
Late of Thouiui A: Allien,
aroi?i-wv.ie,x)iaTa-.INK-COMMISSION
M liRCIIANT
FI.OUII, MKAL, OKAIN, HA V, .Ve.
No, l.'tri Ohio Lkvkk, Oaiho.
IdTC'iish advances on (loodt on sight.
ItHKKitKNCKH: City National ak ur
Cairo, Kii st National Hank of Chicago.
WOOD RITTENIIOUSE & RRO.
FLOUR
mo
General Commission Mercban ta
133 OHIO LEVKE,
Homo Advortisomcnts.
nuuuN.
Schub.
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51
HUTrilKUM.
I1YLAN1) & SAUER,
BUTCHERS
AMI IlKALKKH IN
CHOICE FRESH MEATS
OK HVKUY DRSCUUM ION,
Comer 10th street and Commercial avemn
next dour to the Hyland saloon.
11-lCtf. OAIHO, ILLS.
JAKE WALTER,
BUTCHEB
FRESH MEAT,
KmiiTii Htiikkt, Hktwbkk Waboinoton
ANUCOUUKHUIAI. AvltNUKS,
Ad.oliilnir UI'ion!iui and llannjr'a
Kci., thu iient or lliel, fork, Mullou Veal,
I.Hinli, SnuvsKe, clo ni are prepareil lo tkriu
cltmiDi in the most aceunUMs tuannnr.
JAMES KYNA8TON,
Dutch kk anu Dkalkr in au. Kindh or
Fbkdii MKAT8.
COIINKK NlNitTKNTn AND 1'OI'I.Alt STtl.,
OAIHO, ILLINOIS.
Huys and slaughters only the best cattle
Iiokk aud slice)!, and U prepared to till any
demand for fresh meats from one pound to
tvu thousand pound.
REM IS, DROWN & CO.,
BAG MANUFACTURERS.
Auents Homk Cotton Mills',
NO. 80 Ohio Levee, Cairo, lilt.
1-3-V.iu.

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