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The Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1872-1878, July 25, 1874, Image 2

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0 b ullti,
SA.TOKDA.Y, JULY 2f.,JIPTt.
itlllrlnl 1'iaprrtif Sim Oils' " 'lnily
UllN U. 01IKU1.Y. KMtot nd rifbU8hr
TKUHS OF TOT! DAliW lMiI.KTUi
One wtek, bj- rrir f 3-"i
Ono yearly oarrler, In admce 10 Oil
)n year tx carrier II not pitil In
advance.... . a oo
tut Month, by mall 1 00
rhr months ,, n ()
Mix months ,,,, , tV
One yK , , ,, io 00
TKRMsor wr.KKf.r hullrtin.
Ono Year ft 00
Six MoMha.. , V
Three Month CO
Inrarlablr In advance
ll'rnilliiK inntfrr cm cvrry mgr.
TllE penalty of " ncst-ludine; " ought
to bo tlio allowM ticc.
Ovku two millions of dollars a year
5h the comlortallo sum tlic New York
'llorald' makes by its ndvcrttpcuionts.
TiiEtir. ore defenders of liueclicr'd
dnnooencol Mauy people good pco
ylc, too do not boliovo lie would lie
guilty of" ncst-hiding."
The story is told in fJoriuany that
JJisin.irk's would-bo nssafsln is not n
.lesuit at all but ono of liismtirk'n own
aiicn, instructed by him to do tbo deed
in ordor to givo him npparont occasion
to fetill further oppress the' Catholics.
yoME timo ago, a'triko was orgim
jtod by tho Union printers of Cincin
nati. Non-union compositors wcro oui
ployed in nororal of tlic daily news
paper otliccs. A high date of feeling
iau ezistod among tho Muiou printers
lilncc, which culminated iu a dialiolaci.il
cict a few nights since. After partak
ing of tho regular midnight lunch, a
number of tho oompositors iu the
Gazette' office were taken violently
nick and showed all tho symptoms oi
luring been poisoned. It is almost
certain that the attempt to thus sum
marily end tho type-setting of tho of
J'&ding prin tor? was thu work o( the
Union men. That it failed, was fort
unate ior thu intouded yictirm but
ilocs not lesson tho criminality of tho
lutn who wore capable of making it.
NEW ORLEANS, CASIO 01?
lmmoruoMA.
Lap dogs as pets havo lone been fa
vorites of women. Mrs. MUlcr Wall
if Now Orleans, was no exception to
licr sox. Her lap dog was her friend
find companion, mid was fondled and
jiettcd by her as these animals usually
tire by their mistresses. A few weeks
ngo Airs. Wall's dog, which had shown
I igi of indisposition and had been
treated for it, returned her cnie.M
M'Uk a bite on the lip. Tho lady drew
tliw lip into her mouth, sucked thu
Mood from it abunduutly,uud then ap
plied to the wound arnica and spirits
(if ammonia, which healed it. Three
days after inflicting the bite, tho dog
tiled, having exhibited no special signs
t.f madness. A few days afterwards,
2lrs. Wall experienced a feeling of
thirst and on raising n glass of water
to her lips, was uuablu to drink it ;
this was tho beginning of uu attack of
hydrophobia, during which she nutTercd
11 the horrors of that terrible disease
and which ended in death within
three days after its first symptoms ap
peared. WHAT'S IN A N'A.MH?
Tho Chicago Timo-,' of thu 'JIM
iiist., iu an article we publish elsowhcru
iu this issue of The Htu.niN, calls
our attention to thu fuct that it "is uu
independent journal, with vory decided
political convictions, based on what it
believes to be principles of truth." It
needs no ghost to come from tho gravu
to tell us this. Tito record of Tho
Tims is wcll-kuow to us j uud, it is
because wo know that journul lo bo the
Advocate of sound political principles
that wo ish tho Opposition people of
Illinois, using tbo machinery of the
Jiemocratio party, to formally give ex
pression to the principles io ably ad
located by The Times, and thus se.
cure its co-operation in au effort to
drive from power ltadicalisin, which ih
rovolutioni.ing tho government and du
b luchiug tho public morality.
" Seemingly," cays Tho Times,
The Uu.uvn.N would foreshadow a
political organization of tbo opponent
of a pcipetual nhinplustcr swindle and
u perpetual tariff swindle, for the pur
pose of putting an end to those mous
tious swindles by rehabilitating buuest
money and establishing the anli-nioiio-poly
system of commercial freedom."
This it our idea, and Tho Tiiuot as
ruron us that if it is then Thu Times
ii iu cordial aud earnest sympathy.
" It is tho course which Thu Times
bolioves to bo politically most wisu."
But there is n condition attached by
Ths Times to this ondommiont nul
lifying it, and is not, in our opinion,
oomtistout with the boast of The
Times that it acts upon u plane
raised above party that it will advo
cate the principles it believes to bo wiso
political principles, opposing whatovcr
party opposes thorn and supporting
whatever parly advocates thorn. To
iifo tho machinory of the Democratic
party in au eflort to secure tho success
of correct political principles is, in the
opinion of The Timus, wise, but tho
name of tho party must he rejected
and Its malodorous record disavowed.
In making the pioclamation wo un
derstand tho assertion to be made, that,
if citizens, organized as a political
paily, wero to permit Tho Times to
writuu declaration of principles for tliciu
and wero to plcdgo themselves to carry
tlio'o principles into effect in the gov
ernment of tho country, being success
ful at tho polls, tjiat journal would
nevertheless oppose their efforts to
secure n public endorsement of their
avowed principles, if they should de
termine to call themselves democrats.
This, in our opinion, is an unfor
tunate position. Wo stand iu advo
cacy oi political principles by tho sidu
of Tho Times, but we will not permit
a name or a record to drivo us into op
position to those principles. Wo will
support any party, by wliatover named
called, that advocates our political
principles; wo will opposo nny party,
by whatever natep called, that docs not
advocate them. The ghost of a name
shall not frighten us into an nlliauco
frith tho advocates ol dangerous aud
pernicious political principles.
It is a foregouo conclusion that a
State convention of tho people op
posed to Radicalism will convcuo iu
this Statu.
It is a foregone conclusion, that, if
that convention speaks with thu voice
of its constituents, it will declare for
honest money, the establishment of
tho anti-monopoly system of commer
cial froodom.and honesty and economy
in tnu auministtution ot tho govern
ment. -It is a foregono conclusion, that thu
pooplu opposed to Radicalism, repre
sented in this convention, will, in their
conflict with the Radicals, ino thn
machinery of thu Democratic party.
It is a foregouo conclusion, that
these opponents of Radicalism, thus
using thu machinery of the Domocratie
party, will bo called Democrats.
Will this fact tho use of n dis-
tasteful name justify Tho 'Times' In
opposing thu opposition people, thus
nriikn!'in,l ...1 j.1 i ..ill I
-.b....,nuiiuioyiiaveinauoucciara.
uuurwiuiion to carry inio the
uuuuutauttuu; r vuu government, it
successful, thu political convictions of
Tho Times.
THE NEGRO.
Brown Discusses Uic Muck
Man.
DISSIPATION OF A PECU
LIAR. KIND.
WHAT Of THK N1UIIT ?
Cai.uhonu, duly 147-1.
Dkaii J1i;m,eti.v : In the address
of J.J. Ilird, at Carboudale, reported
in n lato usuo of Tut: Hi'i.i.etin, tho
speaker said : "Two hundred and forty
years of our history in this country was
ono long night of darkness aud despair.
Wo waited, hoped and pruyed. Often
tiuics in the gloomiest hour of our sor
row, wc would cry, "Watchman tell us
of tho night, what.its signs of promise
are?" Thu answer would comeback
falling on our cars with redoubled
force, "Perpetual slavery and ignorance
is your doom forever."
It appears to mo that the aforesaid
watehmsn is purely an imaginary
being, lie might us well hayo an
swered moro truthfully. Tho speaker
could easily, iu the light of recent
event., have made him do so by sup
posing his muwer to bu : "You will
bo, in Cod's good time, educated and
free ; tho white mail's blood uul trcas
uru tihall tlow us ulreams from tho
mountains o'er valleys below."
Rut I intend no eritic'um upon
cither tho speaker or tho poetical state
ments of tho wrongs done his race.
UISES TO EXI'I.AIX.
Only this : Souio ideas suggested
themselves to my mind, tho which I
risu to explaiu : Kirst That tho avor
agu readci of TllE Ri i.i.etis would
infer that tho speaker deeply regretted
that Kluvery had ever existed in tho
country, and that the white peoplo hud
pcrpetimtod u great wrong upon tho
negro iu thus holding him ns a slave.
Now comes tho questions : nru wo to
uudcrstaud that tho vthito and black
people lio thus express themselves
helluva tliut if slavery had nuver ex
isted that tiny considerable number of
negroei' ijould now bu found iu tho
I'nitcd Slate? Or if not , then that
they regret tbat those imported, unci
thuirdehCt'iuliutH,did iiotreiuuin to en
joy their savau freedom and diet of
roots and spiders iu Africa? If so.wo
agreo.
I believe that it is true that if the
negro had not beeu introduced us u
slave thcru would never havu been in
this country, from its failiest settle.
mcnt to tbo present, n many ns do now
vegctato in Cairo.
TUB MORAL ASPECT 01" M.AVEItV
Presents itself differently to different
minds ; to determine tho quality of an
act all the circumstances must be care
fully considered.
For Instance, tho capturo of Friday
by Crusoo. Friday was u wild savage
living on snakes, roots and human
tlcsh , by the association, precept uud
example of li i - master, ho became
something of a eivili.cd being. Did
he in tkitioiv pine away and regiet his
social position l His capturo and fct
vcu wen) tho conditions of his im
provement sine ijmie nun a sort of
abitjuc hor iu tho proceeding a civ
llizcd servant or a wnvago freeman. 1
do not sanction or approve of what
wass'.ylod thc"pcculiar institution." In
my judgment it always involves u
wrong to ono or both parties, but not
necessarily to the servant.
JU ST UEIlllET.
All reflecting and considerate while
men must now regret that slavery ever
existed iu our land. I believe a great
wrong was done, by its introduction,
to tho whito race, tho end of which
none can even now foresee. If slavery
had never existed in this country, it is
moro than probable Rird would never
have had tho pleasure (if suoh it was)
of delivering an address in Carbondalo,
and his countryman, instead of inplor
ing an iinmaginary watchman to tell
thorn of tho night, might havo beeu
subjects of King Munza and roaming
through tho vales of Monhuttoolaiid
in quest ot a victim.
This ho regrets and so do I. At
least I supposu ho does, for it would be
grossly stupid to regret the caiuo aud
yet wish to retain tho effect. Had sla
very never existed, ISird had uevor been
a magistrate iu Cairo, n orator in
Carboudale, or u citizen of tho Tinted
States, nor would his countrymen liavts
attended tho common (uncommon)
schools of Illinois.nay, more, I doubt
if the speaker hud now been in "esseo.'
Idea number two : No coverumont or
nation can long bu peaceful, prosper
ous and progressive unless there is a
curtain unity or hotuogcucousncss
amongst thu peoplo resulting from
a common derivation. Tho ucgro has
been and will continue to bo a disturb
ing element, a balance of power to bo
used by corrupt men for corrupt pur
poses. At present tlic Kcpublicau
parly has him in tho
future other
parties will havu him.
NO 011.1 ECTION. I
A majority of Democrats have no ob
jection to him than that hu doer not
vote the Democratic iicket. If, iu time,
this race should bu absorbed by amal
gamation, the negro will bu benofittud,
but not thu white race. When, iu tho
course of liuuiau events, thu admixture
shall hu thorough, thu resulting pop
ulation will bu utterly unconscious o''
any deterioration, by operation
of what may seem a na
tural law. We cannot see
ourselves as others see us. National
degradation cannot ho cithor weighed,
or fell, correctly estimated or appreci
ated by its individual subjects, liku
many matters which may give rise to
; a plausible opinion yet cannot bo dem
onstrated to bo either false or true.
1 do not regard the average negro
and tho avcrago white man as alike or
equal. If they were, a cross might
combine thu good qualities of both
aud bu superior to either. Hut thuy
arc nut ; why then sock to obliterate
distinctions madu by nature ? This
twaddto about thu man and his brother,
aud that (iod madu all nations of nuu
blood, is nothing but tbo vaporiugs of
a sickly scutiiucntulism in some eases,
aud iu all others an offspring of deina
gogucry suuh us will always bo abund
antly found iu popular governments.
Why not add hair, bones, etc. '! Hu
man blood is not esieutiully different
from that of all other warm tiloodcd
animals. It is only a figure of speech
if not, wo can, with equal propri
ety, say t!od bus madu theontiro feline
race of ouu blood, from thu Royal lieu
gal down to tho common domestic;
but tho showman who should eugu
thorn togcthor would find some assort
ing a superiority that could not bo
safuly ignored.
I recognize thu fact that '.ho negro
is a man ; and, without thu fault or con
sent of hitneclf or any whlto person of
this generation, is here, aud should
havo every civil right necessary for his
enjoyment aud protection so long
as hu remains amongst ui, and re
tains his identity. If he disappears,
either by absorption or expatriation,
there would bu nothing left upon
which to discriminate or found a dis
tinction. Let uu man do or encourage
others in doing, a wrong to any living
auimal. Nor do I think that iu reo-
ogtiiziug iu thu legislation and laws of
u goveruinunt differences created by
nature, there is any wrong, or that it is
a just ground of complaint that thcru
bhuuld bu eliminated from tho social
fabrio overy principle obnoxious to the
perpetuity of our government aud its
continued peace uud prosperity, of
which u mongrul aud heterogeneous
constituency is utterly destructive.
I havo a great many hi-'!" 011 08
many different subjects, but will seo
how tho first installment is received
beforu venturing to say moro. As to
what I havo written, it "y te r" lo
animadversion but if you no liko
him, you no take him.
Kxpcriiuoutally yours,
J). IMtOVVN.
'1 UK OI'l'OSTIUW t'AKTV.
(1 mm the 111' a" 1'mics.
'Pint I'iiu.i lliii.LEiiN rrobably undoi.
stands what it tho political altitude or Tho
lILUef. XbO inltflllC'.'ni cuuur n m.n
papr;proWuly Uoi tbt the limps Is
nn limepenueni journal, uuviui u
polltlrsl convictions, l'S''l on what It he
iiiivcs to lo principle of truth, and that
tlivro principles eonitituto tlio only Riililo
It Hccupts. Thk 1IULI.KT1K mint know,
thorororo, that Tliu 'J'lmfs is liupolotsly
are In tho quuliliciiliuin that osamillal lo
tlm tiling Callml a putty "organ."
What that journal means by saying
that "iho'Timus hns now tho opportunity
to placu Itiolt at tho head or thu new Op
poiltlon parly thrit muit be, In thn near
luturo, ovolvud rrotu tlx) chaotic political
olomerila twM lylni (.round looio," li not
nultu Hppuiont." Kur what purpono U thu
anticlpatml "now opposition part) ' lo tin
uvolvcd'' h It to In an liiilruiiimitalily
for convoying Into oil eel In thu conduct
of our political InstltiillDiis tliu principles
and policy whleh (tho 'Times) would con
vey Into oU'scl? or I' 11 ,0 convoy into
vllect lbs proportions muncniea uy win
lato "dcinoernllo parly" convenlioni In
Indiana, or by tho hoaui farmara' conven
tion In thla ttalc, or by coma other polit
ical gathering that ban proven ite claim
to in ttylert an "oppoillion ' oooy oy or
mulutlrig moro radical Ideas on thu con
groitional sidu of thu pending political
taut, than the mot inflated political
humbug In tho preiont congrcsa has ven
tured to cxprt!! '!
If tin former, tbo 'Times' falls to ma
nny roaon why It thould eeuk to placo
itiolt' "at th head" ot an ornnl..)J ef
fort to attain the end which it ha, sought
to attain, and mint alill auek to atlHln,
whether thura lo any audi or&nUod
vtl'ort or not. If ill latter, then to im
poictbU U It for thu ' rimes' to bu cither
at tho hoad or tail of any Mich sham ''op
poiltluii," that it can only hv It is golu
Id an opposite direction.
.St'emlnirlv. TlIK BlU.I.Krix would font-
shadow n political organization of thix
opponents of a purputual ruiniiiiiaiur awn
die uud n purputual lurid' aulndli-, fur
thu purpoio or putting an nd to thoio
inomtruui awimnes uy reiiaoiiiiauuK
hunuit money and rstatiliitmic the null
monopoly lyitain ot comtnorctnl fruodom.
It that bo Til K llui.LKTIN's Idem, it it an
idtit with which lho Tiling U in cardial
and carncit mnpathy. It Is lho courae
which Thu Time belioviu to bo
politically mull wl.o. Hut it i a tourtu
which, whllu it admits or thu urnploy
mont uf any exiting party machinory
that can ho tuado available, tmplca a rejec
tion or tbo name and a illiavowal ol the
malodoroui ruord or that obsolete politi
cal Idol itylcd the democratic party. Why''
Simply bucauio it ii impossible for a "now
opposition" to cspouio tho old cause or
adopt tbo iiaiiiu without Hltumlni; and car
rying tbo old dead weight. And, furthur,
bocuusu tho men who iro willing to HPtumo
and carry thu old dead weight aro, for
tho moat part, premolars of tbo vory pur
posos which a "auw opposition" must an
laj;oij. ; m wilntfs tho dftuocrntiu party
in Indiana. And. alill further, no-
cuusu many thousands ot carnuit bullnv
ora in the llbural principles of honcrt
nionev and fruu commerce, In Illinois aim
uvery otuur state, auu m.w ..u ...o to
co-operate with a nuw opposition on'tlnj
basis or thoso principle, aro not rondy,
and urn not likuly to hu rundy during this
generation, to culint uudur a political ban
ner ol liaiui inumory.
Apparently, Til Itri.LiTiN quitu uc
cotda with The Tuuos in thete vlowi. It
pruDuuncus unhusitatingly tur thu honuet
monoy and tri-u-comtutrcu side of ihu
panding political iieuo. It dtsiris to or
ganio nod "moblii. u popular etl'ort to
attain thosu great uuds. It fay:
"Th 'Tluiia' has fortibly said, that this
mobilization can only buell'ectvd by using
thu machinery of existing parties ; but
how aru the puuplo who bulluvo with the
'Times to gut poisestlou ot this machin
ory? Tho democratic loadors now bavu
it, and nr unwilling to kivo Wliy that
ot&or mon may Ihko ebarg1) or it and usu
It in accordauco with tl.e wifhus of tbu
democratic peoplo. What, then, can bo
dauu 7 Nothing, In our opinion, but to
rally the democratic ant liberal people
and taku from thu loadurs thu trust they
havo n!Ui.-d.
"Therofore wo advocuto the policy of
calling the opposition people togetticr in
etato convontiun. The only way this can
bo ellVctually done it iu our opinion, to
induct! tho atato eommltlojs of .hu demo
cratic and liberal parties to call them to
gethur. Having assembled, they can then
give expression to tbclr ttnlimenta in an
autboiliativo manner, rail usu tho ma
ehinory of ttmsu parties In thoir hattla
ugainst ropi'ditlon, taritf robbery, ullieial
orrupttoii, and mlfgovornment."
Again lliu 'Times' hu to say that it
thinks these are wiso s .ingestion ; with
tho qualification, however that tho leading
purpose of tho convKntfon should hu do
clarod in thu call. Hut is thu course thus
comnieiidad likely tn bo pursued, or as
seatoi tn by thn committed custodians at
tho political myth called the democratic
party, who will' meet for consultation in
this city on thu ':'Jtli listant ? This is tbo
only atiestion of any real public
importance that the committee
wilt have to consider and de
cide. If tho committee shall decide,
to indorse the Supternbor opposition con
vention for honest money and froo com
merce, Jointly with tho liberal cummiltoi),
and all other citizens, whatever thoir
party antecdnnti, who dnire to promoto
Its openly and honestly declared purposes,
that convention will undoubtedly bu a
great success. If tho committeemen,
howovor, should docldo (as Tho Times
suspects thuy will) to call an old-fashioned,
closu-cnmmunloti, straddlo-tlia-fenco "do
mocrutlo party " coavontlon, it will be a
foroordalncd failure.
EoW. Wood & Oo
1130 HIDOKJAVKNUH
IMLILA-DELAKIA, PENN.,
Fountiilns, Vases, Aulinnls. Iron Stairs,
bump l'osts Stable rilllne,.!,
Wire Works.
3AST. WROUGHT & WIRE RAILINGS
NHWandlMltOVKl'DCIlAIUtortheatiis,
Concert ami J.ocluru Ilalln.
And a d'cucral Assortment of Orna
mental Iron Work.
KstimstoH aaddenlirns scnton pplleatloii,
itittng the clans ol work ieilrud.
tliM-ll-rnd-iS
WILLIAM K. SMITH, M. D.
KKSIDKKOK-.No. 21, 'Ihlrtfontli streot
'sotwtcii WushliiKioii uvi'iiue ami Wuluu
Ireet. Otllcc liii comiiierulal avenue, up
"M
Aiivr.imsi: in
A innn Ititt'iiillng to do business must
first prepare liuuxcR to meet the rr
qiilremonlH of Ills customers; next he
must let every possible or probable
customer Lnow that lie In so prepared.
In ii very mull place he may TKIX nil
the people nluit he lanilo. Inulurge
village a printed handbill, poster or
circular, properly distributed, will he
cnicaciou", but WHOKVKIt IS IN A
I'l-AOK I.AIK1K KXOLKJH Tl) Sill'-
1M)UT A NKWSI'Al'KIt WIM, KIND
THAT IT IS THK niKAI'KSTMKMUM
TllltOl'tlll WHICHTO AIIIHtKSSTHK
l'l'IIMC.
AliVKKTISK IN
lir uUtiii.
MOOKH.
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FINE MILLINER Y 001)
Klth'SII Sl'JtlNO (1001)3.
M It 8 . M . JAOKfiO X.
(Konnerly Mrs. .Hwaudcr.)
iiinounces;that she has just opened a targe
assortment ot the
NKWKST,
MOST KAHIIIONAiii.
AW I) UANL'SOMrr
MIlMnery Uooils tons 'f.uu . o liiuinaik't
she will keep on hand
Hats, JIonnkth, Klowkh , Itinnox-i,
Duxss TnniMiNOH or All Kinps,
Lauiks Furnishinu Goods, Notio.v
Collahs, Unuxbslkkvks, lturis,
And all goods lound Iu mllliuory icro,
ol which will ho dlsposod ol at the Ioa'
culi prlccu, Mrs. JackHon rospei lU.llv
mkB a contluuatlou of tho pataouagu v til
has been so llheiully buvtsuwed Upon her
the ladlea of Calm aud the vlelnitv.
on uiisiiioiiin
Ci'iMrMulu
ClllVAtlO.
Thtiroit Htnour.td SptelatUt ,'f thi Aytjnl'
lr,atiiunt(fl'IUV.iTK, CltJtO.VW aiul Hu
.V.I.' 1' MSB ASKS, SKM1XA I. WKAK.VKS.,.
M'Bvei'sxKs.i.riui-i.i'a os tiik sari AvmmiNie
fOCISTV, SHI'AlSLU SlllllT. loss or HV.UOUT wa
lissiiooi) tiku sri.Y cnin. tii cansx or
llcmCAL I.Siri.UATl'UII.lUt.lrl.4IOi(liuU l,laS.
(Ulblof Ub; nrf l"li t, Tts ly.llutiu
lwatrils TLlr baturt, cauid ftsil dtirt, rrlos M sali
Mbt I a a r,t,n tsrtlops. lultrl rrulrls sarsWal n4,
killcil alUbSuc r MlUs ns Itllor frUitts ia 4xlr.
lulUs riUc4 will yflvUa iarlur&u. Urd, aUa4
ai,"- CuiUu4isatitl. ItvllvrawlisaaaA
rjsssusjyssjjsassnajSSi
sTSBS SBSS
WI10M3SALirANl7 KliTAIL
III! ST 1
fl
DEALBBS
.sSssssssssssssssswjlsssssssssssV lEjftl
sssSJsssssssssssssss1pK'-w- a 4. . Jisssssssssssssssssssaw jsHsa
SEsHSaMSflarbjssjaisssssasjHH'v insjHwa.
BARCLAY BROTHERS
Jobbers and Retailers of
PURE DRUGS,
Chemicals, Patont Medicines, Perfumery, Soups, Brushes,
Toilett Articles, Drugiist's .Fancy (Soods, Collier White
Lead ami Other Grades, J'aints, Colors, Oils, Varnishes,
Window Glass, Wax 'Flower Material, Tt he Colors, J)s'e
Studs, Ktc, Ftc, JOte,
We Solicit cnrri-i'pondttni-c ami order Irmn OruirKi'ta. I'hjririana aiul ili ncrul sturoi
liiwntitnl llnndi Iu mil' Lino. Mv:iuihu:t. I'l intilluii and I'onillj- Mi dlrino ran i turn
Mini nr Itcllllcil with ltclhthlu llruxs at lira-nimble It.'itoa-
WI10LESAI.F. & UUTAlli.
71 Ohio Li; uc.
CAIRO.
T. J. K
hUccc-w
BEERWAR"
M .
TIN.SIIF.K'I tit , i .. : t.l'I'KltWAIti:
I'liini'-, Illrd Ctitef, I'i' Creiim Kivi-7ir
WnlBr (.oi.lci-, AVIn t 'loili fur ui
itow !-crii ii'..l.ii.iiud Ware,
i:i' ., I to.
TIN ROOFING
Guttering and .Job Work
MADU A SPHCIAMTY.
Agent lor tlm
Garry Iron Roofing Co,,
'I'lic hiM Iron Itooilnt; In thu .Market.
Older-(ruin Alnnad will licci ite rroiiipt
.MIUUUOII,
All work done With Dlsiiateli umliW
tod In Kite Satisfaction.
SH-O-lO-tf.
)V .
COFFINS,
AT WILCOX'S III.OCK KOIt il.00
l.-i-ll-li-tf
l.atvs ichn.
SAMUEL P. WHEELER,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT UW
CAIUO, ILLINOIS.
Otlllcn Over Klist .'lallonul lUnk. ::-ir-"ui
John II. JlulVry. William C. .Mulkcy.
MULKEY & SON,
V '..NKYS AT LAW
k;!i , ... .i, cl, ht'tWL'cn Comnior-
.. t. . n i.' ,i. iM iiuec. l-lf.
-..a. x 'ilLBERT,
. 't'..:i.ii
X:, i' ' AT LAW
, -.n. . ".I
W ill. .11
UAIUO, II.S.
jrj-sj ,., 't itntmn tfhen lo Admlrally
iiudHli.iin'K.'t l'U''lms.
Oitico; Ohio l.i'n', Itfiouit 7 mid K aw
l.'ity Natloual Hank.
I1 II VI til) OIL
ItKTAII, & I'ltKinili'TION.
W.islitnglon Ate, cor. I.lgitli St.
SUM tl l.AA4ll H
R. SMYTH &. CO.
WII0W3HAI t
LIQUOR DJ3ALEK.S
Nn. CO Olii,, 1Wi
C'AIIIO, ILLINOIS
R. JONES
Boot Sl Shoe
MAKER,
Commercial Avenue.
i.riuccc 'IVlitn and Kli v-nltt Stri-ct"
CAII10, ILLI.VOI.s
U iirfjiarid to nil onli-ra tviiUont dda)
Hi" Inn n iini- (.lock of imfii(d leather on
huiid.Jut recched lrin .Siutcikt uud ha'
inn ii'ih ii uic jirici-s to I) i ii'Ut t noun.
" 1
B. F. PARKER,
(!?uccevor to Darker & Wake .
Dealer ill
PAINTS & OILS
VAIiNISIIKS,
IMDS I !r
WALL I'AI'hll
WINDOW (IDASS,
WINDOW KlI MUvS
Ami the culchralcd illumin.iiini;
AURORA OIL.
I Uro,,, l,,,ilJI,lK. IUIi St- & UomuMal A
UAIUO, ILLS.
FRED- HOFHEINZ
CARRIAGE & WAGON
iMANUFACTUUEK.
.INI)-
11LACKSM1TJIIN(L
Slxlli SliTct nnd Cnmiiiorrlal Airiiuc,
CAIUO, ILLINOIS.
Hit'flti at tint ton u-lve n to lliiumc simisii
uud 1,'eneitl ii'iialrliif,'. ,'ll-l)-:i--tf
iejE. ICE. ICE.
THOMAS SPROAT & SON
V I l' Mil ' I I 1 It 't til ) l1 'II ill
l'UHK LAKK 10K,
Oalro, Illinol!, and Columhus, Kontucky
t'airu nlllco at lltlli'li .V. Wllsnu'ii, cm in. I'
Twilltli htrict mid Ohio luvt'u,
Wo will run mi n o wagon tiiroiiifhrnit tin;
caMiu, ilellvurlnj,' imro lal.o ico in any ji'iit
si tlm fit y lit thn lowest iinirkct prlcr, and
dill atri.) Iiiruixli our Irlcndi imtMdti the city
u llli leu iiv tho i-aku or car load, pucki-il in
ww dust! flu' alilnnu'iit to any ilMuncc. '
6-5-213-11

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