OCR Interpretation


The Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1872-1878, July 23, 1875, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033413/1875-07-23/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

enocKMiM.
-. w.,,.w-w-w.w.w-. '-
W. L. BRISTOL,
FAMILY
GROCER
Roops ororything pertaining to
tho lino of Staple ana Fancy Gro
ocrioB, Woodonwaro, Vogotables,
Fruits, &o., 8to,
Pirn
Try My Now Style Mixed
TEA.
Difl'oront Combination From any
Ueforo Ottered in tho Market,
und of Excellent Flavor.
Whittaker Hams
WISCONSIN BUTTER,
Sweet nd Rich
Central Hop Yeast
Attain This Summer.
;new STYLE
LAMP CHIMNEYS,
SEE THEM
taa
No. 32 EIGHT STREET
CAIRO ILL.
CO.II..
Coal Coal
PITTSBURGH,
PARADISE,
MT. OARBON(Big Muddy)
AMI
PEYTONA CANNEL
COAL!
Orders for Cool by tho car-load,
'on, or in hogsheads, for shipmont,
promptly attouded to.
aTo largo consumorH and all
manufactur-ors, wo aro prepared
:o supply any qunntity, by tho
aionth or yoar, at uniform ratos.
CAIRO CITY COAL COMPANY.
tt-llalllday Jlro 'solllee, No 70 Ohio Levee.
tTMUUiuny ilio ' wtiarinoiit.
CiAtKRJi.IlttuMIlN, or , ,
jj-.U the Coal l)uin, loot of Thirty-tight
dJ-l'ost Office Drawer, son.
CHICAGO.
FBias,$Qa.oo
Thirtv-Third Annual Sosslon
Begins Sept. 29th
Kor circulars Addle
Dr. DeLaaUio Mlllor, 028 Wabnsli Ave.
Chicago.
a.S-7-lo.d.tw.lw,
REST REST !
Evorpreaont"Rcnt for tho Wcnry."
Mattruucii, I'lllown and Holsters nl
G. W HICK'S
Mattress Manufactory
Coiner of Nineteenth unit l'i)ilr bIitcH. be
tween the New Vol I More mill Col Taylor of
Hce, a Iblluws: Kxcul.lnr and Shuck lat
IresfM. full l.e, cotton top, $1 M second blie,
cotton top, 1 koihI plain Vmirk Mnttreic, r
and V1 Lounge, hliiKle, unit Crili .MnttrecH at
I rdiireii price to suit the hard time. Terms
itrlftlyoiMh Highest cash price paid for cot n
buck, dcllvcied lit my tisi'lory
&.2-ilAn--lu-.
1'Uo
Private. Proscription Boob.
Befrio c-uiuitiug nor lct r lor Chroii
la tul Haxu.l l)iBcaBt'U. A.lliiiia,
llrolubltl. I'.t.rrh, l'i uimi IM'D, I'lW.
I ImiiIu, V.ilwclt, ll,dr.tli'. KrolM.
iuiii. rjt num. .i,,l Hkln IH.ru.r., I.lv
.r l mill. I. Ii.l. I'ciual. M'r.kiiin., kMiv)
I ... pcniinai ana nervou. lij-
Dlllly ana Kxli&uallnn. lmnnlrm.
L CJT, l.lrrl, Himiurr uu.l all ,11., .....rl
IV. ,1J"1 ""a impruaeui
.liu... nnir, ii,ii Nl,,. ,fnil
htftVltaibX V9 CClltB f,,r th P.,, a.n
wrttoth""'"''" lonol..r wmi. M.1HJ uoa.r ...Uu
ti,ti4 of :5 cuu. nllrM.
THa.rW
Medical Mm
V
Ill
VOL. 7.
a iulliifin-.
THE OHIO CANVASS.
OOVERHOIi ALIEN'S TALK ABOUT
THE
FINANCES.
III
ClA IMH THAT Till. HKMOI ItATN
iiavi: Mil aiiamom:ii
ll.lltl) JIOSKV.
Villi Hoes Id r
HltlllClllNlll.
TlilKtl.
II 111 mill
MUX OK N i:VjlltK. FltlMNDH .imi l'i:t.-
i.o-(.'niKXH Many ii tiiiiu UvUmt tills
liavo J on inn) I t-looil liifu t(i face to ills-
uiio's tin titiiiliu (iiu-tioiis nl I tic nay ;
but at no time havu wo come tojjutlier
tiiiiliT cli i'iiiii taii-i'A f-o iirofotinUly In
trtftlii; to tin; Aiiiorlcaii people uk on
tins ouimsIoii, u'lien forty nilllloiis of peo
ple liihubitliitf one of 'the larifi-t and
mo.st '(.Ttild portions of the k'"')" 'eel
that soinetlilii'' oiiiires-i.'S tlietn ilerply
anil f-erlonsly. livery ovfiiiiiient, what
ever may he'lts foruf mr.l;' Itself re.poii
slblu tor the comlltlon of Its people to a
M;ry Inru extent. Ina I'ree government,
tw-ed upon popular milnie, and tietin
through the ivpre-enlatlve prlneiple.
the action ot the t;overinnenl uiion the
people In their deateil rights becomes
t matter ot the hum serious Iinnortto the
lieotile. Tor niore than lll'teen vrat one
ela-s of men have hail .ibso'litte anil
tinre.-lraini'il eonttol of Hie Federal (iov-
crnment, nml, during :dl that period the
control ol almo-t all ol our State jrovern-
ments'. Whatever there Is of liaimlncs-.
ofpro-jierity, (lepi'iidentupon the action
of the (iovcrnnu'iit ; whatever there Is of
Mill'eriu;: or misery, tleiendent upon
the action ol the .iiverninent, N acrlb
alde to thai jmrty for flood or for lit.
They had it all. The jsrvat Democracy
ofthe Cnloti had no (miction but that ol'
payinjr taxc. Apil.mse. The other
party had all the power, all the taxed,
andall the prollu that neccurily grew
out of them. ,pplau-c.l
Now, II the condition ol the American
ixople Is pro'ierous and happy; If no
man Is dl-coiiteiitcd ; If no man i- dU-at-Mlcd
; If there I no cliipie or rin usurp
in' the public authority or i-ou&uiiiliig
the public taxe" ; if every man who wants
to work Is employed and well paid; If
every factory I- rtiiinin. Mlth its blazing
lltvs, throughout the entire day ; if the
fanners, without beliiff overbunlened bv
taxc.-, are reaping the full rewards of
their hard labor in the long summer sun
shine, and have enough to 'uliil-t and
educate their families ; if every farmer
llnd-s UU far.n without mortgage, liitu-elf
without debt, ready to extend the hand
ot Initernlty to an unfortunate neighbor;
il tills be the condition of atlalrs, then we
ought to thank the Itcpublleans for
bringing this statu ol things about.
Laughter and aiplauc With these
long years of absolute rule the war did
not lint all tht-Mj lll'teen ver : the war Is
not to be men n nu pxum lor lmt uil
M,ned alter peace was rctored ir, wii!n
the war clo-ed, and this party took the
entire inns'! of the Southern " States Into
their own hands, and said, We will gov
ern as we please; we will reconstruct;"'
ll the operator of their reconstruction
had restored the Southern people to their
wonted pro-perity ; if It hit ctabli'hcd
peace without discord, they are entitled
to the approbation of the country. That
the t'ougres ofthe United State- wa-. re-spou-lble
lor the government o! tlieSoutli
and it turbulence and dl-cord is maul-l'e-t
from the fact that the party domi
nant In that body was the only political
power that had any .clllclener there. If
thev could not rule the Southern States
alter the rebellion had licen disarmed,
how lit ate they to rule forty millions of
people throughout the whole continent?
L-W"a""'-i . , , .. .
i ney sjircau a ouueiiu iiiigiu over uie
ntire "South; they promised peace and
prosperity, ami tiiygavetnein tucswnru
and have Ittllllletl their promUe bv pro-
luclti'' anarchy and liauiicri-tn. An-
plau-e. They were loading down the
people of the i'nlted States witli taxes
every nay, ami at inc. very tune tney
were iillliir tin the taxes on the people
of the North, they had so desolated the
Southern State that they had no taxes
to contribute, and all that the southern
States were unable to contribute wa
added to the taxes ot the Northern
State. That is a part ol their doings.
ell. thev were In a situation to set mi
example of economy, ol purity, to the
whole American people.
u ney nan tne power unit tue wemoc-
racy had none. They couiii nave, econo
mised the expenses of this Government
twenty fold more than they did, but they
did notchooio to do it. They went on
increasing the taxes, increasing the ex
penditures, audit largo per cent, of all
ino taxes pain ny mo pcoiuu never
cached the nubile treasurv'r It was con
llscated on lt way. They mildly termed
It defalcation: and the number of these
defaulters would almost rival the innu
merable multitude that St. John saw in
hi vision.
Now, 1 want to dellne what this word
detalcation means. Vim havu not the
least illllicultv If u 111:111, nltliotiixh hungry
or prompted by the cries of nature, w hen
his little child lilts up its hands and says,
"Father, I want some bread," and ho has
none to give It, forces Ids hand into a
bakerV shop and takes a loaf. He U In-
dieted, tried and ntobablv tent to you
penitentiary. It Is all of no avail to him
tlmt ho uleads the importunities of hi
w ife and poor little children for food that
no eouin not give, n a pniiiauou 101 111
olleu-e. He Is hurried oil. ho is railed i
tliiel. a bttrular. A Government ofiicer
appropriate!, to his own use a hundred
thousand dollars. That is not stealiliL'
not at all. There I dignity about that
kiiuLol rasnalltv. hecatlal It is notlilli''
but the people's money that he has
ktolen. He U eal ed a defaulter, not
thief, and the people ate bewildered
when thev hear that a Government olll
eer has defaulted. That is. instead ot
111111111!.' the money into the Treasury he
has put it into hi own pocket.
My friends, a crime doesn't change It
character bv belli'' nicknamed.
Now, there ate some curious lacts thill
arise in tho history of politics, ami wo
have a singular exemplification of the
.1.1 . .1...., w.. 1 II cl.l
niiiii'iiiciii 111 1111 111111:. "i; in... o.n,
by all of tho newspaper in that interest
and the most of them in this State aro
conducted bv postmasters we hear It
said that tho 'Democratic! party at Colum
bus, at Its State Convention, hoisted the
Hug of "rag moncv.'' Did they t What
Is rag money? who made It? Where
did it comu Irot'n V Every cent or it was
mndo by your press-gang at Washington
City, run by the treasury department.
Every dollar of this "rag money," Irotn
the beginning to tlio end, was made by
you, gentlemen, who aro now clamoring
against "rag moner." Laughter. How
eamo It in circulation ? Did the Demo
erat circulate it? Oh, no. A Democratic
omum, Tiwllmtln. 23u.5.1d.S.n.cr. Coiatt W-ws-lftU. ttt ami yTMJactsa Airinut.
CAIRO, ILLINOIS, FRIDAY, JULY 23, 1875.
voice was not heard In the councils ofthe
country when that Immense volume of
paper was lsmed, and when the same
Congress that Issued It wrote upon the
back or It, "This Is a legal tender for all
debto," and you mttt hike It, except In
paying Interest to the bondholders and In
the custom-house. l$y this they made a
discrimination In their own currency:
they Imparted no faculty to It and denied
it another. They paid their debts with
It, and paid the fanners with it when
they bought anything Irom them during
the war; thev paid the soldiers with It;
they paid pension with It; hut they
wont pay the bondholders with It, al
though It was specially provided that one
class of bonds was to be paid In it. by
is this?
The bondholders have a great advant
age In holding this lininene amount of
property, antlat the samu time paying no
taxes and getting their Interest paid In
coin on It. Hut whatever the currency
Is In quality and volume, It is their work,
notour?. If they call the Issues of the
Government "rug money," who-e "rag
money" N It? Didn't '"you make It ?
I.augliter.1 Von made the "rag
money." Not one dollar ol pajtcr money
in the Fulled Stales was manufactured by
Democrats. And yet tliese fellows are
making u clamor a though we had 1m-po-ed
uiion the country all this "nig
money. They aro repudiating their
own bantling. They are trying to bring
their own spawn into contempt, and In
doing that they aru doing a good ileal
more than they think they are doing.
Now, "rag money," as they call It, Is a
proml-e of the I'nlted Mate to pay.
That is all It is. A bond of the Fuited
States 1 a proinlse to pay ; a bond of the
Statu of Ohio or the city of Cincinnati
is a promle to pav; all the railroad
bond of tho Ifepublio aro proinlcs to
pay. They all stand upon the same
foundation of credit, and the man who
undertakes to discredit the notes of his
Government di-ercdlbs the entire amount
of our private and corporatcd Indebted
ness ni well ; the individual notes of a
people who will not pay their public in
debtedness will be worth but little in the
money markets of the world.
Then; are hi the I'nltxd States, includ
ing all the bonded indebtedness of the
Union of Stateii, cities, towns and rail
roads, ubout ten thousand millions of
dollars, and all this vast .sum hangs upon
the pn.-cl-o thread that sustains the green
backs and all the bank circulation of the
country. They are based upon the Idea
of credit, and that eredlt Is alone to be
expressed In the lidelity to the institution
that isiies that note or bond which It
promises to pay. They an;all promissory
note-; they are all interivined with each
othei; they lorin an linincn'e credit sys
tem in the United States and In every
country in the world that is civilized.
You would bo surprised. I presume, it I
were to tell you that the whole trade of
the Iti iti-h Ktupire from Canada to India
a larger commerce than any country
In the world, old or young, ever had be
fore Is transacted upon credit, every
dollar of it. Whenever these people
commence an assault upon the credit of
the country ,call-d greenback. they at the
ame time cijiiiiiii'iic; tin nuiiilt uiion the
mtlre. olume of this properly that con-
Mim "ol.ily tu credit.
'iney tali; arjont the Democratic party
being In favor of repudiation. Let us
fee how that matter is. Who talks of re
pudiation? V by, these very uicn.thein-
ivo-. i ney are 'ending worn iiiroiixu-
out all the stock markets ot hurope that
the great party of the United States,
called the Democratic party, are in favor
of repudiation. Well, now, If they
could get everybody to believe that, what
would their bonus be worm, any 01 menu
w 110 put me idea 01 repudiation in the
nlud ot the world or in the minds ofthe
American people? They did; nobodv
sc. Nobody else ever wanted to repu
diate. If thev choose to repudiate, they
will have to take all the con-eniience.s of
repudiation; we will nothelp them. Thev
are making the biggest stride toward re
pudiation that it Is'pos-Ible for a deluded
jieopic to inane. 1 ney aro predicting 11.
and by predicting it they are Invoking It.
Ctedlt lias a political viririn quality. It
will not do to call Its purity hi iiiicstioii.
When It is once blighted It Is gone and
forever. Tlie-e people who are now
trjlng to bring the entire system of credit
in the United States Into dl-honor and
disrepute arc the men that are undermin
ing the whole system of credit, and Invi
ting repudiation. Appiauc.j 11 tneir
bantling dies, it will be from their own
bad nursing. Tho Democratic party have
no bantling of that sort. The Demo
cratic party have no antipathy to hank or
stock-jobber, or any class of men that
own legitimate property in this country.
The Democratic party have but one ob
ject ; that object common to the whole
loopic. n edon t tiiienii to anow mock
obbers, olllce-holders, Government con
tractors, and nng-jobbliig men ol the
Republican party to take the stock-Job
bing Intcre.-t, and the banking interet,
ami otllcc-holdiug lutetest, and put it in
power, to tlio exclusion ot the farmer,
the laborer, the mechanic, and all other
portions of the community. It is not to
put tins interest down ; it is to prevent
that Interest from putting all other
down, and Usurping tho entire Govern
ment ol the country, inatis wnai we
want.
When a Democrat is asked about what
kind of law he wants, hi answer I
prompt and ready. Ho wants a law for
all. that will protect all, that will dipciie
tliu hles-ings ofa free Government to all ;
he wants a law that will take care ot the
interests of the poor laborer that is as
ceuillng yon ladder villi tho hod upon
Id hnulder; he want. a law that will
protect the lanncr, .small though may be
his acres, and sec that ho has a fair .share
in the Government of his country. Wo
want a law, In a word, that 1 the law ol
all, and not thu law of a specific few
rApolauso.1
Now, what I the eondltiuii of this
country at present'.' These men have had
the entire control of It. They are bound
to admit that fact.
Why. tho condition of It is. that full
half million of workluir people are with
out employment. If some of them are
working ten hours a day in the burning
Influence of a July sun, they get for this
labor Irom seventy-live cents to n dollar
and a quarter per day, barely sufileient to
keep them from sun to sun.
In every region of the United States
the farmers-, by the name of Grangers,
have been driven together to consult for
the general interest of agriculture, be
cause that. Interest has been entirely Ig
nored. What n spectacle It would present if
the curtain should bo lifted, and the real
ity revealed to the eyes ofthe people!
Vi'hv, hero are forty millions ol
people, more than eight millions of vot
ers, engaged in an me avocations ui ine,
about two-third ot them cultivators of
the soil. Now, lift the curtain, and let
us see who occupy tho seats hi Cougars.
That tells the tale.
A majority of tlio whole number are
hankers, bondholders, stock-jobbers, or
persons vitally Interested In making laws
for their own hciiPllt, so that the rich
s
may become tidier, and the poor poorer.
Suppose that the fanners, the laboring
people, the manufacturers, the Jmer
chantx, thoslilptM'rs, and all the great In
dustrial classes of the United States Were
represented In that Congress In propor
tion to the Interest they baye. how many
bankers would bo there? They would
be crowded out. They arc not one per
tent, ofthe voters of this country, and
yet in point of representation In Con
gress they amount to about eighty per
cent., anil the other twenty percent, of
the people amount to very little moru
than disfranchised units, having one
great and precious privilege, that being
the privilege of paying taxes. Now. the
Democratic party Intend to right up this
state of things, if possible. What have
these Republican leaders to oiler to the
people, what do they propose to do?
Nothing but to gut on their knees
and ask pardon, mid then turn around and
whisper, "Can't we get up something
about Catholics? Caun wo get the great
American family by the taw on foinc re
ligious questions? and w hile I hey are
pulling and lighting each other ubout re
ligion, llp h; i"'!' getlpossewfon of the
Government again'1' If we can't do til's,
then we ought to begin to pack laugh
ter. for tli warning given us last year,
when the people, without Intrigue,
silently so silently that on the election
day there was hardly a man to be seen
siKMiking a word about the election
sadly moved up to the ballot-lmx mid by
sending an immense majority to the
Lower House of Congres ami carrying
about twenty-one states in favor of the
Democrat?, .just signed adi-missal to the
Kcpuhllcati law-makers, sajing we have
no further ue for you. Linghter and
applause. That Is what thev did. Is
there any denying It? What pro
duced this tremendous change in
the minds ofthe American ixople? Per
haps a full million of these very men
forming!, part of the gnuat Republican
uriiiv, had contlded for year in their
public men, but they had conllded to
their sorrow. Thev saw the country
drifting to ruin as fast as the Impetus of
a storm could carry It. Tlwy saw, see
now every day, the looses by whisky
ring-, Credit Mobiler rings, 'alary grab
bing rings, District of Columbia rings,
these latter brought about bv the conni
vance of cttstoiu-housc olllcers and
Indian agents. These hnmen-e larcenies
are committed upon the iieople, for every
dollar that they steal from the public
treasury has to be taken out ot your
pockets by the tax-gatherers. Thatjis the
tact about it. The Government can j;et
no money except from taxes, and every
fellow that runs oil' with a dollar ot the
taxes makes It necessary for that dollar
to no put on you next year.
Hut the.e gentlemen who arc making
such a hue and cry about rag money
have no word of deprecation lor the
two thousand national batiks, to which
we pay twenty millions of dollars per
j ear lor ine uicsveu mvor ei lurinsiiiiig
us a currency, aihi wnat Kind 01 a cur
rency do they fttrni-h us? I it not a rat
currency? Is It not made out of the
same material out of which irrecnback
arc construcled.and Is it not redeemable in
greenbacks.' Then why is this species of
k ii.niu.y better than the (rreoiihaek.
t.lll. till. OKUIIII. VU ..
..M.I
win nriiiii. .. . " '
...., .... .-ifiniinii
sum every yearior inepriviiiorimvIiiL'
a currency redeemable in greenback
when we can have the greenbacks them-
neive nuu .ivc over iwentv nil llniw nt
dollar.': If we could hear the clink of
the coin on the counter when wimihsr
a national bank bill to its maker for re
demption, there would be a ditliietlou
with a difference between the two kinds
ol money. But while the national bank
rag is only redeemaitie wan a greenback
rag, and the faith and prosperity of Ihi
great Government Is pledged to redeem
the greenback. It seem? to me that the
greenback Is the preferable, as It certain
ly Is tile cheapest currency. To call tlio
,'reenuacK a worthless and an Irredeema
ble currency Is to iiiiiuiL'ii the honor and
credit of the Government. L'pou the
lace of each note Is printed, "Thu United
.States will pay to bearer dollars." It
docs not say when It will pav it, a- It
does In its interest-bearing bonds, but it
nevertheless solemnly proinUes to pav
the amount.
The matter ofthe payment of either of
the series ot the interest-bearing bonus
rests entirely upon the honor ofthe Gov
ernment, 'there is no power under
heaven to compel the payment of anv ot
our bonds If the Govermcut declines to
do so. Therefore, what riirht have the
Republicans to say that the Government
will pay one class ot its honestly-contracted
Indebtedness and refue to pay
another? The obligations ol this Gov
ernment will all be paid. The nconle
will not allow repudiation in nnv shane.
Their moral sense revolts at the Idea.
Hut, say our Republican friend", you
Democrats have a hard-money record.
How can you be for rag money now? I
can say to them that circumstances
change policies. When we were a
hard-money party, lmrd niouev
was po.lble, and it was bli
the Interest ofthe masses. We have al
wavs been an anti-national-bank party.
In Jackson's time we opposed 11 single
national bank beeau-e it was detrimental
to the Interests of the American people.
Now. that we have two thousand na
tional banks, draining thu life-blood of
the people, why should wo not ralso our
voices against thetnV The old National
Hank of Riddle fattened oil of the pecu
liar privileges granted to It by the Gov
ernment, and our present National banks
are contrivances by which the Govern
ment authorizes a favored class to pluck
the Government goose, except the phi
feathers, which aru left tor the people.
Rut who has a right to say that we are
not a hard-money party to-day V What I
there iu our .recent record to
controvert that Idea? There Is
not a Democrat In the lmul
who will oppose a resumption of specie
payment, when It can bo brought about
without paralyzing Industries ami impov
erishing and distressing the people. Rut
wu do not make such an idol of metallic
coin as to bu willing to breed communis-
tie revolts and till our land with paupers
to force resumption. Wo fully rcallzu
that with ten thousand millions or In
debtedness, public and private, and the
vast volume of business leprc-eiited by
it, that speedy resumption Is absolutely
impossible without bringing Immense
distress and disaster to every class ot our
population except the bondholder and the
money-changer. The Congressional
pledge of resumption In lS'lt hangs like a
null over thu business of the country,
rrudent men have been following the ex
ample of contraction set by the Govern
ment. They havo been draw
ing their nivalin out of uc
tive business. mill scflir lllf It
In real property; they are closing up their 1
manufactories; they refuse to go Into I
new cute, prises, and the result is that 1
the paiila of 187-1, which should only 1
have had n temporary duration, lias set-1
tied down into a season of business pros
(ration, which will continue until the
policy of tliuGovernniciitlschaiigt'd.and .
the active men ot tho country can havo
faith to resume operatlouii without fear
Of being overtaken by ruin through Gov
ernment interference. If resumption is
reached iu 1S7D. a steady contraction and
a depreciation hi value must continue,
and what sane man will Invest his means
In buslness'uiider such circumstances?
Let us reach specie payment as speedily
as possible, but let the laws of business
ind circumstances undf-r which we ate
placed L'overn the matter, and not the
special interest of the banker and bond
holder. '1 he Itcpulillcans ol America are not
responsible as individuals for all the bad
doings of their Kepresetilatlves. If the
honest Republicans had known the state
of the country the year alter the war
they would have turned every dishonest
man of their party out ol Congress, as
they assisted the Democrats to do a year
ago. The Republican leaders r.m about
the country hallooing about the war, the
war, the war : and the people or the
country, who had stood by the Union,
HstiMicd to them. They deceived their
constituents year in and year out until
their irulllbllltv ceased, and now thev
have determined to have an honest ad
ministration 01 tho Government through
111c I'cinocraiie party.
Now, my friends, this Is u very hot
night, cither to speak or to listen, and I
think I ought to be excused for not say
ing all the things which I desired to say.
i may vMt you again during the cam
palgn, and, for Hie pre-cut, will say good
night.
I'AIVr AND OILM.
B.
F. PARKER,
Dealer In
t?aints, Oils, Varnishes,
X3X.T7SXXX1JB.
Wall Paper, Window Glass, Win
dow Shades, &c.
Always on lain), the celebrated lllnniliuitlrie
AURORA OIL.
Brona' Bulldlnc,
Corner Eleventh Street and Washing
ton Avenue
CAIRO CITY BINDERY,
r. o. xj.u juxiSt
PBOPKIETOR.
BINDER AND BLANK BOOK
MANUFACTURER.
Julletin Building, Corner Twelfth Street
and WashiBfften Avenue,
Cairo, Tlllnoli,
tCoiintv and tUllroiwl Work a specialty.
Clough & Warren Organ Co.'s
(Late SIMMONS 8c CLOUGH ORGAN CO.,)
lMI'IlOVKD
CABINET
- AND
01
u
a
u
o
&
GrandCombination Organs
llfTKU HUM TMK
SCRIBNER'S PATENT
a .. I tl.. Imnlmiaiiinft Itmtnrfiiiif IVill lillT
,111 Ijitruiiuu ii.ti am nin ......y......
01 WHICH HIP llUIUMiy
increased, uinl the miiilliv 01 lone renuenn
Ij.iI to H ( Uu hi Pipe Orp of Uu Sane !::,
- ()ur celebrated " Vov C'elei-U-," " V lliiiiinim.," "WIUov I'liteul,'' 1 'Of tiiye Coupler. e
clmriiiliiK Cello" or "Clarionet" Stop, "lieius Horn," "IVnionii," "n Angelrt,'
'Viola Ktlierla" mid
ALL THE LATE IMPROVEMENTS
Dm 1h obtained only In Uicm- Organ.
Fifty Difforont Stylos, ,
For tho Parlor and tbo Church,
Tho Host Material ana Workmanship,
Quality and Volumo of Tono Unequalled.
rnioiisi, aftOO TO afeCSOO.
FacloiT and Warerooms, Cor. 6th and Cugrati Sts., DETROIT, MICHIGAN,
(Established in I860.) Agents Wantod in Evory County.
Address CLOUGH & WARREN ORGAN CO., Detroit, Mich.
JS-M3----UII1.
WEEKLYBUILETIN
ONLY $1.25 A YEAR.
NO. 183.
MRS. Ii. J. SPEARS,
FASHIONABLE klLLIHEE
West alcto Commercial Avonue, between
Eighth and Ninth street,
(Next door to .1 Hunter', dry Rood store.)
A Hill line of the latent and limit fashionable
style nl
HATS AND BONNETS
alwnvfl on hand. Also evry variety of
Ribbons Lacos and Trimmings,
from the chciitst to the moil costly. Ijidles
will llml any and everything In her store for
complete .trcit, Kill or party out fit.
Trices to coniiete with any tu the Wejt.
EJ-Al-o ttfc-ent fur the Home Sewlnit Machine.
4.vi-5.io.tr
HOWIE BROTHERS,
PACKERS,
Wholesale, Retail and
Commission.
W ilOO 2K.' B loo is..
Corner Poplar and Eleventh Street.
iS" Highest Cash Frico paid for
Hogs and Cattlo.
DANIEL LAMPERT,
Fashionable Barber
S'OJiTJI SIDE OF EIGHTH STREE1
Between Washington and Commercial
Avenuea.
JACOB WALTER,
BUTCHER
A.1D
Dealer in Fresh Meats
EIGHTH STREET,
Between Washington and Commercial
Avenues, adjoining uanny s.
KKKl'S for talc the beat Beef, Turk, Mutton
Veal, Lamb, Sausage, Ac. and Is )iro
pared to serve families in an acceptable manner
ORGANS
-
H
o
I
1
o
1
g
O
Hi
o
P
o
NIIW UX INVKN1KU
QUALIFYING TUBES,
nil (lit1
future leputatlon of Heed Instrument-!, by
ur fmuuie mi- i-t u 1 j niiflnj
;'...,,. j l,it,rilf
nmi nine i vt
FOR
"tolUMjeiriM.-
R. W. MILLER
FORWARDING '
AMD
Commission Merchant,
And dealer In
FLOUR, MEAL, GRAIN HAY,
orncx:
Momoi.icvii.
e-8-tf.
CAIRO, ILLINOIS.
O. CLOSE.
0neral
Commission Merchant
AND DBALXH IU
LIME, CEMENT, PLASTER,
HAIR, &c,
Uader City Natloaal Bask.
I WILL Mil In ear-load lota at manufacturers
prices, adding Freight.
JOHN B. PHILLIS
AND SON,
(Buccenors to .John . rhllllt)
FORWARDING
Commission Merchants
And Dealers In
HAY, CORN, OATS, FLOUR,
MXAI, BKAH, etc.
Agtnti for LA7LIH ft BAND POWDER CO
ZOoraer Temth Strsst ud Ohio
Levee.
Z. U. Mathuts.
E.C.
MATHUSS to URL,
FORWARDING
And General
Commission Merchants
Dealer In
FLOUR, GRAIN, HAY AND
PRODUCE,
04 Ohio Xsoxroo.
P. CUHL,
Kxcluilxe
Flour Merchant
Millers' Agent.
So ("Ohio Levee,
CAIRO, ILLINOIS.
7-ic-tr.
E, J, Ayres.
S. D. Ayrea.
AYRES 6c CO.,
And g-encrul
Commission Merchants
No. 78
OHIO LEVEE.
DTA1T. 1'AHKl.H.
n. I CNNlSlillAJI.
PARKER & CUNNINGHAM,
(Successors to Miller ,t Parker,)
FORWARD G
AND
Commission Merchants
And Dealers In
WHEAT, MEAL, GRAIN, HAY,
ETC.
,;i oh'oSvbu. Juio. ILLINOIS.
tWu have leased the I-artfe Yellow Ware
I10111.C, Horace capacity u.uon ions, which (five
uu ample facilltien Ibr.torlng mid thiiilns-.
I.NNl'ItA.M'i:.
C. N. HUGHES,
General
Insurance Agent
OFFICE:
IjBVIIB,
Orar Katbnii UU'a-
N
ONK tut Flntt-Clas Companies rejre
INSURANCE.
ESTABLISHED 1868.
S AFFORD, MORRIS
AND CANDEE,
lieneral
Insurance Agents,
73 OHIO LEVEE,
City National Bank BaildiBg, np-iUiri.
Ths Oldsat Established Agency in South
era Illinois, representing ornr
165 000 000.
OAXXO
BOX and BASKET CO
Dealer in
LUMBER,
All kinds hard and sort.)
FLOORING, SIDING, LATH. o
Mill ud Tart,
Corner Thirty-Fourth Stmt and
Ohio LevM.

xml | txt