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The St. Cloud journal. (St. Cloud, Minn.) 1866-1876, September 13, 1866, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033526/1866-09-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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BDIT0B AMI) PR0PB1KT0R.
OLLAMS jCriAR, liV .lOlUA'CA
tm cop, win twt iretis to the ui
MM ton aabacvibtrs.
I E S O ADVERTISING
lao.
SOfi 1000
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I *,lt•
sti
4A0
1 jrr
l&tw
MM
3000
Si 00
4000
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1X8 4BV «S5 7 SO 12 50 82'W
W00 1040 MOO
000 1100 1400 S3 SO 37 50
1. UfM aMlOovaraoaantaJvarttstmoat, Ti*«nU
sonar* Mr ill. tn lu«rlionfa«d sitfeeat.
I Attorn*}* ordarinK iu lagaJTadvartbciuenta ar.
Ngwdsdu uwunUbl. for the rust of tho HIM. «n
lew tbrre i. a spatial a«rwra,.nt to charg* the aamt
toawotharparty. Mbmrat in .11 CUM tobe mad. In
•Svaaca or upon SaUvary of th* afflOatTii.
3 Local Xutfcaa, 15 cants per Hue to traaalent. nil
•10 aaata p«r IIM to rtnlar, aurrrtlaera.
4. Nottoo of death [tIo.ple annouaceauant] 26 cent*
U»'T*i£rti£
™&,
I AU poUUeal, rallgious or other rants
7. Tearly UTartiaan to pay quarterly.
pay la adfanca, or giro satin-
O I N I N
*£**!*!•*?V**1* «•»«•». Mwated on short no
j^t?^*g»**»»%«•* at»OBI •tfcm Print.
T. C. MoCIaURE
AID U0BIBD DBALBBII
O a
tBS Mi rUaitUMM promptly
»«litorVen-reelienu.
-4J!*_Al»«* for Ike sale ef PA88AQ1
ICKITI to orfromall the prtacipal
•am EMUSH in mat POPJI
Office on Washington BVOBUO, one door
•eoth of tho Central House. v7n44-tf
S I N N E
Aim HCIKBTSO A is
FOREIGN DOMESTIC EXCHANGE,
WarraarU amd AcrlcaUtaral Col-
.. ••nnV
Drafts for sale on England, Iro
an Scotland, and all countries of
Europe.
land aid
Tho highest premium paidforGold, SH
OT and Foreign, Drafts.
-i|4BAt farkheiaalo of' 'tfUi? fe{ *J
to s«d tVent aU the
•wtmelpail Goraaaa, KMajllala a ad
I is a a
Collections made, and proceed* romitted
9n da/ of pa/men.
4»** «V*»» .Xiiww* O^ef,
BT. CLOUD, MINN.
INE MULLIKEN,
ESTATE AGENTS
Oppoeite IT. 8. Land Office,
fK. CiODD, .. MINN.
.Will buy and tall RIAL ESTATB on con*
miaaion. •,[] f\\
Locate Land Warrants and Agricultural
College Scrip.
Pay Taxes, and tranaaet all Bneia*t8 con
nected with such an Agency. rSn44-ly
WM. •. Kcoaa.
CHAS. D, KKBS.
MOORE & KERB,
A O N E S A A W
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
Oftt ea Washington Avenue —formerly
OBAQBATa OHITB.
E w. count:
O I N S
A O N E S A A W
Omeo Bell Co.YBtore,
CLOUD, J|
,V*-V-
MINNESOTA.
E O W S W E E
ATT9MJTMT AJT* CQW2UMU.OM JT LAW
y^r3LKrtwa±a
Baaen Coaatioo. Spaeiat attention giroa
taoooyj heforo the Loaalaad Ooaoral Land
Oflaa ea *. tjanaaia wt, mmWnkm* Mara.
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
".. I.I 1
TAYleO A W I
5
ATTOENBTS COUNSILOSS AI LAW,
J. D. W ElliQCg,, EL. P.,
PHfSICIAM AND 8UBQ10N,
h'.iH QHmvmMMwntVtSttwt.
Oflaea loon from 9 to 12 a. It., and from
S la 6 o'clock r. u.
•T. 0UWD, MIHN
C. O A N
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
OM$t—In Drug Store of Tteknor, Tolman &
C»., ^BroJrsr's Block,
-«*..iij .oaaaHOf^
8T.,..-*CLOUD *8n52 MINN.
AftBlNILER M. D., CM
PHTSICTAN, SUB0E0N A ACCOUCHEUR
:-,'• *r™
.'tVyr-'
,^3A jpirAig*haj^ CVntral Home
4-
rJlTft?tAt -AN
T.
s3m
.1AOB ilf
DR.
•8hll
W N E
SURGEON,
MUM
JI^^P^^BSA^
«,a7 ^»M|Mla«Mpi|AlI ,|
on Waahiagten ar. St. Cloud.
I N
E O N
E N IB T,
fUt visit Salat Cloud fear tuaeo a year.
BOOKS! BOOKS
S A I O N E and
.VARIETI^I
1T.
E "W333S5Ps
Uaa just opened a now store wl
fouud all
v8a!6-ly
wr aino
S«A
O
a a a S a a
N
ro ma.
NtW* SajdT P0I»lUar P^bUWt*iU,
ALSO, THE STANDARD WORKS,
SIATIONERY,\x
ncy Goods, ^foy$.
Andja great variety of new and tjaahionable
Jewelry & Silver-Ware,
I W I
J. EJWIST.
O O
J. M. ROSENBERQER,
MOOKaSLUUt, SBftTlOXMM 0 XXWSDKA&Ul
«hras on hand a aieortment of
a a S a
THE LATEST. PAPERS ft MAGAZINES
THE STIIDARD SCH00LB0OIS,
And eTerything usually. found in. a first
class Bookstore. v6nl8-tf
UNION MILLS
Flour and Feed Store.
THE
Proprietors of the above Mills have
opened a Store in "Gorton's Building,"
on Washington avenue, where a constant
supply of
^TJOTFRJ,
Mraf
&0«,
May be found.
The highest price paid in cash for whea
GORTON & BURBANK.
St. Cloud, May 2Sth, 1864., v6n44.
A I N E A
Wo are monufaeturingVsuperior quality
of
A I N E A
which we will sell at
WHOLESALE OR fiETAlL)
at reasonable prices.
.: J?f HERBERGER.
Manufactory opposite the bridge at Punk's
Brewery, St. Cloud, Minn. v8n87
A E S S E
ARCHITECT AND BUILDER
IStions,
prepared to furnish plans, specifica
and estimates for buildings also
to take contracts, and do all kinds of car
penter and joiner work in the latest and
most approved styks. Price* reoeonable.
•. Shop—Hear the Democrat Office.
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
E N W W E A
CARRIAQEMAKER.
Il
A E removed to my aew shop near
tho Bridge, where I am prepared to do
al kinds of work in the Carriagemaking
line*. Wagons, carriages and sleighs made
in a neat and substantial manner at low
rates Particular attention paid to repair
law. v3-tf
W E O
^MJSBGBAS lAILOK'i
.••'. !wi
STTOULD invite his friends and the pub*
W U« to eal and examine his Style
afOoBtlezsen'st
Furnishin GoodsNew
W
jrarjr.
Partic
ularattention paid to custom work.
S PATJIi A S O E
A
DBALBB
W O S A
BT I E 1
.. Case or Package
OssaoraffSdaad Wabaahaw ata., opnoaRe the Bridge
E N A
I N 8 A N E O A N
This Company iasures paoperty of all
kinds against loss or damage by FIRE, on
favorable terms.
Losses adjusted andpromptly paid.
J. E. WESTr Agent.
v8n24-ly .St. Cldod, Minn.
NEW YORK
ACCIDENTAL INSURANCE 00.
Iasures against accidents of of all kinds.'
$10 pax year secures $10. weekly compen
sation if injured, and $3,000 in event of
death. Other sum* {^proportion.
I, EnWBST, Agent,
a42-8m St. Cloud, Minn.
0
STBOHO/,S I
W 1
Qj\&E*gEP iS^JLiXj,
,.(...: fhM
Bu
TAEALER In Carpets* Oil Cloths, Mat*
Ungs, Curtain Materials and Trim
mTBga, UpholetetiagaadPurnishingOoods,
f-B2»*^«^'vtBr
WOHAN'8 LJTI PRESERVER.
^^^B^j^jMjfoA^seA'fe:
iu to es#u
RAREOHANCEf
iliOXJ
'»j.iil] .:
I 8831
.dud, t'n aAort, everything in thim {lV'*.ot
SW All to be sola at St. Pawl ^Seair^if
"Wo'are pleased to 'WiS9~f6&p.
he N Book and
^jSI
ttm#immw\
a? fej
s0 i.lnr".C»
a)
:9«8
Mmm^mmmA store.
itSscita
3 »*s«u«
S01 *^y~V'I
9 1ARQE AND FINE
i- *»«ortmeD.t of 8portsm«n'» and Hunt
ers' Goods, including owr ......
CH
E B««ETS,i-^^^^P
a: Teoia,aM»owiRi^efe, etf
Uan"at
Fanoy ^Air^»!?*ef\B^ji- CAoace e/jr
Rifle-
Goytjtte's
8 1 1
than those of any other housetti^»a Vital.,
tscc.31 i'ilaial olsdt}« ?Ia« vti 6T*i
r~tff
eil-
STf
7
year a supply o/ Ammu^^m^
OSS $!£il*g
I have jest roeoived tho Sola
this vicinity for the celeb
ft
,i«si*M .HtutibJma »A%.]
tf. W. H4N1D1D.
ICECREAM! ICE
banned Prttits, Jejiiesi" Candies.
Figs, N/RW^'.fKaW^,
Cove Oysters,
'.' Clams,
4
O a it
StJC
N Restauran
and Confectioney.
Washington Avenue, tuaYJ.XJt Witt*Store,
ST. CLOUD, I MINN.
I
HAVE just finished and furnished, on
the second floor of my Rostauraat. a
first-class
Ice Cream Saloon,
Where the lovers of a pood iiak.»f loo
Cream canrbe serred with gpS|oa ar
ticle. -r ." ••,-'• A T':'"-.-:
These rooms are fitted up with view to
the accommodation of both ladies and gen
tlemen and all who eill can rest assured
of eTery attention.
,IGE*-COOL LEMONADE.r
I have also a choice slock of .'•
L0|iteri,
Tobacco, Cigaro, [. ft0t fto.
HO iEALS,
COFSE,
E MSTW
Served 6n short notice, in good style, and
at all hours. ••'-'i- ?:..
JOSEPH GOYETTE.
St. Cloud, May 22, 1866, v8n21-ly
OF ... '.-..,
Minneapolis, Minn.
,ooo.
Fretidtnt, R. J. MENDENHALL,
Treaiurer, B. J. BALDWIN,
Secretary, T. A. MEBPHV,
THE
BANK is now open for business.
Deposits of one dollar and upwards
received, and interest at thejrate of Six per
cent, per annum paid each January and
July.
Bank books in English, German and
French. ',' '.'.:
All communications addressed to tho Sec
rotary will receive immediate attention, and
information furnished respecting the Rules
and Regulations of the Bank.
19" Office in State National Bank, eor-
Bridge and First streeti, Mianeapolis.
ATTENTION, FABMEES!
Forsale—
75 Second-hand Wagons,
50 Ox Yokes,
50 Wagont Covert,
Also, a lot of Ox Chains, CampiagUtoasUs,
Ac, CHEAP for cash or prodaoet at
BURBANK BROS.,
Broker's Block,
a
febl-tf .. St. Cloud. Mian
J. G. A E & OXX,
WHOLESALE GROCERS,.
DBALgaeIB
And Cigars,
a a awtt Oeclar streets,
7nv48-ly ST. PAUL MINN
K. A I N & S O N
IMPOBTBBS AND JOBWtBtf«ji
Oroolcciry, Gloesweiref
LAMPS,
.JIB
*.o
DRy TAMAR AH
CUTLERY, LOOKING
1
51
E E S A E A E S
Can be made in Ten Minuet
t*aaail|» tod TovmaWp rayMt« ter gala.
Ineeirsat JOS. TOTBTTB,
v8a%lr,,„ 8t.Clond,Mla«
Heir long brlcht treaae, one by One, [there.
I tney lanRhed and talked In their cluunber
Alter the revel was done.
Idly they talked of waits and quadrille,.
Idly they laughed, like other «irla,
Who over the fire wheu all In still,
Oonu out taa|r hiaids and earls.
Bobes of satin andBnieaela lace,
Knots of Sowers, and rihboda, too,
Scattered about lu evoay placo,
Ifor the revulU through.
And Maud and Madge iu robes of white.
The prelleet night-gown under the aun
Btookingleaa, sllpperlesa, ait In the night.
for tbo rsvelU done.
Bit and comb their bentIful hair,
Those wondeifol wave* of brown and gold,
Till the fire la out in the chamber there.
And the Uttle bare feet are cold.
Then oat of the gathering winter chill,
And out of tho bitter St. Agnes weather.
While the lirala out, and the honse Is anil,
Stand and Madge together,
Maud and Madge in robes of white,
J^.f^J^* ntabt-gowne »«jder the. sun.
Curtained away from the chilly night.
After the revet is done.
Moat along fa a splendid dream,
To a golden gliUaro'e Unkllug too*
Fhtthtng of Jewels and fluttec of laces,
Tropleal ooun Swatterahan musk,
Metraitd ^BB»«a» with beautiful J^cea
S
And eyesat tropical dusk. •.
Andone~£ueithuUngx)uUihsaatar, A- :.
Onefttcehaunting the dreaaaa of eaeh,
Ap«»a^Tolco awtetOT tlian othern«re,
..J..- Breaking into ailrery apeech.
rooms would not account for—there
are always ill-regulated meteors and
comets in the most heavenly best-So
ciety—but it was sotoedung new for a
yoaag lady to be guilty of actual intox
ication at a party. And of aU thiogs,
that it should be Miss Marshall!, that
"Msett, coldest wonder,"
who never even polkaed, hor wore dt
colkte dresses who was almost as much
wondered, at for high moral courage,
and for seeming to have aome purpose
besides pleasure, as she waa admired
for her beauty. The first feeling, as
the. whisper went round, was one of
profound*astonishment the next, with
those who had envied her, was that of
mirth and triumph. Indeed, those,who
Were the most pained by the sight
could not be insensible to its ludierous
ness. Miss Marshall had left off the
heroic, and was playing high comedy.
All those in her vicinity, who could
hear1 what she said or sec what she did,
were convulsed with laughter. It was
as good «s if Mrs. Kole Oyl had added
theatricals to her entertainment. She
bad taken a hollow pyramid of ansae
roons, decorated with spun sugar which
streamed abroad like golden hair, from
the table, placed itjauntily on her head
anal, crowned with thisfool's-cap,and
with a wine-glass for a scepter, mount
ed a chair, where she
"Flayed su*fantastic tricks before Ugh heaven
As made the aanjels weep."
Of course, nothing 'naughty/ which
would not have been tolerated. She
always had a reputation for wit, and
had aped, rarely, a abaft ef satire, when
the folly or sin which drewaver aim? was
two annoyiog to be allowed to remain
unsaolested. *Now, this gift of satire
suddenly developed into a quiver-ftill
of the most stinging snows, which she
shot at this and that of her 'friends'
with the inost pitiless skill. People's
faults and pe«aJiarities, which their ac-
Seir
.1 liKl-:.^
GLASSES, te.
*m fours Mfbt&mi j*M*
and l»t Third Street,
a ibr Sale.
THEm
undersifnjed oflers for sale a
far of 160 acres, on the Berth end of
Malae Praire, about i\ju'r
FOURTEEN MILES XaHgM: ST. CLO'
^UiyueoT4|a««» tis^^^gAaae
rio and meadow, it to
With a good fonee: thirty aeres belng
caitbraaon.! Oa the premjaeu is a
GOOD GOMFORTAKLE HOU8E,
ihA«§«*iJWr
to. This
_oad,ffdmflt.
'a»^:wSS
JMKO1|
8. DAM
iaintanccs had only discussed behind
backs, were toe subjects of hor
ridicule. She even descended to mim
icry, soperfect and so droll, that, while
the victims were enraged, all the rest
of the throng could not help being vast
ly amused. Some minds were divided
between a wish to steal away, lest their
own failings should be the 'next under
consideration, and a wish to remain and
enjoy the discomfiture of their neigh-
Miss Wilkea, a rich old maid, whvjse
utterance was slightly affected by a new
set of artificial teeth, retired, in high
dudgeon, to her dressing-room. Mrs.
Squashingtonj who talked had gram
mar, and wo/s red velvet, was mortally
Offended. Mr. Diddler went to take a
sly look in a mirror to see if he really
lad such 'a fascinsting smirk The
personalities were ot the biost Unforgiv
able character, hut uttered with such
inimitoble spirit, as if in* the very rdek
less of fun, and with snoh girlish arch
ness, that the laughter Continued ana
jbated. One might have persuaded him
iseif thai it was only mirth gone ^mad
only a wild sieeas of youthful leyity
were itnoj for an oocasiosal thmkness
of utterance,. or inppngruous silliness,
with now and then ibat Stupid droop of
the eye betokening intoxication
Yes, Miss Marshall was deeply under
the influence of wise! •..
*TS betave in such a manner, and
in my house," said' Mrs. Kolo 0 1
Eor
ahiie* cf neardsd Woon»r
orerr-*
the
lengUttorn's strain,
•]•!«-L X^ eriJhatao«o*aarao3a.tae»e^Vt*lk^,
.. Us asimeth one for a bride.
aim
i&A%W«r1mtf«*Totiil
m*mim
fc
for th. tomb, fi
brvwn kaw anftveUsa a
IhereTibeonlyoneof you left lor the bloom
Only onefcrthe bridal pearls,
The robe of aatUn and Brussels laee—
Only onetoblush through her carls
At the eight of a lovar'e Ihoe.
Oh 1 beautiful Madge, in your bridal white I
For yon the revel baaJust begun
Bat for her who aleena In your arms to-night.
ef Is r—
The revel of]life donel'
Bat robed and crowned with your saintly bliss,
Queen of heaven and bride of tho son.
Oh 1 beanUfal Maud, you'll never mlis
The Usees another hath won 1
—Abnt Perry.
UNDEH A SHADOW
.: OB
HOW DARK EYES DIDST WIN.
Mrs. Kote OylV party had progress
ed onward to its culminating point,
Which* was sapper. When the splen
dor of this was somewhat on the wane,
fl carious circumstance occurred, caus
ing a novel Bensutioa amid the brilliant
atoms forming the luminous ring about
the main center of attraction, the table.
It was whispered about that Miss Mar
shall had taken too much wine—that
she was in fact, tipsy. If any one of
the twenty young gentleman standing
about with champagne-glasses in their
hands, had been observed in a state of
iseini-intoxication, it would have excit
ed little attention. People in Mrs.gazing
Kole Oyl's set were accustomed to ex
cuse the frailties of the ^career sex if
it would only furnish the requisite
amount of whisker and silk waistcoat,
and partners for the Lancers, a little
softening of the brain and a little in
discretion in tho use of stimulants could
be very graciously overlooked. It was
not a thing entirely unknown for the
cheeks and eyes, if not the manners,
Hx. Thoiatoni it
*»|^iirt:aieri:'-i'v- ':,
t: ••. r' •:.,.... ?."
!. I -. c^ ::-•:.
m*&
arlors something of a'triumph In
heart Mrs. KoleOyi did not care
who was tempted info excess by the pro
fusion of her table that part of her en
tertainments she made )t a feature to
havo seductive, in lieu of her power of
excelling in any loftier sphere but she
did not wish to have Mr. Thornton's
good taste offended.
That gentleman remained pale and
quiet, gazing at the strange exhibition.
He'Wa* as proud is Lucifer, and his
pride had been the first means in fisting
bis anecHons uponT Miss Marshall. She
was so beautiful, and yet so reserved,
highly accomplished ycfe averse to dis
play, so dignified1 for so young a girl,
that hia first admiration led to rever.
eUee, and then to love. A young lady
who never allowed men to put their
arms around her waiSt in the 1 waltz, aud
who* darea^in^tfie isce ^ffhshlon^o,
vail the exquisite bounty of jher shqul
Iders and arms—retieent of.he ^tAy'
charms, yet peerlessly graofcful and self
possessed—was the maidee of all whom
it would suit him to woo for his wife.
He had wooed her, aria won her prom
ise, not a 'fortnight since. The head
which never had stooped to any other
shoulder, had stooped to his the hand
which had never lingered in any other's
had lingeied in his. His love, had ex
ulted, gloried in the thought of the
goodness and sacredness of its object.
Now he beheld her, degraded past
forgetting, making herself•conspicuous
in a most unwomanly manner, guilty
of a frightful wegkness, the center of a
surprised and laughing assemblage. He
groaned, like a person trying to throw
off a nightmare: No one heard him
fortunately—the attention being direct
ed in another direction- He looked
about to see why the friends of Miss
Marshall did not take her away, and
prevent her condition from being so
publicly proclaimed. Then he remem
bered that she had .told him', earlier in
the evening, that her mother was pre
vented, by a severe headache, From act
ing, as their chapcrone, but that her
cousin Annie and herself had come to
gether in the carriage, and the coach
man was to call for them at one o'clock.
He saw Annie, standing, like himself,,
a Uttle apart from the crowded circle,
at her cousin with a sort of fas
cinated, intensely rivetdd stare, as if
too much astonished to more or speak.
Her eyes never left their fixed, singu
lar gaze, upon the face of
the girl, who now provoked a fresh
burst of merriment, by taking off the
pyramid of macaroons, shaking it, and
setting it back saucily on her head, af
ter the manner of clowns at the circus:
then drawing her face down' to thc.in-
tpnaoat orrnfitv. asking if she did not
resemoie ait.rTnorimnn—
God!! if that had been
"My God if that Ua
a been my
wife!" He caught his breath, as if
cold water had been dashed over him.
Then and there, in his heart, he dis
owned any further acquaintance with
Miss Marshall. That beautiful face
would have 'tempted some men to for
give almost any fault, but he could not
forgive. Making his way to Miss Kirk
land, he spoke rather sternly:
"Why do you not get your cousin
out of the room, Annie Persuade her
to go upstairs, if possible."
"Oh, Mr. Thornton," replied she,
turning toward him that dark, peculiar
face, which ho had.never liked, "I was
so overcome I.didn't know what to say
or do. What teill her mother"say when
she hears of it? She never liked to
trust her out alone! but to night she
was bent upon coming (because you
were to be here, I suppose,) and this is
tho consequence 1"—with an air of great
distress.
"You do not meantosay that Helen
is in the habit'-"
"No oh no! I did not intend—I
would not, for the world, be the first to
awaken your—oh, dear! what am I say
ing? Yes, Mr. Thornton, I will coax
her up to the dressing room."
At that moment Miss Marshall put
her hand to her forehead with a bewil
dered air the spectators thought it part
of the performance, bat she stepped
down from the pedestal, lemoved her
crown ot sweets,, and pressed forward to
Iter cousin's side.
"Annie, what have I been doing?"
"Amusingyour friends, Helen, shall
we go up-stairs I
She answered with a laugh BO silly
that Thornton turned away from the
vacant, foolish countenance, with dis
gnat too deep tor words.
Annie took her by the arm and hur
ried her uj» /to the dressing room, where
she sunk into a stupid slumber upon
the bed, from which she was with diffi
culty aroused when the earriage was an
nounced: The hostess liorsel? came up
and helped her on with cloak and hood,
summoned Mr. Kole Oyl to conduct
the ladies to their carriage, and did what
she could to conceal the lamentable
state of the young lady. But gossip
had. scon enough, and too much Miss
Marshall was the favorite topic the rest
of that night, and for the next 'nine
days.' The name whi«b had been Spo
ken only with admiration and respect,
was.mentioned in that blasting whisper
which witherd whatever feminine refu
tation it breathes upon. Mr. Thornton
was obliged to hear a great deal more
than he wished. Any allusion to the
subject in his presence made him writhe
with hidden pain, until he ceased to go
out, confining himself to his business
or his boarding-house.
»3-««J
ST. CLOUD, MINNESOTA, S A Y, SEPTEMBER H.
of a window and gazing fircjily bt theand
remarkable display which had disturbed
the smooth sweep of the current of com
monplace. His reply was satisfactory
and his. hostess did not observe the- pal
lor of his face. She had *no idea, that
the young gentleman to whom she had
expressed herself, was enhaged to
theed
young' lady who was 'thus disgracing
herself and friends. Of all her guests
there had been none whom the hostess
was more anxious to Beciire than Mr.
Thornton he was rather unattainable,
and enough distinguished by fortune
and family to make his presence in her
A fortnight passed, and he had not
{ercalled
et upon Miss Marshall to give
a formal frelease 'from their engage
ment.- He could not he was tortured
by lore mots than, pride). When he
triedjto call up contempt to wrestle with
affection, he could only picture her as
on the evening of their betrothal, giv
ing herself to him regally, with infinite
love and sweetness, yet with the reserve
of the purest maidenly dignity. From
that |ater vision of the vine-crowned
revels he turned *way with shudderings
One morning he received a note direct
ed in the hand ho knew so well it wis
a brief request from his affianced that
he would call on her that afternoon at
four tfclock. He determined to
make this the opportunity for sev
ering the tie between them.
At four o'clock he was ushered into
Mrs. Marshall's parlor. Helen was
alone. She rose to her *iect when she
heard him enter, and came toward him.
Her face was pale, and her eyes show
that she had been weeping.
"You, too, ErnC8t,:heUcve it !w
Tho sad reproach of her voice made
his own tremble. At that moment, as
he looked at her, she seemed his^own
Helen again—the incomparably 'best
nod most noble woman he ever hadjbe
held. His glance fell before her mourn
ful, searching gaze felt as if he
were the guilty party instea'd of she.,
"If you refer to that unhmpy even
ing at- Mrs. Kole Oyl's party, Helen,
how can I doubt the evident^ of my
senses?"
"By trusting the evidence ol* your
soul, Ernest. You have said that in
soul and spirit wc were one. Were th«
Words idle? The^'miist have been—
false and idle—or you would net have
turned from me St the first appearance
of a fault. Do you know, for arfthis
long, wretched fortpight, I neverdream*
ed what kept you from me? l9taovWr
guessed the Story which my friends
were delighting over. I saw that sopfe
thing- waa wrong^..-Jzquestioned my
mother, Annie,others but I found no
cue cruel and-kind enough to tell me,
ttntiLMiss-Wijkjes.calie4ihjFe yjetarday
,_ two young ladies awaited, is the well
never a-vers^to :hun»ng people'sj li^hied rvom, hack of ten long parlor.
W®^i®ms*^^ -sx^eiBdTfdmpanyl
_. to'ask'her-to ob|igeme.by
tellmg inc what actually^ctttced wioug
at Mrs. Kole Oyl's, and she laughed
maliciously, and inquired if I really did
not know that the story went that I was
drunk^ there—that I made a terribly
silly spectacle of myself. TelL me, Er
nest, is itso?"
"Youcertainly behaved very strange
ly, Helen—in a manner entirely con
trary to your usual charaoter."
"Yes, she told me—-that I stood up
on a chair and made speeches—that I
ridiculed every one, herself among the
rest.: Well, Ernest, you too, believed
me intoxicated!" No words could de
scribe the pathos of reproach with
which she uttered the last sentence.—
"I tell you, truly, that I did not touch
wine, n.or any beverage except a cup of
coffee, on that evening. Ay! since my
friends are so easily persuaded of my
evil propensities, I will swear it on this
book of God, that I touched no wine
that night!" She reached out
hertended
hand, aud laid it on the Bible which
occupied a little table by her side.—
"What was the matter with me, or what
did occur, I do not remember. I have
tried hard to recall it, but it slips from
mc before I can seize it. I must have
been ill. I was not well the day of the
party. I had a severe headache, in
common with mother, but Annie cured
it by magnetism, and I felt bright
enough when we started. She tried to
eure mother's, but she has not the same
power over her as over me, which tru
ly is wonderful."
"Did you take any medicine
"Not a drop of anything. No Ernest
I cannot even conceive what was wrong
with me. That I must have acted
strangely I can no longer doubt, since
you all assure me of it. The most cru
el thing of all to me is that you, too,
A I a W si
I was under that fatal evening. Er
nest, do you think there "can be any—
any insanity developing itself in me
If you think so, speak it out, I beseech
you!"
She was paler than ever, and the
tears were sti earning down her cheeks.
His heart yearned toward her as sheupon
stood there before him, distressed and
implonng. The tears rushed into his
own eyes.
"Because, if you do, I would like to
tell mother. It would be best. Per
haps something could be done for me.
Do you remember, Ernest, it was only
a few weeks ago that Miss Sinclair be
came insane She was so young, so
amiable—and her own friends did notyour
suspect it. She is raving in the asy
lum now."
Unable longer to control himself, he
took her in bis arms, pressing, her ten
derly, again and again, to his bosom,
kissing the fair white forehead which
should oircle only a noble brain.
"What put such a dreadful fancy in
your head, my darling No, no, I beg
of jou, do not mention anything so ap
palling. I Your words and actions were
quite too consecutive and sensible your
madness had too much method in it.headache?
No, no! your burlesque and mimicry
were not at all those of a diseased brain
far from it! They were characterized
rather by a sharpness quite acute, but
not precisely of your natural order. I
do not believe, come to reflect upon it,
that even were your wit exalted and ex
cited by wine, it would be of that style.
1 think I read, the impress of another
mind—a mind we are both of us well
acquainted with. Sit down, Helen, you
are pale and worn —here, by me, on
the sofa. You will sit by me, will you
not, if I have been oruel to you for the.
last two weeks
The light of happiness which had
been quenched in her eyes, was relit*
She sat by him, quiet and contented,
while he, holding her hand tight as if
to keep her with him, relapsed into a
brown study. He had chanced upon a
train of suspicion which he was follow
ing up carefully in thought. While
they sat thus in silence, Cousin Annie
came, unawares into the robm. She
started upon perceiving Mr. Thornton
their eyes met he held her. glance
with his own for a full moment then
her black lashes drooped, and a slow
blush, which she tried in vain to keep
down, crept up into her thin dark face.
She laughed, however, saying, with a
slight sneer:
"I did not know you lovers were
here, or I would not have intruded."
"You know, Annie, that yon never
intrude upon Us 'lovers,'" said Helen,
affectionately but the young lady re
fused to be seated, and went out of the
room humming a gay air
"I am sorry Annie has such a dispo
sition," remarked Helen, after she was
gone. "She in too sensitive. We try
all-we can to make her feel at home. I
love her as a sister, and wish her to feel
as if she really were such, with, equal
rights and privileges. But, she insists
upon calling herself dependant, and in
making herself unhappy about it. rl
wish she were not so sensitive.?'
"You are mistaken about its being
sensitiveness, Helen—at least of a no
ble kind. It is envy. She has a rank
ling, jealous disposition/'
«'Oh, Ernest, ho* can you speak so
I know she is not very affectionate—at
ahe docs not lovo mc as I do her:
go,least,
I would like to call witbVa
evening,
friend.
He kissed the inquiring look from
her face and went away& a...enough
That evening Mfs Marshall and the
Helflft-hndvchosts othJirilEaaavj, as being
retired from ohanco oaliers, ias she in
ferred from hor lover's manner, that
something connected with the recent
unpleasant affair might be brought on
Those keen black eyes betrayed
nothing ot their inward disappointment
however, when the servant admitted
Mr. Thornton and Mrs. Kole Oyl.—
Mrs. Marshal and her daughter were
surprised for although they at-
Mrs. Kole Oyl's grand par-
ties, and she theirs, yet there never
had been any of that intimacy which
warrants a social evening visit. That
lady laid aside her hood and cloak, took
the comfortable chair offered her before
the glowing grate, and the circle were
soon in animated conversation. Only.
Annie Kirkland experienced an unac
countable, uneasy sensation. She was
more audaciously gay and glittering
than usual, seeming in the highest
spirits, flinging all' kinds of sparkling
sallies at Mr. Thornton, who sat oppo
site her, and who gave her all, and more
attention than she coveted. It was the
consciousness of his eyes continually
upon her,'Which made her so restless
this restlessness she endeavored to coa
eeal by brilliancy.
For once, the) subtle, mastering spir
it had met its master. Strive as she
SobgldYou
rwmnM'mmmmmll 1
^iifiiBT^H»^^H ^^i^HHHsiKj^*v}^b.%Kl«^H
but you muat remember how much she Urol of her causing her face to resume
has Had to make her|bitter anfl susnic-{Us silly expression and %hen you got
lous. It must be hard, to be poor, as
she was, before mother adopted her—"
"And homely. If she was as beau
tiful as you, my Heleu, she would bo
less bitter, I assure you I read her
plainly."
"She has always said that-that you
did not like her, and I am so sorry
about*it. I would wish you to be good
friends. I think she admired you very
much indeed Ernest, if you'll never
breathe k, I'll just whisper that I be
lieve you could have gained her love if
you had solicited it. Now, she is cold
to you, because she fears you do not
like her."
"I have always treated her with the
most courteous, friendliness, for your
sake, Helen. She is a girl of talent I
admire her talent more than I do her
disposition. But I must go now. Stay
»U dinner 'Thank you, not to-day I
am coming again this .evening. Be
bright.and chterfuL my darling, and I
will, promise, to blow'away this cloud
which has darkened you—blow it away
with* breath. If you,'- your-mother,
and Annie, will all bo at home this
Host.
lencc oppressed and anxious. The rest
of the circle were all unconscious of the
influence at work but to one who
could have read the inner consciousness
of those present, it would have seemed
like the hawk floating high and silent
in the heavens, ready to swoop down
the serpent, in its turn busy
charming the innocent dove.
Mr. Thornton, always a good talker,
touched lightly on many themes, until
at length the company found themselves
interested in some suggestions he made
about spiritualism—and from that to
mesmerism.
"By the way, Miss Marshall, did you
not tell me that your cousin dispelled
headache, not long ago, by mes
merism
"Yes. She can nearly always cure
it."
"Has she strong mesmeric powers
"I think she has. What do you
think, Annie You obtained an influ
ence over me very readily, though I
believe mother has proved more stub
born. Your success with her has been
only partial."
"Hid Miss Annie ever attempt any
thing further with you than to dispel
-Did she over obtain any
power over your will T*
Helen blushed and hesitated.
"Not untilquite recently. She wish
ed to experiment upon me, and I allow
ed her to put me to sleep sev
eral times. With a few passes she
could put mo to sleep, and I would
awaken At the time she willed. We
never experimented much, as I do not
spprove of it. Not longsince—I think
it was the day before your party, Mrs.
Kole Oyl—she stopped me as I was
walking across the floor. She was be
hind me, at the other side ot the room.
I could net tell what was holding mc,
until she laughed and willed me to go
on. I did not like any doc, even An
nie, to hold such power over me asthat,
so I begged her to exercise it no more."
"No," said Mr. Thornton, solemn!),
"free will is God's great gift—it is as
sinful as it is dangerous for us to
yield up this nobleBt of our privilege".
Who would be the slave—the mental,
worse than the bodily slave—ot anoth
er But you told me, did you not,every
Miss Helen, that your cousin cured
your headache the afternoon of our
friend's party
"Yes, and that was the last time. I
wished to go so much that I begged
her to charm my head into better beh
vior."
"Well, Miss Kirkland," said Mi
Thornton, rising to his feet and lookih^
her steadily in the eyes,1 "I know not
what evil purpose you had ih bringing
such unpleasant notoriety upon your
friend and cousin bur this I .know,
and now assert before these witnesses—
that it was your will, controlling that of
Helen's, which caused her singular
conduct at Mrs Kole Oyl's. I watch*
*d you upon that occasion. I saw the
steady, concentrated look you kept up
on her. It would have been natural
that you should havo been distressed
and. nervous—that you would have
gone to her and taken her down from
the chair. Instead of that you remain
ed motionless, directing her words sod
actions. The moment I spoke to you—
forced pu by my earnestness, to at
tend to m«—the Spelt:was broken
your victim left off her play, came to
ou an asked jou what she bad bean
partly regained your oon-
qi'alaaf "1,"-i^-
Annie-Kirkland hursfr into tears of
mortification and thwarted revenge. "It
is probable that Mr. Thornton under
stood her motives better than any other
person, as he was not only unusually
the carpet. What it could be—what quick in his reading of character, but
revelation could be made, or explana
lions given—what 'breath could blow
away' the memory of her remarkablo
state and behavior, she puzzled herself
in conjecturing. As for Annie, think
ing that Mr. Thornton's friend might
be some One of the other sex worth
pleasing, she had dressed herself care
fully, smoothing the heavy braids of
her black hair, and relieving the sal
lowness of her complexion with warm
tints, until she looked almost handsome.
had perceived that the preference she
had once plainly shown for him had
changed to dislike upon the avowal of
loreforher cousin.
Annie retired to her room, without
an attempt to deny the charge and af
ter a pleasant hour of conversation, Mr.
Thornton escorted Mrs. Kole Oyl home
satisfied that her gratification at being
the first to publicly announce the en
gagement would be sufficient induce
ment for her to labor to restore things
to their usual order.
And he was not in error. Mrs.'Kole
Oyl waa only too eager to report the en
gagement, and after a few days, the
pretty Miss Marshall's shadow passed
away forever.
THE LOYAL SOUTHERN UNIONISTS
AT PHILADELPHIA.
Their Address to the Whole Country.
I S SCATHING IMMCTMEXT
A N E W JOHNSON.
Their cry, "Help u* or Perlali."
Thoughts that Breathe and Words
That Burn.
A Soul-Stirring Appeal from Treachery
1*» Powe to the Loyal People.
THE LOYAL PHILADELPHIA COX
VKIHTIOB.
The Appeal or the Loyal He no the
Sowth to their Fello Citizens ©rthe
United States.
The Representatives of American citizens
appeal for protection and justice to their
friends and brothers in the States which
have been spared the cruelties ot the re
bellion and the direct horrors of civil war.
Here on the spot where freedom WHS prof
fered and pledged by the fathers of the
Republic, we implore your help against a
reorganiied oppression, whose sole object
is to remit the control of our destinies to
the contrivers of the rebellion after they
have been vanquished in honorable battle,
thus at once to punish us for our devotion
to our country, and to entrench them
selves in the official fortifications of the
Government. Others have related the
thrilling story of our wrongs, from reading
and observation. We come before you as
unchallenged witnesses, and speak from
personal knowledge, our sad experiences.
If you fail us, wo are more utterly desert
ed and betrayed than if the contest had
been decided against us, for in that case,
even victorious slavery would have found
profit in the speedy pardon os those who
had been among its bravest foes. Unex
pected perfidy in the highest place of the
Government, accidentally filled by one wbo
adds cruelty to ingratitude, and forgives
the guilty as ho proscribes the innocent,
has stimulated the almost extinguished re
venge of the beaten conspirators and now
the rebels who offered to yield everything
to save their own lives, are seeking to con
sign us to bloody graves. Where we ex
pected a benefactor we find a persecutor.
Having lost our champion wo return to
you who can invoke presidents and punish
traitors. Our last hope under God is the
unity and firmness of the States that elect
ed Abraham Lincoln and defeated Jeffer
son Davis. The best statement of our ease
is the appalling yet unconscious confession
of Andrew Johnson, who, in savage hatred
of hia OWB record proclaims his purpose to
clothe four millions of traitors with the
power to impoverish and degrade eight mill
lions of loyal men.
Our wrongs bear alike on all races and
our tyrants, unchecked by you, will award
the slime fate to white and black. We canby
remain as we are only as inferiors and vie
Vhoulid fea.r. to tru^A. ou.r fate_ with- those
who, after denouncing and defeating trea
son, refused to right those who have brave
ly assisted them in the good work. Till we
are wholly rescued, there is neither peace
for you nor prosperity for us.
Wc cannot better define at once our
wrongs and our wants than by declaring
that aiuce Andrew Johnson affiliated with
his early slanderers and our constant ene
mies, his hand has.been laid heavily upon
earnest loyalist in the Soutb. Histo
ry, the just judgment of the 'present, and
tho certain confirmation of the future, in
vile and command us to declare (hat after
-Ejecting his own remedies for resolving
O Union he has resorted to' the weapons
of traitors to bruise and put down patriots
that after declaring that ncbe but tae loy
al should govern the reconstructed south
he has practiced upon ths maxim that none
but traitors shall rule that while in the
North he has removed conscientious men
from office, and-filled many of the vacan
cies with the aympathizcrs of treason in
tho South ho has*removed the proved and
trusted patriot, and selected the equally
proved and convicted traitor 'and after
bravemen, who had fought for the old flag,
have been nominated for positions, their
names havo been recalled, and avowed reb
els substituted that every original Union
ist ia tbo.South who stands fast Andrew.
Johnson's covenants from 1861 to 1S66,
has been ostracised that he has corrupted
ths local courts by offeting premiums for
tho defiance of the laws of Congress, and
by openly discouraging the observance of
the oath against treason that while refu
sing to punish eni. single conspirator,
though thousands had earned the -penalty
ef death, more than a thousand of devoted
Union citiiens have been murdered in cold
blood sines tae surrender of General tee,
and in no case have their assassius been
brought tojudgment that ho has pardon
ed some of the worst rebel criminals North
and South, inoluding tome who had taken
httmaalife, aader circumstances of unpar
sllalsd atroeity that while denouncing and
faUchood,"
.:
^.::::^r
them.. She has suffered much through,
the micbief-loving—or shall I say ma-"
licious ?—experiments of one who ought
to have been the last to cause her any
pain—and I jieed not ask, Mis. Kole
Oyl, that you will do what comes in,
your way in righting this wrpog.witb
your friends. If yon are merciful
to represent it merely as
thedeniejd130th
fua-lonng freak of a thoughtless girl, I
Wvi^niugtojetii^passforti^ Mrs.
^rshalj must inflict her own puDish
ment^" W I I
oal*-^?»tt"ka
her into the dressing room, you plung
ed her into a mesmeric sleep which you
were kind enough to, allow to pass for
the stupor of intoxication.
"Mra. Kole Oyl, haying a deep in
terest in this young lady who has prom
ised* soon to become my wife, I have
traced this matter up, and this is what
1 have made of it. You have only to
look in the face of Miss Kirkland to be
assured of her guilt. Whatever power
she has over others, she has not poller
to repress the blush of shame. Nature
there, is stronger than her will. You"ed
will not need tho assurance of Miss
Marshall, when you recall her manners
and character, that, upon that unfortu
nate evening, she did not touch wine
at all. It was not until yesterday that
she understood the nature of the char
ges' being made against her.- He*w
motnetfdld not understand them, and -ibioody a W I the
Miss Annie did not chose to explairr. -"»"•s at^iAmmauS^i^,
OF
tims. We may fly from our homes, but we ter against loyalty-, ignores* and denounces
A A a a .*» A. 1 1 1
N 1
RfeHEP'5
PreedtneWB
edge of the
the black msa
has concealed
... white* Mian blacks haio
cfed and: fed bjr that noble 0"
aBd4*a£fwlat«Vdeclaring that it
waa^orruptly managedBWf-expcngive to
the €rtn%iea)*at, hVllaSrJtonnived at a sys
tem of ftrefligacylii the uee- of the public
Batrooale and public money, wholly wL'h
oot parajkl, save wlisn the traitors bauk
rupiW i^p,reasury,.and Kttught, to di*or
ganizeaEjdscatter the army aiid the navf
lt the mor^ ca*i to ciptiae
tie Goverwueat Q«ait"'wSle declaring
against- t*V iajuutioe *f-eeaving e!&r«t
Stat«:iudcp'ri6jnjc«) jbo hae* f'j«ed to atr
iuonze the liberal pka sti Codfer-^* simply
becaaseit reeoAuea.tB*1 loyal m^joi-ity,
and refase&teYer^cttritfe "^lie trailer au
nority thatiueivery «it»te.1. ath of Mir
Liixob'B line his ffilvij As wa&ughV
son^nd
'hajfcoac deplorable eo3fiifl-i«i:«s, sfteTai,
oprBi a"'d
BO
ti
iaorw an political, "it h* ecibo!iet
returned rebels to thr*Aten ei-il war in
Maryland, Missoitrf, 1'oaf Virginia «,a«':
Tennessee, unless the patriots vLo saved
and sealed these Staies.to.the old Hag sur
rendered before' thelr'-'aivegt.it ituiaad.
It has'corfupled high 8trie oliic'.ala, elected
by. Union men and swor I to enforce the
laws against returned ib:]., a&d madi
Iheas the urera*«n»truai»f of authors of
the rebellion. If bus iK^oviraged a new
alienation between tty» secrlow, and by ia
aeding eraigmtioa to the South, has erect
a formidable barrier' aglftnst free nd
friendly ii^0oursc»'th'e1aryiacd V.'e^t.
It Las aliowed the rebel soldiefy to pcree
cote tbe teachers of-'the. Co'oied schools,
an* to burn ike"':cL.urcb.§E fn winch ths
Freedmen have worshiped.theXiricg God.
rThat a gyetenf ?o 'barbarous should huve
culminated in"the ^i^htful'lrwt of Mem
phis, and tbo etui more appalling ma»a
Je Of Kew OrFeafts, Wai as natural as rbat
ttach
ing»oLJogratC Calhoun and ".Jefferson 1»
via. Aa^tf#jyo^aWn jB r'cs'pjaisii le for all
thea«"4'nope5kaTjrc IWWtBpftd as he ^ro
Tok'ed.jwhft^Jsrhre^-fiB^^pplRuda them,
sending his agents and-eniisiaries into the
r#fitU»L apt patriotic ,Tn\atTpptna to insist
upon niafcing \m rt&ltta&tiry a test op
en- a-cbrjstian-^e^pnle.., lie forgot that ths
protection'extendedi to'tho lath of August
Convention in I'hihMhjhohiA wai rot only
to-tliij freep'copl^.of New Orleans
off fire day 'ofrtolyywnenPthey assera
bfatl to dtacu*"hoag»«8t -M* *TOU--" them
PI to UtseV4.noKcOa^nttV*§/':,::-.•.
£sJveS, UiiOfi»iedraMidsi. thejlaughte
hundTeu^rffAoTerJ Mi^aS
1
'•"•:--1 ..•.--....•-
nr
,A "?".«•«.-«
T^ra^d»xf/»l«iBBjtnjsjt.- Bissueu in tiie
Con8titutionrhy.H| gSjGryJptirrei
grown litei a7%oBBtro'oBapJger, uhrse
cognirloiIftn"us wrung Irom
ave
re-
.. the reluctant
framers flFthJr?-§reat instrument, .lj]«d
these States to entrench thcaseive? bfhind
the perverted docWme-CafAate rights, and
sheltered by a claim otConsiiiulicnal cbli
gation to maintain shivery In -the States)#to
present to tha American, gcrernui^ct i'hs
alternatives of oligarchy''with' slavery, or
Democratic Republican govorfamer is with
out slavery. A forbearing govertaecr,
bowing to a supposed Goastitutional behest,
acquiesced in. the former alternative. The
hand of the government was stayed fcr
eighty years. The principal^!" Conntitu
tio&al liberty languished for want of gov
ernment support: Oligsrcto matured its
power with subtle design. If a history for
eighty yearsisTsplelewifbunparalleled iu-'
jurie and .usutpatkn. Ii 4aVelo.ed on1y the
agricultural localities geographicaiy iistiLet
from the free laborJlocaUties, anei lefa tjtin
one-third of the whole, with African slaves.
It held four million.-, of human beings at
chattels, yet made them the bat is of unjust
power for themselves in the Federal ia
State Governments. To maintain their en
slavement it excluded millions of free white
laborers.from the agricultural lands of Lhe
world, forced them- to remain inactive and
unproductive on the mineral, manufactur
ing and lumbering loeaLtk-3: comprising
two-thirds of the whole couth in tquare
miles and real undeveloped wealth, simply
because the localities were agriculturally
too poor for slave" labor," and condemned
them to agricultural pursuits .Wi this una^-
ricultural territory c.nd consigned tLem to
unwilling ignoranca and poverty. Fy de
nying capital, and smothering enterprise,
it repelled trie capital,' •ilT'Jthi energy of
the free States from tiieiree Ltbor localities'
by unmitigated intolerance and proscrip
tion, thus guarding the approaches, to their
slave domain against democracy. Statute
books groaned under despotic laws against
unlawful and insurrectionary assemblies,
aimed at the constitutional guarantees of
the right to peaceably ..assembla and peti
tion for a redress of. grievances. It pro
scribed de&oeratjpItterature a* incendiary.
It nullified the consntntina^I guarantees cf
freedom and tree speech aclTi'e press.
It deprived citizens of the oJier Stares* of
their privileges and immunities in ihe
States—an injury and userpathm alike v.a
ynst to i\oi»jii.-rn oiyzeusj sat! destructive
of the best interests of the States them
selves.
Alarmed at the progress of Democracy in
tho face of every discouragement, at last it
sought immunity by secession and war.
The heart sickens with the contemplation
of the four years thst followed. Farced
loans, impressments, conscriptions with
bloody hands and bayonets. Ihe numbu
of aged men who had long laid aside the
implements of labor, bnt who had been
summoned anew to the field by the con
scription of tlie-ir son?, to support their
children and grandchildren, reduced from
comfort to the verge of starvation ihe
slaughter of noble youths, types of physi
cal manhood, forced into an unholy war
against those with whom they vvere connec
ted by every interest loag.months of in
carceration in rebel oastiles, bankhmeut
from homes and' heai-thsi'che, are but. a par
tial recital of the long catalogue of horrors.
But Democrats, North and South com
bined, defeated them. They lost and
what did they lose The cause of oli
garchy. They lost African avery by name
only. Soon a's the tocsin ot war ceased—
soon as the clang of arms was hushed—
they raise the cry of immediate, admission,
and with that watchword seek to organize,
under new forms, a contest to perpetuate,
their unbridled swny. They rehabilitate
them with sweeping control of ail local and
State organizations. The federal Execu
tive, easily influenced, yields a willing obe
dience to his old masters. Aided by his
unscrupulous disregard of the constitution
and laws, by his merciless 'proscription of
true democratic opinion, antl by ail his ap
pliances of despotic power, they now defi
antly enter the Bsts in the-rb^y«i north, and'
seek to wring from ireemeu.au endorse
ment of. their wicked designs,
Every foul agency is at'wori to accom
plish this result. Falsely professing to
assent to the abolition of slavery, they are
contriving to continue its detestable power
by legislative acta agminat-pretended va
grants. They know that any form of ser
vitude will answer their unholy purpose.
They pronounced the foUr years of war a
brilliant sword scene in the great revolu
tionary drama. Prospective jiublic senti
ment holds high carnival'?Sand profiting
the example ot the l'reaisjfntial plat
form, breathes out tlircatenings cf slaugh-
0
av -X
nil1 legal1 restraints_,* and, ajJMJE wit_h""the**"'*»»
tongue of maligaunt slander tho constitu
tionally chosen representatives, of the peo
ple. To still ihe .Voice ot IfVetty, danger
ous alone to tyrants midnight conflagra
tions, assassinations and murders in open
day, arc called to their aid.i,SA reign if
terror through all these teu States makes
loyalty stand sQeq'i in the presence of trea
son or whisper in bated 'bfeaitii. Stron»
'men LeeiiAtc".o»criT^nto~5peak for liberty"
and decline to attend a Convention at
Philadelphia for fear of destruction.
Rut'all Southern nien sfeaot yet awed
into submission
u:treason
?aasl we have
assembled from ail th^se Siatea?.. determin
ed that liberty,'when endangered, shall find
a month-piece, and that the eaveinment of
th^peofil^rj^^he^eoph^for^ihe people,
shall not perjsh frpni £h'c earfE. W\ we
here consolt «o«e*h* how afst to prc
v»dc, »fo? a Laiou o4'jtcnlj^Repuhiican
Siatcs-^-Jp^seck to resume thirty-six ^stars.
'on^rhe'ohi ftaj».: tt'e *re btrcU|o say that
ten of these stars ar* opaayto^Hrdies paling
their inetfectuat fires bcaeath.t|e gloom of
darkness and of oligarcbfcat granny and
oppression. Ue wiSfY thenfto Tio "nliiarlt
stars, emblems of constitutional liberiy-^
glittering orbs, sparkliagiUith the life
living principles of tho-.uitKlel? republic
fitting ornaments of the glorious banner of
freedom._Our last_andjjnTy hope i.- in-the
unity-and'fortitude'of tH'c loyal people of
America in the support, and vindication
of tho thirty-ninth Congress, and the elec
tionof a controlling Unittar majorit in the
succeeding or iortierh-.'ttDngrtss. Whilo
•the. BeWj.arttekn amendinj' She National
Constitution, offersAlie mosV Ifberal condi
tions to (ho authors Of the rebeilion, and
W I of oVr ex-
pectations, we behve its ratification would
be the cojarnvneeweel of o«dipk"te pro
tectioa to all oui--Beanuv andjijhereforc we
accept it as the beat present remedy, and
appeal to our brothers andf-frvind* in the
Norslaod the Woattoa«ikajidaheir
word in the coming elee»|risaVicI
:.. «o»e4waaaa|aatl
d^ N O?WJ

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