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The Donaldsonville chief. (Donaldsonville, La.) 1871-current, March 10, 1917, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034248/1917-03-10/ed-1/seq-2/

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iUe M.llRUUsoIillvIU Utie
JAS. VON LOTTEN G. D. BENTLEY
Publishers and Proprietors
SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 1917.
LAMENTABLE LACK OF
PIATRIOTISM.
The closing hours of the sixty
fourth congress of the United States
were marked by a most lamentable
exhibition on the part of twelve mem
bers of the senate, who took advan
tage of an archaic rule of that body
to prevent, by deliberate intent and
mere time-consuming debate, the tak
ing of a vote on the pending "armed
neutrality bill," authorizing the pres
ident to arm American merchant ves
sels for their protection against hos
tile attack while exercising their right
to navigate the high seas and engage
in peaceful commerce.
The house of representatives had
previously passed thei bill by the over
whelming vote of 403 yeas to 13 nays,
and 76; senators signed a public state
ment to the effect that they favored
the measure and would have given
it their support if the obstructive
tactics of a small majority of their
colleagues, maintained during the
twenty-six consecutive hours of the
closing session, had not prevented the
taking of a vote.
President Wilson issued a state
ment to the people of the country em
bodying the following facts: That he
may be without power to arm mer
chant ships and take other steps to
meet the German submarine menace,
in the absence of authority from con
gress; that it is useless to call an
extra session of congress while the
senate works under the present rules,
which permit a small minority to keep
an overwhelming majority from act
ing; that the special session of the
senate now being held should revise
its rules "to supply the means of ac
tion and save the country from dis
aster, and, finally, that "a little
group of willful men, representing
no opinion but their own, have ren
dered the great government of the
United States helpless and contempt
ilte."
This is severe language, but there
can be no doubt that it reflects the
sentiment of the nation, and that the
attitude of the handful of obstruc
tionists in the senate is condemned
and despised by ninety-nine hun
dredths of the patriotic people of the
United States. -1.
The twelve senatblls who opposed
the armed neutralitirbill were Clapp
of Minnesota, Cur-mins of Iowa,
Gronna of North Dakota, Kenyon of
Iowa, La Follette of Wisconsin, Nor
ris of Nebraska, Works of California,
Republicans; Kirby of Arkansas,
Lane of Oregon, O'Gorman of New
York, Stone of Missouri, Vardaman
of Mississippi, Democrats.
The thirteen representatives who
voted against the bill in the lower
house of congress were Benedict of
California, Cary of Wisconsin, Coop
er of Wisconsin, Davis of Minnesota,
Helgesen of North Dakota, Lindbergh
of Minnesota, Nelson of Wisconsin,
Stafford of Wisconsin, Wilson of Illi
nois, Republicans; Decker of Mis
souri, Shackleford of Missouri, Sher
wood of Ohio, Democrats, and Lon
don of New York, Socialist.
The senate is considering a plan to
amend its rules so that debate can
be limited and a vote on any proposi
tion ordered by a two-thirds majority,
and the project is said to have the ap
proval of both the Democratic and
Republican caucuses, hence the pres
ent objectionable rule is almost cer
ta;n to be changed during the pend
ing session.
Meanwhile it is not unlikely that
the attorney general, to whom Presi
dlent Wilson has applied for an of
ficial opinion on the subject, will find
that the chief executive of the nation
has the power to take whatever ac
tion may be necessary to protect the
commerce of the country from attack
and destruction on the high seas
without waiting for congressional
sanction.
TIIE LTAF'OITRCIE LOCK UP TO
UNCLE SAM.
At, the meeting of the board of com
missioners of the Atchafalaya basin
levee district held at sort Allen, La.,
on Thursday last, M ch 8, a resolu
tion was unanimous1 'lopted pledg
ing an appropriation b hat body of
an amount equal to one-fourth the
cost of constructing a lock to re
place the dam at the head of Bayou
Lafourche, provided the sum to be so
appropriated shall not exceed $150,
000 and that the congress of the
United States will provide an appro
priation of $300,000 or more for the
same work.
The board of commissioners for
the Lafourche basin levee district had
previously authorized a bond issue
of $150,000 to cover a fourth of the
estimated cost of the proposed lock,
and an appeal is now to be made to
the federal authorities to make pro
vision for the remaining half of the
expense incidental to the work.
As the Chief has heretofore said,
we are justified in hoping that the
national government, taking into con
sideration the great burden that has
been borne by the people of the La
fourche valley in maintaining levees
of constantly increasing size and cost
to protect their property and homes
from inundation, and in recuperating
from such disasters when fights
against the devastating floods have
failed, will come to our assistance by
sharing with us the cost of installing
the lock at Donaldsonville.
The levee boards have (lone all that
can reasonably be expected of them
in view of their other heavy obliga
tions and their limited revenues. The
provision they have made would have
been deemed sufficient, at the time
the temporary closing of the bayou
with a dam was authorized, to build
the lock, but it is now calculated, ow
ing to the enlarged extent of the nec
essary excavation and other work and
the greatly augmented cost of all
kinds of material, that a very much
greater sum will be required. It is
not unreasonable, in view of all the
attendant conditions, that our Uncle
Sam shoud help us out by providing
for the unexpected increase.
SCHOOL TEACHER
Wards Off Nervous Break Down
Alburtis, Pa.-"I am a teacher in the
mublic schools, and I got into a very ner
ous, run-down condition. I could not
leep and had no appetite. I was tired
11 the time. My sister asked me to try
_inol. I did so, and within a week my
ppetite improved and I could sleep all
ight and now I feel well and strong."
-RosA M. KELLEB, Alburtis, Pa. c
We guarantee Vinol, which contains
eef and cod liver peptones, iron and ii
ianganese peptonates, and glycero- t
hosphates for run-down conditions.
X-RAY PHARMACY
A ROOSEVELTIAN RETORT.
Theodore Roosevelt has made E
characteristic r e p 1 y to an in.
quiry from three prominent anc
doubtless well-meaning citizens ol
New York if he would debate the
I question of preparedness with Wil
liam Jennings Bryan.
The meat of the typically Roose
veltian retort is mostly containect ir
the following paragraph:
"I cannot accept your proposal, be.
cause I regard it as a waste of time
to debate non-debatable subjects. To
debate with Mr. Bryan his view:
against national preparedness
would in my judgment be preciselS
on a par with debating the undesira
bility of monogamous marriage or
the morality of abolishing patriotism
or the advantage of the reintroduc.
tion of slavery, or the right of judges
to accept bribes from suitors, or the
duty of submission to the divine righi
of kings, or the propriety of actior
such as that of Benedict Arnold. Al
different times in the development ol
mankind practices such as all of these
have actually obtained in certain so
cieties and have been defended b3
men of good intelligence. But ever3
society that has advanced to the
grade of morality and civilization nec
essary for the acceptance of the
ideals and spiritual leadership ol
Washington and Lincoln has done sc
only by treating as axiomatic, an(
therefore as no longer debatable, cer
tain great truths, such as the need of
a clean standard in domestic rela.
tions, the wrong of slavery, the iniq
uity of corruption in public servants
and the high duty of preparedness
which is itself the hand-maiden of ef.
fective patriotism."
Another of the numerous good licks
in the rattling reply of Col. Roose
velt is this: "China accepted anc
acted on the doctrine now preachec
. by Mr.Bryan ;and half her territory is
now under alien control. But every
forward looking and enlightened citi
zen of China is at present actively en
deavoring to prepare his country for
both war and peace, and it is only the
more backward among elderly Chi
nose reactionaries who would now
treat Mr. Bryan's thesis as debata
ble."
We are more than half inclined to
the opinion that Col. Teddy has sized
up the situation about right, and that
if Col. Bryan, formerly of the Ne
braska militia, who marched boldly
away from Omaha at the head of his
regiment when President McKinley
called for troops in 1898, is really
hankering for someone to meet him
on the Cooper Union rostrum in dis
cussion of the question of prepared
ness, his best chance for finding an
antagonist is to enlist the services of
a committee of "elderly Chinese re
actionaries."
GERMANY'S DUPLICITY
CONFESSED.
Advices from Germany confirm the
statement that the government at
Washington is in possession of proof
of the charge that the German min
ister of foreign affairs formulated
and sent out a confidential commu
nication to the Carranza government
in Mexico, proposing a combination
of Mexico and Japan against the
United States in the event of an
abandonment by the latter country of
its neutral attitude toward Germany
and her allies in the pending Euro
pean war.
So far from denying the existence
of such a communication, Foreign
Minister Zimmerman and other Ger
man authorities defend the proposal
as wholly legitimate and justifiable,
inasmuch as it contemplated meas
ures for meeting and counteracting
as far as possible the power of the
United States to attack and injure
Germany in case of a declaration of
hostilities between the two countries.
Viewed only from that standpoint,
there might be some excuse for the
attempted conspiracy, but its moral
turpitude cannot be concealed or ef
faced in the light of the oft-repeated
German protestations of friendship
and good-will for the United States,
and the professions of surprise from
Berlin that there should exist in this
country any feeling of doubt or dis
trust as to the perfect amity and good
faith of the kaiser's government to
ward that of the American republic.
The sudden adoption of a policy of
ruthless and indiscriminate destruc
tion of vessels and human lives by
submarines, in clear violation of as
surances previously given the United
States, and the demonstrated willing
ness to foment a plot against this
country in order to cripple our power
to defend the rights and property of
our citizens abroad, indicate that
Germany had planned long and deep
ly for the inauguration of the cam
paign of ruthlessness and lawlessness
and would hesitate at nothing that
might afford a chance of achieving
the success which she seems hopeless
of gaining by other means.
T'he Prussian military dynasty is
to all appearances playing its last
card in the great world war, and the
prospect grows that the trump is not
big enough to take the deciding trick.
ANOTHER GREAT LOUISIANA
SALT DEPOSIT.
The interesting news comes fron
Lafayette, La., this week of the dis
covery within five miles of that at
tractive little city of what is believec
to be the largest deposit of natura
rock salt in the known earth.
The find was made in the Anse La
Butte section of Lafayette parish
where oil was discovered severa
years ago and a number of prolific
wells yield the valuable fluid which
plays such a large and ever-increas
ing part in the world's industries, and
it was while boring for oil that Andre
Martin of Lafayette city perforated
the gigantic salt deposit. It is as
serted that the formation is at some
points covered by barely 100 feet of
earth, and therefore of easy access,
while it has been perforated to a
depth of 3400 feet without reaching
the bottom of the bed.
A company has been formed with
$750,000 capital, all subscribed and
paid up, and machinery for the sink
ing and working of the projected mine
has already been ordered, indicating
that within the next few months the
already extensive salt output of Lou
isiana will be greatly augmented and
a very notable addition be made to
the state's vast natural resources and
the volume of her products.
Both houses of congress have pass
ed the immigration bill with a literacy
test over President Wilson's veto,
thus ending a struggle which has been
waged for years to exclude illiterate
foreigners from the privilege of em
igrating to the United States. The
final enactment of this law is attrib
uted in large measure to the influence
of the labor organizations that sought
to prevent the bringing of ignorant
immigrants into competition with
their own members as laborers.
The Chief, $2 per year.
THE MELTING POT!
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The above cartoon, repr:.ited from The Times-Picayune, was drawn from one of the suggestions
submitted by men and women of Louisiana and M ississippi in The Times-Picayune's campaign to se
cure ideas and suggestions that would impress upon the minds of the public the great opportunities
!and wonderful natural resources of Louisiana and Mississippi.
I.
'-i I
/1 jjry r -i~Sir
II l ~ f~ ', h.~i·~
-~ ~ _i .1/-
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Th bv ato.rerltdfo h TmsPcynws rw rmoeo th sugsion
submited b men andwmno oisin an sispp nTeTms-iauescapint e
caeida ndsggsinstatwud mresuontemid o h pbictegra oprunte
and wonderful natural resourcofLousan ndMsssipi
UIT. MARTIN'S POSITION.
f
Louisiana's Progressive Congressmai
will Vote for the Best Interest
of His People.
The following interesting com
pendium of a recent interview be
e tween Congressman Whit. P. Martir
t of the third Louisiana district and ,
f representative of the Indianapoli
Star is copied from the New Orleans
j Times-Picayune of Feb. 26, 1917:
Whit. Martin, Louisiana's Pro
t gressive congressman from the thirn
district, "will do what he thinks bes
e for the people of his district," wher
the vote for the speaker of the house
f is taken, according to an interviev
y with him by the Washington corre
spondent of the Indianapolis Star
which refers to him as "holding th(
e power of the house in his hand."
The interview is an extended one
and tells of Mr. Martin's change fron
.1la Democrat to a Progressive. Th4
reduction of the tariff on sugar is
given by .him as the cause. In this
r connection the interviewer quotes
him as follows:
e "When the Democratic party de
f liberately repudiated its pledge made
at Baltimore and enacted a law thal
meant to the people of my districi
bankruptcy and ruin, and President
1 Wilson not only approved that law
- but gave it his warm indorsement as
I the greatest tariff law the country
3 had ever had, I ceased to be a Dem
ocrat. You know the Underwood lans
1 made a horizontal cut of 25 per ceni
until May, 1916, when sugar was tc
go on the free list. The effects of
I that law on my district were fearful,
- There had been a flood that had swepi
away much of the cane, and creditors
I who would have stood by the planters
- to he,) them recover from the flood
losse. refused to advance a dollar in
- th -nºie of free sugar. Sugar prop
I e>t immediately decreased more
than 50 per cent in value, and many
s plantations were adjudicated to cred
itors for lack of other bidders."
Judge Martin also is quoted as say.
ing the European war came to the
rescue of the Louisiana sugar plant
ers, but the war cannot be expected
to last forever, and after its con
clusion "sugar, as well as many other
industries, will have to be afforded
adequate protection or go to the
wall." He also says further that ex
perience has given no hope for help
from the Democratic party along
tariff lines.
In reply to the question as to how
he would vote on the house organiza
tion, he is quoted as saying:
"I will say this to you, and say it
in all candor, that when the time
comes I will do what I think is best
for the people of my district. I am
here to represent them, to work in
their interest, to vote on all matters
that have a local bearing as I be
lieve will best help them. With the
division of sentiment in my district
it looks a little as if I will be d-d
if I do and be d- d if I don't. Un
der such a division of sentiment I
shall exercise my own judgment, leav
ing the future to vindicate me. In
my short congressional career I have
had but one aim-to deserve well of
my constituents, and that shall con
tinue to be my aim, and to that end
I am looking only to the good of my
district."
The article places the balance of
power in the house entirely within
the hands of Mr. Martin. The house
is evenly divided as to Republica-is
and Democrats, with five Independ
ents and Progressives. Two of these
are regarded as certain to align with
the Republicans and two with the
Democrats, "leaving the fifth man,
Representative Martin, Progressive,
still undecided so far as any but Mr.
Martin knows."
The town of Houma, La., is to have
free mail delivery beginning May 1.
The Houma Times says: "Two car
ries and one substitute will be em
ployed in the two routes mapped out
for delivery and collection of mail
each day. Twelve mail boxes will
be installed in convenient places
throughout the city to receive mail
matter which will be collected several
times daily." All of which suggests
the inquiry whether it isn't about time
Donaldsonville was getting into the
free delivery game?
If you buy out of town. and we
buy out of town. and all our ntih
bors buy out of town, what in thun- I
der will become of our town? I
LOCK APPROPRIATION PLEDGED
The Atchafalaya Board Conditionally
Agrees to Contribute $150,000.
Another step toward the construc
tion of a lock in Bayou Lafourche at
Donaldsonville was taken Thursday
when the board of commissioners of
the Atchafalaya basin levee district,
in session at Port Allen, adopted a
resolution pledging an appropriation
of $150,000 as the Atchafalaya
board's pro rata of the cost of the
lock, provided congress shall contrib
ute $300,000 or more for the same
purpose. The resolution was offered
by Commissioner J. A. Humphries of
Terrebonne, seconded by Commission
er King of Iberia, and unanimously
adopted by the vote of the six mem
bers present. It follows:
"Whereas, at a joint meeting of the
Atchafalaya -and Lafourche levee
boards, a res..ition was adopted com
mitting the two districts to appropri
ating $250,000 for building locks at
the mouth of Bayou Lafourche; and
whereas, we recognize the irregular
ity of that action; and whereas, ma
terial of every kind to be used in the
construction of this work has ad
vanced in price; be it
"Resolved, that we do hereby
agree to appropriate one fourth of
the cost of the work, provided the
amount shall not exceed $150,000, for
the construction of these locks; but
the appropriation shall be contingent
upon the congress of the United
States appropriating $300,000 or
more for the same work, and any and
all resolutions heretofore passed at
tempting to make an appropriation
for this work are hereby repealed."
Dugas Plantation Sold.
The Dugas plantation on the west
bank of the river in Ascension parish
about one mile below Donaldsonville,
owned by the Lemann Co., Ltd., has
been purchased by the LeBoeuf Plant
ing Company for $12,000. The place
comprises approximately 400 acres of
land, with a frontage of 5 arpents on
the river by a depth of a fraction
more than 150 acres, and is traversed
by the Texas & Pacific Railroad.
The Gulf States Farmer, Edw. O.
Wild's invaluable agricultural month
ly, entered its eighth year in January,
and has never been better, bigger or
more deservedly prosperous than now.
It is particularly devoted to the farm
ing interests of the south and fills the
field admirably. May its eight years
grow to eighty with Brother Wild still
at the helm.
The home merchants are prepared
to supply your needs. Buy from
them, and by keeping your money at
home help build up your own com
rnunity.
It's Time to Think
About That Easter Suit
YOU CAN ARRANGE TO HAVE
YOUR TAILORED TO ORDER
SUIT WHENEVER YOU WANT IT
-BUT WE ADVISE YOU TO
COME IN AND SELECT YOUR
PATTERN TODAY
GET FIRST CHOICE OF ED. V.
PRICE & CO'S HANDSOME LINE
AND HAVE US SEND THEM YOUR
MEASURE.
I REASONABLE PRICES
B. LEMANN & BRO.
c'"."" Donaldsonville, La.
WARM PRAISE F D. H. S.
State Inspector Says Nice Things
About Local School.
The following complimentary re
marks concerning the Donaldsonville
High School are quoted from the
January report of Chas. F. Trudeau,
assistant inspector of Louisiana high
schools, and will be read with a feel
ing of pride and gratification by the
friends and patrons of the institu
tion and patriotic citizens generally:
"The building and grounds have
been described in a previous report.
In the high school department eighty
four pupils are enrolled; in the ele
mentary grades, 379; twelve teachers
compose the faculty. We found all
the classroom work progressing satis
factorily, but we were especially
pleased with the work in eighth grade
English, tenth grade geometry,
eleventh grade French, ninth grade
English, and eighth grade arithmetic.
Other features that impressed us fa
vorably are: the good work done by
the girls along the line of physical
education-outdoor gymnastics, the
excellent work of the boys' military
company under the direction of one of
the teachers, the sanitary condition
of the building and closets, the trees
set out on the school grounds, the
well-kept laboratory. But, above all,
except the classroom work proper,
we were impressed with the large,
scientifically managed library, with
its twenty-five bookcases, reading ta
bles, and 2841 volumes. The teacher
of the first grade pupils is in charge
of the library, and much credit is due
this young lady for the superb man
ner in which she manages this de
partment and for the deep interest
she manifests in building it up and in
getting the town peo e of Donald
sonville to co-operate ith her in this
excellent work. Amo ther needs
of this school are ma harts and
globes."
The esteemed Thibodaux Commer
cial-Journal entered its fourteenth
year with its issue of Feb. 14 and re
joiced that it is "always growing and
improving, ever ready to serve the
public good," and that its career has
been different from that of "the ma
jority of papers," in that "we have
built our plant and our product on its
merit without aid or assistance of
any consequence from a political
source."
It is the best of good news for the
people of the Mississippi valley that
the flood control bill passed the sen
ate last week, after being approved
by the house of representatives, and
has received the signature of Presi
dent Wilson.
An ad in The Chief will pay.
MULES FOR SALE
For the Sugar, Rice and Cotton Farms
WE WISH TO ANNOUNCE TO
PLANTERS AND THE PUB
LIC THAT WE HAVE LEAS
ED THE BIG STABLE OF B.
LEMANN & BRO., IN MIS
SISSIPPI STREET, DONALD
SONVILLE, WHERE WE WILL
OFFER FOR SALE AT ALL
TIMES HIGH-CLASS MULES
SUITABLE FOR THE SUGAR,
RICE OR COTTON FARM.
ALL MULES WILL BE SOLD WITH THE SAME GUARANTEE
AND PRIVILEGE OF TRIAL THAT OTHER FIRMS ARE OF.
FERING. WE INVITE AN INSPECTION OF OUR STOCK, GUAR.
ANTEEING SAME TO BE THOROUGHLY SOUND AND HEALTHY
IN EVERY RESPECT, AND THE PRICES REASONABLE .
THE NEW STABLE KNOWN AS THE
PLANTERS' MULE STABLE
P. H. TRUXILLO, Mgr. J. S. SUTTLE, Prop.
TELEPHONE 303
VACANCY IN POSTOFFICE.
Competitive Examination for Clerk
to Be Held March 24.
The United States Civil Service
Commission announces that an open
competitive examination for the posi
tion of clerk in the Donaldsonville
postoffice will be held here Saturday,
March 24.
Clerks in offices of the first and
second classes are divided into five
grades, the salaries of which are $800,
$900, $1000, $1100 and $1200, per
annum, respectively. Clerks at first
class offices will be promoted success
ively, a grade at a time, to $1100,
and clerks at second-class offices will
be promoted in the same manner to
$1000. Promotions will be made at
the beginning of the quarter fol
sliowing the expiration of a year's
service in the next lower grade.
And no promotion will be made
- except upon evidence satisfactory to
the postoffice department of the ef
ficiency and faithfulness of the em
ployee during the preceding year.
Clerks of the highest grade are eligi
- ble for promotion to the higher posi
tions in their respective offices.
Competitors will be examined in
the following subjects, which will
have the relative weights indicated:
1. Spelling (twenty words of aver
age difficulty in common use), 10
points.
2. Arithmetic (simple tests in ad
dition, subtraction, multiplication,
and division of whole numbers, com
mon and decimal fractions, and Uni
ted States money), 20 points.
3. Letter ;writing (a letter of not
less than 123 words on some subject
of general interest. Competitors may
select either of two subjects given),
1 20 points.
4. Penmanship (the handwriting of
the competitor in the subject of copy
ing from plain copy will be consider
ed with special reference to the ele
ments of legibility, rapidity, neatness,
general appearance, etc.), 20 points.
5. Copying from plain copy (a sim
ple test in copying accurately a few
printed lines in the competitor's hand
writing), 20 points.
6. Reading addresses (test in no
ting with pen or pencil, on a printed
sheet of addresses, differences be
tween the printed addresses and the
written addresses of which they are
a copy), 10 points.
Applicants must have reached their
eighteenth but not their forty-fifth
birthday on the date of the examina
tion. The age limits are waived,
however, in the case of persons hon
orably discharged from the United
States military or naval service by
reason of disability resulting from
wounds or sickness incurred in the
line of duty. A person under 21
years of age on the day of the exam
ination will not be eligible for ap
pointment as assistant postmaster.
Male applicants must measure not
less than 5 feet 4 inches in height in
bare feet. No male applicant who
passes the examination will be eligible
for appointment who does not weigh
at least 125 pounds without overcoat
and hat. It will be inadvisable for
male applicants whose normal weight
is less than 125 pounds to enter the
examination. Female applicants are
not required to be of any specific
height or weight.
No person who has any of the fol
lowing-named physical defects will be
appointed to the position of clerk in
the postoffice service: Hunchback;
defective hearing, sight, or speech;
blindness in one or both eyes; asthma;
loss of arm, hand, or leg; crippled
arms or legs; flatfoot; hernia; con
genital weakness of the abdominal
wall, or such weakness caused by
wound or operation; except that
deaf-mutes and persons with de
fective speech or hearing may be ap
pointed to the positions of mail clerk,
distributer, and directory and for
warding clerk; and persons suffering
from flatfoot or weakness of the ab
dominal wall may be appointed to any
position of clerk the duties of which
they are physically capable of per
forming. Applications of persons
who are not entitled to examination
on account of physical defects will be
canceled. Other physical defects
may debar persons from this exami
nation when in the judgment of the
Commission such defects would ren
der them unfit to perform the duties
of the position for which the exami
nation is held.
Married women will not be admit
ted to this examination. This pro
hibition, however, does not apply to
divorced women.
Each applicant will be required to
submit to the examiner on the day of
the :examination an unmounted photo
graph of himself taken within two
years. An applicant who fails to pre
sent such photograph will not be ad
mitted to the examination. Tintypes
will not be accepted.
This examination is open to all citi
zens of the United States who meet
tle requirements.
From the eligibles resulting from
this examination it is expected that
certification will be made to fill exist
ing and future vacancies.
For application Form 1371 and "In
sItructions to Applicants," address the
Donaldsonville postmaster, or the
Secretary, Tenth Civil Service Dis
trict, Room 330 Customhouse, New
Orleans, La.
The noted Mexican Gulf Hotel at
Pass Christian, Miss., was destroyed
by fire in January.
Read your home paper.
PARTITION SALE.
State of Louisiana-Parish of Ascen.
sion-Twenty-Seventh Judicial
District Court.
Alfred Miller
'vu, Vs. No. 2457
Zeno Johnson
BIY \IRTUE OF and in obedience to
an orde rof sale to effect a parti.
tion, issued by the above named court
in the above entitled and numbered
cause, and to me directed, I will of.
fer for sale at public auction to the
lart and highest bidder, according to
law, at the principal front door of the
courthouse of the parish of Ascenpion,
in the city of Donaldsonville, on
SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1917,
at 11 o'clock a. m., the following de.
scribed property, to-wit:
A certain portion of ground, to
gether with all the buildings and im
provements thereon and thereunto
belonging, situated in the parish of
Ascension, state of Louisiana, in the
town of Donaldsonville, being lot
number thirty-four (34) in. squati
number thirty-two (32) of said t
fronting sixty-six feet six .inehes
Taylor' street, bounded on'di.
by lot No. 35, on the other sidei-.
lots Nos. 33 and 32, and in the rel:
by lot No. 42, and being one huif
dred and fifty (150) feet in depth,
being the same property acquired'by
the late Frank Miller from Louis De
hon on January 9, 1890, as'recorded
in Book of Conveyances No. 34, it
folio 597.
Terms and conditions-Cash in
United States currency.
E. C. HANSON,
Sheriff, Parish of Ascension.
Donaldsonville, La, March 8, 1917,
NOTICE OF-ESTRAY.
Barton, La., Feb. 24, 1917.
TAKEN UP,Wednesday, February 21,on M.
premises at Lumville, on the west bek
of Bayou Lafourche, two and one-hlf
miles below Donaldsonville, a dark bay msre;.
about 8 hands high, with long bobbed tail
also a light bay horse colt. 6 hands high,witt
three vi ite feet and blazed face. No marks
or brat s on either animal.
The' ner is hereby notified to come fl
wa" iThin thirty days from the date het'
of, "establish title, and defray all costs, in
default of which the animals will be dispoeal
of according to law.
R. H. CRAYTON, Barton, La.
BIDS WANTED.
B IDS will be received by the commissies
council of the city of Donaldson'ville'59
to Monday, March 12, 1917. for furns h
ing the city with 1000 feet or less of 4-IpV
rubber fire hose, 2 '," internal diamneta
coupled complete in 50 ft. sections. f. . b.
Donaldsonville. The right is reserved tore.
ject any and all bids.
C. KLINE, Finance Commissioner,
FOUND.
ON TIIE PUBLIC ROAD near. Modeste
in the first ward of Ascension parlsh. $
bunch of keys, tied with a string. OUe
of the keys is stamped, "U. S. Letter cai
rier," and on the reverse side, "AA I540L."
Owner may recover same, upon proper i4*
tification, by calling at office of the Chid
and paying for this advertisement.
FOR RENT.
T.RACTS OF FARM LAND in east AsMe-s
t sion parish, in rear of Miles Compamsf
plantations, ranging from 20 to IN
acres. Suitable for cultivation of cotteon,
corn, cane and other crops. Reasonalh
terms. Apply to or address WEILL BRO&.
CO., LTD., Lutcher La.
LOST-REWARD.
A SMALL BLACK GAME COCKEREL,
about one year old. Disappeared fros
prerises of owner in Claiborne stit,
near Railroad avenue, Monday, March 5·
A s:uitable reward will be paid for its rt
turn. Communicate with this paper.
WANTED.
YOUNG MARRIED MAN as bookkee9P
and stenographer. Must be familT
with modern accounting methods. St5I
salary expected and experience. Give Tf'
erences as to character and ability. AA
dress S. L. P., care this paper.
WANTED.
YOUNG WOMAN OR YOUNG MANt
Sclerk in store and attend to office Wt
Must have some knowledge of be'
keeping and typewriting. Apply to
BLOCH, Donaldsonville, La.
WANTED.
GEN'IS to sell accident and health l
surance. li'osd contracts, liberal
mission. ROSS-EUTIS COMPAD.
INC., 834 Gravier street, New Orleans, L1
FOR SALE.
TWO GOOD MULES and one four-W.
Sfloat, now in Donaldsonville. Can
bought at a bargain. Apply to or '
Iress THIOMAS LANDRY, Flaquemine, I.
WANTED.
ALESMEN to solicit orders for lubrif
3 ing oils, greases and paints. Salary '
commission. Address LINCOLN OIL C0
Cleveland, Ohio.
FOR SALE CHEAP.
CHICKERING PIANO is offered for -
at a bargain: cash or op terms.
to Mrs. T. T. TYREE, DonaldsonvI,

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