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The Ouachita telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1865-1889, October 02, 1869, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034336/1869-10-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE TELEGRAPH:
PUBLISHED EVBER SATURDAY AT
MONROE, OUACHITA PARISH, LA.;
-. w. MoConA2 Ix,
EOITOR.AND P3ROPRIETQR"
Terms of Subscription.
The following rates of subscription will be rigidly
adhered to in all oases:
One copy, one year - - - - $8,00
One copy, asi months - - - 9,00
ringrle copies - - - 10 cents.
Any persa sending us five new cash subscribers,
to the same pot olice, will be entitled to a copy ot
"fHE TELEGRAPH" gratis, for one year.
W" Sbsoription priceinvariably in advahce.. r
Iprotesslonal 4Qarb,.
Dr. D. H. Key,
TRENTON, LA.,
C AN be found at his office ever the Drug
Store.
March 3, 1869. n24:10m
Da. R. D. WHYTE
H AS resumed the practice ot Medicine
and offers his services to the citizens of
Trenton and vicinity.
Office over the Drug Store.
January 30,'68 Iy
Drs. Calderwood & Richardson,
HAVING associated themselves in the practice of
Medicine and Surgery, offer their services to
"hu citizens of Monroe and vicinity. They can
be found, when not professionally engaged, at their
..ioe, opposite the Catholic Church, at all honrs, day
and night.
fnta Special attention given to Chronic Surgical
cases.
Monroe..Tne 22 1Ri8 v2n37:chv3n40:lv
COLUJMBIA, LA...
WILL practice in all the courts of the 12th Judi
cial District. n7-tf
ISAIAH GARRETT. FRANKLIN GARRETT.
GA1RRETT & GARRETrT,
ATTORNEYS AT LAZW
Corner Wood and St. John Streets,
(Opposite Recorder's Office,)
MONROE,.....................LOUTISTANA.
August 5. 1868. n46-tf
A. L. SLACK,
MON ROE, LA.
DRACTICES In the Parish and District Courts as
I follows:
Ouachita Parish, Monroe; Morehouse Pariah,
Bastrop; Franklin Parish, Winnaboro.
Monroe. Augn. 2. 1868. . 5:17
R. RICHARDSON. JAS. D. McEssur.
RICH.1 RDSN &. McEENERY,
Attorneays at Law,
MONROE, LA.
PRACTICE in all the parishes of North Touisiana.
I.n the Soprernm Corrt at Mouroe, the Federal
Courts. and in the Land Office Department of the
7'eneral Government. nl9-tf
JOlN M'ENERY. S. D. M'ENERY".
J. & S. D. McENERY,
MONROE, LA.
PRACTICE in the Parish and District Courts of
Ouchinta, SMorehouse. Franklin, Richland. Calid
well and Catahoula Parishes, in the Supreme Court
at Monroe, and U. S. Courts.
t' l'articular attention paid to business in the
Land Ottiee at Monroo, and the Land Otlice Depart
ment of the General Government. n17:tf.
C. R. MORRISON. W. W. FARMER.
Morrison & Farmer,
ATTORNEYS AT LA V,
Monroe, La.,
Will practice in the Parish and District
Courts in the Parishes ofOnachita, Morehoese,
Franklin, Caldewell, and Union.
Also in the Suoreme Court of Louisiana
and in the United States Courts.
n41:v3
V. r. bTUBBo. R. G. COBn.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
.Mkonroe, Li.,
Will practice in the Courts of the 12th Jud'
rial District, compused of the parishes of More
house, Ouachita, Caldwell, Catahoula and
Franklin.
And also in the Parishes of Jackson and
Union. v4 n32
R. Iillis Richardson, liobt. 1W Jemison
_XIC.lIRDSO.rT # JE.IIISO.',
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
PRACTICE in the Courts of Catahoula, wCaldwell.
Franklin, Ouachita, Morehouse, Richland. Carroll
and Madiso,. in the Supreme Coutt2 of Loeiiana,
in the United States Courts and in the Land Office
I)epartment of the Government. Special attention
paid to the collection of claims. marl0-n e25
DENTAL R'OTICE.
HIIAVING determined to settle permanently
in Monroe for the purpose of practicing
my pro tession, I can be fo nd at my office
opposit'e the south-east corner of the public
square, in the house lately occupied by the
Land Office, at all hoors. Mly family will live
in thile same building. Having had a very
large experience in all the different branches
o my profession, the treating of children's
teeth and all the diseases of thl teeth of adults,
and the extracting of teeth and arranging ar
tificial teeth; I feel justified in saying that I
am prepared to do *ything in any department
of my profession as well as can be done any
where, and at reasonable prices.
N. F. McCRAW.
Jan. 6, 1869. nl6:tf
Ouachita Female Academy.
THHEF FALL SESSION of this.Institutlon
L will open on the Third Monday of Sep
tember. The Rector will be assisted by an entire
Snew corps of efficient and experienced teach
ers; he,.therefore, assures the public, that no
effort will be spared on the part of himselfand
assistants, to render the Academy worthy of
the confidence and support of all who advo
cate a thorough and liberal course of educa
tion.
oFor further information, aeDply fora catalogue
REv. T. B. LAWSON, RECTOR.
Monroe, La., Aug. 18, 1869. n47: tf
"ENGAGED IN THE DEFENSE OF AN HONORABLE CAUSE, I WOULD TAKE A DECISIVE PART."-Juvms.
To01. V_. MONROE, LOUISIANlA, OCTOBER 2, 1869,s 0.
CORNJER OF DESIARD & WALNUT STREETS
1WONROE, LA..
L. . T VBURGsHTOR, Propietor.
THE ABOVE ;HOUSE HAS BEEN EN
tireiv repaired, and refitted, and the Pro
prietor promises the public every comfort and
convenience. Board moderate. n 2
TRENTON i HHOTEL
JOHN NOBLE. - - PROPRIETOIR
THE above House, recently erected and newly
furnished, is now open to the public. The Pro
prietor engages to do all in his power to render
guests comfortable and contented while under sit
roof. His Bill of Pare will be kept fllly up to the
market and other accommodations maintained in a
style that will insure satisfaction.
A liberal patronage ias respectfully solicit
Trenton La.. Jan. 184. 6 v2n17
Ouachita House,
(coaiER OF DmIARD & THIalD STREBTB,)
MONROE, LA.
J. L. HUNSICKER, Proprietor.
THPE above named Hotel so long and tavorably
Lknown throughout the country has been refitted
and newly furnished, and is now complete in every
department.
Thk Proprietor pledges himself to spare no efforts
to make all comfortablo who may favor him with
their patronage. 1: tf
NEW HOT.EL.
LEWIS HOUSE,
(Opposite Catholic Q(Thurch nd Female Academy,)
MONROE, LA.
.'!. .. LE f'IS, PROPRIETOR.
ragE Proprietor, formerly of the OUTACHITA
. HOUSE, informs the public that the
large and commodio.,s residence of Col.
Robt. Richardson has been purchased a h
and handsomely furnished, and is now
complete in every particular, as a First Class Hotel
A mple accommodations, good fare, and conven"
ent location. Board reasonable n28
St. Hyacinth Academy
Wj7ILL Ibe ppened on WEDNESDAY, Sept. 15th
W for the reception of boarders and day scholars.
Apply to
ISTRF. SERAI'HINA, Superior.
Mon roe, La., Sept 15th, 1869. no524t
MONROE MALE ACADMY,
TlHE Fall ter m of this Institution will open
on Monday, August 30th, 1869.
JAMES A. BETHUNE.
w2m n46
TO TEACHERS-- TtXT BOOKS.
T HE SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY Series
L o Text Books is the cheapest and the best.
Specimen copies sold at one-half Publishers'
prices. Special terms made for introduction
Peachers will please forward their addresses,
and send for cataloones and circulars to
J. LANE ORDEN, Trenton, La.
General Agent f.r Text Books of all kinds.
and for the "Memoirs of the War," edited by
General R. E. Lee.
Sept 25, 1869. noltf
Trenton School !
.MALE A./ND FE.MA/LE.
rT HE Session for 1869-'70 will open on
. the Fourth Monday in September. It
will be composed of three Terms-thirteen
weeks each. One half of the tuition must he
paid in advance and one half at the close of
each term.
TUITION PER TER31:
Primary Course, $9,00
Intermediate Course, 12,o0.
Academic Course, 15,0n.
Contingent fee, to
Pupils are charged for the whole term du
ring which they enter, when there are no
special arrangements made. No deduction.
made except in cases of protracted illness
Circulars iodicative of tie correct scholastic
and general status of Scholars are issuedl at
the close of each term. Pupils are thorougly
prep'ared for college and for entering npon the
active duties of lile.
For further information apply to
J. LANE BORDEN.
PRIxCIPAL.
Trenton, Sept. lst, 1869. no bltV
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL
FOR
'Y o ni g ]E-La, d ies,
.NYEWV ORLE./LNS.
ADDIESS LOCK BOX, 630,
Mrs. LEOIrDAS POLT, Principal.
This School will open on Monday, September 6th,
1869. There will be two Sessions in the Schoel
year: thle first enldilg on January 31st, 1870; the sec
ond, on the last Friday in June, 1870.
Boarders.
Board with Tuition in French. English and Math
em atica, pernon th, .......................40,0
lse of Piano,per month.....................3 00
Entrance Fee, which covers fuel, light and
se of furniture,.................. ........ 00
Washing, per month,........................ 5 00
DAY SCHOLARS.
Senior Class, per month .................1....15,00
Middle Chass, per month,.....................12, nO
Junior ClasMs, per month.......l.............l 00O
Pilmary Classes, per month,............. to 8 o0
Sundries, (pens, pencils, etc.,)...................50
Fuel, perSession,... ........................2,50
EXTRAS.
Munsica (Instrumental,) per month,..........12,00
Mlusic, Vocal. por month,...................12,1)
Solfege, per month,..........................3,o0
Dancing, per month........... ............e6 0
Drawing, Painting and other accompltshments at
the Professors' charges..
Bills payable in advance. Eash pupil shoud be
provided with two pairs of Sheets, two Blankets,
one Connterpane and Mosqnito Bar for a single bed,
three Pillow Cases and esi Towels. st
Another Continental Line--Been
ning of the Southern Pacific bail
road.
Generals Rosecrans and Sedg
wick were advertised in San Fran
cisco to leave that city on the 12th
instant for San Diego, the sea
port at the southern extremity of
the State of California, there to
inaugurate the work on the San
Diego and Gila Railroad, and Mr.
Seward was also to be present to
assist in the ceremonies of break
ing ground. Funds sufficient to
build the road to the Gila river
have been subscribed. This is
the beginning of the Southern
continental railway line. A com
pany, headed by General Fre
mont, has been organized East,
to begin at Memphis, Tenn., and
thence to build a road southwest
wardly, through Arkansas and
Texas, to El Paso on the Rio
Grande, thence across the table
lands to the Gila river, and down
its valley, or near it, to a junction
with this San Diego branch.
From the Mississippi river this
is a much shorter route to the
Pacific Ocean than that of 'the
Union Pacific road; and as it
flanks the Rocky Mountains and
the Sierra Nevada chain it may
be built all the way over the
Plains. It is also below the re
gion of interrupting snows,, and
the work of building it and of
running it when completed may
be continued without the stop
page of a day from wintry storms.
With anything like the enterprise
which built the Union Pacific this
Southern road ought to be finish
ed within two years, for there will
be comparatively little to do in
building it, beyond marking out
the line and laying'down the ties
and rails. When finished it will
be the main line for through trav
el; but there will be work enough,
not only for two continental
roads, which will then be in ope
ration, but for one or two more.
In the building up of a half a
dozen new States the Union Pa
cific will soon be an immensely
profitable line, and so with the
Southern Pacific in tapping the
undeveloped resources of Western
Texas and of New Mexico, and
Arizonia, and of the northern
States of the Mexican republic,
and the vine and olive lands of
Southern California, the most
productive in the world.
In this connection it will be
seen that General Rosecrans is in
better business thah he would be
in running as the Democratic
candidate for Governor of Ohio.
General Fremont, we believe, is
now in Europe raising money for '
the main line from Memphis
westward. He only asks the
right of way and certain Territo
rial lands along the line from
Congress; for with these and the
liberal grants offered by Texas he
calculates upon building the road
without further assistance of gov
ernment bonds. We think, too,
that on this basis the road ought
to be pushed through with out
difficulty, considering the advan-.
tages of the route, the lightness
of the work and profits sure to
follow.-New York Herald.
Mr. Bigelow succeeded the late
Henry J. Raymond as editor-in
chief of the New York Times.
Some of the newspapers outside
of that city have taken the liberty
of criticising Mr. Bigelow's man
agement. They think he has not
kept the Times up to its old stan
dard. "Minor Topics"-a column
or so of short articles-was an
attractive feature of the paper
under the old reginme. 'This Mr.
Bigelow discontinued at the start.
It was said that Mr. E. H. House
would cease to be the dramatic
critic of the Times at the end of
last week, and that the dramatic
and musical department was to
be dropped from the paper,
RE-ASSESSMENT OF INCOMES.
Commissioner Delano has deter
mined to thoroughly sift the in
come assessments, and to this end
appointed a large number of
assistant assessors, whose special
duty will be to re-assess incomes.
The commissions have already
been issued and the work will
commence in the large cities im
mediately.
THE WIDOW OF GEN. IAWLINS
-A TOUCHING ROMANCE.-There
will be a general feeling of sym
pathy in the South for this afftlict
ed lady. During the war she
resided at Vicksburg, Miss., as a
friend in the family of Mr. Lum,
a prominent citizen of that place.
Her maiden name was Hurlburt,
if we remember correctly. She
.was greatly admired and respect
ed by all of the Confederate offi
cers who were visitors of the
house. Pleasant and winning in
manner, the charms of her socie
ty and her manifold courtesies
and kindness to all of them will
be remexibered by those who
were among the many who were
cheered by her kindness and ele
gant hospitality. Among the
throng of her admirers was a
brave young officer belonging to
Withers' batalion of artilery, C.
S. A., who awakened a deeper
feeling than friendship in her who
was doomed to hear of his death
out on the lines shortly afterward,
during the last memorable siege.
When Gen. Grant, with the late
Gen.. Rawlins as chief of staff, en
tered Vicksburg, Mr. Lum's house
was occupied. Here it was she
met her late husband, who touch
ed by her great worth and charm
ing qualities, subsequently offered
himself and was accepted. All
the Southern officers who were at
Vicksburg will bear testimony to
the undeviating courtesy of Gen.
Rawlins in his intercourse with
them, and his afflicted widow will
now have their heartiest sympa
thy in her great bereavement.
THE Holly Springs Reporter
says:
"Moses Hopkins, negro, who
was appointed route agent on the
Central Road, to run between
Jackson, Tenn., and Canton, Miss.,
resigned his position last week.
Hie discovered that he was totally
incompetent' We have heard of
many funny things which he did
during his short career. At Hol
ly Springs, on his first trip, he
threw off several bushels of mail
matter that belonged elsewhere.
He distributed matter indiscrim
inately from Jackson down as
long as it lasted. At a depot be
low Holly Springs, the postmaster
asked him for the mail. Moses
replied that he hadn't started
with as much. as he thought he
had, and had given it all out at
the depots above; but he would
leave a good sized bag full for
him the next time. Moses, good
bye; you are better at picking out
cotton than you are in picking
out letters and papers."
THE SOUTH AND COTTON.-A
friend of the editor of the Mem
phis Appeal, writing from the
Rhine, says :
Everything connected with the
South and that tends to an in
creased production of her great
staple is matter of vast impor
tance on this side, and I. speak
the true sentiments of the Eng
lish and Continental cotton man
ufacturers, with many of whom I
have lately come in contact, when
I wish this great enterprise God
speed.
There is no country that can
supplant our own South from her
position of Chief Cotton Commis
sary for the world, provided she
can increase her production of
the staple, and if she can do so
by Chinese or any other kind of
cheap labor, crowding out compe
tition as well in price as in quali
ty; it is manifestly her duty no
less than her interest to avail her
self of Mr. Koopmancha's propsi
tion.
Insanity seems to be the lot of
a large number of the late Grand
Duke Maximilian's associates in
the Mexican adventure. Senor
Salazar, his ex-Minister, is the la
test victim heard of. Were these
people actually poisoned by an
insanity mixture, as story writers
assert?
General Sherman's commission
as Secretary of War appoints him
until the end of the next session
of Congress. The law does not
prevent him from holding the two
offices of General tnd Secretary
of War, but he must select which
salary he will a tepnt.
BEN BUTLER VS. MRS. STOWE.
-A case of scan. mag or crim.
con. is to Ben. Butler a delIcious
tit-bit, a savory morsel. His ex
perience and practice at the bar
have so sharpened and whetted
his legal appetite for this sort of
mental pabulum, that he has not
been able to withhold his opinion
in the Byron calumny, and has
rushed into print in four columns
of a Boston paper, in which he
cross-examines Mrs. Stowe and
riddles her story with his rules
of evidence so completely as not
to leave that elderly female any
thing to stand upon. He care
fully and ably reviews the char
acter of Byron and all the incidents
of his life, and proves conclusively
the falseness and improbability
of her ingenious canard. It has
been the habit of Daniel to come
to judgment, but now comes Ben
jamin, and, wonder of wonders,
in the cause of truth 'and morali
ty! The report that Butler was
seen at a camp-meeting lately,
must be true, for his action in this
matter is proof positive that he
has experienced a change of heart.
After all, it can now be said with
some show of probability, that
"the devil is not as black as.he is
painted," for here is Butler in his
great, daring act (never before
attempted in America) of the
Moral Reformer and the friend of
innocence.
CLEBURNE'S SWORD.-The At
lanta Constitution has recently
seen the sword which was pre
sented to Gen. Cleburne by his
old Arkansas regiment, and which
he wore at the time of his death
at Franklin. It is in the custody
of Miss Gay, of Decatur, Ga., the
lady who has done so much for
the graves of the Confederate
(lead in her own State and in
Tennessee. The sword is thus
described by the Constitution :
"It is a very handsome weapon, I
with a finely-tempered, flashing i
blade, in a handsomely embossed i
and carved scabbard, and strange- I
ly enough it bears, as the name k
and place of its makers, H. Mar- 1
shall & Co., of Atlanta, Ga. The ]
scabbard has at the top, on one c
side, a carved medallion of Mr. (
Davis in profile, and on the other '
side the harp and shamrock of i
Ireland twined together. On the u
first ring below the shamrock, t
midway down the scabbard, are c
the words:
'Maj. Gen. P. U. Cleburne,
Presented by his old Regiment, c
15th Arkansas.' t
"Below is a carved Major Gen-I
eral's insignia-a wreath with 8
three stars, the middle one the E
largest, and underneath the let
ters 'C. S.,' representing those ill
fated but historic words-Confed- ]
erate States."
- - t
THE RIGHT VIEW OF IT.-The <
Richmond Whig takes General O.
0. Howard to task for saying, in
a recent speech, that slavery had
dwarfed the intellect of the Afri- t
can race, and we think our con-I
temporary has most decidedly got I
the better of the Christian soldier i
on that point when it says:
"This implies that the intellect I
of the negroes has been dwarfed
since their arrival in this country.
This is something new to us. The
common impression has been t
that on their advent here they t
were unmitigated barbarians,
many of them cannibals, all of
them a very low and unintellect
ual type of humanity. All the
humane ideas and civilized hab
its they now possess were acquir
ed here while in a state of slavery,
and from their white masters.
This. we believe, is the fact, nev
er before contested, and still in
testible."
Gov. Hoffmaan, of New York,
has transmitted to the Secretary
of State, at Washington, his
official certificate that New York
has ratified the XVth amendmlent
[Mail.
Not a bit of it, See his letter
in another place. He only senti
a copy of the resolutions of the
Legislature, as a matter of per
sonal politeness in reply to a re
quest. There were neither act of
the Legislatuse, nor "oflicial noti
fication" of an act.-Ez.
Rates or. Adversaing.
i K Yt4D·~b ItU Q" Al:°1 L ~bdS·
O' se, 646lhues r 1in, (Msdu
yeSi)? bjgee fat g ....................
]aat b era romte.bm ..........
sAll awis se d .eat to tbioe wbe asS
wiOibe aesented "t 19 * , .'sa
No fraetiý.s a ause osunted so aesS. bar e?
will be ohaSod as whole lquare in ewesr matare. 5O
. oa dilayed, afavslgsm enbe e sSe
by measurement and not by thea umber o flee.
f roeeetoual cards on per ann i" 6ssnisI
81 , in advance.
AGE3RT. -
Tnos. Mclwrrrs, e.ra. is e 8duly awrlsel
agent for the 2Tegraphl h New ONesas
LV Agents wanted threughout the Statb s wbou
Sliberal per cent. will be paid out of all mosey. i
ceired by them.
California papers are received,
with full accounts of the recent
election in that State. The San
Francisco Herald says it was a
positivetidal wave, sweeping over
the whole coast, and leaving the
Radical party stranded and shat
tered, so that they can never
again enter into the sea of poli
tics in California. What is one
of the most observable features in
the result is that the Radical par
ty is broken into small fragnents.
In the city of San Francisco it
did not emerge once from ta
shell,. or show its head. One
wing voted the Democratic ticket,
of the other wing vast numbeis
staid away from the polls. The
party cannot in many years re
cover such discipline as, will make
it effective, without some great
over-powering blunder on the
part of its adversaries. It has
fought its last battle in California
for many a year to come; nor will
it even regain a sure foothold un
til it shall have changed its name
and its principles. The Radical
Sacramento Union aekno*ledges
" very general Democratic vic
tory," and the San Francisco
Morning Call (Independent) calls
it "unprecedentedand overwhelm
ing." The State, it says, will
now be redistricted for members
of Congress. The Sacramento
Herald is frank enough to ac
knowledge the overthrow of its
party.
Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton,
the editor of the Revolution,
speaks of Susan B. Anthony, the
publisher of that incendiary sheet,
as "the Napoleon of the women's
suffrage movement in this coun
try." Of such women as these
the New York Star says: "Pro
fessional gabbists, peripatetic
scolds, whose own homes are up
side down, whose husbands are
either driven to desperation" or
led sneakingly by the snuffing
nose,-these are the so-called 'Wo
men of America,' the agitators,
the women lowerers, the women
slanders, the women stabbers of
New York, in the year of our
Lord, 1869. The real workers
among women have cause to thank
God every day of their lives that
women are not in place and do
not hold power; not that women
ire not competent, but because
the best women are elsewhere oc
oupied, and the worst women are
Ievils in temper serpents in dis
guise, mean, cowardly, base and
cruel." Severe, but not wholly
anjust. The mischief these stron
nihded women are doing their
sex, all for the sake of money and
notoriety, is incalculable.
The World does not like Carpet
Baggers, and gives them this dig:
Where the prey is, there are
the vultures. Those impecuni
ous vultures that make up the
reconstructed government of the
South are eager -to have extra
sessions of the so-called Legisla
tures-in Louisiana and Alabama
notably--not that there is any
need for such sessions, but merely
to get the big mileage and per
diem and a chance to finger the
public funds. Some little in the
shape of taxes has come into the
several State treasuries of the
South since the adjournment of
the so-called Legislatures, and
the loll are crazy to seize the
same.
The Knoxville Press and HIerald
says: "Private advices from ýMid
dle Tennesee assures us that
among dispassionate and observ
ing men, the electidn of Antdrew
Johnson to the Senate is now a
conceded fact."
Gen. James B. Majors, of Tex
as, has purchased a sugar planta
tion on Bayou Courtableau, for
$30,000, and will in a short time
be a citizen of St. Landry, La.
In Cork, the crier of the court,
anxious to disperse the crowd
around the bar, exclaimed, "All
ye blackguards that isn't lawyers,
quit the court ."
lG en. B. P. Chcatam is a candi
date for County Court Clerk in
Davidson county, So is Majer
;Dick McCann.

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