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The Ouachita telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1865-1889, April 19, 1873, Image 2

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MONROE, LA., APRIL 19, 1878.
G. W. McIOANi, EBitor.
IELLOGG'S PERJURY BEARING
FRUITS.
The disturbance in Grant parish has
culminated in serious results. This
was to have been expected from the
moment the colored people of that
parish, heeding the few partisans of the
white race who were bent upon tramp
ling down the manhood of their parish
in order to possess themselves of office,
organized in an armed body, seized the
Parish site and forcibly entered and
sacked the residences and business
houses oflaw-abiding while and colored
- citizens. Whatever may have been the
the aggravating cause, that induced the
supporters of Mr. Kellogg to take the
initiative in hostile measures, there has
not appeared a sufieient reason, any
where, for the taking of the matter in
dispute from the province of the law,
and settling it, as the negroes of Grant
parish proposed to do, by a direct and
unauthorised appeal to arms. Looking
upon these ignorant negroes in every
way as good as white people, and award
ing them every legal and humane con
sideration due even to an outraged
community, still, by all that they claim
to be so considered, by Just that much
more are they to be condemned for the
violence and mobocratic proceedings
which have characterized their course.
Legal forms and remedies appear to
have been held in utter contempt in
contrast with the overshadowing the
ory common among ignorant people,
that might makes right, and that he
should rule who has the power, or the
ingenuity, to get control of the reins
of government. Perhaps, we should
not visit upon the negroes of Grant too
severe a condeumnation for endeavoring
to carry out this false notion of repub
lican institutions, since they had before
them the example of Mr. Kellogg whose
flagrant swindle anti usurpation are
known to the negroes as well as the
white men of the State. It was he who
Inaugurated the policy of fraudulent
and forcible usurpation, and has taught
"thewardsof the nation"-the untutor
ed,unlearned and semi-civilized negroes
-that the control of government is not
a matter of right and justice and law,
but of false oaths, force and fraud. And
it is not by any means an extravagant
hypothesis, when we assume that Mr.
Kellogg was not ignorant of the pur
poses of the negro leader Ward-a mem
ber of the Kellogg legislature;-or that
he actually agged on this negro and
his accomplices to taking forcible pos
session of the offices and public build
ings of Grant parish, which Ward did
do, without color of law, and w)ich
was the prime cause of the trouble in
Grant. The practical solution of the
emeute has been just what the arch con
spirator, Mr. Kellogg, might have ex
pected: the negroes have been terribly
punished for their savage manner of
carrying out their notions of govern
ment-the whites have successfully
maintained their rightful supremacy in
a matter where every intelligent crea
ture could but concede it to them,
-and there is peace in Grant parish
and will be for the next quarter of a
century. Deplorable as the occurrence
was which proceeded this salutary les
son, thelesson itself is worth all it cost.
It will elevate the people of Louisiana
In the eyes of the good people of all her
sister States, and will rivet attention
upon the possible and probable results
of unbridled political abasement and of
the cant and pseudo philanthropy of
the equality of the races. But we, as
every good citizen does, ntmust deplore
such tragedies in our once great and
prosperous State. But knowing that
out of the abnorma, and unnatural
teachings of such Radical leaders as fMr.
Kellogg, so long as inunoral causes are
followed by certain fermentation bring
ing back the ascendancy of right over
wrong, must come tile bIitter remedial
process of conflicts between tile two
races, and that under such teachings a
statoof peace and preosl,'Prity in louisiana
must be the special wonder of both
statesman and philosolpher, we have
Seen prepared to see, and shall bhe, in
constant expectation of seeillng iany tlnay,
the harvestingofjust such fruits as have
been garnered in the parish of Grant.
The philosophy of governmenut, ihe
spun as it may be, can never harmonize
such elements as exist in this state, if
Radical teachings are to be followed.
Postmaster General Creowell and
Senators Cameron and Howe have been
making excursions in tile lower por
tion of the State. Their tirst jaunt was
on the May Flower to tile llace of
Efhtngham Lawrence on tile river be
low New Orleans, whither they were
accompanied by B3rother-in-law Casey,
Gov. McEnery, Gen. Bussy, Col. Penn
and other dignitaries of the State. Old
Efflngham appears to have put the lit
tle pot in the big one in honor of the E
occasion. Gen. Sypher, it seems, had ,
no idea of permitting his competitor to 4
entertain the distinguished Washington e
magnates without his being in ear-shot 1
and so we find him with his bow legs
under Mr. Lawrence's table ready to
counteract any favorable impression I
Lawrence might make upon his influ- I
ential guests.
The next excursion of the party was t
over the Opelousas railroad to the
country of the Teche. Thither went
also Gen. Beauregard, Col. Nixon and
Prof. Forshey as invited guests. Ave
ry's Island,where the famous salt mine
is situated, was an object of special in- t
terest to the tourists. The mines were I
leisurely Inspected, and the salt pro
nounced very salty. Judge Avery's
what-you-may-call-em, in bottles, was
decided to be very like Krug and Mo
selle, and his spring chickens and ducks
were declared to be as fine as any in
Pennsylvania or Iowa.
Of the Teche country, Senator Came
ron said, it "surpasses in loveliness all t
that I have ever conceived of it, a fit
abode for angels, if such ever dwell on
this earth." From this it would appear
that the Senator was inclined to do the
Teche region full justice, but we venture
to say that he will next winter resent
the kindness done him, by a kick at
Louisiana when she asks of Congress to
do this fit abode of angels the justice to
place it in the keeping of civilized, in
telligent beings who are its rightful
owners and legally electedl to rule over
it.
The ostensible purpose of the visit of
these gentlemen South Is the inspection
of the postal car system. Doubtless,
3 there are other causes at the bottom of
5 their protracted stay in New Orleans,
I one of which we imagine to be a better
) understanding of the muddle existing
in this State.
SNOT VERY HAPPY.
p We feel authorized in saying, from
, internal evidence furnished by the fol
, lowing paragraph Irom the Madison
t Journal, that Col. E. B. Towne, some
t time in retirement, Is again on the
- tripod of that paper :
IfGov. Kellogg has any more appoint
ments to make for this Senatorial Dis
trict, we would suggest that if he fol
lows the advice of our Senators, Pol
I lard and Crawford, and Chief Justice
t Ludeling, he will be apt to subserve the
interests of the Itepublican party, pro
vided hle regards those gentlemen as the
party in this District. We will guar
anteoo that they will recommend no one
t who will not work for them, or who
Idoubts that they possess all the virtue;
intelligence and capacity of the four
parishes.
No one but Col. Towne would or could
manifest so much fooling, in a tender
way, as is shown in this brief paragraph.
The same benevolent feeling appears
to have dictated the expression, in
another column of our brother's paper,
to the effect that ",eov" Kellogg hav
lug promised to commute Ben Smith's
punishment from hanging to imprison
ment for life, perhaps has changed his
mind since he hall learned that a few
white citizens of this parish are merci
fully disposed to this poor negro." \Ve
regret to see in these tender symphon
iques, a faint tendency not to accept
confidingly the situation in Madison
parish. At whome is the Journal offend
ed? IHas the lion. WVilliam Murrill
been too "previous" for our good-na
r tured brother? Is he enraged at poor
old Curtis P'ollard whose eyes are always
red with excess of tears for his distressed
f country? I [ls our Ike been making
trouble with our brother's phans? Let
not triflt like these h(e urged( in exten
uation. 'Tihe Journal nlLst subdue its
restivenes, :md gracefully acept the
leadershil of the promlinent ltepubli
cans of its parish. If it does nrot, we
shall be obliged to revoke its printing
contract.
The New Orleans Republlcan, in its
leadler of Weldnesday, fairly groans out
thesesoleln words: ''Tnl eeiiat w on the
,tate d'crdlt hats b/c'0 sr ca5~Asftl. 'ihe ob
lig(atimon of the ,ate a"c r unO able."
\\Vell, Inow, 'ce Ilhdl no idea that Mr.
Kellogg's goverllnlment wa\\'s so soo0011 to
to give up thle ghost. It evitdently is a
SOlloner\" govermntmeIlt tIihal \we gave it
credit or,--:,1nd we hadl given it just
as little credit iis amlly one for any
thing.
"The Louisiauna Congrcsmenu voted
Ias a unit on thie Lback pay question,"
says the New Orleans IRepubllican, but
in its usual style of protecting wrong
I doers, fails to tell that they voted as a
Sunit for back piay, Mr. Boarman, tie
only Democrat, among the number.
f Cincinnati, Albany, Evansville,
*Cleveland, Selnma, and several other
e insignificant places hav\e been carried
, by the Democrats.
PEACE IN BILEAT PARISH. v
NEw Om lEAws, April 15.-The ti
steamboat Southwestern, which arriv
ed at about 1.80 p.m. to-day, brings
stirring and important news from
Grant parish. The whites have retak
en Colfax, and there is not a negro to
be found for miles around. From pas- fI
engers on the Southwestern we glean the
following. o
The negroes had strongly entrenched o
themeslves in the Court House and l
built breastworks three and four teet n
high. There were, it issaid, about four d
hundred men armed and equipped 1
thouroughly. On Sunday, about 12 a
p. m., one hundred and fifty whites, y
who had gathered from the surround- ,
ing parishes, made an attack on the e
breastworks, and a brisk fight was s
kept up until near 3 p.m. The breast- t
works were then stormed and captured, c
the negroes taking refuge to the court
house, the doors of which were barric- s
aded. After some further fighting the
negroes threw out a flag of truce and
several men advancedon it, when they
were fired upon by the besieged party,
wounding several, one of whom was
Captain Hadnot, who was shot in the
bowels, and it is feared fatally. They
retreated on the breastworks, and as
the only means of dislodging the ne
groes, the courthouse was set on fire
and they were shot as they came from
the burning building. It is reported
that between 80 and 100 negroes were
killed, and there were none to be found
for miles around. The Captain of the
steamboat Southwestern makes the fol
lowing statement: "We arrived at Col
fax on Sunday evening about 8 o'clock,
and found that the white people, and
the Sheriffl suppose at their head, had
capturad the town, after having had a
conflict with the negroes. It was re
ported to me that about 100 negroes
had been killed and many others
wounded. WVe saw from the boat
about IS or 20 around on the banks
dead. One white mali was reported
killed, whose name we did not learn,
and two seriously wounded, Messrs.
Harris and Hadnot. Mr. Hadnot was
shot through the bowels, and it is sup
posed that he is mortally wounded.
We brought Messrs. Harris and I-Hadnot
clown from Colfax to Alexandria; three
or four other white men were slightly
wounded. Aboutone hundred negroes
escaped, but it was reported that the
whites were still pursuing them. All
the leaders of the rioters escaped,
especially the white men. The negroes
ambuscaded themselves in the Court
house, and the whites finding there
was no other recourse, made the attack
on the left and then set fire to the
building. The whites numbered in the
neighborhood of 150 men. The fight
lasted from about 12 o'clock until near
ly 6 o'cock p.m. The whites are now
in possession of Colfax, and when I left
late last Sunday night all was quiet."
Proceedings ol a Public Meeting In Clal
borne.
LIsBoN, Li., April 15, 1873.
Pursuant to previous notice the citi
zens of Lisbon ward met for the pur
pose of taking into consideration the
propriety of paying or not paying taxes
I to the so-called Kellogg government,
r whereupon It. L. Dawsou was called to
the chair and J. McClendon requested
to act as Secretary.
The object of the meeting was ex
plained by the Chair, and the following
resolutions were adopted :
1. That we do not believe Kellogg
was elected Governor of Louisiana, and
it was so decided by a Committee of
Senators appointed by the Congress of
the United States.
2. That we will to the last extremity
resist the payment of taxes to the said
so-called Kellogg government.
3. We further agree to form ourselves
into an associational body for the pur
l pose ofjoining in with our duly elected
Governor, John McEnery, and will
l support him in resisting the payment
of said taxes.
4. That we call on all the voters of
r Claiborno parish who so zealously sup
s ported McEnery in November last to
I join us in resisting the payment of taxes
to Kellogg.
The meeting then adjourned.
1t. T. DAWSON, President.
J. McC'Is.Nxuox, Secretary.
The New Orleans Republican says
of the white ien of (rant parish, that,
"There is a spirit elsewhere as intol
orant as their own." That must be the
spirit of those fellows who excited the
s negroes to riot and robbery and blood
t shetl in order to put themselves in
r office, and then couldl not tolerate the
- idea of standing by their deluded fol
lowers, but licd like dogs dlown Red
river to New Orleans. As for any other
>spirit of intolerance worthy of heing
l emlployed as a thr(eat/, the Ilepublie:cn
t may as well understand that the spirit
Sof the men who gave Grant parish peace
is the spirit that actuates the whole
white pecople and many of the blackns
of the State. We are all intolerant
toward robbers, bandits and grave-des
poilers.
An enthusiastic meeting of the friends
of the Fusion government was held in
New Orleans on Monday. Odd Fellow's
HIall was filled to sutffocation. Ad
dresses were delivered by Judge Man
ning, of ltapides, Judge Muse, of St.
Helena, (oen. McMillan, and Oov. Mc
SEuery. Strong resolutions pledging
support to the McElnery government
were adopted. An unmistakable earn
estness characterized the meeting
throughout. E
TIlE ilOG'S ENDURANCE.
The Turf, Field and Farm has the
following:
The hog, it would seem, is tenacious
of life. In the big storm, which swept
over Minnesota on the 7th of January,
five hogs belonging to Mr. Nye, of Fill
more county, were buried in a snow
drift. On the 7th of March, a period of
fifty-eight days, the drift was opened
and the hogs discovered alive. They
were Ir. fair bodily condition, but were C.
unable to use their legs freely,having not
exercised the muceles of the limbs for
so long a time. Just after their rescue
they preferred slop to a more solid kind
of food. Mr. Nye is said to be an honest
man, and his statement is regarded as
strictly true. The hog, it would seem, a
can be an economical feeder when cir
cumstances so compel.
GRIANT'S PERQUISITES.
The question of thePresident's salary n
is not generally understood. In fact, it
has resolved itself into a question of the
President's " perquisites." These are
the facts: The recent session of Con
gress, at which the Republican major
ity increased Grant's salary from $25,
000 to $50,000 a year (and he approved
it to make it a law), also gave him
$35,000 to buy new furniture; $5,000 to
pay gas bills; $5,000 to buy coal; and
$6,000 for his glass flower garden. Be
sides this, it is only a little while since
between $25,000 and $30,000 were
cribbed from the Treasury-building
appropriation to build him a billiard ,
room and a stable. Instead of getting a
$50,000 a year, he actually receives over
$100,000. Pretty well, this, for a plain
Republican President.
There is good news and a bit of sar
casm in the following from the Natchi
toches Times:
The Fusion parish officers and city
council still retain possession in this
parish, and seem to have no disposition
to yield their offices without a struggle.
A striking contrast to the city of New
Orleans, where the Mayor, Judges,
Sheriffs and other officials elected on
the Fusion ticket made haste to give
in their adhesion to Kellogg, before
the ink of Durell's decree had become
dry. And yet it is this class of men
who call us submissionists, and reject
all compromises!
The Mansfield Reporter says:
Mr. Walker, the Chief engineer of
r the New Orleans, Baton Rougeo and
t Vicksburg railroad, was in town on last
Wednesday. He is now surveying the
Shreveport branch, and thinks that
work will commence as soon as the
route is located. Two surveys will be
made before he makes his report. The
line he is now running passes about
five miles cast of this place; he thinks
the next one will pass through or near
this town.
Professor Ubassy, at the French game
, of billiards, discounted Henry Miller,
a billiardist of some local celebrity in
o New Orleans, and beat him 117 points
1 in 300. The highest run made by
Ubassy was 83 points; his average was
16. In this game a carom counts only
one point.
There is a fine opening for a young
g man to starve at Jackson, Miss., by
,f publishing a monthly giving the Su
,f premeCourt decisions, as recommended
by the Vicksburg Times.
d ,"Dear me, how fluidly he talks!"
said Mrs. Partington, recently, at a
s temperance meeting. "I amn always
rejoiced when he mounts the nostril,
d for his eloquence warmls every cartrige
ll in my body."
It
The general appropriation bill, No.
f 56, passed by the Kellogg Legislature
)- to meet the expenses of the State for
o the year, aggregates the snug sunm of
$4,106,199.12.
The spring has been every way favor
able to the planters, except the cold
nights and mornings. Vegetation has
Ibecn at a stand-still for a week.
t'he people of Livingston, St. lie
leln, Terrebone, Morehouse, Jackson,
and several other parishes have joined
e the tax-resisting army.
1- l en. Jefft. ). Davis succeeds ;oen.
SCanbly ill comnmnand of tile Ilepartlmellnt
o of the Colunbia.
Od hl State -warrants are lquoted at d3e
r ill New Orleans.
MISCEL.LANEOUS.
i TI'e pil'rtinoerahip herotoftore oxlsiing be
twe n the undersigned, nuder lie firm
mlaneof Ntstandifer .-l MtC luire isl dlissolvted
C by ilutunai lleusent,to take elTfect froml date.
T .- St4andifer. hbving utrrcaused t he entire
interest ofihtos. Metmuore amid 5.0. Lmuche.
It msunloes tho li:abilitiea of theo lirta anid i
alone aulthorizedl to sign the lirllil name inl
Sliquidating the business.
'l'. C. STANDI'IIEl.,
S. O. LA.lIiE.
is Trenton, Ia., March 31. 1i73. 29:3t
Mfs . 1 I) UNN,
Formecrl" of NCw e§rle:n-s, respeltfmmlly
infornms tlhe la(dies of MIonroo and vicinity.
tlhat lle is roeady to recei\-ve orders for I)res
Making. Satistactoll guI'arantoadl. 'ntting
done at moderato price, and perfect lits
g guarnmtred.
SResidenc- ip-sltairs in liernhardt buill
t lg: enItranlce on Sero~lnd stree.mt. J:$:t
TRENTON ADVERTISEMENTS
DAN. T. RIAD. L. MCLAIN."
HEAD & ItIcLAIN,
TRENTON, LA., s
RECEIVING. FORWARDING AND o
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Dealers in
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING,
BOOTS, SHOES, HATS,
THARDWARE, IRON, CASSTINGS,
BAGGING, TIES, WAGONSI
CARTS, BUGGIES, ROCKAWAYS,
COOKING STOVES. FURNITURE.
AND PLANTATION SUPPLIES
Of all kinds
Liberal advances made on Cotton, in eash
and supplies. Trenton, Sept. 29, 1870. n2:1y
T. C. STANDIFER & CO.,
(Successors to Standifcr& McGulre)
RlRIIVINO, FOIWAiDING AND COMMI.%ION r
MERCHANI A T S,
And Dealers in
GENEIRAL MERCHANDISE,
TRENTON, LA.
April 1, 1873. v8:29-tf
%DO LPIIUS F. JACKSON,
I-IEAD & MILAIN,
TRENTON, LA.
Having connected himself with the above
house,will be pleased to have his old friends
and acquaintance call on him when they
visit Trenton, and will be pleased to serve
them in any way possible with the advan
tages of a largeo amount of General Merch
andise, feeling confident that he oan make
it to their interest to do so. Oct.9,'72.-tf
MONROE ADVERTISEMENTS.
E. V. WMEALY'S
PHOTOGR'PIIIC& FINE ART GALLERY
SGrmand Street, Afornoe, La.
Pictures taken In all the improved styles,
such as
Rembrandt, Mezzotints,
fMedalion, Porcelain,
Ferrotypes, Gems, &e.
PSictures taken in cloudy weather as well
as clear.
t ill keep constantly on hand a large as
sortlment of
Albums, Stereoscopel
and Stercoscopeic 'iowes
of all parts of the world.
t PICTURIR PRAI B,
3of every description, for sale with or without
t pictures.
PICTURFS OF ALL KINDS FRAMED TO ORDEDi,
Views of the ruins of the city of Monroo
for sale. February 24, 1872. 23:1y
SLOTS FOR SALE I
IOUSES TO RIENT!
Persons desirous of purchasing eligibly
Y situated City Lots, on accommodating
, terms, or renting a comfortable residonoo,
will do well to apply to
J. V. LOCKI,
g Forth La. and Texas Railroad Depot,
Y Or Dr. S. L. BRACEY, Dentist,
C rand St., opposito Intelligencer office.
Jan. 35, 1873.-19-Gin
J G. SANDERS,
i ;lAN 1 S't'RlEEl1', MONROE', LA.,
i) I-iAI.aI IN
liAtl)VWAt.E, 4; l:,ttClltE.IS, D)RY GOODS
AND
( ENEI' EIAL, PLANTATION S Pl'PIJ. S,
AND IMI'OITERE OF
fANI)ItE1T l'S GARDEN S;UITD).
i REElPS CONSTANTLY ON IIAN D
I LIIME, CEMENT AND L'IAS''llIt.
. AL.O AN ASSORTMENT Oi
WVAGONS, WVHEELIIARROWS, PLOW\S.
- August 17, IS72. 4-:Lf
itF W. MICIIAUIX,
1 ESTAIRD STRIEET, 51NlOR. LA..
it TLOT'IIING,
IT IDWAR E,
IA(G-ING .
IRON TrES,
I'IANTATION
.SUPPLIES,, Ac.
Iighesrlt nmarket price paid fir cotton and
n4cuntry lirodluce. 4h:tf
. ORL;E C'II.IIIIRIAIN.
C ('cOMMISSION MEItCIIANT AND
SDEAlEl t 1N 1S ESTIE N NPRIODUC'E,
MO N O E, LA.
Corn, Oats, IIay, Bran, Pork, Itacon and
Flour soldi on consignienit. 25--1y
SFO1 SALE CHIEAP I
AN O'PEN CAllRTAuIAE,
iin g.ood condition; andtl also a nr er - of
TOUILE LI IAIINES5.
Mnr., '7-t Apply to V. YOGl.
SDLAIN AND FANCY JOB WORK
S.AIN EXECUTED AT THIIS OFFICE
TRANSPORTATION.
ST. LOUIS FREIGHTS.
Merchants, and others, making bills in
St. Louis, are notified that the OUACHITA
BELLI., or any packet commanded by either
of the undersigned, will receive all St.
Louis freights consigned to their boat, or
boats, at the Mouth of Red river, and de
liver the same at Monroe, or Trenton, oa
Through bills, for
TEN PER CENT LESS
than any Through rates now charged from
St. Louis to Monroe, or Tronton, whether
by Rail or Through boats.
This arrangement will continue until the
low-water season.
J. W. BLANKS,
F. A. BLANgS.
Monroe. March 20, 1873. 27:tf
REGULAR WEDNESDAY
OUACHIITA CITY, TRENTON A MOI
ROE TVEEKLY PACKET,
6 OUACHITA BELLE,
F. A. BLANKS, Master,
Jos IIoLtas, Clerk,
Will leave New Orleans every Wednesday
at 5 r. M., as above and all landings below,
making weekly round trips.
Ie Passengors may rely upon this ar
rangomnent, and upon siperior packet ao
conimodations. Jan. 11, 1873. 17:t(
DAILY ACCOMMODATION
FROM
MONROE TO BASTROP.
fHacks leave Monroe at T A. M.;
Leave Bastrop at 7 A. M.
Faro, g3 00.
Office-In Monroo, at Ousachita Stable; in
Bastrop, at Bastrop Stable.
H. O. DOBSON.
Jan'y 6, 1872.-15-tf Proprietor.
REGULAR N. . O. AND OUACHITA
PAssErrnn r PACii-, WrHAMRM
SA BIN ,
R. SmxorT, Master,
Will enter the Ounachita with the first rise
and continue in the trade during the sea
son. Nov. 23, 1872. 101-t
TRENTON AND MONROE
REGULAR PACKET SKIPY,
"CARRIE LONG."
I will make regular trips with my skin
between Monroe and Trenton, making from
four to six trips each day, and connecting
punctually, morning and evening, with the
cars at Monroe. Fare, each way, 25 cents.
Small packages carried at same price.
26:ly RIOBERT LONG.
NEW ORLEANS AND CAMDEN
PASSENOEn rACKiT
1 MAY FLOWER,
J. W. CARLTON, Master.
Will run regularly throughout the season
in the Ouachita river.
For freight or passage apply to
W. P. lENWICK, Agent,
Fob'y 14, 1873. Wharfboat, Monree.
BUSINESS CARD&
SOUUTHIERN CARRIAGE FACTORY.
The undersigned takes pleasure in making
known that he is now as well prepared as
before the war, if not bettor, to do all kinds
0 of work, either in
Manufacturing or Jiep~*-Es
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, HACKS, I'(t
Ready nrade work kept on hand; sped
mens of which may be seen by calling at the
Factory. tIe wilt also carry on a general
Blacksumit/, shop, arranged to do all kinds of
blacksmiitt ing Terms reasonable.
April 26 1866. n30-¶ FR. ENDOM.
UURNITURE STORE,
g AND FURNITURE REPAIRING.
The undersigned respectfully informs the
public that ho has now on hand a well se
lected stock of Office and Ifousehold Mrni
lure, Wooden Coffing, MfIctalic Burial Ctbkets,
Coffin Trimmings such as Irandles, Plates
Screws, etc. Terms, Cash. Store on Grand
street, near the Courthouse.
J. E. PETERS.
Moonroo, La., March 18, 1871. n26-tf
GEORGE KEHIILER,
Guunsmith, Monroe, La. Dealor In
-GUNS, PISTOLS, CAPS, TUBES,
CARTRIDGES, POWDER FLASKS,
PATENT ELASTIC GUN WADS,
Repairing of all kinds neatly
done, at 25 per cent, below for
nier prices, and work guaran
teed. Juno 18, 1870. Iv
nAGONS, BUGGIEts
CARRIAGOES AND DRAYS
Made and repaired, with full guarantee,
by the undersigned, upon reasonable terms.
'The Shoeing of horses will receive particu
lar attention. E. MILLER,
DeSiard street, Railroad crosning.
March 0, 1872. 25 ly
C BIOFENSCIIEN,
--DEALEITts -
Fino gold and silver Watche, and
French and Amnerican Clocks fine
8. solid gold Jewelry, Pianos and lIelo-I*a
dions, Musical Instrunments of all descrip
tions, sheet music, tc., and solicitor for the
celebrated pianos of the St. Louis Manufac
turing Company. dec20--dam:wy
JOIIN ROTII,
BOOT AND SHIOE MAKIER,
I.as located between the tin shops of Mr.
Nauighiton and MIr. Locke, and will execute,
faithfnlly and promptly, all kinds of work
in Iris line entrusted to himin. Terms, Cash.
MIoiroo, La., October 5, 187- 8-1y
CA1I{IIAG.E AND SM ITH SIIOP,
c. (i iAND STRItET, MONROE,
liavr' tile lansuire of notifying the Public
t lhait they a:re prceplred to brild and repalir
(iarriages and Iuggics, to Shoo Horses, arnd
- exeute all kinids of l'lantation Work.
-,-t )wners of nurden's Subsoil Attach
mient fior ()unchita Parish. marS,73.25tf
V .II. FEIIRY,
IOUL'S3 AND SIGN PAINTER,.
Monroc, LouRtrieno
" 5ALL WORK OUARA5TEED.-."
August 3, 1S72.-41t:tt
iM FEl1iEL3IAN,
WJ,7holesalQ and Rletail Demler in
I hill (;OODS, GRIOCIE:RIhE.. VWIi
I t'IltO'CI", AN lI
D iLirA, IA. l2nly

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