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The Ouachita telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1865-1889, January 03, 1879, Image 1

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VOLUME XIV. -v - MONROE, LOUISIANA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1879. NUM .EB 17.
IHE TELEGRAPH:
Pablished every Flmday.
I' I'l.INttOli, OUACHITA PARISH, LA.
:..ý. '7". StoC d3T.lI=B,
Ed.it4r and Proprietor.
LCPICMS OF 8UBSCRIPTION.
i.: -oy, one year,.......................... 04,00
*.I..npy, six months.......................... 2,50
ADVANOIE RATMS:
w w,py. one year............. .. ........00
A0o lcopy, six muonths.......................... 2,00
.'. I1 'F OF ADVERTISING RATES.
i v.,rtisements will be inserted at one
di..ll .r and fifty cents per square (one inch
ot apace or less) for the first, and seventy
five cents for each subsequent insertion, for
any time under one month. For longer
periods as follows :
. uLamBas q'a mf1m.2m. m iL.2 .
One....»......... I8 $ 11 15
Two...... ...... 6 5 1 i3 20 25
Three.................1....i 0 00 151 171 2 85
Four.................;...I13 0 20 2 281 45
Five...................I 15 01 2 271 40/ 50
Ten (. coL)..........I 260 40 70 90
Fifteen (X. ol.)....... 40  0 0 130
Twenty-one (t e)...80 001 70 85 125 175
Cards o1 a personal havracter-when ad
missible-will be charged double our regu
lar advertising rates.
Obituary and Marriage notices will be
charged-as advertisements.
Any person sendingus five new cash sub
scribers, at the same post-office, will be en
titled to a copy of Ta TwlloAPai gratis
for one year.
ADVERTISING REGULATIONS.
Lt'ransient advertisements must be paid
for in advance.
All advertisements sent to this office
when pot otherwise ordered, will be in
serted "till forbid" and charged accordingly.
Editorial business notices will be made,
free of charge,of all advertisements ordered
in the paper; for other editorial notices a
charge of 25 cents per line will be made.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
a. 0. co0s. A. A. GUe ar.
Cobb & Gunby,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
Aug. 2,1878, 40 tf.
Dr. Was. Bandel
'TENDERS his serviess as Physician and
1 Surgeon, to the public. Hecan befound
upon his plantation, four miles below Mon
roe.- March 11, 1874. 2-y17
R. S. TODD. DAVID TODD.
Tedd d Todd,
ArTTRNEYl AT LAW,
MONROE, LA.
December 7. 1877.
L. N. Polk,
PARISH SURVEYOR. Ouachita parish.
La. Surveying, civil engineering and
draughting promptly attended to. erms
cash. April 12, 1878.
John T. Ludeliuag,
A TTORNEY AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
will practice in the State and Federal
Courts in Louisiana, and in the Supreme
Court at Washington City. 11:3m
Dr. U. C. Strother,
OFFERS his services to the citizens of
Monroe and vicinity. Office: Corner
of Grand and Wood streets, on bank of the
river. August 24, 1877. v8-n41
PRAIrE Y V wTUW . JNO. B. STONE.
Stubbas Stone,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Monroe, La.,
Ofoe in Henry Kindermann's build
ing, upstairs, on DeSiard street.
October 2, 1874. if.
Franklin Garrett,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
Lands for sale and rent in the par
ishes of Ouachita, Morehouse and Richland,
including desirable farms. Special atten
tion to real estate titles. Communications
solicited from parties to buy sell or rent
lands and houses. Enquiries promptly
answered. Correspondents in all the
States. December 0, 1878. ly
Dr. Thos, Y. Aby,
MONROE, LA.,
OFFICE on DeSiard street, at the inter
section of First, in the rear room of
building formerly occupied by A. J.
Keller
January 5, 1876, ly
R. W. RICCARDSON. C. J. BOAT'NER.
Rlehardson d& atner,
 TTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT
Law Monroe, La., will practice in all
the Parishe of North Louisiana, in the
Supreme Court at Monroe, the Federal
Courts, and in the Land Office Department
of the General Government.
Office fronting northeast corner of public
square. January 38, 1878.
Dr. A. B. Sholars.
MONROE, LA.,
OPFFERS his professional services to the
citizens of Monroe. Office in his Drug
Store on DeSiard street.
September 24, 1875. ly.
It. RICHAKRDON. S. D. M'BNERY.
Blehardson * Mlelunery.
A TTOREYS AT LAW, Monroe, La.,
will practice in all the. parishes of
North Louisiana, the Supreme Court of the
ate, the Federal Courts, and in the Land
Alice Department of the General Govern
ment. January 11, 1878.
Deatistry.
R. S.L.BRACEY, Dentist, respectfully
offers his professional services to the
citizens of Monroe and surrounding coun
try. Having an experience of fourteen
years in the practice, he feels confident of
giving satisfaction in all branches of his
profession. Is willing to warrant all work.
O(tiee at residence on Jackson street, near
the Female Academy, Monroe. TA.
v7-mnarl6:ly
TALBOT STILLMAN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MONROE, LA.
Will practice in the Parish and District
Courts of North Louisiana. Will attend
these courts in person.
%Vill give special attention to Land Office
matters connected with the T~nd Office at
Monroe.
Will give to all business immediate at
tention and abundant cnre.
Will answerall Comtmluicati,,lns with the
east possible delay.
August 10, 1877. ly
.Ol PRl'INlTING.
-t6TELEGIAPF P"
JOB OFFICE.
We are prepared te execute
JOB PItT~lT'I'ING,
q I ery Deaeription,
FROM TH E MAMMOTH POSTER
TO THE WEDDING CARD.
PLAIN. ORNAMENTAL, AND
FANCY PRINTIIN,
SUCH AS
POSTERS,
HAND-BILLS,
PLACARDS,
CIRCULARS,
B ILL-HEADS,
BRIEFS,
PROGRAMMES,
BILLS OF LADING,
BLANK RECEIPTS,
CATALOUG ES
LAW BLANKS,
BALL TICKETS,
PAMPHLETS,
&c., &c., &c.
ALSO
.CARD WORK
OF EVERY VARIETY
IN THE LATEST AND MOST
APPROVED STYLE OF THE ART.
OF EVERY 81ZE, COLOR, AND
ON ANY QUALITY OF PAPER
PRICES ACCORDINGLY.
MONROE ADVERTISEMENTIS. .
NEW ALI[AMBRA RESTAURANT
Has been removed to the corner of St.
John and St. Ann satreet, in the rear c 1.
Bflls' book'0re,'were I will be found at
all hours. readyto serve my old customers
and the public with the beat that New Or
loans and this market can afford.
Orsters is every Style i
Fish, Crabs,
Shrimp, Game,
And everythig'else to be fblnd in a
FIRST-CLASS RESTAURANT.
I will give my personal attention to all
who call upon me and guarantee the best
attention.
G. C. ENSSMINGER.
Monroe, October 6.1877.
ORS. II. HOLLAND,
DALREn IN
FASHIONABLE MILLINERY,
Has j nat received a stock of millinery goods,
consating of Hats, Feathers, Velveta,
Ribons and Fancy goods generally. Also,
FINE GOLD WATCHES,
JEWELR,, CLOCKS,
SILVERWARE,
AND GOODS FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
All of which will be sold at
ASTONIBHINGL Y LO W1 PRIC EN
Call, before purchalng.elsewhere, on
MRS. H. HOLLAND.
Grand street, Monroe, La.
NoveSber 21,1878. tf
SOUTHERN CARRIAGE FACTORY.
Thenidersigned takespleasure in making
kiown that he is now as well prepared as
before the war, if not better, to do all kinds
of work, either in
Maas.easaritmg or Repair*i,
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, HACKS, ETC
-eady made work kept on hand; speci
mens o which may be seen by calling at the
Factory. #Ie will also carry on a general
Blaksmitlh shop arranged to do all kinds of
blackamitaing. eorms reasonable.
April28 1809. n30-- FR. ENDOM.
RETAIL FAMILY GROCERY STORE
ALL GOODS FRESH, AND DIRECT
FROM ST. LOUIS.
I have opened, at the store formerly occu
pied by Chas. Saunders, a retail.fmily gro
cery, and offer to the public a choice selec
tion of Family Groeoeries, at lower prices,
for the cash, than any house in Monroe.
solicit a share of the trade, and guarantee
satisfaction.
Mr. JAmas T. Lawis will be in charge of
the business and attend to the demands of
customers.
G. W. PIERCE.
Monroe, Oct. 2, 1877. PIERCE.
PELICAN SALOON,
Grand Street, Pierce'  Old Bland,
W. H. FERRY, Proprietor.
Where the public will always find the
very best variety of liquors and drinks
served up in style by an old and experi
enced ba-tender. He offers Faa LUNCH
every day as an extra inducement to the
public, from 11 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock
p. m., consisting of Hot Seasoned Soups;
Roast Beef, Salads, etc. Price of one drink,
inclusive of Lunch, only 15c. He respect
fully solicits a liberal share of the patron
age of the public.
Monroe, January 25, 1878.
DIEDOLD SAFE AND LOCK CO.,
CANTON, OHIO.
N. B. MILTON, AGENT,
MONROE, LA.
Safes sold for less money than by any
one traveling, on time, or for a heavy dis
count for cash.- .
Guns, pistols and sewing mnachines re
paired on short notice by
N. B. MILTON,
ll:tf Rills' News I)epot.
MONROE BAKERY,
DaSIARD STREET,
H. PETZOLD, Proprietor.
Families supplied with bread made of the
best flour. Cakes of every kind kept for
sale, or made to order. -
FANCY GROCERIES,TOBACCO,CIGAIRS,
Fruits, Confections, &c.,
Kept in stock and will be sold at the lowest
market price. October 6, 1877. ly
PROF. E. IIEFFNER,
TEACHER OF
VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC,
Having permanently located in Monroe,
will instruct pupils in either vocal or in
strumental music. He will give lessons on
the flute, cornet, clarinet, guitar, piano or
violin; and vocal music will be taught after
the best method. Lessons given at the
pupils' homes, or at his residence on St.
John street, next door south of the post
office. Music furnished for balls, parties,
&c. January 18, 1878. ly
ONION SETTS,
RED AND WHITE,
12 AT McFEE'S.
NEW ORLEANS CARDS.
-. A. P'EALE,
COTTON FACTOR
AND
OiGENERAL COhMMIhSION l~JIRC IFA NT,
No. 52 UNION STREET,
NEWI OJLEANB.
Liberal cash advances made on consign
monts of cotton. 1l:Om.-p
DISEASES OF THE EBYE AND EAR.
DR. C. BEARD,
OCVLIST AhTD ATRST,
142 Canal St., Now Orleans.
Hours from 9.30 to 8:80. Dr. Beard can
furnish good board and attention for sur
gical patients at the Orleans Inflirmary, 142
Canal St., of whlclh hle is one of the propri
etors. 12-In
THE SCRIFPTURAL PANORALA.
",There was. a fellow travelling
around in that country," said Mr.
Nickerson, " with a moral-religious
show-a sort of spiritual pagurama
and he hired a wooden-headed old alab
to play the plano for him. After the
first night's performance the showman
says:
" My friend, you seem to know pretty
much all the'tunes there are, and you
worry along first-rate. But then, don't
you notice that sometimes last night
the piece you happened to be playing
was a little rough on the proprieties, so
to speak-you didn't seem to jibe with
the general gait of the picture that was
passing at the time, as it were-was a
little foreign to the subject, you know
-as if you didn't either trump or fol
low suit, you understand ?"
"' Well, no,' the fellow said, ' he
hadn't noticed, but it might be; he
had played along just as it came handy.'
" So they put it up that the simple
old dummy was to keep his eye on the
panorama after that, and as soon as a
stunning picture was reeled out he was
to fit it to a dot with apieoe of mselo
that would help the audience to get
the idea of the subject, and warm them
up.like a eamp-treeting revival. That
sort of thing would corral their sympa
thles, the showman. said..
" There was a big audience that
night-mostly middle-aged and old peo
ple who belonged to the church,-and
took a strong interest in Bible matters,
and the balance were pretty much
young bucks and helfemrs-they always
come out strong on panoramas, you
known because it gives them a chance
to taste one another's complexions in
the dark.
" Well, the showman begun to swell
himself up for the lecture, and the old
mud-dobber tackled the piano and ran
his fingers up and down once or twice
to see that she was all right, and the
fellows behind the curtain commenced
to grind out the panorama. The show
man balanced his weight on his right
foot, and propped his hands over his
hips, and flung his eyes over his shoul
der at the scenery, and said.:
"' Ladies and gentlemen, the paint
ing now before you illustrates the
beautiful and -touching parable of the
Prodigal Son. Observe the happy ex
pression just breaking over the features
of the poor, Suffering youth--o worn
and ,weary with his long. march; note
also the eastascy beaming from the up
lifted countenance of the aged father,
and the joy that sparkles in the eyes of
the excited group of youths and mai
dens, and seems ready to burst into the
welcoming chorus from his lips. This
lesson, my friends, is a solemn and in
structive as the story is tender and
beautiful.'
" The mud-dobber was all ready, and
when the second speech was finished,
struck up :
"' Oh, we'll all get blind drunk,
When Johnny comes marching home I' "
" Some of the people giggled, and
some groaned a little. The showman
couldn't say a word. He looked at the
pianist sharp, but he was all lovely and
serene-he didn't know there was any
thing out of gear.
"The panorama moved on, and the
showman drummed up his grit and
started afresh.
S' Ladies and gentlemen, the fine
picture now unfolding itself to your
gaze exhibits one of the most notable
events in the Bible history--our Sa
vior and his disciples upon the sea of
Galilee. How grand, how awe-inspir
Ing are the reflections which the sub
ject invokes. What sublimity of faith
is revealed to us in this lesson from the
sacred writings ! The Savior rebukes
the angry waves, and walks securely
upon the bosom of the deep !'
" All around the house they were
whlspering, 'Oh, how lovely, how
beautiful l' and the orchestra let him
out again:
"'A life on the ocean wave,
And a home on the rolling deep I' "
" There was a good deal of honest
snickering turned on this time, and
considerable groaning, and one or two
old deacons got up and went out. The
showman grated his teeth, and cursed
the piano man to himself; but the fel
low sat there like a knot on a log, and
seemed to think he was doing first
rate.
" After things got quiet the showman
thought he would make one more stag
ger at it any way, though his confi
dence was beginning to get mighty
shaky. The supes started the panorama
grinding along again, and he says :
"' Ladies and gentlemen, this exqui
site painting represents the raising of
Lazarus from the dead by our Savior.
The subject has been handled with
marvelous skill by the artist, and such
touching sweetness and tenderness of
expression has he thrown into it that I
have known peculiarly sensitive per
sons to be even affected to tears by
looking at it. Observe the half-confused
half-enquiring look upon the wakened
Lazarus. Observe, also, the attitude
and expression of the Savior, who takes
him gently by the sleeve of his abshroud
with one hand, while he points with
the other toward the distant city.'
' Before anybody could get off an
opinion in the case; the innocent old
ass at the piano struck up:
"' Come rise up William Ri--ley,
And go along with me I'
" Whe-ew I All the solemn old flats
got up in a huff to go, and everybody
else laughed till the windows rattled.
I TIhlI shlowman went lown and
gahbbed the ore~estra and shook him
up and.ays:
" 'That lets you out, you know, you
bowder-beaded old clamn: Go to the
doorkeeper nd get. your money, and
cut your stiok-vamnse the anub '
Ladles and gentlemen, elrnamstances
over which I have no control eompel
me to dismiss the house.' "-Mark
swaein.
 esP4u 4- - ------. "
NATHAN HALE--JOHN ANDRI.
Editor New Fork SItm:
I was pleased to find, in reading the
Sun this morning, that there was at
least one American besides myself who
protested against the erection of a
monument to Major Andre in this
country. When I red 'the proposition
of Mr. Cyrus WV. Field in your paper
on- Saturday last I was filled with
astonishment. I asked myself, could
toadyism to British pride and arro
ganeo go further ? Where is thembnu
ment to Nathati Hale ? Of the two he
appears to me iur the nobler and man
lier character. Andre entered our lines
by stealth to corrupt a General in our
armies from his alleglance, and sur
reptitiously obtain possession of one of
our strongholds, considered the key
to our defences, the loss of which might
have involved the subjugation of the
colonies. He was caught, tried, and
hanged as a spy, according to the well
known laws of war. When arraigned,
he pleaded earnestly in extenuation
that he was no spy, only an envoy
from his Commander-in-Chief, aathor
ized to treat with an American officer
of high rank-for what ? The violation'
of that officer's oath by the base and
treacherous surrender of a fortrees to
the enemy. Andre's condemnation
and execution have been justified by
the ablest writers on the laws of war
of that period and subsequently. He
received all sympathy and kindness
compatible with his situation. His
execution was delayed by Washington,
It is said, in the hope that the sur
render of Benedict Arnold, or even his
capture through the bold device of
Sergeant John Champe, might give
the American Commander-in-Chief an
excuse to save his life.
Who was Nathan Hale? A young
Captain in the Connectlcut militia who
boldly took his life in his hand to save
the patriot army which, broken and.
dispirited, llngered in New York un
der Washington after the disastrous
battle of Long Island, by obtaining in
formation as to the proposed move
ments of Lord Howe, then encamped
with a vastly superior force on Brook
lyn Heights. lie was daught, tried
and condemned. He attempted no
evasion, but frankly admitted his
offense, the object of which-to save
his country-he gloried in. He was
sentenced to be hung the next day.
The attendance of a clergyman and
even the use of a Bible were denied
him, and the letters he wrote to his
iatally and friends wore destroyed.
When inquiry was afterward made as
to this last Inhumanity the reply was
that "the rebels should not know they
had a man in their army who dould
die with so much firmness." In the
brief space between this sentence and
execution, Hale was treated with the
grossest barbarity, being placed in
charge of the Infamous Capt. Cunning
ham as Provost Marshal, who was
hung for forgery in London in 1791,
and declared in his dying confession
that while in charge of the old prison
at New York he had been accessory to
the deaths of 2,000 prisoners, starved
in the churches, by stopping their pro
visions, which he sold, and also to the
murder of 275 Americans, with or
without the orders of his Government I
Nathan Hale died a spy, but a martyr
in the cause of civil liberty. Where
is his monument? Some thirty years
ago, a few brave, patriotic women of
Connecticut undertook to build it with
their needles. How far their pious
task succeeded I am unadvised.
I have seen the monument over
Andre's remains which rest in WVost
minster Abbey, splendidly entombed,
beside England's kings, heroes and
sages. And now a wealthy son of New
England proposes to raise him a mon
ument in this country, whose Inde
pendence he sought to defeat, not by
force of arms, but through the most
despicable treachery. Should Mr.Fleld
carry out his purpose. I think I can
furnish a more appropriate inscription,
under the circumstances, than even his
learned, courtly and aristocratic friend,
Dean Stanley :
Hlere Lie
MAJOR JOHN ANDRE,
A Loyal Officer of King (Meorgo Iii.,
Cruelly Hanged by the Arch-robol,
Gaonos WAaSlIoTON.
JohtN W. B3tvYE.
Hoboken, N. J., Dec. 24.
Great ceremonies are necessary, says
the Itailway News, to get a train off in
Germany. When all is ready a bell
rings. Then another bell rings. Then
the engine whistles, or rather toot-toot
toots gently. Then the conductor tells
the station master that all is ready.
Then the station master looks placidly
around and says, "So?" Then the
conductor shouts "Fortig ?" Interroga
tively. Then the station master re
plies "Fertig !" positively. Then the
conductor blows a horn; the engine
whistles; the bell rings; the other bell
rings; the station master says ",So?"
the passengers swear in various tongnes
-and the train starts. That is, unless
there is a belated fat man-in which
as' thoey3 do it all ovr nagainil.
OEOR IA't GREAT GUN.
Lob Too bs at i. Persemonal Appear
auee-Wlhit' e Hea to eay of
National Pollttes.
[Coresspondenee Cincanal Oommnseial.]
* WAaSNoi r, Dsaee. .-Gen. Robert
Toombes; r etOuMia,:utieadnlyknwan
as the get eethe gbsea
tlem a " _ n ash,- floa
until hg4laled Maltl ,pjtteas 1"
of Bunker Uisa heey aMend
ing to important ibsin beSa' the
Supreme corat. ]oe tbe,l t hree
yeea he has been vitin Waeiihtrm
nrequently, called hitlr to to sam
before the suj eme tdbq, Hi law
practlce is very ,xti and . satid
to be mdre lucrative than sny other
privatepractice Inthbefouth. He never
,touches a casn [or a .le ensldegateu
than 65000. As a. blM t advieate.
and as an able and aealculastal Jrat,
his reputation is s great how ia Il hi
p almyypolltieal days when itb fhed the
Senate by his burning rhetorle and ln
flamed the Southern Beart, stung by .hl
impassioned declamation. W, met
him as he left the Supreme Court to
day, and on presenting our card as a
preliminary for a littletalk, we took a
survey of thellistrious ohasamct while
he was considerdlgogr claims bPr an
audience. He is a man of tive feet ten
inches in hel ht, with a fual 170 pounds
mathematieally destribitted over his
several limbs; his physique is not im
posing, but t Is ilapsesive to one en
the first meeting that within the aasng
is an Iron soul, a steel heart a an gl
en brain; his face is broad adM CdOiu
cut; his eyes are still gray and shin
with but little dimnnes, though sixt-;
five years have passed since they ftib
saw light; his hair shows the pencil
ings of time and the aptseA of the
grave; it Is not snowy white, but thor
oughly gray; in quantity it is abun
dant and hangs la long straight looks
almost to his collar; it Is roughly kept,
showing that comb and brush are not
the most favorite utensils of his house
hold. His head is unusually large, the
forehead Is broad and almost'eoeesalve
ly high; it is not a retreating but a
projecting and overhanglpg .ont the
cerebellum is Igij4l ad ..roalafy devel
oped, making th t inq ul ipt
of the gentleman syimnliiltbi and well
fashioned. Age has shown its arl
in another partlcular by stoping the
shoulders that were once to straight
and strong. His clothes are quite com
mon and fit rather loosely. 'His shirt
was not the cleanest we have seen, and
his tie could certainly have sustained
a better Chesterfield twist. a Well,
says he, after glancing at our card, wlh
a very polite bow and a warm grasp of
the hand, " I am glad to see you, but I
do not want to be asked any questions
of a personal or strongly political char
acter. You must remember that I am
not a citizen of this country, so I should
not be used as an oracle of the views of
any sect or organization." After giv
ing assuaance that no personal ques
tionashould be Introduced, we ventured
on the broad question of the South.
" The South," said he, " Is poor, not
on the verge of bankruptcy, but clear
down in the abyss of poverty; not one
decade, but two it Will take to restore
the South to her pristine glory and po
sition. The war left us in a horrible
condition, but by perseverance, econo
my, education and the restoration of
local government, we will In time fully
recuperate." " Who Is the South In
favor of for President in 1880 on the
Democratic ticket ? and if the Republi
cans are to have another executive who
would the South prefer ?" "Well I
will answer your last question first. If,
by the decrees of Omnipotence, we are
not to be free for for i years more from
Radical power, then I should say give
us a full lion, not a sucking sheep.
Grant is a lion. I have respect for the
Juan, bccauso he kills or wine. I have
never forgotten how gracefully he
treated Lee and our soldiers at Appo
mattax. No, Grant is better a lion,
though he is, for the South than is a
sheep who strives to make a bear of
himself." " I don't understand your
figures, General." " Oh, well then, I
will not explain further." "But you
have not answered my first question.'t
"a No, sir, I must beg not to do so, for
there are so many admirable gentlemen,
both in the North and in the South,
that are so entirely calculated to become
the Democratic standard-bearer that I
must forbear to speak of them by
name." " What do you think of Thur
man, General?" "I think Judge
Thurman is a great man, a man of
wonderful judicial capacity, a gentle
man of fine manners, of polished edu
cation and a statesman of extraordinary
character and foresight."
" Who Is the choice of Georgia, Gieno
rarl, for the nomination ?"
"+Georgia wants the man who can
win-the strongest man in the whole
flold--a man who can wield enough
strength to demolish at one stroke the
whole system of rotten Republicanism.
But will you excuse me, as I see my
froiend, IRepresentative Hooker, and I
desire to see him?" and so the old, but
still vigilant and invincible defender
hibf State rights, the ultra leader of the
South, the last consplenous survivor of
the deceased Oalhoan confederacy,
slowly, but majestically moved away,
and was soon lost in the great ball,
where he so often pleaded for his prin.
ciples with an eloquence like unto Mc.
Dutfle, Irontiss, C'honte and Webster.

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