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The Ouachita telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1865-1889, January 10, 1879, Image 1

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VOLUME XIV. MONROE, LOUISIANA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1879. NUMBER 18
THE TELEGRAPH:
Pabllhe. every Friday
,T MONROE. OUACHITA PARII ,. LA.
.. wTi. Sa canadarESR.
Editor and Proprietor.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
(,Oe copy, oneyear ............................. 4,
-ne copy, six months ......................... 5.60
ADVANOS 3A7aSM
,:fne copy, one year............... ............3,-J
One copy, six month .........................-9.00
TARIFF OF ADVERTISING RATEB.
Advertisements will be lnserted at one
dollar and fifty cents per square (one inch
ot space or lesm) for the first, and seventy
five cents for each subsequent insertion,fbr
any time under one m6nth. For longer
perlods as follows :
Nu anausaa es. 1 9m. Sm.6m. ism.
One ........................ l * = I s I
Two ........................ 8 50 1 1 30 -5
Three.....................11000 15 17 18 s1
Four...................118.....100 2 2 8 45
Five............... ........ 1 00 5m 2l 3 40 =0
Ton(3oe ....... .70 0
Fifteen( eoL) ..... 40 30O 190
Twenty-one (t e.).. 50 00 85 15 175
Cards of a personal ecaraeter-when ad
missible-will be charged double our regu
lar advertising rates.
Obituary and Marriage noties will be
charged as advertisements.
Anyperson sending u five new eash sub
scribers, at the same post-omice, will be en
titled to a copy of Tarm TALGomAI gratis
for one year.
ADVERTISING REGULATIONS.
Transient advertisements must be paid
for in advance.
All advertisements sent to this ofice
when not otherwise ordered, will be in
aerted "itil forbid" and charged acordtagy.
Editorial business notices will be made,
free of charge, of all advertisements ordered
in the paper; for other editorial notices a
charge of 25 cents per line will be mde.
PROFUSSIONAL CARDS.
a. 0. coas. A. A. n4UMT.
Cobb & Gunby,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
A * Aug. 2, 1878, 46 tf.
Dr. Wam. eandel
T tENDERS his services as Physician and
I Surgeon, to the public. Hean be fhund
upon his plantation, four miles below Mon
roe. March 11, 1874. i-ly
R. 3. TODD. DAVID TODD.
Tedd s Te4d,
ATTORNEYi AT LAW,
MONROE)&,"LA.
December 7. 1877. MONROE,
L. N. Polk,
ARIh SURVEYOR, Ouachita parish
draughtin promptly cttended to. Trm
cash. April 12, 178.
Joha T. Ladolag,
A TORNEY AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
will practice in the State and Federsl
Courts in Loulsiana, and in the Snupreme
Court at Washington City. 11:3m
Dr. It. C. 8trother,
OFFERS his services to the citisens of
Monroe and vicinity. Office: Corner
of Grand and Wood streets, on bank of the
river. August 24, 1877. v8-n41
FPnAR IaTUIIeD. JNO. a. sTOsE.
Stabbe k Eteaoe,
ATTORN .YS AT LAW, Monr, La.,
Office in Henry Kindermnsann's build
Itng, upstairs, on DeSiard street.
October 2. 1874. tf.
Frankln Garrett,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
Lands for sale and rent in the par
isnos of Ouachita, Morehouse and Richbland,
including desirable farms. Special atten
tion to real estate titles. Communications
solicited from parties to buy, sell or rent
lands and houses. Enquiries promptly
answered. Correspondents in all the
States. December 6, 1878. ly
Dr. Thes, Y. Aby,
MONROE, LA.,
OFFICE on DeSiard street, at the nlter
section of First, in the rear room of
building formerly oooupied by A. J.
Keller
January 6, 1876, ly
R. W. RICHARDSON. C. . nOATNS.l
Rlehakrde 4 Beatmer,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT
Law Monroe, L. will practice in all
the Parishes of Northi Louisiana, in the
Supreme Court at Monroe, the Federal
Courts, and in the Land Offce Department
of the General Government.
Office fronting northeast corner of public
square. January 3, 1878.
Ue, A. 1. Shelase.
MONROE, LA.,
OFFERS his professional services to the
citizens of Monroe. Office in his Drug
Store on DeSiard street.
September 24, 1876. ly.
R. RICHARDSON. a. D. Mr'NBYT.
$Relhardsoa D I emaery
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Monroe, La.,
will practice in all the parishes of
North Louisiana, the Supreme Court of the
ate, the Federal Courts, and in the Land
Alice Department of the General Govern.
ment. January 11, 1878.
Dentilsry.
DR.S.L. BERACEY, Dentist, respecltfully
offers his professional services to the
citizens of Monroe and surrounding coun
try. Having an experience of fourteen
years in the practice, he feels confident of
giving satisfaction in all branches of his
profession. Is willing to warrant all work.
Ofice at residence on Jackson street, near
the Female Academy, Monroe, La.
v7-marl8:ly
TALBOT STILLMAN,
ATTOQN Y AT 4 44W,
4MONROE, LA.
Will practice in the Parish and District
Courts of North Louisiana. Will attend
these courts in person.
Will give special attention to Land Offce
natters connected with the Laud Office at
Monroe.
Will give to all business immediate at
tention and abundant care.
Will answer all co mnUllunictions with the
east pos1siblo (lelay.
August 10, 1 177. ly
jTOS APRINTING.I
JOB OFFICE.
:o:
We are prepared Lo exeoul.
-JOB PRINTING,
FROM THE MAMMOTH POSTER
TO THE WEDDINO CARD.
PLAIN. ORNAMENTAL. AND
.FANCY PsIITIrI ,
a
GUCH AS
POSTERS,
HAND-BILIS,
PLACARDSB,
SCIRULARS,
BILL-HEADS,
BRIEFS,
PROGRAMMeB,
BILLS OF LADING,
BLANK RECEIPTS,
CATALOUG E8
LAW BLANKS,
BALL TICKETB,
PAMPHLETS,
e':, he., Ac.
ALSO
CARD WORK
OF EVERY VARIETY
IN TES LAT3T AN~D MOBT
APPROVED STYLE OF THE ART.
or auer atu, coo, AND
ON ANY QUALITY OF PAPER
PRICE ACCORDIONGLY.
MONROE ADVERTISEMENTS.
NW ALHAIMBRA RESTAURANT
Has been removed to the corner of St.
John sad St. Ann street, in the rear of B.
Bills' book tore, where I will be found at
all hours, redy to serve my old customers
and the public with the beat that Now Or
leans and this market can afford.
Oysters in every Style ;
Fishk Crabs,
Shrimp, Game,
And everything else to be found in a
FIRST-CLASS RESTAURANT.
I will give my personal attention to all
who Call upon me and guarantee the best
attentlon.
G. C. ENSSMINGER.
Monroe. October 6.1877.
R TAIL FAMILY GROCERY STORE
ALL GOODS FRESH, AND DIRECT
FROM ST. LOUIS.
I have opened, at the store formerly ooou
pied by Chai. Saunders, a retail family gro
ery, and ofer to the public a choic selec
ttion of Family Grocerles, at lower prices,
for the cash, than any house in Monroe. I
solicit a share of the trade, and guarantee
satasfaction.
Mr. JAMa T. LawIs will be in charge of
the business and attend to the demands of
customers.
U. W. PIERCE.
Monroe, Oct. 2, 1877.
SOUTHERN CARRIAGE FACTORY.
The nnderalgned takes pleasure In making
known that he is now as well prepared as
before the war, if not better, to do all kinds
of work, either in
.Masselestis or Repairtssp
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, HACKS, ETC
Beady made work kept on hand; speci
mens of which may be seen by calling at the
Factory. Ise will also carry on a general
lackamit shZop arranged to do all kinds of
blackamitrain. Terma reasonable.
April 2 1860. n30-- FR. ENDOM.
MONROE BAKERY,
DaStARD STREET,
H. PETZOLD, Proprietor.
Families supplied with bread made of the
best flour. Ca ee of every kind kept for
sale, or made to order.
FANCY GROCERIES,TOBACCO,CIGARS,
Freits, Ceafetleaon, Ae.,
Kept in stock and will be sold at the lowest
market price. October 6.1877. ly
PELICAN SALOON,
Grand Street, Pierce's Old Stand,
W. H. FERRY, Proprietor.
Where the public will always find the
very best variety of liquors and drinks
servad up in style by an old and experi
enced ba-tender. He offers Fana LfrLĀ·c
every day as an extra inducement to the
public, from 11 o'clock a. m. to 8 o'clock
. in., consisting of Hot Seasoned Soups;
Roast Beef, Salads, etc. Price of one drink,
inclusive of Lunch, only IAc. Ho respect
fully solicits a liberal share of the patron
age of the public.
Monroe, January 25, 1878.
DIEDOLD SAFE AND LOCK CO.,
CANTON, OHIO.
N. B. MILTON, AGENT,
MONROE, LA.
Safes sold for less money than by any
one traveling, on tine, or for a heavy tdis
count for cash.
Guns, pistols and sewing machines re
paired on short notice by
N. B. MILTON,
1l:tf Rills' News Depot.
Successor to
Invites the attention of the public to his
entirely new and elegant stock of
SGOLD AND SILVER WATCIHES,
.......... ............... ......... ....... .............. :
CLOCKS, JEWELRY,
DIAMONDS AND PRECIOUS STONES.
Also a full and extensive line of
SOID STERLING
SILVER AND PLATED WARE.
Watches RIepaired, Diamonds Reset,
AND
NEV ORLEANS.
January 3, 1879. 31um
W e A. PEALE,
COTTO.N FA CTOR
AND
OCEN'ERSAL AO3IMI ON MRIIS[A . ",
No. 52 UNION STREET,
NE'IV OLrLES.
Lurnish good board anesd attention for sur
mgcal patlents at the Orlans firnary, 1
anal t., of whleh h is oe of the plroiri
eiors. 12-1in
TILE EXPENSIVE SENATE.
"Vhy Uncle Snan Groans--LeRnons
and sugar.
[Brooklyn Eagle.]
The Secretary of the Senate has made
his annual report to that body. A
careful examination of the items of ex
penditure contained therein shows that
the spirit of economy practiced by the
House has not yet prevaded the north
wing of the Capitol. Among a few of
the miscellaneous articles for which the
Government has to pay are pocket
books worth from $1 to $8.70 a piece,
pocket-knives costing $21.79 per dozen,
rubber corkscrews at $4.50 per dozen,
visiting cards printed from plate, au
tograph albums worth from eighty-five
cents to $1.25 a piece, Mark Twain
scrap-books, mourning cards, six brass
castors for chairs in the Senate cham
ber cost $18, gum camphor costing 830
has been purchased, dozens of gallons
of bay rum and cologne, bottles of
castor oil, French blacking, combs,
brushest ice, etc., are frequent Items in
the list. Shaving materials, Pinaud's
soap, toilet bottles, Brown's ginger,
olive oil, and, in fact, an assortment of
articles sufficient to thoroughly equip
a fancy store, have been bought by the
Secretary for the use of the Senate.
One dozen of Martinique snuff cost $10.
The Senate generously allowed $100
compensation to T. A. Jones, an em.
ployee, for injuries received while re
pairing the Senate elevator. Mr. Jones
was incommoded for nearly a week by
his injuries. Eight lunches for the
Committee on Appropriations cost $120,
and six boxes of lemons and 120 pounds
of sugar were required to mix the
drinks.
The cost of investigating the frivo
lous charges against Senator Grover, of
Oregon, and his alleged participation
in electoral vote for Tilden, cost $10,217
34. James Redpath received $1,548
for services as clerk to the sub-commit
tee. Redpath's chief business was to
arrange the reports into a sensational
manner, placing small cap head lines
over those portions of the testimony
taken which showed that the Demo.
crats had terrorized the negroes. Sena
tor Chrlstiancy informed the Eagle
correspondent last winter that he re
fused to sign the report simply because
of the presence of Redpath's obnoxious
head lines. Murphy, the Senate steno
grapher, received $1,200 for compiling
for publication the proceedings of the
Electoral Commission. J. A. Burbaud,
the confidential private secretary of the
late Senator Morton, was. paid $12 a
day for services as special clerk to the
Committee on Privileges and Elections
during the political investigations of
1876.
George E. Bullock was paid $10 per
day for forty-three days " for extra ser
vices rendered Committee on Privileges
and Elections while acting under Sen
ate resolution of December 5, 1876, to
investigate elections held in certain
States, in examining, assorting, etc.,
certain telegraphic dispatches furnished
said committee by the Western Union
Telegraph Company, from January 21,
to March 4, 1877, inclusive." There is
a flavor of cipher telegranms in this
item of expense.
TIIE COLD WAVE.
Causes, Extent and Efect of the
Veatnther TVe've Bleen Hlavitg.
[Philadeiphia Times.]
The cold wave which reached the
West and Northwest on the winter
solstice, December 21, accompanied by
a large fall of snow, was modified in
this city and vicinity by warm winds
from the south, which made it a day of
snow, rain, fog, ice, sluch and storms.
Since then the wind has been princi
pally from the northwest, and, being
deprived of a large portion of its heat
by passing over vast areas of snow, the
weather, to the great joy of dealers in
ice and the venders of poultry and
other articles likely to be injured by a
mild temperature, has grown colder.
On Monday morning the thermometer
indicated 20 degrees above zero in some
parts of this city, and on yesterday
morning, in like exposure, 18 degrees.
In Europe, and especially in England,
the fall of snow has been unusually
heavy, and in Canada and some parts
of New York and the New England
States the depth is three feet. The fall
of so great a quantity of snow imme
diately after a mild weather which
preceded it is not common, and is due
to climatic influences which might be
traced across the Atlantic. If the cold
weather which is now prcyailing should
continue even to a late period in the
spring the winter must be far shorter
than the many which have preceded
it. In thle winter of 183.5-36 the ground
was covered with snow from the 25th of
November till late in April, and on the
10th of that month a team loaded with
two tons of iron crossed the West
Branch of the Susquehanna on thle ice,
and in 1874-756 the ground continued
frozen from Thanksgiving Day to the
last of MaItrch. Although severely cold
weather is a cause of much suffering to
t~e poor and increases the demands on
the charitable by the diminution which
it onuses of out-door labor, yet it is not
without its sources of enjoyment and
its benefits. Setting aside the pleasure
and healthful exercise of skating, which
the ice-covered streams afford to the
young and those of larger growth, the
ground Iby lt.in'g ulIsiy tfro,,,n is mnore
open when spring arrives for the per
meation of moisture, and is more rea
dily penetrated by the roots of plants.
As the temperature is generally higher
when snow is falling than after it has
been deposited, and, being a poor con
ductor of heat, it protects the roots of
plants from the injury which the ex
pansion incident of freezing and thaw
ing would produce.
It is well known by every owner of
a laundry that extreme cold produces
evaporation almost as readily as ex
treme heat, and vegetation unprotected
by snow where exposed to a high degree
of cold is deprived of moisture and per
ishes. The almost eatire failure of the
wheat crop in Pennsylvania in 1875
was due to this source. The cold was
severe and long continued, but the fall
of snow comparatively small. As a
consequence the grain and grass be
came dry and Itfeless, so much so that
a field of winter grain set on fire by the
sparks of a locomotive burnt with the
rapidity of stubble.
The severe cold of winter also aids in
destroying the larvae of insects, and
thus helps to keep in check one of the
great sources of disappointment and
loss to the husbandman.
DISSECTING AN ELEPHANT.
(N. Y. Sun, 28th ult.]
Professors and students of the Colum
bia Veterinary College, on Thursday
morning, dragged the carcass of the
baby elephant that died the day before
in Central Park into their court yard.
Then they prepared to hoist it to their
dissecting room. The great weight of
the animal alarmed them for the safety
of their pullies and hoisting ropes, but
reflection overcame this ditfficulty. At
nightfall they had fitted up an incline
plane, placed the animal upon it, and
adjourned for the morrow's work.
There gathered yesterday about the
body, Prof. Spitzka, Dr. Finlay and a
score of students. Before fixing the
ropes and tackling, they stripped the
monster of its skin, thereby saving the
hoisting of a hundred pounds. Sling
ing the body upon the table, the stu-.
dents prepared for the autopsy. Two
seniors, G. II. Borns and C. A. Meoyer,
with a junior, went with sharpened
knives at the abdomen, while Profs.
Spitzka and Finlny cut and carved
about the head.
WVhen the examination was finished,
Prof. Spitzka gave an explanation of
the autopsy :
"This animal was about two years
old, and had not, of course, attained
its full growth. Its weight was about
800 pounds. That spongy, honey
combed looking bone contains the air
chambers. You notice that there are
two skulls. In the skull oC the ole
phant that went mad in the Royal
College of London, -100 bullets were
embedded, yet only one of that num
her caused death. The only way to
death, in my opinion, when firing at
the head, is through the eye.
"Tlhis is the brain ; its weight is five
pounds," the l'rofessor said. Placing
a human brain beside it, lie continued:
"The intellectual portion is well de
veloped. The convolutions are more
intricate than those of the human
brain. The spinal cord is not so large
as that of the horse. The trunk is rich
with nerves and muscles. The eye is
smaller than the horse's. The heart,
you will notice, has two points; in
that it differs from all other animals.
This shape is seen in a marine mon
ster, whose shape is somewhat like to
that of the porpoise. The complex
mass of muscle on Ithe neck, which
supports the head, is most interesting.
The direct cause of death was ipul
monary congestion. The lungs were
so congested that they sank in water."
The hide was exhibited. The cover
ing of the feet looked like large rubber
shoes. The hide at this part is more
than three-quartersof an inch in thick
ness.
" The Israelites," said the husbaInd
of a model and economical housekeep
er, " the Israelites may have had
quails till they couldn't rest, and be
gan to sigh for hash, but they were
Jews and couldn't have pork in their
stews, so I don't wonder. ult If the
Israelites hind had roast turkey on
Tuesday, and turkey warmed over on
Wednesday, and cold turkey on Thurs
day, and hashed turkey on Friday,
and turkey-bone soup on Saturday,
then they'd have kicked. However, I
don't think she can get any thing more
out of that turkey."
A correspondent of the BJoston
Transcript writes: "Please inform me
of the origin and meaning of 'Iiobson's
choice.' " The answer is: ,"The pro
verb took its rise from Thomas Hlobson,
an English stable-keeper of the Moven
teenth century, who let his horses byy
turn as they stoodl, never giving his
patrons their choice. It was that or
none, and hence calne the proverb,
'IHobson'.s choice.' "
The fool withl the gun is ibro:li in
the land at this season. The fool is
neither versatile nor ingenius, but he
is effective. I to either blows in the
mnuzzlc to see it it is loaided, or pulls
the guim to him lr, uzzle foremiost.
Texas has 1701% convi('ts, of whom
somne .504 are kept in pirison, siid the
rest are hired out to work on railroads
andl farms. One, unlergoing a life
sentenc, is hired bIy hi- wif,', anml
ljV,- comifritlnly :i i hb i,'.
THE YELLOW FEVER EPIDEMIC.
Conclusions of Dr. Choppin.
The Yellow Fever Commission ap
pointed by the two houses of Congress
is in session in New Orleans. Dr.
Choppin, President of the New Orleans
Board of Health, submitted as the re
suits of his observations during the
late elpidemic in that city, the fol
lowing :
1. Yellow fever is a ipecifie disease,
not indigenous to or originating spon
taneously in the United States, and its
appearance in this country Is always
due to a specific cause.
2. That the germ hypothesis of the
infection of yellow fever is the only
theory which explain satisfactorily to
my mind the phenomena and spread
of yellow fever, and the only one which
leaves us a hope of relief from its future
visitations.
3. The habitat or cradle of yellow
fever is in the West Indies, in the At
lantle and Gulf coasts of South America
and of Mexico, and in South Africa.
4. That all the great epidemics of
yellow fever In the United States, from
the time of its first Introduction into
Boston in 1093 to the present time, can
be directly or remotely traced to a for
eign country or to a foreign germ.
0. That it cannot be indigenous to
any place where a freezing temperature
is annually experienced.
0. That marsh miasm, city filth, or
garbage have no agency in the creation
of yellow fever; if the special matter or
germ of yellow fever be not present, a
corrupt atmosphere, however obnox
ious otherwise, will not produce the
pestilence.
7. If the germs of yellow fever be
present, defective drains, cesspools, de
composition of animal and vegetable
matter, heat and moisture may become
the potent distributors of the germs,
and of epidemic disease and death.
S. The infection of yellow fever once
established in the body, this evil form
of life must run Its course.
9. Medical science, as yet is power
less to arrest its progress, and the great
point to be arrived at Is to prevent its
access to the.human body, on the sound
doctrine of what we can't cure we must
10. The experience of the present
year has fully demonstrated the efficacy
of quarantine, when properly and faith
fully administered, as In Galveston,
Natchez, Shreveport, Monroe, in guard
ing their inhabitants from the ravages
of the pestilence.
11. There can be no mediocrity in
the organization of a quarantine. If it
does not Interpose an insurmountable
barrier between the healthy and In
fected localities, it is worse than useless.
12. Conditional quarantines cannot
and will not be effective so long as cu
pidity is an attribute to human nature.
13. Disinfection, although a valuable
auxiliary agent in the prevention of
yellow fever and cholera epidemics,
cannot be entirely depended upon to
attack such it powerful and subtle foe
as yellow fever infection.
.1i. The great object we have in view
is to prevent the germs or somites of
this dreaded pestilence from having
access to our people; and the only cer
mtim and surn preventive of yellow fever
in my humble opinion, is absolute non
intercoursc with ports where yellow fe
ver is indigenous from the " first of
May to the fitrst of November of cach
year."
15. If the several Stains have not the
power of preventing commercial non
intercourse with foreign ports, impose
such quarantine restrictions as the un
loading of cargoes of incoming ships,
subjecting thern to thorough fumigation
and purification, with suitable appli
ances for that purpose at the quarantine
stations, and compel the vessels to re
turn to sea without coming to our ports.
Their outward cargoes could be taken
to them by lighters or barges.
10. That a properly organized system
of quarantine in New Orleans, so far
from interfering with the interests, will
prove really beneficial to its commer
cial prosperity.
17. That the profits of our commerce
with ports where yellow fever usually
prevails for the summer months during
which it is necessary to enforce quaran
tine is not worth more than $1,500,000.
18. Pecuniary damage to New Or
leans by an epidemic of yellow fever,
on a money basis, without reference to
our blasted hopes and ruined prospects,
without considering the wholesale suf
fering and death which are presented
to us, is over twelve millions of dollars.
Mr. A. 13. Farquhar, in a letter to Dr.
Woodworth, supervising surgeon of the
Ii. M.H., places it at tile enormous sumr
of $175,000,0() for the whole country.
10. Now, who is so blind to every
sense of Justice and humanity as to
comlltare the trivial inconvenience re
suiting from an interrupted commerce
with tropical ports for a few months in
each year, to the desolating catastrophe,
the great public calamity of an oeli
demnic of yellow fever? WVho Is there
that will confess himself the advocate
of a system that values at so Insignifi
cant m plrice the lives of our Citizens ?
20. If New Orleans will not effectu
ally quarantino against all tropical
ports, where yellow fever is indigenous,
every State, every town and city on
the banks of the Mississipli, Ohio andl
Mlissourl rivers, every village in our
own State, will quarantluine against us
to pcetre them from, invailons of tlims
f,,r.ign lw- til,,nc -..

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