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The Ouachita telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1865-1889, January 17, 1879, Image 1

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VOLUME XIV. MONROE, LOUISIANA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1879. NUMBER 19
THE TELEGRAPH:
PabUlihod every Friday.
.rT .LONROE, OUACHITA PARISH. LA.
cs-. W, . 2hesola.A1%T M3,
Editor and Proprietor.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
fn,,copy, one year,..................... 4,00
.no copy, six months,......................... 2,50
ADVANCE RATES:
the copy, one year, .................. ............3,00
>ni copy, si onths ....................... .... ..2....00
'TARIFF OF ADVERTISING RATES.
'dvortiseanents will be inserted at one
dollar and fifby cents per square (one inch
of space or less) for the first, and seventy
live cents for each subsequent insertion, for
any time under one mnonth. For longer
periods as follows:
NUslBaRa q'REs.. 1.2a S m.dn.2m.
Ono........................ $3 501$ 0$ 8$ 1 15
Two........................ 0 10 1 20 25
Three..................... 10 00 15 17 26 35
Four....................... 13 00 20 23 32 45
Five.............. 15 00 25 27 40; 50
Ten (% col.)........... 21 00 40 50 701 90
Fifteeu( col.)....... 40 00 55 70 901 130
'Twenty-one (1 c.)... 50 00 70 851 125i 175
U(ard of a personac character-when ad
missilble-will be charged double our regu
lar advertising rates.
Obituary and Marriage notices will be
charged as advertisements.
Any person sending us live new cash sub
scribers, at the same post-offico, will be en
titled to a copy of Tirs TErEORAPir gratis
for one year.
AIDVERTISING REGULATIONS.
T'ranusiont advertiseoments must be paid
.for in radvance.
All advertisements sent to this office
wihen not otherwise ordered, will be in
serted "till forbid" and charged accordiugly.
Editorial business notices will be made,
Iree of charge,of all advertiseonents ordered
in the paper; for othier editorial notices a
charge of 25 cents per lino will be made.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
It. (I. conn. A. A. OUNRY.
Cobb & G unby,
AT'ITORNEYS AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
Aug. 2, 1873, 4i ttL
Dr. Win. Saudel
r 3F ENDERS his services as Physician and
1 Surgeon, to the publie lie can be found
upon his plantatiou,.fonr miles below Mon
roe. March 11, 1871. 25-1y
It. B. TODD. DAVITD TODD).
Todd & Todd,
ATTORNEYS AT.LAW,
MONROFl, LA.
December 7, 1877.
L. N. Piolk,
PARISHI SURVEYOR, Ounachita parish,.
La. Surveying, civil ongineioring and
draughlting promptly attended to. Terms
c3ah. AprIl 12, 1178.
John T. Ludeling,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, MONtROI, LA.,
will practice in tlhe State anl Federal
Ctourts in Louisiana, and in the Suproemo
Court at WVashington City. 11:m3n
Dr. BI. C. Mtrother,
OFFERS his services to the citizens of
Monroe and vicinity. Otlico: Corner
of t rand and Wood streets, on bank of the
river. August 21, 1877. vS-ni11
FPItAN S STUBDS. JNO. I1. STONE.
Stabbs &t Stone,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, M1onroe, La.,
OIHce in Henry Kindoernann's build
inlg, upstairs, on DeSlard street.
October 2, 1874. tf.
Franklin Garrett,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
Lands for sale and rent in the par
istes of Onschita, nMorehouse and Richland,
including desirable farms. Special atten
tion to real estate titles. Colulnnications
solicited from parties to boy, sell or rent
lands and houses. Enquiries promptly
answered. Correspondents in all the
States. December 0,1878. ly
Dr. Thos, V. Aby,
MONROE, LA.,
OFFICE on DeSiard street, at the inter
section of First, in the rear room ofI
building formerly occupied by A. J.
Keller.
January 5, 1876, ly
11. WV. RICHAIDSON. C. J. BOATNIiER.
leichardson a& Roatner,
STTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS AT
Law MPtonroe, La., will practice in lall
the Parishes of North Louisiala, ill the
Supremo Court at Monroo, the Federal
Courts, and in the Lanlld Otlice Departmeut
of the G(eneral Governmlent.
Ollico fronting northeast corner of public
.'luare. January 3, 1878.
Dr. A. B. Sholars.
MONROE, LA.,
l 'VFElS his professional services tol tIle
citizons of Monroo. Ollico in his Drug
Store on DoSiard stroet.
Neptemnber 24, 1875. ly.
it. RICHARDSON. S. D. M'ENIIIV.
Richardson & YleEnery,
TATTORNEYS AT LA\V, Monroe, La.,
will practice in all the parishes of!
North Louisiana, the Supreme ('Court of the
ate, the Federal Courts, and in the Land
mice Dopartment of the (leneral Govern
anent. January 11, 1878.
Dentistry.
D t. S. L. IIRACEY, Dentist, respectful lv
offers his professional services to tIme
citizenls of Monroo and surromllding coun
try. Having an oxperiocneo of fourteenm
vyars in the practice, ho feels confident of
givinlg satisfaction in all branches of his
prouessiou. Is willing to warrant all wvork.
OtlthI. at residence on Jacksont street, u:lir
thie Femoalo Acadellmy, Mollroe. LI:.
''v7-mmmarim: ly
''AI.HOT r STILLMlAN
ATTOltNEY AT LA.1\V,
IONltOE, LA.
WVill practice in tmhe Pariis mald li-mtrim-t
('onrts of North ILolisitla. 'Vill attend
these coulrts ill personl.
\Vill give spe'ial :lttontlion to I l,al ,1 0lie
matlers comnnected witlh the. I.:tnl lli.ce at !
Vill give to all bu.siness inmn ediate at
teotion and abmndant ca l'.
W ill aust er all l. ltlllll , ifionv wvit h t h
August 10c, 1877. 1
MONROE ADVERTISEMENTS.
NEW ALiIAMBRA RESTAURANT
Has been removed to the corner of St.
John and St. Ann street, in the rear ot IB.
Rills' book store, where I will be found at
all hours, ready to serve my old customers
and the public with the best that New Or
leans and this market can afford.
Oysters in every Style;
Fish, Crabs,
Shrimp, Game,
And everything else to be found in a
FIRST-CLASS RESTAURANT.
I will give my personal attention to all
who call upon me and guarantee the best
attention.
G. C. ENSSMINGER.
Monroe, October 6,1877.
RETAIL FAMILY GROCERY STORE
ALL GOODS FRESH, AND DIRECT
FROM ST. LOUIS.
I have opened, at the store formerly occu
pied by Chas. Saunders, a retail family gro
cery, and offer to the public a choice selec
tion of Family Groceries, at lower prices,
for the cash, than any house in Monroe. I
solicit a share of the trade, and guarantee
satisfaction.
Mr. JAMES T. LEwIs will be in charge of
the business and attend to the demands of
customers.
G. WI. PIERCE.
Monroe, Oct. 26, 1877.
SOUTHERN CARRIAGE FACTORY.
The undersigned takes pleasure in making
known that he is now as well prepared as
before the war, if not better, to do all kinds
of work, either in
Mfanttaeturing or Repairing
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, HACKS, ETC.
Ready made work kept on hand; spesl
mens of which may be seen by calling at the
Factory. He will also carry on a general
Bllacksmith shop, arranged to do all kinds of
blacksmithing. Terms reasonable.
January 1, 1879. FR. ENDOM.
THE GORNER SALOON,
ConNER DSIARD AND ST. JOuN SS.,
IMONROE, LA.
The undersigned, having opened a now
and elegantly furnished saloon in Monroe,
respectfully solicits a liberal share of ub
lic patronage. Every attention will be
ioven by a polite and experienced bar
oepoer. Imported and domestic Wines,
.ioLuors and Cigats kept constantly on
hand.
** All kinds of MxixED DImNK, in season,
a specialty. M. L. DEDMAN,
Jan. 1, 1879. Proprietor.
,¥IONROtE BAKERY,
DESIARD STREET,
II. PETZOLD, Proprietor.
Families supplied with broad made of the
boest flour. lakes of every kind kept for
sale, or lnado to order.
I'ANCY GROCERIES,TOBIACCO,CIG ARS,
Fruits, Confections, &c.,
Keopt ill stock and will be sold at the lowest
market price. October (, 1877. ly
])IEHIOLI) SAFE AND LOCK CO.,
CANTON, 01110.
N. T. MILTON, AGENT,
MONROE, LA.
Safes sold for less money than by any
one traveling, on time, or for a heavy dis
count :or cash.
(luns, pistols and sowing machinos re
paired on ahort notice by
N. B. hIfLTON,
ll:tf Rills' News Depot.
NEW ORLEANS CARDS.
GLrE(. E. S.'RONG,
Successor to
F. A_ TYLER,
I-ivites the attention of the public to his
entirely neow and elegant stock of
( ClOL) AND SILVER VATCHIIES, l
CLOCKS, JEWELRY,
lIAMIONDS ANI) PIRECIOIUS STONES.
Also a full andt extensive li, ,of
sor.rn STERLINOi
SILVI.lit AND I) l'LATEI) OVAltE.
Itcaltlhs i'pnaired, i)inmlnds It aset,
ANK)
J.1ewelry ol all kinds madet to order and
repaired by experiencell
aworkunmun.
i13 ................ .NAL STItRI ET. . .............. 115
NICEV O(III.\'N.
Jatnl:n . :t, I79. :111
W. A. P'EALE,
I ('(o'7TTO.V ,' 1 tClTO n"
lb. OCL.,EAlDS
OCCTLIST T AI'T ATRIJ-T,
112 (ttal St., New Orleans.
IInuros frott 1,:(.50 t 3:310. D)r. Heard ca:ll I
urliiilai gu~lo Inlrld anld attoltion for sur
Ei~al ):atietI' i I Ithe noeh s Itinrmary, 112
Itlanail St., .f which ha, is one .1 the j)ropri
od'-. 12-1bn
MONROE ADVERTISEMENTS.
J G. SANDERIS,
GRAND STREET, MONROE, LA.,
DIALER IN
HARDWARE, GROCERIES, DRY tiOODe
AND
GENERAL PLANTATION SUPPLIES
AND IMPORTER OF
LANDRETH'S GARDEN SEED.
KEEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAND
LIME, CEMENT AND PLASTER.
ALSO AN A80ORTMENT OF
WAGONS, WHEELBARROWS, PLOWS.
August 17, 1872. 48:tf
HENRY KOCH. J. F. WETZEL.
KOCH & WETZEL,
Dealers in all kinds of
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE,
COFFINS, COFFIN TRIMMINGS, dc.
Furniture repaired, or made to order, and
satisfaction guaranteed. All orders for
Furniture promptly attended to. Coffins
supplied at abort notice, with services of
Undertaker, if desired.
Store and shop on Grand street, opposite
MeFee'a drug store. An inspection of our
work and furniture is respectfully invited.
January 1, 1879: ly
NOTICE.
All my interest in the mercantile busi
ness, heretofore carried on under the name
of D. A. Breard, Sr.. has been transferred
to A. G. Breard, who will assume all liabil
ities of the late frm, and will conduct the
business, in the same building, in the
name of A. G. Breard.
D. A. BREARD, Sn.
Monroo, January 1, 1879.
Referring to the above announcenlont, I
respectfully informn the Public that I as
sume all the liabilities of the late firm of
D. A. Breard, Sr., and that I will continue
the business conducted by D. A. Breard,
Sr. in the sane building. A cordial invi
tation is extended to tihe Public to call at
Breard's Corner.
A. G. BREARID.
Monroe, January 1, 1879. 3t
OPERA HOUSE SALOON
DESIARD STREET, MONROE, LA.,
Adjoining the Opera House,
The undersigned having tlhorouglly fur.
nished the above saloon-built under his
directions and arranged expressly for the
pleasure and convenience of his patrons
respectfully tenders his services to the
public.
The Bap will be found supplied with the
very best of
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS,
BOTTLED, oR KEG BEER,
And at all times with a
PLENTIFUL SUPPLY OF ICE.
Lovers of Billiards will find two elegant
tables ready at their command. Polite
attention is guaranteed every custoumler,
and the strictest order rigorously enforced
at this saloon. G. W. PIERCE,
April 20, 1877. Proprietor.
-EDUCED PRICES.
Look out for the
LITTLE ISARBER nI1OP
Around tile corner, next to D. A. Breard.
B. MITCHELL, Proprietor.
HLair-cutting, 35c ; Shaving, 15e; Shamll
pooing, 35e. Oct. 12, 1877.
O UACHITA IIOUSE,
DrSIARD ST., MONROE, LA.,
JULIUS ENVEM osEn, Proprietor.
This House is now open for tile reception
of the traveling public. Favorable arrange
ments can be mnade for board by the week
or month. Aug. 9, 1878. ly
NEW MARKET HOUSE.
The undersigned has opened has opened
this new market house, and will be pleased
to suply the best of meats at all hours of
the day His old patrons are respectfully
invited to come and see him.
f Whole hogs, neatly butchered, sold
at Sc per pound. J. L. NELSON.
Dee. 19 1873.-14:tf.
JOB PRINTING
NEATLY EXECUTED
AT TIIIS OFF'ICE.
ONION ETT"S,
RED AND WHIIITE,
12 AT McFE'E'S.
MISCELLANEOUS.
'lP TOP,
TIHE CELBRtnATID
IHARNEIS AND SADDLE STALLION,
Will make the present season at Imy
stable on the Mctluire place, three miles
north east of Monroe, La. llis services are
offered at $10 a single leap ; $20 the season
or $25 to insure a mare inl foal. Money dcue
whlon the fact is nscertained or ,mare parted
with. The colt, in all cases, standinig goad
for the money.
DESCRIP'TION AND I'EDIGRIIIE:
T'i Tor is a beautiful bay, full In handls
ligin, strong and munsnlar, possessing tinne
style and action. Was sired by tile world
renowned ol1 Edwin Florresnt, owned by
Alexander of lieontucky; daRn by Excelsior
Morgan; grand ldam by old Gray Eagle.
PERFORMANCES :
lie Ilns taken several premniunus at vari
ous fairs in Keentucky. Also, in St. TLouis,
Mlo., and a nulnlor of premiuns at COlnnum
)in, Fultonn and Jeferonll City fairs, .connl
oetig with seiome of the boest trotter, iln tho
1Vest. lle has trotted a mile in ":40.
Mar h 29, 1878. Ii. WV. McLEOD.
JOn RiIINTING
NIEA'I'IY IEX I T(:T'IEI)
AT THIN OFFICE.
GiENERAL JACKSON'S NERVE.
The Extraordinary Manner in which
lie Put it Veto on Swindling on a
Tennessee Race Course.
[New York Herald, Nashvillle Letter.)
Many are the interesting scenes of
Jackson's life which his biographer,
Parton, has omitted and not brought to
light. When a boy I.saw him scare
and put to flight twenty thousand men.
The occasion was this: Grayhound, a
Kentucky horse, had beaten Double
Head, a Tennessee horse, and they
were afterward matched for $5,000 a
side, to be run on the Clover Bottom
Course. My uncle, Josephus H. Conn,
carried me on horseback behind him to
see the race. He set me on the ce
dar fence to remain till he returned.
In those days not only counties, but
States, in full feather, attended the
race course as a great national amuse
ment, and the same is still kept up in
France and England under the foster
ing care of each government. There
must have been twenty thousand per
sons present. I never witnessed such
fierce betting between the States.
Horses and negroes were put up. A
large pound was filled with horses and
negroes bet on the result of this race.
The time had now arrived for the com
petitors to appear on the track. I heard
some loud talking, and, looking down
the track, saw, for the first time, Gene
ral Jackson riding slowly on a gray
horse, with long pistols held in each
hand. I think they were as long as
my arm, and had a mouth that a
ground squirrel could enter. In his
wake followed my uncle Conn, Stoke
ley, Donelson, Patton Anderson and
several others as fierce as bull-dogs. As
General Jackson led the van and ap
proached the Judges' stand he was
rapidly talking and gesticulating. As
he camte by me he said that he had ir
refragable proof that this was to be a
jockey race, that Grayhound was seen
in the wheat field the night before,
which disqualified him for the race,
and that his rider was to receive $500
to throw it. off, and ", by the eternal
God" he would shoot the first man
who brought his horse upon the track;
that the people's money should not be
stolen from them in this manner. He
talked incessantly, while the spittle
rolled from his mouth and the fire from
his eyes. I have seen bears and wolves
put at bay, but he was certainly the
most ferocious looking animal that I
had ever seen. His appearance and
manner struck terror into the hearts of
20,000 people. If they felt as I did,
every one expected to be slain. He an
nounced to the parties if they wanted
some lead in their hides to first bring
their horses on the track, "a by the
eternal " he would kill the first man
that attempted to do so. There was no
response to this challenge, and, after
waiting some time and they failing to
appear. General Jackson said it was a
great mistake in the opinion of some,
that he acted hastily, without considera
tion. lie would give thescoundrels a fair
trial, and to that end he would consti
tute a court to investigate this matter,
who would hear the proof and do jus
tice to all parties. Thereupon he ap
pointed a sheriff to keep order and five
judges to hear the case. Proclamation
was made that the court was open and
was ready to proceed to business, and
for the parties to appear and defend
themselves. No one appearing, Gene
ral Jackson introduced the witness,
proving the bribery of Grayhound's
rider, who was to receive $500 to throw
off the race, having received $250 in
advance, and that Grayhound had been
turned into the wheat field the night
before. Ile again called on the parties
to appear and contradict this proof and
vindicate their innocence. They fail
ing to appear, General Jackson told the
court that the proof was closed, and
for them to render their judgment in
the premises, which, in a few mo
ments, was done in accordance with
the facts proved. I was still on the
fence forming one line of the large
pound containing the property bet on
the race. Each man was anxious to
get back his property. General Jack
son waved his hand and announced the
decision, and said: " Now, gentle
men, go calmly and in order, and each
man take his own property." When
the word was given the people came
with a rush. It was more terrible than
an army with banners. They came
bulging against the fence, and, in the
struggle to get over, they knocked It
down for hundreds of yards. I was
overturned and nearly trampled to
death. Each man got his property,
and thus the fraudulent race was brok
en up by an exhibition of the most ex
traordinary courage. IHe did that day
what it would have required 2,000
armed men to have effected. All this
was effected by the presence and action
of one man, and without the drawing
of one drop of blood. A certain know
Iedge that in one event streams of blood
woul lhave flowed to efflect this great
and worthy object.
•IEXICAN VETERIIANS.
As there are a great rumhber of per
sons interesited in pensiolan claims, we
,ropose to call attention to certain
points which may be of service to such
I~ersons. The hill granting ipensions to
MIexican soldiers will soon become a
law, and almost every soldier thinks
he can fix up, iis papers without any
trotlllc, but when hae is calhled aon ly
lhec di,.arl aigant If, ilt- '.rrtain rusqjair
ments, he will find it to be a very
difficult task with all, and with some
an impossibility to effect this end. We
throw out the following hints for the
benefit of the soldier or for his surviv
ing widow: you must prove up clearly
where you enlisted, when you enlisted,
give the name of the officers of your
company, the name of the regiment
to which your company was attached,
the name of the colonel of the regiment
to which your company was attached
and where you were mustered into
service and when mustered and paid
off. Then you must be enabled to
prove that you are the identical person
who enlisted as set forth in your appli
cation. The Mexican war closed in
1847, thirty-one years ago, and you
will find it no easy task to find wit
nesses now living to prove all these
points. There is not a single colonel
of Louisiana troops who served in
Mexico now living, and of the com
pany to which the writer was attached
he has not been able to find one soldier
now living after a search of four years.
--.Th,.. . "cillc GazetCe.
TIIE PENALTY OF RICHES.
Mrs. A. T. Stewart's beneficent gen
erosity in all the charities of the holi
day season have excited general admi
ration, despite the refusal ,of the Hle
brew benevolent institutions to accept
their Intended beneficies through the
me.ium of Mr. Hilton. That the
doubly bereaved lady, mourning sim
ultaneously a husband dead and the
sa.city of his last sleep so cruelly out
ra-ed, should have the thought for the
commoner sufferings of others to ap
portion liberally from her means in
wisely discriminating gifts of timely
succor mo. es countless hearts to chival
rous appreciation of a womanhood so
worthy of the prerogatives of great
fortune. Yet, this kindly and afflicted
woman is so persecuted in her grand
yet desolate home by the countless har
pies of privileged pauperism that she
must soon come to a choice between
literally flying from the city or being
worried into the grave. Although
vigilent watchers are engaged in pa
trolling every outward approach of
the great white marble house day and
night, to intercept any would-be intru
der having the least possible appear
ance of mendicancy, enough sprucely
dressed, wholly respectablo-looking
practioners of eleemosynary imposition
can pass this guard to infest the build
ing with their pertinicious presences
and keep the sorrowing lady in con
tinued nervous perturbation by their
insolent insistance upon every deuom
Ination of alms. From embarrassed
"societies" and "struggling" churches
do vn to the most trivial pretences of
individual necessity, every known
form of appeal is made to Mrs. Stewart
for sums in as many different amounts ;
the inmost sanctuary of her homo In
sures herono immunity if'om at least
the well-worth begging "letters" of her
tormentors, who make themselves at
ease in her halls and parlors; and there
seems no practicable medium bot worn
giving some momentary toleration to
their persistent applications and turn
ing the whole pestilent crew away by
absolute police force, to become un
scrupulously revengelful nmligners of
one already painfully sensitive to tile
least considered public aspersion.
BAD IREPORITS ABOUT ALIIEIIT
EDI)WAD.
lIis Royal Highness, the Prince of
Wales, does well to attend the debates.
llis presence in either of the houses is
edifying, which is much more than
could have been said of his presence the
other night in the box of a fashionable
West End theatre. Ilis companions
on the occasion were two well-known
ladies of the fashion, whoso portraits
are to be seen in the shop-windows all
over London. ieo was in a festive
mood, and so, it would appear, was
one of the beaonuties. At any rate, he
was seen with his complaisant arm
around her symmetrical waist. Per
haps this sort of thing is one of the
habits and customs of the court; I
don't know ; I only know, on the testi
mony of two gentlemen connected with
the theatre in question, that some such
tccno as that which I have roughly do
tcribed took place. On the same occa
tion he sought and obtained admission
eohind the scenes. " Let us see," said
his Royal Highness, " how they set a
Irawing-room." And they saw. I
lare say there will be readers of this
opistle who will declare that the little
anecdote which I have related precisely
as it was related to me, without garnish
or ornament of any kind, is a fabrica
tion; the sort of thing used by writers
of my sort to Impart the piquant flavor
to a London letter propared especially
ror the American market. \Vell, I
mnust risk your incredubility. I can
only rcpept what I have. said before,
that Albert Edward, P'rince of \Wales,
was secn, two or tihrc nighlis since, in
a private box, in a Vcest :End thlcatr(,
with his airlm around the waist of a
married woman, not his RIoyal 1igh
ness' wife. 1Vo do nriot, for obviou.
reasons, tako journalistic cognixzance of
this kind of thing here; but tihe case in
thuestion was so Ilnagrant, it will not
surprisc e it onle or other of thle socic
ty journals notice it. \VC can forgive
Prince Hal a good cleal in view of his
really good nature, but he miust not
flaunt his pecadlilloes in thie eyes of tlhe
worlhl us ic, did I hle ,thc.r cighl.. I0,
WHY TIHE IRISH OJECT TO ENV.
LISH RULE.
[ orrstroundenoo of the Irish World.]
DUBLIN, Dec. 1, 1878.
The main object of England hbas been
to destroy the peasantry of Ireland by
means of rooting them out from time
to time. To afurther this end England
has e.Lployed hirelings in diE rent
capacities, and has recourse to low and
vile intriguing of every ort, notwith.
standing her boasted principles of jus
tice. Unfortunately this diabolical
system Is but too well succeeding, for
the land is fast assuming the appear
ance of a desert. And though the
population is decreasing-nor are the
unfavorable reports from foreign quar
ters checking the tide of emigration so
much as might be imagined--ltill, the
country is not growing richer, but
poorer, as is apparent to any person
who travels through it, or sees the car
goes of cattle shipped off every week
from North Wall, Dublin, to England.
The number of cattle exported during
the past year from Ireland to England
amounted to some hundreds of thou
sands over a million heads. Can
any country be prosperous that ships
off its products while its own people
suffer? Of the enormous sum of money
which goes to pay for this vast supply
of meat, there is little or none expended
in Ireland, as the aristocrats to whom
this source of wealth belongs almost in
. ariably reside in England or on the
Continent. Take, for Instance, the
province of Connaught, which Is no
exception to the other provinces, and
it will be seen that the best and most
fertile portion of the lands is turned
into extensive cattle tracks, while the
majority of the people to whom it
should. belong are driven from their
country or compelled to delve out an
existence in the mountains, where they
have to pay most exorbitant rents.
The consequence is that most of those
poor people are under the necessity of
going to England during the harvest
season for the purposo of carning money
to pay those rents, which is In many
cases futile.
The towns and villages throughout
Ireland fare no better. There Is no ad
vancoment or progrecs of any kind.
No inducement hold out for manufac
turing or industry though possessing
many natural resources and facilities
which now lie dormant. Besides, those
towns receive little benefit from the
rich and fertile land by which theyare
surrounded. As one of this class may
be ranked Castlobar, the county town
of Mayo. It presents in a most strik
ing manner the devastations committed
by tihe robber landlord, backed and en
couraged by the British Government.
The only buildings in it worthy of
notice are two or three public institu
tions and some military barracks. It
has anil the appearance of a dilapidated
village, thoughl in its immodiat neigh
borhood, extending in either direction,
Is beautiful and fertile land naturally
adapted for cultivation. This land has
Ibeen owned by an English land robber
alnmed Lord Lucan, who at one timw,
it is Faild, declared he would not rest
satisIled till lie saw grass growingI on
the streets of that town.
Fromin either side of the town the sur
rounding country is visible to long dis
tance, but not a human habitation is to
be sooeen but an occasional lhrdsnman's,
except, perhaps, the residence of the
notorious Neill Brown, who gave or
tlers to shoot Peter O'Neill Crowley int
the Fenian rising in '67. All this rich
land, which would be sufficient to
maintain hundreds of families, and did
at one time, is now turned Into pastur
age for the purpose of fattening cattle
for the English market. The greater
portion of the best produce of the soil
is taken to England ; nor has Ireland
tny large storehouses in her seaport
Lowns-Dublin, Belfast, or Cork, In
which is preserved grain and other
provisions for any exigency that may
arise, for England needs it all and
must have it. This is how England is
succeeding in extirpating the people of
Ireland slowly but surely, and making
an otherwise fruitful land a kitlclhen
garden for the especial use of English
men. In) every part of Ireland, but
particularly in the large towns, crowds
of detectives are employed whom Eng
land rewards liberally from tLio pockets
of the working classes who themselves
have to struggle -but in a inuoro sp,o
cial manner those dependent on agri
cultural labor -in opposition to the
adverse circumstances of fortune, such
perhaps as few other people in the
world have to endure.
(One cannlot walk through the streets
of Dublin without beingcloscly watched
by detectives. This is one of the
modes adopted by England to stille tihe
national feelirgs of Irehland.
Of all the dIays of the week, which is
Sth Sie abiithLI or ioril'. ,tiy?"' Thn(l
imlictmluent itga intls a cigar ldenllr of
fIriilgtjiort, Coinn., chargn!l that the of
ribuae WaL.L coiimruitltetl, not on Hut-day,
,ut (jon " the Habbuiath or laurdl's luy. '
l'ite court qluarshled tihi iindict(mnut,
lolillng Ihlnt tlhe Hlanlbth iolansl tlne
,evenith lilly of the wt ek, and Hutll:ly
Stheil lirst, whilde the Lorli's daty i.
Baturnlay with seine worshiipners anlt I
.iniday with others. The Chihri4utian
rso of the word Hublathl wheln itnyllllty
s meant is a imore affectationi.
Wre trust the undermost man in thie
light will not forget tIat the provcrlm
tay- thit. time auevil Insis Ionguigr I thia tine
luduiiuuier.-f)il/ (tSq ia,*,*i(-/.

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