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The Ouachita telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1865-1889, March 25, 1882, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034336/1882-03-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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Obt XVa COE UIa Te.1g ..B
VOLUME XVII. MONROE, LOUISIANA, SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1882. NUMBER 28.
THE TELEGRAPH:
Published every Saturday.
A'1' MONtOE, OUACIIITA PARISH, L.A.
i-. tNT. 3&oC3RbA. L ,;"3I1
Editor and Proprietor.
TI1ERIS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
mie coplDy, one year.............................. },00
Oi1ne topy, six Imonths........................ 2,50
ADVANCE RATES:
"one copy, one year ...............3,00
Otne copy, six months............................2,00
T'.It FF OF ADVERTISING RATES.
Advertisenents will be inserted at one
dollar and fifty cents per square (one inch
ot slpao or less) for the first, and seventy
live cents for each subsequent insertion, for
any time under one month. For longer
ipeiods as follows:
Nl~llIEKt SQ'R-S. . .11. 3I . In. 12n.
One......... ....... 50$ 51it 15
Two.................. 6 50 10 13 20 25
hree ................... 00 15 17 35
I'our ..................... 13
Five............. .....15 00 25 27 40 50
1'| l1 (. col.)........... 26 00 40 50 70 O
i 4ten(51 col.)....... 400 55 70 90 130
'went3-ono (1 e.).. 50 00 70 85 1211 175
Citrds of a personal chavacter -when ad.
tmissible-wilI be charged double our regn
lar advertising rates.
Obituary and Marriage notices will be
charged as advertisements.
Any person sending us five new cash sub
a'ribers, at the same post-office, will be en
titled, to a copy of Tie TELEGRAPI gratis
for oneo ver.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
R. 0. COBB,
* TTORNEY AT LAW, MONROE, LA
LL Jan. 2. 1879.
Theo. O. Benton,
A'TTOINR.Y AT LAW,
MONROE, LA.
Office with S. D. McEnery.
Dr. T. P. Ricehardson
H AS resumed the practice of Medicine.
He may be found, when not profes
sionally engaged, at Moore's drug store
during the day, and at his residence at all
other hours. Monroe, Feb. 6, 1879.
R. Riehardson.
A TORNEY AT LAW, losnoR, LA.,
Elwill practice in all the parishes of
Worth Louisiana, the Supreme Court of the
State, the Federal Courts, and in the Land
Office Department of the General Govern
Inent. August 18, 1881.
Janmes T. Etrother.
A TTORNEY AT LAW, Monroe La.
A Will practice law in North Louisiana,
before the Supreme Court at Monroe Fed
eral Courts of Louisiana, Court of Claims,
and Supreme Court of the United States at
WVashington City.
.1JOHN CALDERWOOD. THOS. Y. AnY.
DUr. Calderwoosl d- Aby,
Practitioners in Medicine and Surgery.
Otlice on Grand street, in rear of F. N.
MlcCormnick's Drug Store, and opposite
|i. Ii. Gunuhy's store.
.Jamlnury 23, 1880. n20:ly
John H. Dlnkgrave,
A'I'ORNEY AT LAW, MONROE, LA.
SOffice opposite Court House. Practices
ini all the Courts of North Louisiana ; also
in thie Inpromeo Court of the State and the
l"'e leral Courts. All chlims, including cot
ton clairns, will receive prompt attention.
Land Oflhce and Pension matters attended
to. March 28,1879.
Dr. S. C. Murphlay,
1riSIARD ST., MONROE, LA.-Having
/ recently arranged his office with special
reference to the treatment of chronic female
diseases, hr. Murphy will give particular
attention to that bIralnch of his profession.
;:3T-Refers to the medical traternityof Mon
ro and Trenton. June 15. 1811.--tf.
Talbot Stillman,
A'iTTOlltNEY AT LAW. MONROE, LA.,
will oractice in the Parishes of
')Uteita., Mlorehouse, Richland and Frank
lilt, in the Supremlle Court of the State,
anl in the Foderal Courts. Will take
.hnitats for collection in all other parishes ill
I.,,oisiana, with privilege of managing
sa;le in connection with attorneys residing
dhere. August 18, 1881.
. J. . OA'TNER. M. J. t.IDDE.IL.
Boatuner at Liddell,
A 'I'ORNEYSIAND COUNSELORS AT'
L.aw, Monroe, La., will practice in all
Ithi Parishes of North Louisiana, in the
Supremo Court at Monroe, the Federal
(o',rts, and in the Land Office Department
of the (ieneral Government.
Offic lfronting northeast corner of public
slitaro. January 3, 1879.
Dentistry.
I H. L.. ItRACEY, Dentist, respectfully
I le rs his professional services to the
citizens of Monroo and surrounding coun
try. Having an experience of fourteen
vers in the practice, he feels confident of
*.iving satisfiction it all branches of his
t.rol'tssionl. Is willing to warrant all work.
'hlieu at residen4ce on .Tackson street, near
i hi 'Jt:tloe Academoy, Monroe. La.
v7-mnarl6:1y
Johnll .HeEery,
ATT'I" RIN EY AT LAW, & LAND AGENT,
No. a; (arontleleL St., New Orleans.
1 AND BUSINESS at the Land Offices in
New Orleans and WVashington City at
trtnded to. Agency for sale and purchase
o, Plantations, Farills and unilnproved
I ulnds solicited.
g -rMajor J. G. Riichardson is associated
with Mr. McEnery in the land business,
t. which lie will give his entire attention.
.J;tUllaruy 6i, 1881.
Wv. . M ILL.APSI. C. H. TROUSD.tI.IE.
.lillsaps & Troasdale.
A.lT'(ORNEYS t ('OUNSELORS AT LAW
MONROE, I.OUISTANA,
W ill practice inl the courts of tlhe Fifth
I)istriot, Suprenme Court, and Federal
(IuIrts. WVill take claims for collection in
all the parishes of North Louisiana, with
privilege of lmanaging same in connection
\ itll resident attorneys.
()thice inll TUBB's Bturt.DImo, on TVWood
't r. August 18, 1881.
It. II. Russell,
.A'4" 1lT: .' &" COUNSELOR AT LAW,
MONiROE, i..
1)-I.\("'IT'IS' REGI1'LARLY in the Par
ish est (o Oachita, Richland, Lincoln
and (Caldwell. anld in the Supreme (curt.
('llection of claims prosecuted with dill
y'ent-An tladI mlOey protnptlv remtitted. M:lan
..gittltet, sale at Ir lease of real estate under
1t n, anlll satisifalction euaranteed. Fees
tito.lerate. Ofiice on WVood street, in
ft:.bb's b:iidiZg. Jan. G, 1881.
[Io F FI C I Al.
CITY TREASURER'S REPORT.
1880.
May 1-To amounts brought forward from old account, viz:
Reports of sales of impounded Hogs and Stallions, held as
special deposits ...................... ................ ....... .. ...... 14 05
To Currency in Treasury this date............................ 138 75
To Reports of R. B. Vinson, Recorder. for collection of fines be
fore his Court vin-.
Mbay 3-For month ofApril, 1880, $58 00; general fund, plkg I,..... $4ti. 45 66
School Fund, C. B.. p210.................................................... 12 43
June 2nd-For month of May, 1880, $91 50; general fund, pkg 18... 45 75 45 75
School Fund, C. B., p 210 ............ ................... .......... 5 7
Juoly 1-For month of June, 1880. $71 50; general fund, pkg 19.... 35 75 75
School Fund, p 210.................................. ................................. 35 75
August i-For month of July. 1880, 611 00; general fund, pkg 20.. 3050 3 50
School Fund, C. B., p 212................................................... 0 50
Sent. 1-For month of August, 1880, 142 50; general fnd. pkg 21... 71 25 71 25
School Fund, C. B., p 212 ........................ ................................ 71 25
Oct.4-For month of Septemer, 1880, $125 00; general fund, pkg 22.. 62 50 6250
School Fund, C. B., 212 ...... .................................................... 6250
Nov. -For month October, '80, $157 00; general fund, pkg 2-. 78 '50 7 50
School Fund, C. B.. p 212.................................................. ....78 860
Dec. 2-For month of November, $101 00; general fund, pkg 24..... 5050 50 50
School Fund, C. B., p 212 ............................................. 50 50
1881.
Jan. 3-For month of December.'80, $115 00 generalfund,pkg25. 57 60 57 50
School Fund, C. B. p 212 ............................................................ 57 50
Feb. 3-For month of January, '8l, g9 00; general fund, pkg 21 . 34 50 31 50
School Fund, C. B. p 212 ........................................................... 34 50
March 2-For month of February, '81, $5900; general fund, pkg 27 2950 219 50
School Fnnd, C. B. p214........... ... 29 50
April 4-For month of March, '81; $88 00, general fund, pkg 28... 44 00 44 00
School Fund, C. B. p214 .......................................................... 44 00
May 2-For month of April. '81, $2 00; general fnd, pkg 29..... 4 00 44 (100
O Ihool Fund, C. B. p 214........................................................... 40 00
May 31-For month of May, '81, $81 00; general fund, pkg 30..... 4050 40 50
School Fund, C. B. p 214 ... ........................................ 40 50
1880
June 14-To report of John B. Garretson, tax collector, for the
Months of May and June, 1880, viz:
On Tax roll of 1879, general fund, $2193, loss commissions $1 34... 25 59
On Tax roll of 1879, school fund, $11 0, less commissions 60... 10 99
On License roll of 1880, general fund, $1815 00, less co's 75... 1,724 25
On License roll of 1879, general fund, $142 0, less con's 712... 135 38
$1,906 19
Paid in currency, general fund.........................$1,885 22 22
Paid In currency, school fund, C. B. p 210......... 10 99-1,896 19
PACKAGE No. 1.
Sept 7-To Report of John B. Jarretaon, collector, for months of
June, July and August, 1880, viz :
On License roll of 1880, 210 00 less commisions $10 50................. 10. 50 190 50
PACKAGE No.2. Paid in Currency.
Dec. 0-To Report of John B. Garretson, collector, for montls of
September, October and November, 1880, viz:
On tax roll of 1880, general fund, $259 70, leas commissions $12 98.. 246 77
On tax roll of 1880, school fund, 111 31, less commissions 5 F0.. 105 75
On license roll of 1881, general fund, $135 00, less comn's 6 75.. 128 25
348077
Paid, in currency, general fnd .................. 375 02 ........... 375 02
Paid, in currency, school fund, C. B. p212............... 105 75-480 77
1881 PACKAGE No. 3.
Jan. 6-To report of John B. Garrotson, collector, for month of De
cember, 1880, viz:
General Fund
On tax roll of 1878, $ 75 72, less his commissions 3 78 ........... 71 94
1879, 144 01, 7 20......... 136 81
1880,3,032 41, 181. 6I2............ 30,45079
Onlicense ... ... 40 0, 0 . . 200........... 38 00
School Fund- 3,76 54
On roll of 1878, $ 32 44, leoss s commissons 02 ................. 3082
"" 879, 61 72, "" 3 08.................. 58 864
1880, 1,478 1 78 83 .................. 1,478 91
E rror .......................................................................... ................. 1 00
$1,569 37
Paid, in currency, general fund.......................3,607 54 ". 3,697 54
... ..." ey " school fund, C. B. p 212......1. 71,00 7
.;,,,".. ........PACKAGE No. 4.
Feb. 9--To Report e'Ja~in R. T -arretson, c.bVtmr, for' 8l8a th -of' ; '
January, 1881, viz:
Gleneral Fund
On tax roll of 1875 to 1879, inclldsive, $187 60 less omn's .9 35.,. 178 25
15...0, 1,:114. 47 "'" 7 27... 1,278 20
School Fund- $1,45645
On rolls of 187;5 i,o 1879, inclrsive, 80 40 . 4 01... 76 39
S-- 18820, .57m( 3 "'" 28 82... 547 90
General Fund- 4 24 11)
(In license"r " 15 (I " 75...
.. . .. 18 1,1,,895  "" 94 75...-1.814 50
3,895 14
Paid, in currency, general fund. .................... ...... .3,270 95 3,270 T)5
Paid, in curreney, school fund, C. B. p212............ 624 19
PACKAGE No. 5.
To this amount paid into Treasury by F. EnNdom, mayor, for a
lot sold by him in the City Cemetery to T. S. Darrab, being C
of lot No. 36 In new part of old cemetery..................... 12 50
To this amount paid by F. Endon, mayor, into Treasury being
collected by him from Thos. Naughton for rent of house on new
lot for Female Academy from March 19 to April 19. 1881 ............ 20 00
To reports of Re B. Vinson, recorder, for collections of lines before
his court, viz:
July 2--For month of June, 1881, pkg 31................... ................. :3
August 2-For month of July, 1881, pkg 32 ................................... 9
.July 5-Report of John B. Garretson, collector, for month o1 Feb
ruary, March, April. May and June, 1881, viz:
On tax rolls of 1877 to 1880, less commissions, for general fu.nd...... 188 25
On tax rolls of 1877 to 1880 less commissions, for School fund ...... 80 6U0
Slicenses of 1881, general fund ....................................... ........... 52
Paid, in currency, general fund.........................2240 4 24(0  
Paid in currency, school fund, C. B. p 216 ............ 80 10--321 10
PACKAGE No. 6.
To thlis suon received from City School Fund Warrant No. 37, made
,y F. Garrett, chairman of city school committee, in favor of F.
Endom, mayor, beingloan to city general fund to be returned
on or before the 31st of December, 1881 ..................................... 5041 010
Sept. 2-To Report of John B. Garretson, collectorof city taxes lnd
licenses, for months of .July and August, 1881, vir=
-ieneral Fnud
Roll 1878, $2 10, less colssios, $0 110 .................................... 200
1879, 82 0, . ......... 4 ...... 13................................... 78 47
1880. 188 70, .. .. ...... .. ............................... 17927
25974
Roll 154), llos.s $ 10 00, less ~o isslons a 54 ....................... 9 ti4
School Fund-- 269 24
Roll 1878, 60 90, less eo lniisis, *4) o0 ................................... 86
S 187, 35 4, ... ... 77 ........................ ........ 13 16
.. 4 Il , (S4 S C, B... 4 . 4 4.............................. 76 84
381 57
. . """ fo..le fund], C. I. pe1e ..........o... 18 1 .tL----3L8 0 .r7
PACKAGE No. 7.
To Reports of It. 11. Vinson, recorder, for collections ibetore his
court, viz:
Selpt. 2--For month of August,'81, pkg 33 .................................... 2. 00 2+T 00
School fund, C. Il. p 212 .......................................25 00
Oct. 3--For month o1 Septholer, 8t45 (1; gnceral fund, pkg 34... 22 50 22 50
School Fund, C. It. p 211;........................................................... 22 5
Nov. 4--Forinontl of October, '81, $59 4s0; genueral fond, pkg &...5 2'1 fd K1 5.0
School Fund. C. Il. p 216......-.......... ... ............... ................
Nov. 30-To report of ). Ii. Trousdale, Recorder before his (monrt
for mnoth of November, 1881, $43 00. (Package No. i).
enoral Fund .......... ........... .. . . .............................. . ...... . 1 ) 21
School Fonfd (Seo C. B., p 120) ................. ....................... 21 t4
Nov. 18-To this armount received per hands of F. Endom, Mayor, .
being for rent for city prolperty known as the Bofensachen
house front th e 15th Septomber to 1th November. 1881........ 4J
Less repairing cisterns. (Package )............... 5 w, ;:4 5 (4
Nov. 9--To report of Joham B. Garrets,,n,Collectorof City Taxes asi
Licelses for mnomths of Septemb.er and October. 1881, viz:
On Licenso Roll of 1881, $1135 50, less comnniss.ion :$8 25. (Pa.ll
currency General Fund)....................................... ;
I'ACKA(GEI1 No. 8.
I)ec. 7--To report of John B. (arrctmon,, ('ity Collector f4nr l!i4 hI4 40
Nove,,, er, 1851, viz:
CGe,,eral Futll, 'ITmxcs anid Licenses-
Itoll of 1878. less co,,mnlsisions .............. ..................... 173 8!4
Roll of 1881. lessq cnnioninsln. ........................................ 226 110
Roll of 1.i', ci licenses, less ¢otunli....n.. .......................... 28 50
To Schchl Fond-
Roll of 8IH78, less Col.ltnissio4ns.............................................. 447
Roll of 18794, Iess colnnlisii 45*s .. . ........................................ 1 8 142
Roll omf 1.80, less .o4lnn0iMSiomS ... .......... ............ ................. 74 52
Ioll of !881. 104c m o ln qs|inq .............. ................................. 134 18
8800 79
T , (4',.4't IIt,, 054 I;u,c, IPi, .5 e0oll40 1 i4 . .. .4.......................... 90 79
Iaidl, Ih cui .'4.rreny, geeral smchlool fln1....a.l............429 :ts 421 "tS
Paidr, i schrrl-nov, *elool fusnd: (C. B., p " ............... . 780 35
PACIKAGE No. 9.
IConcided on Third Page.J
NEW FINDS AT POMPEII.
What has been Done at the New Exea.
rations.
[Correspondence Pall Mall Gazette.]
I was anxious to see what was doing
at the new excavations, but I knew
a that the best things would be at once
transferred to the museum at Naples,
s so I went there first. I found one room
entirely devoted to the newest frescoes.
There are about five pictures, averag
ing four feet square, each fullof roman
tic Interest; some of these have only
been there a few weeks, and none of
them are yet labelled. The colors are
fresh, the drawing is equal to most
thinjs at the Royal Academy, and the
effect of these. buried relies of the first
century (A. D.:79) so suddenly,. liftte
Into the daylight of 1881, Is, I confess,
a little ghostly. I should not have
been surprised on turning round to find
a Pompellan of the arrested life of the
period looking over my shoulders at
some of his old haunts. One of the
larger pictures gives a sort of bird's-eye
view of the theatre at Pompeii, with
a wild-beast fight going on. You look
down upon the arena from some height.
You also command a vlew of the street
with the passers-by and a few booths,
from one of which a thief has stolen
something and is making off. The
"velarium," or vast awning, is half
drawn over the top of the theatre. It
Is, as far as I know, the only contem
porary representation of the thing ever
discovered. We know that sailors
were employed to stretch a similar veil,
supported by poles, over the top of the
Coliseum, but exactly how the thing
was managed I believe has puzzled an
tiquaries. They may get a hint from a
closer Inspection of this amazingly 4
vivid bit of contemporary history. Two
long flights of steps outside enable the
spectators to reach the top seats with
out going inside the theatre. This is
surely an admirable idea, worthy of 1
our Imitation. The next day at Pom
peiill I puzzled over the ruins of both I
theatres. I could not make out where I
these external stairs could have been I
placed. In the painting they rise from
a public square, but the temple of Isis
is built close against the big theatre,
and the small theatre is also completely
hemmed in by houses. Is it perchance,
the theatre of Herculaneum?
A large painting of a sleeping bac
chante, nude, watched by a satyr,
might have been designed for Etty in
drawing, color and perspective. It is a
a masterly study, showing besides a
great deal of feeling for landscape paint
ing, which for some reason or other, the
ancients are not supposed to have cared
for; but the more we conceited creatures s
know of them the more evident it is
that they know about as much about s
color and drawing as they did about
sculpture. Look at lyramus and
Thisbe on the other wall, or Mars andt
Venus and a capital study of Europa
mounting the bull surrounded by her
maidens. All these are highly pre- t
served and show a perfect ease, vigor ,
and freshness of handling that many a s
modern artist might envy. The new t
find in bronze is an exquisite seatedl
statuette figure of ,"Abundanti," about
a foot high, holding a patera, or cup.
Hier chair is adorned with horns of
plenty, and the pressure of her body r
and the set of her drapery over tile
cushion on which siteo sits is so realistic c
that one expects to see her move upon I
her chair or rise at any moment. lie
side her is aslave-boy, in backward at
titude about a foot and n-half high, f
pouring wine into a cup. This Is also
new.
I visited Pompeii next day, and went I
straight to the diggings. The only N
wonder is that anything is ever dug up t
at all ; the proeess is ridiculously slow,
even for Italy. The directors sit all day ,
on the rubbish heaps smoking, and t
dozens of children file up and down
with their little baskets of earth, while
a few idle peasants shovel up a few lazy
spadesful at a time. Still the first thing
I saw was the side of a dining foom,
uncovered only a few days ago. On one
side was a bright picture of a flnecock
and hens in a great state of excitement
over a large basket of grain and red
cherries all upset. Landseer could not
have done it better. The fondncess of
the Pompellans for birds, beasts and
fishesl is very apparent, and they al
ways seemed to be dining. The wealth
of cooking apparatus In the museum isI
astonishing. You have saucepans per
forated with countless holes, in most
elaborate patterns, every conceivable
kind of boiler and caldron, eCssl of
jPelles, representing the prostrate hare
-and the suckling pig; ladies, spoons,
skewers, dishes for roasting sixeggs or
a dozen eggs at once, toasting-forks,
gridirons, and fancy machinery for
pastry and delicate confectionery, what
in Elizabeth's days were called "con
eelts." In Pompeil itself the oil-pote
e and wine amphorce, let into slabs and
of moelac work of colored marble, are
among the quaintest features of the
rullned shops. I saw in another new
.part a fine dining-room, found three
months ago, with some of the liveliest
animal painting imaginable. The first
f section of the walls all round repre
sented the boldest scenes under the sea
-a conger struggling with an octopus,
a shark pursuing its prey, a shoal of
fish flying through.the water, all glit
terling and fresh. The middle section
adierFith BTtdinid a twId 'fowtr fio-st'
lug, flying, quarreling, diving, and the
I upper and largest section gave fierce
hunting scenes-a horse pursued by a
lion, and ox in desert scenery sprung
upon by a tiger-and all these were set
-in scenery of great'force-woods, rocks,
rivers, and green hills. The corridors
and ante-rooms of this house are equally
rich, the walls coplously vignetted with
flgures-dwarfs on stilts, street scenes,
animals. In one room there is a per
fectly white suite of marble steps in
stitu, belonging to a fountain. Tihe
whole thing stands as though finished
yesterday, without a soil or chip or
scratch.
They seem now to be coming to some
of therichest houses, and have broken
into the outer court of one in which
stands a beautiful fountain cupalo and
niche of elaborate mosiac work, repre
senting gods and goddesses in the deep
blue heavens half-veiled with fleecy
clouds. The house is still Imbedded
under thirty feet of earth; but if this
is the back yard, what must the halls
and corridors be! The plan now adopted
is to leave as much as possible in stitu.
Specimens repeated themselves, and it
is needless to go on removing similar
mosiacs or frescoes, of which there are
plenty in the Naples museum. As a
rule, therefore, all the latter excava
tions are more interesting than the old
ones, because they have been left un
spoiled of their treasure. I should like
to spend a week at.Pompeii every year,
it only to watch the uncovering and
revel in the new finds.
Tillf MINiSISIPPp FLOODN.
[l',rona the (,lmlmi"e iiornhl.j
Time present rise In the Mississilppi,
which has made waste of all tihe low
lands between Cairo and the grltf, showis
how completely inadequate is the levee
system for the protection of the low
lands along the lower Mississippi, and
sweps away the last vestige of argu
ment for squandering more money upon
them. Time levee system must forever
be a failure along ia river which carries
any considerable quantity of silt. The
bottom of the river will be raised by3
the deposit of silt about as fast as its
sides are raised by levees ; and the re
suit of this process is to gradually raise
the river, bottom and ilnnks, higher
and higher.
It seems to us thIat the only practical
way to help the people along the lower
Milssissippi Is to drop the mouth of the
river as low as possible, by the means
of outlets near New ( erleans. The river
can be lowered at Neow (erleans by out
lets some fifteen feet. This will vastly
increase the current, deepen the bed of
the river above, draw off the water
faster, and help the river perceptibly
at least to Cairo. In all as many as
eight or ten outlets can be made in the
lower Mississippi, which will draw the
water out of that river and carry it to
the gulf through other water ways.
When these cuts are made the country
along the lower Mississippi will cer
tainly be safe from overflow atall times
except when a very unusual flood oc
curs-and perhaps all overflows can le
prevented.
No more money should be spent in
leveeing the lower Mississippli until this
outlet system can be givenr a thorough
trial--not amother cent. Thie outletsys
tem can be pretty thorouhly tested ati
very small cost. It. will take at least
$.50,00,00 to Icvee the lower Missis
sippi, mnd the worst of it all is tihe l.ves I
I will do no pernanenra t good after they
are built.
j len N. l. I lanks having accepted an i
- Invitation to lecture in a New I:ng-I
Sland town a wag announces that his
subject will be: ,rteccolletionms of a
r C(onfedl-raie 'r,nmmissnary; or hlow I
fed Stonecwall Jackson's Army."
TIlE CHINESE PIGTAIL.
A writer In the London Globsays :
A. recent Imperial edict on the subject
calls our attention to the origin of the
pigtail, which is now the distinctive
mark of a native of the Flowery Land.
It Is one of the strange phenomena of a
Icountry, where everything Is ancient
and where so few Innovations have
been tolerated, that the practlce, which
was originally the badge bf conqheet,
should have been not merely accepted,
but permitted to entertwlae Itleif so
closely with, the national ;ltle thalt it
would now require fbreible meattles to
induce the people to foregoit. iP1r in
the days before the Matnchu e·d nest,
when the throtl"tllVWnas"cupied by the
great dynasty of antlquity, the Chinese
allowed the'hair to grwas'be l~ct it
pleased them ; and they were ktinwn
tosomeof their neighbors as the atlong
haired race." But when the great
soldier Noorachu marched southwards
from MLoukden to conquer China 'and
establish the Manchu dynAbt4o te gave
an order to his liHoeutenantte to coapole
the people, as they submitted tqshalvo
their heads In token of their saurender.
The Mlanchus were thus enablied toidis
cover at a glance which of the Chinese
were vanquished, and whichl were not ;
while the thoroughness of the success
was expressed in the most formal and
emphatic manner. This practice, whiclh
was adopted partly from the exigencies
arising out of the conquest of the mul
titudes of China by a mere handful of
Tartar soldiers, was continued and be.
came an Integral portion of the lZan
chu system of government, and the re
sult has tended to confirm the wisdom
of the founders of the present dynasty.
The popular views on the subject of the
pigtail have not yet been ascertained
with any degree of certitude; but it
may be remarked that all the Insurrec
tions of the last twenty years have been
put forward, as one of the features of
their Intention to renew this practice,
which has there been represented as a
badge of conquest. There now, how
ever, seems more chanco than over of
Its perpetuation.
PLANTING AFTER TIlE OVEitFlJOW.
Distressing as the situation is in the
overflow districts, as ws observed a, few
days ago, it is not as hopeless ns it
appears with a wild waste of waters
covering the loveliest and moat fortile
lands In tihe Southwest.
The Memphis Avalanche shows that
fine cotton crops in tile overflowed
regions were mnade after the great floodt.
of 1858, whel the AMississilpl was oul.
of its banks, until Ilate in .1nle, andi ill
18,59 even a worse year inll the biottoaml
thlanl 1858. In 1871., notwitllstantinigl
tme overflow, tile cotton crop in tile lOW
lands grew so vigorously alld raplidly
that it attained its usunal growth its
August, and a fair erojp wouldl Ilave
ibeen made but flr the dIrotlih Ihat subll
sequently Iefell it.
The writer of this article in I18hi, we
tlhink it was, planted thirty-threeoo anes
in eotton qarly in May, niter thho snb
Hidelnce of thel waters e(uIIIsI by fIle
Ibretkilg of the tMorganlza luvoe, anti
lihe thirty-ihreo rlcres yielidhed thirty
b)ales of cotton. Th'lo Irlnl, hIowever,
was virgin Inrlm. (1n one(, stalk of (oL
ton on1 thiis land1 were (counted S!)::
blooms and bolls. This was, iprolmblly,
tihe most prolilic stalk of cotton on
record. WVe have known Ialf a halo of
cotton to tile aere to )be made oin the
same land planted early in .June after
an overflow.
Indeed, on those unprotelcte(d lands it
is an establiahed tfact that, in I lie great
majorily of c'ases, i1s largIe : crofp of
cotton can be malllde oin IthousI after an
overflow with ta ftVormible, faill as oni
ordinary hill landrs.
I ence it is probablel that, if ia good
season succeeds tlie overflow, mlmuchl c:lan
be dlone to retrieve (thi disaster.
'Thouglh the loss in stock alnd property,
the delmornlizatlion of labor and diflt
cully ofobfninifng timely sulpplies will
aggregate many nllions of em ollars.
Tile politieal cllfcets of lmnnmigrnmtinm
are beginning toshow in the apportionl
menot tabliS. In 1850 illinois maid nhmii,
rmembers; now she lhas twcnity-one.
G(eorgia had eight in 1850, anutd now
she has ten. Iowa had eight in 1850,
and now she has eleven. Alahlama
had seven In 1850, anrid now she lits
eight. WVisconsin has gone fromi tihre,
in 18150 to nine.
'l'The grater lho difticulty tl.e more
glory in surrounding it.

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