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The Ouachita telegraph. (Monroe, La.) 1865-1889, July 20, 1889, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034336/1889-07-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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1TOJME'XXI. MNROE LOISINASATUDAY ' ULY20, 889' : ,
- MNIONOEOADVERTlSEMENTS.
ý. .ý ER BRO., .
- DEALERS IN- i*
DryGoods, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Hats, &o.
AND -GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
NOS 1t) 0 12 GRAND STREET, MONROE, LA., .
~ u-Respect lly nvitea the public to call and be convinced that they are carrying
a full and asdiat 1 1e of the above. -
4 New* Spring * Stock ,
for every department rces.ved daily.' Prices to suit everybody: BSpell atlent to t
Srer Nos. 10 and 12 Grand Street. Monroe, La. p
"-MEYER BRO'S,I
Wholesale a-d Retail Dealer in -
Drr goods, Bools, So es, Hais, &c.I,I
NNos. 2, 24 and 26 GRAND STREET, f
, O q1-RtOE--, - -- - - ..
ZThe attention of the Trade is called to his well selected stok of
SPRING AND. SUMMER 600DS.
All Lines Complete.
Vall and examine the stock and price of goods. '* All mall orders filled with care
and dispatch.
J. . BLOCH,
--'holesale and Recail Dealer in
liurs,W Mes, Blrandies, Ales, Beer,
CIG- A.1S, E'I'TO.
Highest Cash Price Paid for Hides, Wool and Fur.
CORNERI GRAND AND DESIARD STREETS, to
M1ionroe, l a*. m
No. 22 DeSIARD - - MONROE, t
VRTiET, T1A ISIANA, I
Choice Family Groceries
HARDWARE, CROCKERY, GLASSWARE ce
TINWARE AND NOVELTIES. v°
E
Country Produce Bought and Sold. be
loodsn purchased froml mie will be delivered FREE .within the City Llmits. rg
T sell tI I he lebrated MONOGRAM VINEGAR. Everything sold on the hi
LIVE AND LET LIVE PLAN. 8
Samples of Wall Paper Always on Hand. COUNTRY ORDERS SOLICITED.
Ei Ml I-il . gooTT T .
Bookseller and Stationer.
_-.. . SP:ECIATIrIES - ~-- __- m
SCHIOOL BOOKS, I GUNS, PISTOLS, RIFLES, ti
BLANK HOOKS. I SHELLS, CARTRIDGES, CAPS, A
I[IR A lRY, MAG(AZINES AND PAPERS, I SHOT, POWDER, WADS, cl
PLUSHJ{ OODS. I FISHING TACKLE.
POETS AND OTHER WORKS, I OIL, NEEDLES. &C. P
IIOLII).Y GOODS. - SEWING MACHINES. I.
bi
No. 15 Grand St., MONROE, LA. *
IeSIAIRD STIREET, MONROE, LOUISIANA. al
- DEALER IN - Ic
IDRUGS, MEDICINES, GHEMICALS, PAINTS, e
Oils, Varnishes, Dye Stuffs, Glassware,
Putty, Pens, Ink, Paper, Envelopes, Lamps and Chimneys.
FINE CIGARS AND TOBACCO, b
Pure Wines and Liquors for Medleinal Purposes. .c
rI
W. A. 'AILIE. DR, T. O. BREWIER. P
BAILIE & BREWER,
Successors to J. A, Moore and W. H. IHarris, o
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGISTS, 1
McFee's old Stand, Grand Street, Monroe, La.
Dealdrs in Medicines, Chemicals, Paints, -Oils,
Glass, Stationery, Cigars and Tobacco, I
Pure Wines and Liquors for Medicinal Purposes.
M. J. DUTY, GULLETT'SMA)OLIA
Enginiler & Mlachiist, G61N
-AGENT FOI FIEOT
Gullett's Magnolia Gins. ANr
, -DEALER IN
MI o y and Ellgineer's Supplies. OD
.evoLLr STOCK ON HAN I). HIHEST AWARD 2. 'Ath.wk
o""' POWER-IsHOP M
i p shlele ipmest. Adirss orerser partkicab
pbi""",, .-NROE, -EuA. UmETTITiOu.AMmITlT,LA,.
I TE PERSBIAN RULER. Ii
As Account of lis Remarkable Career.
TMis descendant of princes whotonce h
held the mime susralty in the East
that Cbarlemagae claimed in the
West-this cKinog of Kinkg," s he Is
to this day called throughout Persia d
and Afghanietian-ls in many rgepeots t
a highly remarkable personality,
writes Rev. Mr. Hawels in. the Bt.,
James Budget. He is between sixty
and seventy, but looks mueb younger.
He came to the throne quite a young h
man in 1848. No one knew much of
him then. AsCrown Prince he was t
tacituro, fairly well educated, without h
confidants, thoughtful and reserved; w
rather than studious. He was not sup. f
poseS to be a man of action or peecially
apt for governing; but from the mo. a
went bhe ascended the throne a change E
came over him. Every province in I
his Empire was then in open revolt. tI
With the aid of a certain grand vizler a'
of high genls-a man so great that a
had he lived be might have changed w
the face of the East-the young Per. a'
elan monarch subdued the rebels and.
soon got the reins of power into his b
own hands. He then quietly gave his ae
grand vizier the go-by, turned a deal T
ear to his would-be counsellors, broke a
the intrigues of the harem, smiled P
down the dismay of the Jacks-in-offie p'
who had loaded it over his father, and i
proceeded to surround himself with tt
numerous chamberlains, who became c
less his ministers than his executive P'
offieers. At first he shqwed signs of
what is called Liberalism, and it seem
ed as though he might give his people g
some sort of constitution; but those
were stormy times. The Shah hasn
marked the fate of Louis Phillippe, of fu
Bombs, of the late Russian Emperor, tr
of Lincoln, of Garfield, of Napoleon w
III. ; indeed, as he remarked some at
time ago, with the exception of Queen
Victoria and the old German Empe. m
ror, there was hardly a crowned head Is
In the world but what had been either w
assassloated, threatened or deposed. ti
So be elected to keep all power in his of
own hands, and he has reigned for pi
forty years-without a rival over the w
meest mixed, wayward and fanatical be
people in Asih. From the moment he U
ascended the throne, instead of exploit- le
lug the country for, his pleasure, he at
applied himself to the arts of war in or- fo
der that he might be strong, and then in
to an encycloeilec course of study in hi
order that he might be wise. He has of
learned French since he became Shah. to
Geography is a passion with him. He it
is an excellent mathematician, and so it
good a financier that he controls per tt
sonally the whole expenditure of his
court. -He revises the accounts and
authorizes the payments. He is a r3
clever artist, an elegant poet, and a es
voluminous writer. Our Persian di
minister, Malcom Khan, by far the w
most enlightened oriental now in bi
England-perhaps 'l Europe-has si
been heard to say that every dlspatch re
received in England bears signs of fa
having been read and corrected by the il
Shah, and the clearest and ablest state to
papers are written with his own hand. pI
He is surrounded by Oriental intrigues pt
but he dominates them all by sheer el
force of personal superiority, and be ni
now leaves Persia without any govern- at
ment, except a shadowy authorily left as
tI the hands of three sons all born in O(
the same year of three different pi
mothers. What other Eastern poten- tt
tate would be able to wield so excep- at
tional a sceptre without a catastrophe? as
At present the Shah rules through his
chamberlains. These functionaries are Is
personal friends, who, however, know V.
only so much ofthis majesty's mind as re
he chooses to reveal. They obey him it
implicitly, and he rules by keeping ni
everythlng in a sort of fine equlpoise., ti
The harem, the princes, the States be
aunctionaries, the army, the religious at
fanatics, the merchants, the European it
and Asiatic powers even, are all made bi
to balance, to check, to counteract each T
other, and the result is remarkable at
enough. o0
No Shah for centuries has had such w
a reign, both as to quantity and a+
quality. In two centuries Persia has a
has about ten dynasties; but the Shah as
for near half a century has not only to
reigned supreme, but has been what O
perhaps no other potentate in Europe. A
Asia or Africa can boast of In an equal
measure-he has been his own master. el
The Sultan Hamed never ventured II
outside his palace grounds. The Shah e:
has twice quitted Persia to travel, anil a
be now leaves his three sons as nomi- a
nat viceroys-all, however, rivals, who it
agree in nothing save in a great re- jt
gard for and allegiance to their father. Ie
Hit government is, in fact, a real n
tour de force--the result of marvelous -
tact, knowledge of human nature and 'I
consummate practlcal ability, and, we a
must add, a certain temperance, v
tolerance, self-control and real mag a
nanim'ty. The Shah is generous and (t
forgiving. Hie is a great respecter of a
religion and devout in his personal
habits, but no fanatic, Iil risee early.
At 10 o'clock breakfast he r(celves and a
converses with any learned and sien
iric or literary people or other visitors c
who may be Invited to court, lie
talks a great deal and listens veryr
well. He never uses a vulgar expres
seio, and his language is singularly
elevated and chaste in both matter and
manner. He drinks very little. He
eats of everything, but only a little of
anything. Hunting is his great de
light, and be pursUse it regularly for I
the sake of his health. Otherwise be
Is incthesantly engaged with eretiie,
who write fromdietatloni and translate
the foreign books and newspapenl or
him. Even when he rides abroad be
is accompeaned by a mousted se·mr
tary, who reads -aloud to him., IH
shows himself 1e all ports ofhis 0l 1
dom withbot ftl, though b eha bao
than once been wioitaddt, alt e'; r l
assaslated' by -:atfeastlel rseetof
Persian Nibllats.
Frogn hIe great' knowledge of iq
tory, and epeeldly M'ur pa listry,
he has at last` becomei mvlnedtoibha
Western elvtiltlion cannot be uceaes
fully resisted. This s at the root of
his desire to travP. He not. al
wante to make favorable terms wi.tb
foreign powers, but'. to borrow their
methods and learn the secret of their
commerelal and Iadatrial suhese.,
a. Is convincetd .that. Pastald bra :an
Important part to play Is the regsa.
lion and reconstruetton of the cat,
sad he comes abroad to seek' the er.
sonal alliance and friendship of tlsNe
whose, Influence and attailaments h
admires and respects, and -whom he
believes ase ready to.sympatiblz, with
his enlightened sad liberal aspiratiost
and help him to adohlev his objdots.
The Shab is fortunate I Lpowsseslt
such a man as Prince Malcolm Kasan
Persian minister in England. The
prince is not only a near relative, and
Intimate frlend of his Majesty, but hal
throughout been his 'most trusted
counsellor in all matters, of foreign
policy.
EQUAL TOSE3 NATIO1'S DEB F.
Enormoas Cost of Travelias ttalesme.
"The money use to In a single e"r to
foot the salary and expenes:bllse of the
traveling salesmen of the Valted State
would pay off the entire national bebt
and leave a few dollars over.'.
This rather atarlleg statement was
made by a junior member of one ,f the
large dry goode houses of this city,
who has a force of about fifty travelers.
;nder his immediate charge. As proof
of his assertion be presented these
particulars: "«There is hardly a
wholesale, jobblag or commalilon.
bouse in any line of business n the.
United States that oes - not have at
least a single travellinag representatllve,
and from one lone man- the travellngl
force ranges up as high as 125 or 100
aen, and there may, be one or two
houses with even more. The average
of the mos reliable estimates places the
total number of commerclal tourists in
this country at,250,000; and, mind you,
thbs does not mean peddlers, but only
those' who sell goods at wholesale.
1OW TIIE EXPEN)WE MOUNT UP.
",The raliroad fares, charge for car
rying sample baggage by freight or
express, hotel bills and numerous Inci
dental traveling expenses of these men
will range between 14 and $12 per day,
but some men will spend $25 in a
single day for these purposes without
resorting to any extravagance. Take
for Instance, some of the carpet, cloth.
ing or fancy goods men who carry ten
to fifteen trunks full of samples, take a
packer with them and hire a hotel
parlor to display their goods when
ever they open their trunks. But the
number of these men is comparatively
small, and $0 a day will fairly repre
set the average expenses of the 260,
000 men. There you have $1,000,000
per day for expense alone. Multiply
this by 865, and you have $547,500,000
as the amount expended nla one year.
MEN WHO EARN LARGE SALIARIES.
,"The item of salaries is nearly as
large. Few men are paid lessm than
*900 per year. The largest number
receive between $1500 and $2500, either
ln salaries or commilsions. A lesser
number are paid from $8000 to $5000
those receiving the letter amount
being comparatively few. But there
are traveling salesmen who are always
in demand at $10,000 to 185,000 a year,
but they are few and far between.
The lower salaried men predominate,
as might be supposed, and an average
of $18000 per year is not far out of the
way. Figuring 250,000 men at an
average salary of $1800 per year gives
a total of $450,000,000 according to my
arithmetic. To this add $547,000,000
for expenses, sad you have $997,500,.
000 for these two items.
A STORE FILL OF GOODS IN TRUi 'SB.
",But there are other items to be
charged against the salesmen's acoount.
It is Impossible to give any accurate
estimate of the cost of trunks, sthebels
and other requisites of the traveling
men, but the Items as we figure them
In our store will give aomethlnog to
judge from. Our fity men require 180
trunks costing 88 each, orl1200. These
men require two sets of samples yearly
-one In the spring and one in the fsll.
The cost of these two sets of samples i
about $1000 per man. Of this *80,000
worth of goods which are reluired for
samples every year a considerable per.
tion is lost, while most of it is o soiled
and damagled by constant handling
that it has to be sold at a heavy reduc
tlioo from the actal cost, or else given
away. To cover this depreciation we
make an allowace of 88) per cent up
on the cost of the esamples, or about
$17,000 per year. Truanks do not need
renewing every year, but repaira nad
replacnlog lost ones form quite an item
of expense. From bthese figates it it
evidelnt that the similar expenses ol
Sgreater or lesser amount bore by
Ievery wholesale house will swell thi
Ssalary and traveling expmmense Item c
$997,500,000 far bpyond *1,000,000,00(
per year."-hitadelpda Record,
xhibhitioe ,lnts hy te obp.ervaat Mft. i
Corrpt ese at C wgrawflW A
The Exhibito, with'' it gSs, tai
45* eanews, eson)t hold.400,006
t , t. s um ofj .
bet o t o·hlt - try -
the fttthere W l :when the t
-ehoolan te. rsie IlmtsaeiaIr lis
earest Inrsh, 011 hr e dmp wite
torma to ask wthts the ghtt t
omsar tor s t he" oU bltion. ai air al
swqr les "se seoms tsyouea; stadh te
sooner iu better."C t
Where shall weleat the h xhlbi
ton?' would-betua. e r
is** You tilts ho eimbad
is thew day of tresta wits tbr tbe arh
sore. upon that those -wht do sotget
-a rSatare not likely4o be servedd at
all. f as o i, say, a clergymae , w ht
a qulverful of young people, IsI belter
to makt up 'a picwl bask etla Pnl s
sea:ndira , t "em depot" b at ith Ie
lion Ballway until it ist wated. Mtore
than 100,000 peanloked la the Exhibl
tion grounds on Beturday. I. never
saw such a sight. Ttny nst on the
ge rasy edges of the wAike or ote the
steps ofhe temra when they could
aot get hobirs. They wes gey,gooad
natured orderly, and di not destroy a
lower. All the freiapgte and the
newspipies whlb served as table.
elbth'~witp wrapped upi after the mean
to he earrid away, and there was not T
tlbera ths atreco ta esal a- bone bottle
br nretp ofr offal to e found lying
abiout Thble rowd was a popular one.
Its bappleess was Indesorlbable had Its
ivilised sielabillity delightful. I
n oo THE eaxt,.
A tip. The river boats are the least hi
overerowded mode of conveyance. If at
you do not woant to pass the evennlog at,
the ObChamp d Mre go by one of them it
down to St. Cloud to dine and then on C
by rall to Paris, or go up the river to It
eeery, where the restauranot are very Ib
good and the Burgudy winelo better pi
than sasywbere along the boulevards, g
You eaab assiy get from the Beret to T
central Ptlse by omnibus or train. The.
bate agave to ply at 8 p. m.
ASIATIC CArPERINOb. 'a ii
As to the amusements at the Exrd h I
bition, they are those of a fair. One a
goes to me the Oriental dances and a
Dervishes toin the Run de Caire-a street at
made by real fronts of OCiro houses., itt
deaces are performed by beardless au
men, origlinally intended to guard ani
herems. I don't sea the ane in watch Ilt
log bow, to aimee atyle, they wriggle ri
their fat hips. The alme., by the by, te
was exelided on the score of public It
decency. While the debanehements Ie
go on, a rIng of fellabs sit round the a
dancer, crooonig a monotonous tube Itr
and batlng time with their ands.' A bi
long manger Is near, at which a buo- i
dred Egyptian asses feed. These iatel.
ligeot animals often turn round to
watch the performance, and add to it
the feature of a braying chorus.
Near "hLe Ruiner des Tuileries," In
Portland cement, there is ia Theatre
des Follee Puarlesenne on theni Alceaer p
model. It has the advantages of plenty h,
of fresh air. At the Hunoarlno, 8er'* p
visa and Neapollian pavilions there ty
are Tsigane and Neapolitan concerts.
There is a gutter-scraping etudiantiuna of
Ino a South Amerlican palace. One has it
musal Into the bargain when one eats b
or drinks in these places. be
ONE WAY TO SWINQ AROUNID 'T'IE1 t
CIRCLE. bi
The Exhibition be a big place. Mut c'
the nlodolent visitor may be taken t
through it In Bath hobairs or little Ao
onamite ones, lightly hung high above t
the wheels, painted in fanciful and
gandy patterns, and pushed by far- at
Easterns wearing low comical hate of It
red varnished wood, the shape of the I
lid of a tureen, There are linen hoods e h
to these picturesque vehicles, which v
young ladles at the Exhibition for an ri
outIng with their admirers greatly m
affect. A neat foot can be so well dels- bi
played by the occupant of the Anna. PI
mIte hobair, and the wheels ran on at P
the greased-ligbtning pace. Tne small
Aonsmite who pushes keeps lge read
on one aide to watch for obstacles, a
which he avoids with speed and dehi. a
terity. fe
AMONG TUX *'iNATIVJEG." d
There is no prettler part of the Ex.
bhbition than the French Collnderles, U'
ta the grounds of the lovaildes. One
gets there by a railway runniag from n
the river side, in tralns made like tl
wsgonettes. "*Native" villages, on
Tonquln, Annamdie, lIdian, Algerian J
and Cayeone modeleare the attraction, e
with nativen" meoo, women and chilt a
dren practicing hanodierafts, danelg t
and playling games, in rwhich there Ie
often sleight-of-band.
TEA WORTU ThY1e(~.
Water is very bad at Ithe EhIbition
-a reason why the publil have takenr
to tesdrlnoklg at the Indian Palace.
The cheerIng beyerage is served blhs
nlatyed Riodoes, blsek of skto, and
In snow-white ralment. They move
about like pathoere, stesitbtily and
with soft atep, and never seem to
smile. All the tea druk here Is londla,
and very grateful it is.
)I WREarn EaarEzs Iil.EW.
Red I the misfortune to be sur
-*I wet e
l orade ItY
btinae~ta
tbie ieb
Whihalllr ( alarl
ltonarh W iag ,t
wt e oatevu
in orderIK t
sirates a bpeed e
Totbd fithio one apti
rie Brnres
eploe red .ltbo
woulighted confer ed n th
narn, testmon but t
the ellchicken voallon of on
obeing deritite' *o. ': e
The Britie deemshed b the ta
the employ ment'W totlia #tae
would cooler credibility on the b--.
tan'a testimony, bult the eleta ba
no such thought. The d capitatlon
sht ould properly . be acopaid by. ,
the silent Invocation of nislklleglons
upon hiupselfon the part ot theo wi
noea but s It was l mpia Iblo t o the
low the witness' mental tpe
rite is deemed by the Rngllaheaý
to be Iipracticable and thes rejected.
It is aeserted that no: "formatty. Will,
Impress upon the Ohlncase4Ilesebes of
a religious obligation to speak the
truth, and that to them no oath Is
binding.
UARl TOMAAKE A WIuNAMA TIWFL
THEI TRUTI.
"This Is not properly an oath, said
Mr. Bollo, In commenutlng upon tha
Tribune article, but It Is a mNean of
gettlng at the truth and as such Is
worthy of employmant. There are no
athbs to China, but this plan was em
ployed in Portland with aeuooes, and I
nave reason to believe that n tbhis
Philadelphla trmal the witness who
swore by the sputterlng blood wae los
pelled to stick closer to falto than any
of his fellows througb the frar that
the pullet's spirit would haras him if
be lied. I learned from parties on
both sides of the case that the slaughl .
ter of a chlcken would be absolutely
blnding on a Ublonaman's consclence
and accordingly I urged Judge Bregy
to allow the Introduction of that rite.
It would have been impossible to elloit
the truth unless some such course had
been pursued. It would be folly 'to
attempt to frigbten a heathen Ohlase
into truth-telliog by a mere threas of
temporal punisthment for perjury, for
be would reallrs the difiloulty of con
viction and would he tempted to lie
right and left. If there is any legiti
mate method by which thbetruth may
be reached that method absoud be em
ployed.
PRECEI)ENT FOR THE (1UC'KEN KIfL.
INO
".There is ample precedent for ad
ministering an oath or ite substitute to
a heathen or non-Christian in bhis own
fashbto. Wharton's 'Crlmlnal Evl.
deace' reads as follows;
While the common and regulur way of
swoaring by a Christian is on the four
evangellats or on the New Testament, the
general rule is Lthat witnesses are to be
sworn after a forim tlhe obligation of whlob
they acknowledge.
",Wharton then goes on to msay that a
Jew may be sworn by the Pentateuch
stone with bls hd covered; a Maho
metan 'n the .orac; a Genotoo by
ouohinlg with his band the foot of a
TIrahmla or priest of his religion; 5
Chinese by breaknlog a chnloa sauer.
i Tbhe proper way a Parsee should be
sworn is by hbedlo the tall of a cow,
end it Is reported that Sir James
Maeklntosh once had a heifer brounbht
ianto the coqrt.toh ton order to lnsure
the truthful@.02l  a Pareee's teSIti
mony. Thete lto ton's authority
fr swedrlng a Lnt ae*an by a broken
saucer, and a rooster ia only
a sisghtly di ward ite as.
complishe ~hel * I -
ie eC he t r O mage
is nur u: a
- aose the or'eaas' 06."
U'.i

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