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The times. (Richmond, Va.) 1890-1903, February 03, 1900, Image 8

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85034438/1900-02-03/ed-1/seq-8/

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MRS.IW. M. JOLLY'S
Murdered Mpn's Widow Loses Her
Home.
ESCAPE ONLY WITH CLOTHES.
Pcterslmrjr HasnN'oali Tiiat in Lon;:
Xtaildlus His Ark?Discusslii'*
tlie Proposed Line to
Clarctnont.
J"*ETHRSBURG. VA, Feb. 2.?Special ?
2tfrs. W. OA. Jolly. of Dinwiddic county,
-widow cf the late W. M. Jolly. who was
?hot and kill. d by RoMnson. a negro. scv
<>ral weeks aico. lost her -iom?- and al! its
contents bv fire last night. Mrs. Jolly with
Jier -three 11 tle children were aslecp in
thc house- und wer-:- arousetl by tbe stifling
?mokn Tlie Hames spread so rapidly that
iiothing could be saved and the ot_<*r
bulldings on the prx-nises had caught Be
Tor_ assistiiiKv could arrive.
Mrs. Jolly and li^.r children oscaned un
injun-d. but brought nothing from thc
house wltb tliom save the dothes they
wore. ln tbe smolavhousc was a thousand
pounds of meat, which was lolally lost.
The neighbars of Mrs. Jolly are making
efforts to restore, as far they can. the
ser'nus loss she has susfcilned. A few
woeka ago when Mr. Eubank lost every
Ihitrg ho had by fir<\ an a.ppea.1 was tmade
10 tlie chizcns of IVt'-rsbiirg nnd so geii
r.rous was the response that he reo--ived
nvo hundred dollars in money nnd clothes
rnougli for his family for two or three
years. Tlv:- people will hardly be less gfn
erous in thls case.
ANOTHER. XOAH.
Late latst Spring an old man commcnerd
the building of ? boat about thirty feet,
long on the banks of the Aiu-omattox"
river Just oppt.slie 11-^ l"n on dep'oL H<e is
still hammcring away in 1he hope of com
plr-Hng his work by next spring.
"Xoah." as thc old man has been called,
lives in a little b use he bullt on the
bmik nnd s-eeans to onjoy life. He has a
mnrrtol d.iughter Hving in iCIiestcrtield
county cind lived with her until lasyycar.
Being n sa-ior ho says be intends to spend
the. rest of his life 011 th/ water. His boat
will bc l.-unched as so->n as it is com
*p>!ed. and thc old man will leave for Bos?
ton.
He was bom ln Massachusetts and celr
hm.tod his sivciity-lifth birthdiiy last
munth.
MTXICIPAL OWXBRSHIP. '
Tlie aflvoca.ias. of inunlclpal otwnershlp
say that not only will tho city not con?
sider thc rnt-sfloh of sillinj*- its Water
Works, but that in a few years it -wUl
own its own plant for lighling tbe city.
The cnipltalists of <"a.rysville. in Prince
Sem-ge coi:ii*y. and ( thers interoste-.l in the
mnltor. will n--?'t to-morrow week to dis
cuss the iirc-i.iscd new railroad from Pe
lersburg to Claremont.
The hoalth officer cf Pdcrsburg has is?
sued a notice that no children who have
not b_en projorly vacclnated will be ;il
lowed .*.o attend tiie public schools.
FUzhttgb Cnrner. colored, who assauited
the little son of Mr. William Mahone last
week. -was sent to j.iil to-day for six
tmnnths.
THE WATER WORKS.
The ?Co-m.mnn Council. at its meetlrig
last night. traiisactert only routine busi?
ness. On account. of the absence from the
city of tho chairman of the Public Prop?
erty Committee. the propositlon to bay
the city's water-works was not brought
UP,
Tbrre ar" now 4". cases of smnllpnx in
Prmce G'v.rge County. Tho officials have
sent Jettcns to tho jeprcsentatives of tho.
county in tiie Legisiature asking that
thr;y have a bill passed at once to rm
jiow,'r the-n to force Ihe citizens lo bu
vacclnated.
Mr. AV. C. Ker.-in sold to-day fnr the
trustee of Geo. W. Brooks. in bankruptcy.
thc stock of goods consisting of stoves.
glass and tlnwarc. -to Mr. E. L.. Ds Jar
nett. as a who!<\ at TS per cent. on the
Invfijilory and appraisenfent made.
Mr. William Budd will leave tomorrow
011 a trip through the north.
RYAN WANTEDlS
RIGHTS DEFINED
(Continued from First Page.)
charter of the Seaboard and Roanoke
was granted In two States. yet icach State
hns the power to njnnid in eertain iii
Btanoes. and such action does nol require
thc coneurrcml acton.
"Tin- Seaboard aud Roanoke in Virginia
is a Virginia corporation, and ln Xorth
?Caroiina. .1 X6l_h Caroiina corporation.
Enii who would dlspute that one long
road is betfter than mvo short roads."
?iriKK 1.1-:\V1S" CONTHNTION.
Judge L. L. Lowis followed Judge Cross.
"If the rule." ^a'd Judge Lewis, -'is we.'l
tfounilc .1. and it ci-rtainly is, th-u an
injunction will not bc granted unless thc
party ,-i>;ppiyins for it ts entitled to it. and
110 other ramedy is io be obtained. tho
? ?om-i'ainan! is 110J f-nt .tlcd to the restrain?
ing order asked for."
Judge Lewis nbo contended Ihat tho
COJVsUttutlonnllty and validity <>f tbe act of
rbo. lvi._-islntui-e '.n .-i.mcnding tlie i-harn
was the only matter brought out ih tlie.
e-upplenicntal bill. Hc claimed Uiat it was
const'tutional and the Ijegish.ture possa
<"d the rescTv-.- power to amend ^/iharters
(granted by tbe State. H_ insis'ted'that tbe
charter of tlie Richmond. 1". lorsbing an 1
Caroiina railroad was constitutional and
tiiat tlie Ij^-glslatuiv has tlie right
laanena tbe charter of the Seaboard and
Rtianoke and to authorize it to consolida'.e
with other companies. .
"Mr. Bcrnard Carter followed Judge
Lewis, and <-lost-d tho lu-gumcnt for
Ryan. The <iuestion Is whether the Sei
J?o*ard and Roanoke had the legal j>ow<
to consolldate or be niarged with any
other company. Mr. Carter contended
that the Seaboard and Roanoke had 110
Towcr to consolldate* under the ?charter
yrrantcd by the State of Xorth Caroiina,
ps that State failed to reserve the right
to modify or change tlie charter granted
by it
"We are here lo dcierminc"'- said Mr.
Carter. ?'Whether there is legislative au
Ihoiity. no matter from whence it ema
tiates. for the consolidation <>f the Sea?
board and Roanoke railroad with other
roads.
"1 say that there is 110 charter power
tinder ihe grant 01" the State of Xorth
Caroiina to all >w the Seaboard and Roa
Jiokc to consolldate with any other road."
Mr. Carter biuerly attacked the scheme
j?roposed for the oomiM-nsation of the mi
?iority stockholders. puttlng forth the
?rjru?v~n1 that any ennrpensation that the
<?oi*'olidaled company; might bc liable for
-would Ih- ma-ie secondary lo the satis
#ylng of the liens and mortgages the con
polidnted vompany had Issued.
Mr. Carter also claimed thut if the pro
visioiis for the compensation of the dis
?_tiK!ifd stockholders were followed out.
the Federal courts tvould be oeprivcd of
thfir jurisdiction in the matter. Mr. Car?
ter oontcnd.-d ?hnt they were entitled to
nn Injunction: that the case was a unlque
one. "We want to know whejfiier there i.s
uny legal authorlly for the consolldation.
tThe only thhig that has b.v-n liled in
Rtiswer to our bilf ls the slatement that
the stockhold??-s' an?:-ting has not yet
been held.
*'Thc court has now the right to decide
th* matter. and if there exists no legal
j-lg-ht for the -consolldation, Uien prohibit
It. We ask for an Injunction. We ask
that our rlghts be dbflned, It is the duty
of your Honor to end thls controversy on
th* legal qvestions and issues that have
\0m Uirly m*t."
No Fusel Oil.
Coughs
Colds
Grip
Asthma
Bronchitis
Consumption
speedily cured'by DUFFrS PURE MALT
WHtSKLY. Us regular and continued use
cures Consumption, because it kills the
jjerms, itcnriches tlie blood and tones up
the system. Duffy's is the only whiskey
taxed as a medicine by Uie Government.
Gen/lemni: I suflcr -with hcmorrhagcs of the
lungs and have stomach trouble and kidncy com?
plaint. Dufly's Pure Malt Whiskey has helped me
to livcthese six vears. Without it slx months, 1
??*0""ld ro to my gravc, 1 believe. Vcrv rcspectlully
yours, Josiiru Collins, South Scavillc, N. J.
Irescrloed by over 7,000 doctors.
All dr_srgi?< -ncl .Tncer-;. Ji.tw - hotllr. y_lu?bi- "?o"c of
Information frcx. Get t!ic cin-"*?t'-**'" of sub.titutes.
DUFFY MALT "v7_IS__T CO., Rochester, H. T.
theIyidence
is now all in
(Continued from First Page.)
and no general publicity was given to
the fact that such renewa1 was contem
]>lated. Uut the Board had the mat?
ter-'under eonsidpration from, last May
until October. Mr. Chesterman said he
held out for sometime against the re
newal of the contract six years before '.'
expired. but finally joined with others
who had to deal with the matter and
made the action unnnimous.
PROFIT TO THE STATE.
Mr. Chesterman stated that the present
conlrax-t was not unlike the others lhat
have been in force during ntnctecn years.
He called attention td the fact that when
tho Davis Company made its origin '1 c< n
tract the penitentiary was running tlie
State in debt to the cxteiit of about ?'0,OJ0
per year. Nc.w, a handsome sum. some
thing llke $40,000. is turned into tKe State
treasury. ln nlneteen years ijie Davis
Company has paid to Ihe State 51.330.000
Majjor Lynn, who was suporlnteridcnt
before Major Helms went into oflice.
thoroughly fami!iari?.-d himself with
prison contracts, and was of opinion
that Virginia had the best one of
any Southern State.
Mr. Thac'scr had stated that he-di-i
not think tiie c-ompany'.s plant wortli
$"i"*.on*. *.lr. Chesterman said iic. was not
competcnl to estimale the value of the
plant, but he had always had the idea
tliat it wa-j very valuable.- lt was
brought out. that the eompany pays taxes
on son.ooft of assessed value of property.
Mr. Chesterman said Richmond had com
pele.nt and efficient ollicers. and he was
willing to accept as correct the v_luation
they placed upon the properiy.
MK. HAP.MAN TESTIFIES.
Mr. llarman was asked if Ihe AVil
liamses had been informed by him as to
the action of the the board as to sccuring
a copy of the contract. lle replied in
the ricgatlve, but stated that Mr. Mose?
ley had had several conversatlons ivltli
him. and he had given the information
to Mr. Moseley. As far as he knew, Mr.
Moseley never eopied the contract. In
one conversatlon with Mr. Moseley. Mr.
Hartman asked him*"if the Williamses
wanted to bid for ihe hire of the convicts,
and. if so. what use was to be made
of them. Mr. Moseley replied that he was
unable to answer tho question. but sur
nilscd that they might want the convicts
to work on an electricai enterprise in
which the lirm was interested.
*.Ir. Folkes said at this point: ""Well,
I am glad they didn't geCtho convicts.
This thing is coming lo a pass when a
fellow will have to go to the penitentiary
to get a. job of work."
Mr. Harmnn, continuing his statement.
said the Williamses had been given aim
ple opportunity to bid if they cared to
do sd.
There was a desire expressed to hear
the Mr. Williams who had spoken to Mr.
Chesterman about the contract. It was
stated lhat he had. been in tlie Senate
chamber earlier in the evening. and had
left
"lr. Pilcher expressed himself as in
favor of not renewing tlie contracts for
convict hire until two or three years
before the existjng contracts expire. He
was in favor of advertlsing for bids.
The committee adjourned to meet in
executive session at the-call of the chair?
man.
IVoposod New llo.-ul.
The Senate Committee on Roads met
ye_terday afternoon at 4 o'clock to con
s'der _i'e biil to incorporate the AA'aidiing
ton and Richmond Railway Conmany.
This company ls asking for practically
the s__me clmrtor as the 'Richmond and
Wash'ngti-n Air Line Company (Seaboard
Air Line).
The corporators ai-e W. (Brydon Tennant,
.1. J. Collier. Herman Rkketts. Walter
Smith. .lohn-F. AVilkins, J. A. H. .lunker,
M. E. Sturges and G. F. Ambrose. Hon.
John B. Moon, of Albcmarle. prepared aml
had ihe blll introduced. Mr. Flood is the
the patrcm in the Senate and Mr. Hubard
in ihe House.
Major E. T. D. Myers, Judge AV. .1.
Leake and Mr. AV. C SPraston were on
hand to i_._-Fesei.it the 'Richmond, l-'red
erJaksburg and Potomac Railroad Com?
pany. lt was decided to postpone tlie
consideration of this measure until next
Tuesday and consider it along wlth the
tSeaboard Air Line biil.
The committee heard Messrs. AA7. J.
Nelmc, of Newport News, and Thomn.s
AA". Shelton, of (Norfolk, in behalf of the
biil io incorporate the Hampton Roads
llaMway and Electric Company, and Mr.
S.-unual Kegw.er. counse! for the Newport
News and Old Po'nt Railway and Electric
Company. in opposition to it.
A vote will be taken on Uie biil next
Tuesday.
REPORTED FAVORABLY.
X Hill Relating; lo tlie -.iceiisiiig* of
Steam Vesseis.
WASHINGTON, Feb. --?Special.?Sena?
tor Martin. of Virginla, has reported
Jfavorably from the Committee ou Com?
merce the blll relating to the licensihg of
steam vesseis. The object of the biil is
to provide a legal means of preventirig
fraud in obtaining licenses by persons ap
plying for licuiise as steamboat officers'
and for punishing ollicers who, after re
eeiving licenses. frauduloritly. and by
fcirgpry. lncrease the conditions originally
stated on the face of such licenses.
The fraud referred to has been of fre
nuent oeeurrence. ind it has been found
that tlicre is not nt present any legal
means of prevehtibn or punishment. The
attention of Congress has been several
times called to tiie necessity of legisla
tion such as indicated iri this biil.
James A. Dumont. supervising'inspec
tor-general of steam vesseis, says thero
is no question of doubt touchihg the
?merlls of this biil, and strongly urges
its passage.
Representative Bellamy, of North Caro?
lina, to-day introduced a biil authorizing
Frank Hltch to construct and inaintaln
a bridge across Fishing creek, within the
boundary lines* of Edgecombe county.
North Carolina.
Several members of the A'irginia Repub?
lican State Committee are in tlie city for
the purpose.i of arranglng a call' for _the
State conveiltion.
These North Carolina fourth-class post?
masters .were..apiX)lnted to-day: W. M.
Brockman. Armstrong; C. J. MePherson,
Hofwyl; J. H. Keily. Lydia.
S. Brown Allen and R. A. Tuttville,
Staunton; J. M. Oast, Norfolk: J. S.
lsman. Richmond; Henry Campbell; Nor?
folk; R. L. Durham; Richmond, and J. L.
Lasb, of Newport News, Va., _re in the
citjr. '
HOW MOCCASINS
ARE MADE NOW
V Business of Which; Maine Has
Nearly a IVIonopoly.
0 JLYFOOT-WEARFORHUNTSWIEN
I'lie Matct-ials U.-.cd Since Mi.oscliiile
Became Too Scarc'u and Hard 16
j.-jnd-iU'liat Sliociiacl-s and
Lni-i-ijrans Aro.
When tho ellent Indiin ranged the for
csts iu Xerr England in qti^st of the
ga-.ru that was his source of susleriance,
hc wcrc a foot covering which made his
tread as soft r.s a wiid cat's?a shoe
called a moccasin. shaped to hls foot from
.1 single piece ..f gr-en mcosehide, se.vn
to a f-maller piece ai the top of the foot
with Ihe sinev-s of a di_er.
Centurles havo passed since tho sav
age lirst fashloned this shoe. but ;o thls
day a beUer foot covering for the hunter
has iH-ver been .levis.-d. Hunters; boots
of various kinds aro madi^ and eoltl to
eitiy rrieii who go Into the woods a!':or
big game. but none of them equal fyr
i soi.tr.oss of trcad tlie moccasin. whifcl)
l tb-day is made in just t"n__ satne style
i as in tho days when the s'lyage relgncd
i supreme throughout the land. "Men have
I dev'scd roaehinery for making shoes; but
i tbe. machine has never been made that
can fashion a moccasin as well as it can
be shaped by hand.
tn only a few places in this country
are mocciisihs now made, and mesf. ot
these places aro^ in Xew England. The
art of making good moccasiiis has bc-n
pics-rvbd by tiie Indian tiibe;at O dt wn,
Me:. and from their porgenUo'rs and other
Indiaus. who come from Canada into
Mai'no to hunt. the art of making a rcallj*
good hunting moccasin was lirst caught
by white men. So well are moccasins
inade in Maine that those supplied the
western Indians 'by the gowrnmciit oire
madu in the city of Bangpr. The red man
of the plains does hot have the skins to
make moccasins as his fathers made
them, and if hc had them it is doubtful
if a proper supply for themselves could
be furnished by the agency Indians. ln
thcso'i-ays when the noblo savage has
degenerated to the agency Indians. re
ceivirig ihe botinty of the government in
red drill overalls and plug. tobacco. his
traditioiial footwear comes to him from
the factory of a moccasin maker who
learned his business in Maine from the
wood lore lianded down by woodsmen and
Indian hunters. Not only are mbecasins
sent from Maine to the West for the
Indian?. but Uncle Sam's scouts in the
"West and in Alaska. where moccasins
are needed in the service, for use on
snow, with showahpes, get their footwear
from Bangor. The contracts are made
for several thousand pairs at a time.
XEAT'S 11IDE. \
None of these moccasins are made of
moose hide now'adays, tbe material being
chlefly oil?tanned "neafs hide." which i=
cowhldc. This turns thc water as well
as moosehide, and wear? almost as well.
The leather is well saturated with fish
oil, which gives it a strong smell, but itn
parts vlrtues that assist in repcilins
snow waier. -which will penetrate ordi?
nary leather very quickly.
The tannago is known as ?'indian Tan/'
Xot only are moccasins made frp'nj this
oiled tanned leather, but btfher articles of
footwear that may properly be called off
springs of the moccasins such as the
shoepack and thc larrigan.
The shoepack is a moccasin with a shoe
top made of the same sort of material
as the bottom. and laced. The'origfn of
the word is not clear, though it ia
ascribed to the vernatular of lumbormen
in upper Canada, around Lake Supc-rior.
lt was brought into Maine by thc Cana
dians, and' has become a part of the local
vocabulary in thc- northern part of the
State. A city shoe-dealer would be at a
loss to know what a customer wanted
shouid he demand to be shown a shoe?
pack. ln Xorthern Maine these useful
articles of footwear. based on the In
dian's moccasin, are displayed outside
every store whore lumbermen's or hunt?
ers' supplies are sold.
The larrigan is a. moccasin with a] boot
top. and for wear in the deop snow is
liighly esteemed by many. lt is a Cana
dian articie of footwear. and the name
seems to have become as much a part of
tlie local Maine vocabulary as shoepack.
Its origin. however. i.s not so clear.
While native hunters in Maine wear all
three of the foot-coverings described they
prefer the mocc asin for all-round wear.
lt is light, noiseless, easy to the foot,
and wears well. In winter it is worn
over three or four pairs of stocklngs, and
a pair of leggings. also knit. This makes
a I bundle of woollen stuff covering the
foot, and maintains warmth e.ven ln the
coldest weather.
Xot a lumbermaii or guide in Maine is
to be seen in winter without his leggfns.
They are as much a part of his wardrobe
as iiis hat. They are thick and warin,
and when slrapped around the leg below
the knee with -a piece of tape are snow
TKE TYRANT CUPID.
Say what you
will, Cupid is
sotnewhat of a
tyrant after all.
He waves his
lash of govern?
ment over the
head of every
^g?. woman who
1 4 e 1 e c t s him to
rule her life. No
,-oinan can choose
the happiness and
honor of wifehood
and motherhood
without being subject also to its pains
and penalties.
But no woman ought to suffer as most
do from those ailments and weaknesses
which are due to her peculiarly delicate
and susceptible organism. Every woman
ought to know that Dr. Pierce's Favorite
Prescription will cure these unnatural
and debilitating troubles. It cures them
absolutely, completely, permanently. It
contains no alcohol to create a craviug
.for stimulants.
" It is with heart-felt gratitnde that I must tell
you what your medicine has done for me,"
writes Mrs. A. F. Crenshaw, of Pannsoffkce,
Suniter Co.. Fla.. in a letter to Dr. R. V. rierce
of Buffalo. X. Y. "After consulting you about
my case I took your medicine aud it cured rae of
fetnsle weakness. I was all run down; I suffered
with sick headache, pains in the back and bear
iug down pains. I took two bottles of Dr.
Pierce's Favorite Prescription and was then able
to take care of my house. My health is better
than it has been for three years. I do not know
how to thank you for the kind advice you gave
so cheerfully."
This grand " Prescription " has accom
plished tbe same beneficent purpose for
thdusands of women in every corner of
this broad land. It impa'rts health,
strength and endurance to tbe special
organism of womanhood and gives tonic
vitality to tbe entire nervous system.
Its marvelous properties are more fully
described in one chapter of the People's
Common Sense Medical Adviser by R. V.
Pierce, M. D., a splendid thousand-page
illustrated volume which will be sent
free paper-bound for 21 one-cent stamps
to pay the cost of mailing only; or cloth
bound for 31 stamps..
proof. These leggins are knitted by the
women | in the French settlements in
Northern Maine in great numbers. and
retail in the _tpres. at 75 cents a pair. If
the amount of woollen yarn.; in them
were employed in making factory-knit
stocklngs such as are sold in the cities,
the nuantity ln each leggin would make
a" dozen pair. With hls leggins on. and
his moccasins,- shoepacks;. or 'larrigans
over them. the" woodman cares not how
deep the snow may be. W.h-en-it gcts too
dtep for-walking he gets out his snowshoes.
and on these slcinis the surface of the
white covering of earth as easily as a
rabblt.
MOOSEHIDB SCARCB.
Owing to the restrictions that have
been placed on the hunting of moose
there are not so many moosehide mocca?
sins to be seen in Maine now as in years
past. v.-he-t moose were "htinted by the
Oldtown Indians "and otiiers for their
hides. All tho moosehides secured now in
a season in. Mair.e .would not cut 2.0CO
pairs of moccasins if each was used. As.
most of the iiUles taken by sportsmen
aro sent out of the Sta'.r. it will be seen
that thc; supply fcr mcccosin leather is
j s-nall at the best. This makes the leather i
the more priz.d.
fThero are but three shops outside of |
| Eahgbr where a business is made of th>* j
| fcanufacture of moccasins. They are all |
| iu the reglon around tin- west branch of i
[ the Penobscot below Twin Lake--. In !
| these shops. iwhich are small p'aces. two |
| <:? threa men are employed to make moc- '
castns fcr sp_rismen and lumbsrmen: The ;
j supply/ <:!' mcosehide being sni-ili. mosr. '
I of ihe moccasins are made of "neafs ,
j h'dc,"' and sewed with deer skin. ciit into j
j The process of preparing tle deer hide ?
j for s v.in;; the moccasins is an interest- !
ing one. Tho shin of tiie de.er is cured. as :
j "raw bid.-.- ;:,:li cut into -narrow strips
| whiie v.-ec. These strips are strung on j
? nalls and allowed to dry. They aro then ]
j transparent. but stif". Before usin'g they ?
i are placed in a. bottle, v.'ith both ends |
.air. and thc bottle is fll'Sj with wat-r.
After soakitig for some time they become
perfeetly pHabie. whiie the ends remain }
hard. These ends are shaped when thc j
strips, or strings. as they are now, are
needed tor sewing, and form needles to
sew with.
Cutting a moccasin "s a simple affair.
There are but two patterns. one for tbe
sole. which is also thc .sides after being
shaped, aad tlie other lor the top sides.
The relative size of the pattern for Ihesc
two pi'ees is about -seven to one. Xo last
is used in making a moccasin. The toe
is gathered up around thc small top piece
and crimped. stitch iby stitch, a special
kind of stilch -being employed. AVhen the
entire toe of a shoo has been made a
stick twith a round end is introduced, and
the toe is furth-r shaped by pquncl'ng.
The heel is tiien closed up. and a small
ear is left at tlie bottom by cutting from
tho hef; itso'r a short strlp. that is used
for pnlling thc moccasin on. When tluis
shaped tho shoo is complete. except for
the string, which is introduced through
holes in the top made with a punch. This
string puckcrs the top of the moccasin,
drawing ?: around tho foot. and ls tied
over tho instei>. When properly tied a
moccasin cannot slip off.
GLQVE FINISH.
Tho majority of moosehide moccasins
?made in Maine now aro for summer wear.
in dry weather, or for use as slippers'in
the house. They are soft tanned with a
giove-tinish. The* tanning is done in Xew
irampshire. all the skins used in Maine
being sent tliere to be cured. Tlie ontcr
surfaco is buffed and colored like buck
skin. Moccasins made from this are very
warm. As a summer shoe in the woods
they are well nigh perfect.
When shod iwith moccasins tho hunter
can fee": every twig he steps on, and if he
is tracking deer of moose he makes no
more noiso than if ibarefooted. Shouid ho
stop/on a twig he can raise his foot be
for<( it breaks and thus prevent its snap
pingv In still hunting this is very im?
portant. as the snap of a twig will ap
ipriso gnme in tho ncighhorhood of the
hunter as cffocUially as the discharge of
a gun. The guide who takes you into the
woods sums up the argument for the
moccasin as foilows:
"These dude hunters come down here
in what they call a 'hunting costume.'
and they don't get nothing. They -wear
shoes with na.ils in 'em and soles as thick
as your hand. or they have what they
call 'hunting l-oots.' tMight -as well go
hunting on a freight train. Give me
good, soft. heat hide moccasin or a shoe?
pack. and l'il show.'em what's what in
getting through tho woods without mak?
ing noise. I tell you tlie old Indians
knew their business. and it ain't any use
trying to improve on what they wore."
The moccasin Idea has been employed
successfully in Bangor in tlio Tnanufacture
of dainty bedroom slippers for women.
made. like moccasins. but without the
strings. These are made of elk's hide,
very soft and warm and very much like
mooseliTde. They aro trimmed with beav
c7. the remnants from furriers' cutting
tables being used, and when ready for
sah*. with a hit of embroidery on the top
piece, they are a temptation to any woman
who sees them.
OI'IiUAItY.
Mrs. Lettir Xcwlnml Lambprt.
BRISTOLv TENX., Feb. 2.?Special.?
Mrs. Lambert, the young wife o* Hon.
Geo. A. Lambert. who represents Wythe
county, Virginia, in tlie House of Dele?
gates, died at tho home of her sister, here,
at 7:.'l0 o'clock this evening, from dyph
theria.
?Mrs. Lambert came to Bristol recently
to visit her sister, Mrs. XV. R. Dungan,
and was taken ill only ten days ago.
She w*as formerly Miss Bettie Xew'and.
A iwo-year-old daughter survives. The
remains will ho taken to Wythe county
to-morrow for interment.
A. S. Hamaker. a native of Snowville.
Va.. died here this afternoon of cancer,
at the age of tlfty-one. -
Sitns Gregoi'y.
EMiPORIA, VA., Fsb. 2.?Special.?Infor?
mation has just reached here of the death
of Mr. Sims Gregory. -who died. at his
father's residence at Reigate. last night,
of pneumonia,' in the twenly-second year
of his age.
Mr. 'Gregory enlisted on the iSpantsh
Amerk-an war as soon as volunteers were
called for, going wit'! Cornpany l from
Franklin, A'a., Captain Vaughn command?
ing.
His father and mother, a sister and
brother survive him. These with a large
circle of friends lament his early death.
AViiliam Gi'Cfjoi'.v I'owoil
ALEXANDRIA, VA., Feb. 2.?Special.?
Mr. Wiiiiam Gregory Poweil, aged twen
ty-Jthree. son of tho late Dr. R. C. Poweil.
died this afternoon at the home of his
aunt, Mrs. Thomas Beadbeater.
Cliaii-s l'oi- London Salcswomen.
With the lirst d'ay of the new year the
seats for shop assistants' aet came into
force. The new act. which is practicaliy
part of the shophours' act, is wide in its
application. as will be seen from Ihe fol?
lowing clause:
In all rooms of a shop or other premises
where goods are actually retailed to the
public. and where femaie assistants are
employed for the retailing of goods to
the public. the employer carrying on busi?
ness in s-uch premises shall provide seats
behind the counter or in Such other posi?
tion as may be suitable for the purpose,
and such seats shall be^ ln the proportion
of not less than one seat to every fhree
femaie assistants employed in each room.
The first offence of non-compliance with
the provisions of the act carries with it
on convictlpn a penalty not exceeding ?.3;
and subsequent offences a penalty not
exceeding ?">. with a minimum of ?1.
Irate Femaie?See here: do you mean to
tell me that I have such an ugly nose as
that?
l'hotographer?iBut my ap-paiatus can?
not lle, madam.
Irate Femaie?Then. for goodness' snke.
go and get one that can.?Ohio State Jour?
nal.
BRIGHT BLAZE
IN THE EAST END
Armitaee Nlanufacturine Company
Destroyed by Fire. j
DESTRUCTION WAS COMPLETE;
Brave' Work of thcT iresncn?The 3ia
tci-ial ?Biirncil Ficrccly?A Xruck
nian's Haiitj Badly flut.
Tlie Insuranee.
A disastrous fire bro*-' out last night
about 7:40 o'ciuck at the piant of the Ar
mirage Monuf-a-turins Company", on AV.I
liamsburg avenue. whicli completely de?
stroyed the building.
The Armftage Company manufacture
rooflng materials. palnts". fir-paper, etc,
w-hchurr very n l r. mi*-le anlvv.hcno.iee
cutght are Ihible to consume everything
thit"- comes ln eont.ict with it.
At r.'jcut 7:'" o'clock. when tlie b'.a_e
v. j- _l--coy'red, t'ne lire had gainec! co:i
>?i_e.r_'b"e htudway. An alarm -was at once
titritc'. ':i from box 12. c.rne.- M:;in ar.d
Ash streets.
Assistant Chlef Shanv an:l steamers Noi.
;: ahd S,' and truck company Xo. 2. re
spon'ded to tlie _"arm,'*?nd on'th.Ir arrival
Chfe' Shaw'turned in the second alarm,
and In. less than live minutes after the
arrivu-l of the lirst .br'g.ide, ingin-j No. 7,
frcm Cary .street, was hustening to thctr
assistanec.
When the department arrived at tiie
firo Ihe ofKc-e. ma'.n building and several
frame dwellirig:' near by and oc.cupled by
negroes, were In a blaze. while the build?
ings across the strset wero smoking.
BUILDINGS SAA'EO.
Chief iPulier arrived on the seene wlth
the second alarm. and took charge ot tti^
light. fcjtreams were dlre-cted upon the
ofiice building and the rrame dwellings.
and after a stubb^rn fight the.--? buildings
were saved- The .fight was continued on
the main buildlng of tlie plant, but t'ne
flaniei had g-ained such a hold upon tbe
Inflammajble tar. paper and oils that
every thing seemed tiseiess.
Chief PuIIer dlrected streams upon the
Uruilding- ton the opposite side pf tlie
street, and live ladders from truCk com?
pany No. 2, ttncier Captain Atkinson. were
put up.
The streams applied to theso buildings
prevented tb-'ir taking fire.
In the rear of tho main building is
the slables of the company, ln which were
a number of horses. These were gotten
out. and after hard work by the fire?
men the stablo buildings were saved;
Not long after the arrival of the de?
partment the main building- fell in, but.
fie other buildings were damaged very
little. ..i
MATBRIAJ- DESTROATED.
There were largf r|irnntlties of raw
tmateriai and goods ready for shipment
ln the buildings. which are badly dam
"aged if net entirely dnstroyed. The
large vats of tar which were used in
the making of tnr-roofing paper. eaught
lire and were extinguished with difiiculty,
much of the tar being destroyed. One
of these vats was about eightecn feet
deep, and nearly filled with liquid tar.
This was badly burned on the surfaee,
but not sertously damaged. Tiie ma?
chinery of the plant is a total-wreck and
almost useless.
The plant was insured in the A'irginia
State Insuranee Compnay for S10.000. *S.r>00
of which was re-insured. The loss will
probably l>e in excess of this.
During the fight Lieutenant J. B.Haake.
of truck company Xo. 2. had his hand
badly cut about tbe wrist by a failing
piece of glass. Ho was promptly treatted
by Officer Pop Tate, who applied the
fa.vorite remedy, a piece of tobacco.
which he bound around the wound.
The department was greatly hampered
in their right by the scareity of water
at this point. In this part of the city
the pressure is very light ind the sup?
ply small, and serious difiiculty arose
by o'ne engine taking tho supply of wa?
ter from another.
The. fight was over by half past -3
o'clock. bilt a stream was kept upon
the embers until a late -hour.
The cause of the eonfiagration is un
known, but the materials used at the
plant are so infiammable that the slightest
spark might have caused the burning.
Toast*- to Queen Victoria.
There is only one regiment among those
in the British Army which does not toast
her majesty at mess. This is the Seventh
Fnsiliers. and the regiment is extremely
prouel of its distinctioii. lt seems that
upon one oceasion, in the long ago. some
King of England was dining with the of?
ficers of the regiment. and said. after din?
ner. that tho loyalty of the Seventh was
sullieiently well assured without their
drinking the Sovereign's health.
lt is a curiotis fact?the origin of which
is not known?that the Qtteen's health, on
shipboard. is drtink By the officers sitting,
instead of standing. as is customary
elsewhere. *
Of all the regiments, the AA'elsh Fusiliers
have the most curious army toast. It
forms part of the ceremony of the grand
dinner given annually on St. David's
clay. After the dinner. tlie drum major,
accompanicd by the goat, the mascot of
the Fusiliers, bedecked with rosettes of
red and blue ribbon, marches around the
table, carrying a plate of leeks. Every
officer or -guest. who has never eaten one
before is obliged to do so. standing on
his chair, with one foot on the table.
while the drummers beat a roll behind
his chair. He is theli considerfid a true
AVelshman. All the toasts are coupled
with the name of St. Davtd. lt is ln
much this way that the toast with High
lanil honors is drunk. Each guest stands
with one foot on his chair, one on the
table and the pipers-a-piping parade the
room.?N. Y. Sun.
mi:_i* *iva*"t_i>?ni-iic.
WANTED, RELIABLE MAX* TO DE-*
liver and collect. Sulary, $15 pei\ week
and expenses. Address GLOBE CO.,
7*':; Chestnut street. Philadelphia, Pa.
Mi: KTIX.CS.
The Prudential Banking and Trust Co.,
Richmond, Va., Jan. 20. 1000.
THE REGULAR AXXUAL MEETING
of this company will be held at the
office of the company, Xo. 110:" east
Main street. Richmond. A'a.. MOXDAY,
February 0th, at ' o'clock P. M
T. A. A\ ELLER,
ja_:5 President.
Richmond, \*a? Jan. 27, l'JOO.
A MEETING OF THE STOCKHOLDERS
of the VIRGINIA MACHINE COM?
PANY wlll be held pursuant to a reso?
lution of the Board of Directors of said
company, At Its office, 1107 east Main
street, in the city of Richmond, Va., on
AV'EDNESDAY. Februury 2S. 1900. at 1_
o'clock M.. to consider and vote upon
a' proposition to increase the capital
stock of said company, and for other
business.
By order of "the Board of Directors.
AV. H. LUCKE,
ja2S Secretary and Treasurer.
SPECIAL'NOTICES.
AVE HAA'E SOLD OUR AVALL PAPER
business to SAMUEL MOORE, who will
. conduct lt ln alLof its details ai the
old store. 1-04 EAST MAIN"' STREET.
He is a practlcalr workman, understunds
the business, and, with every faclllty?
wlll conduct.lt to the. satlsfaction of all
of our old customers,
GEO. XV.ANDERSON & SONS.
Jan. 20, 1000. tel
JAMES N.^YD, ??.,??. MANMS.aUARL-S,V1C..P?S-T. JCHN MORTON, S.e-r * T,
Virginia Trust Company,
?*-*-' -.1CHMOND,VIRGINIA.
.200 MAIN STREET, - **n?nnn
CAPITAL, * - - - $???'00?
CHARTERED BY THE tEGlSLATURE OF V1RUNIA.
- AUTHOR.ZED LEGAL Wfi^*"?* .xicUT^ OFmS. CHARACTER OF TRUSTS.
ACTS AS TRUS-EE.UNDER ^RTGAGt^ V**??f CORPORATB STOCKS ANO BONDS.
RECEIVES DEPOSITS SUBJECT TO CHECK _AT_S QF DEPOSrrBEARING INTEREST.
ACCOUNTS OF INVESTORS SOUCmg AND..NTEREgrALLOWED^Y AGREEMEN..
ITS STORAGE. AND SAFETY VAULTS ARE NOT EXC.LL-U. ^_
The Savings Bank of Richmond,
Corner Main and Elevcnth Streets, Richmond, Va.
R.A.PATTJiRSCN, President. t. Z. MORRIS. Yice-Pres^nt. .JMES M. BALL. Cashier
DIEBCXOaS:
GEO. L. CHRISTIAN. W. H. ZIMMERMAN. L. Z. MORRIS 0 0 OWENS.
N. D. HARGROVE. B ALSOP." F. SITTERDING. JOHN W. GORDON,
P. WHITLOCK.
H.THEODORE ELLYSON
Capital anii Siirp'.us.
ounisd. On anci aiU
ington and oppasite 1
?. ?.,.??,.,?..?.. B ALSOP " F. SITF_K_IN_. ?? ?- -?"???
P. WHITLOCK. R*A PATTERS0N H. SELDON TAYLOR. G. G. VALENTINE.
Lexington and oppasite Ihe olfics ol The Ri-hmond Dispatch.
AUCTION SAKKS?Fntare Dny?
By J. B. Elam & Co.".
Real Estate Auctioneers.
TRUSTEE'S SALE" BY PUBLIC AUC?
TION OF
Two Well-Loeated
and Valuable Dwellings
No. 110 East Leigh Street,
ESPECIALLY ATTRACTIVE. MOD
ERXLY -CONSTRUCTED
TWO-STORY* BRICK HOUSE OPJj-IOHT
ROOMS, WITH LOT 25_T_- FEE1,
AND
No. 4 West Leigh Streei,
A NEAT. SUBSTANTIAL AXD DESIR?
ABLE TWO-STORY FRAME
OF ABOUT EIGHT ROOMS. WITH LOT
__V_xl_3 FEET.
Tn execution of a certain deed of trust.
dated Deeember 10, 18f?7 reco,rd?! '"p^"
B 1H" A puge 152. Richmond Chancery
Court. default havlng been Wfl^B"^
debt secured. and being requiredlw tp do
bv the beneticlary. theiuiidenfeged^truSr
tee. will sell, by public auction, on the
premises. on
MOXDAY. FEBRUARY 5. 1000.
beginning with Xo. 110 EAST LElGlt
STREET, at 5 o clock P. M., the above
mlntioned properties. No 110 EAST
I EIGH STREET, fronting 2.?xl.'.b feet on
north side of Leigh street. between First
and Second streets, be"ng a most stib
Sta'ntial, modern and attractive i W O
STORY BRICK HOUSE, with wide iron
-eranda porch. ranse. hot-water bath, all
city conveniences and in good order: and
Xo. 4 AVEST LEIGH STREET. fronting
_2*_x*55 feet on north side of Leigh
street, between St. James . and Price
streets. beinjr a NEAT AXD SUBSTAN?
TIAL TAVO-STORY FRAME HOUSE.
having the usual conveniences and in
frood fepair.
TERMS: Ccsh as to expenses of sale.
taxes to day of sale. and the sum of
s:*,(:0-). with interest thereon from Deeem?
ber 10, 1S00: as to the residue, upon such
terms as shall be announced at time of
cale and at whieh time very liberal terms
mav be offered as to the whole purchase
mohev. J. B. ELAM. Trustee.
J. ii Elam & Co.. Auctioneers.
By J. B. Elam & Co..
Real Estate Auctioneers.
TIIE A'ERY ATTRACTIA'E LOT. S&c
120 FEET, WITH NEAT AXD COM
FORTABI.E TWO-STORY BRICK
DWELLIXG thereon. on east side F'fth
street. between Clay and Leigh, oppositc
"Subletfs Row."
No. 517 NORTH FIFTH STREET,
nt public auction.?On
TUESDAA*. FEBRUARY ?. lfiOO.
nt 4-.:i0 o'clock P. M.. we shall sell. by
public auction. on the premises, the above
named well-lccated and very attractive
property; the lot belns admirnbly sutted
in size and location for two tenementg,
which may b? built without disturbing
he present dwelling, whieh is a most sub
stantial nnd eomfortable ono. contttining
live rooms, city conveniences. nicely pa
pered ahd in ?ood order. The location is
especially convenient and Dleasant. and
this property offers tinnsual Indueements
to investors ;is well as homeiseekers. Ex
amine it and attend the sale. TERMS:
One-third cash; balance at 0. 12 and IS
months. J. B. ELAM & CO..
fel Auctioneers.
By J. D. Carneai. Real Estate Auctioneer,
No. 1100 east Main street.
TRUSTEE'S AUCTIOX SALE OF A
TEX-ROOM -'BRICK DWELLING.
IX A GOOD LOCALITY. BEIXG Xo. Sl>2
NORTH TWENTY-FtFTH STREET.?
By virtue of a certain deed of trust.
dated October t;. l.stil, und recorded in the*
Richmond Chancery Court clerk's office.
in Deed-Book 144 A. page I.V.. default
having been made in the payment of the
debt secured thereby. and having been
required so to do by the beneficiary
therein. I will. on
WEDXESDAY, FEB. 7. 1000.
at 4:-0 o'clock P. M.. on the premises,
proceed ro sell. at public auction. the
property conveved therein?viz.: All that
certain LOT OF LAND, with the im?
provements thereon, lying: and being in
the city of Richmond. Va.. commenctng
at a point on the western line of Twenty
lifth street. ot' feet north of its intersec?
tion With the northern line of X street.
running thence northwardly and front?
ing on the said western. line of Twenty
fifth street 33 feet, and running back
between parallel lines 12."> feet to an al
lev. The dwellint? is well built, with
large and hlgh-pttched rooms and halls:
also, all necessary outbuildings. This ls
a most excellent location in which to
dwell; therefore. this property should
be sought after as a home, or it will rent
well.
TERMS: Cush sufficient to pay all costs
of sale, all taxes to day of sale. and a
debt of i"l.tit*7.t50; balance at a credit of
twelve months, for.- note. witlK Interest
added and secured by deed of trust on
the property. AV. C. PRESTOX.
fe2 Surviving Trustee.
T
By C. - L. & H. ? L. Denoon.
Real Estate Auctioneers.
RUSTEE'S SALE
OF
Well Located Building Lots in .
Jackson Ward.
Bv virtue of a certain -deed of trust.
dated July S. 1S3S. and recorded in D. B.
1K4 B, page S4. Richmond Chancery
Court, default having been made in the
payment of the debt secured, I will sell
at public auction, on the premises, on
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1900,
at 4:30 o'clock P. M_. all that lot of land
at the northwest corner of Seventh and
Duval streets, rronting U feet on Seventh
street and running back between parallel
lines 80 feet." MEDIUM-SIZED DWELL?
INGS built on these lo*s, will pay nancl
somely.
TERMS: Cash, as to SpO.Zi. with inter?
est from July S, 1S09; balance at one and
two years. :?-..-. " ;
C. L. DENOON, Trustee.
WANTi
*V^TE-_^YOIJ^''ro"~CL-RE JO^f
chapped hands, lips. etc. with I^TI*
MEIR'S Compound Glycerine Lotion, 19
and 25c a bottle; or LATIMERS Com
pound Carophor Ice, 10 and 25c a box.
G. WV LATIMEiR. SC0 west Man-haO
street? Both 'pbones 67.
wanted, fifty boys _nw-_r' 12 ano n
years of age who caii sing. Apply tc
day at 10:30 o'clock to Miss GERTRiDL
HAYNES, Bijou Theatre. _
l'OK SALK. . _:
F^R^_AL_-rCH___P^S_CONp-llA_N D
DELrVERY AVAGON a.nd CAR*.. Aj*
-! ply at HYGEA Sl___-_--. _U> ncrrtk
' Flith street. *?*
TleSiateMoffiii.
RICHMOND, VA.
Capital.$500,000
Surplus. $240,000
JOHN S. ELLETT, WILLIAM. I. HILL,
President. Cashler.
Directors: Alexander cameron. John a,
EUett. T. C. Wllliaxae- Jr.. Uranvlll. ??
Valentine. James r>. Crump. John R.
WHUanis. J. M. jfourqur.an. A. R. Ell?r
son. J- L- Antma. _
C. W. BRANCH St CO.,
STATE BANK BUILDING,
BANKERS and BROKERS
Privata wires New Tork. Chlcaj-o and
all DrlncioRl trsda cehtrsa oc2-8t
AMl'SKMKMs.
ACADEMY.
Saturday Matinee and Night.
IS.?BC-?S: J. O. LEWIS,
j And His Big Comedv Company Cj P|l|nkard
! m the Rural Farce-Comedy. Ol r lUllivoi U
Srri THE GREAT R. R. SCE
r}-' THE THS.SHING MAC
*- ? j THE COUNTY FAIR SC
Prices : 25c to 55.
lAOADE
TUESDAY NIGHT. February 6th.
?'One for All and All for O.ie"*
Tho ??.?iili/.usioii <>f Konvmco ?
iM JAMES O'NEILL
in Lioblcr & Co.'s stupendously stunnlnj
s7e.ta.ular an.l scenic production ot Syil
ney Grundy's yersion ot Alexander im
iruis' story.
m f
as uh'.yel for One Year in London and
New York l>v- Ceerbohm Tree and J;i-n.-:*
O'-Cetll. ]_
TEN TALE-TELL1NG TASLEAUX THROBBING
WITH THKILLIMS ADVENTUKES.
Wonderful east incltnloat: James 0"N?-'l'.
Kdmun 1 Breese, Jaeques Knip-pr, < leo. r*.
A. Johnson. Jefferson UoytT. Mark l-.'N
v.-./r'h. \rihtir Gcrrels. Maude QdelT.
Nnrtili O'Brir-n. Gertrude Bennett, Mlnnte
VTctotson, John W. Thot?rpsotr. Edgar
Porrest, Claude Gllbert, and -?""? others.
AnArr.yo.-i Slnijc. Tons Upon Tons of Sc nery. .
Largest Drasnat:. Organization En Tour.
Seats now on sale. 25c to S1.50.
RICHMOND'S POPULAR PLACE Cl AMU5EMENT
To-Nigh t. S:35.Matlr.ee To-Day. 2:30.
A'r. and Mrs. Sfdney Drew, Gertrude
Haynes and others.
ASCENSION AND
PARACHUTE LEAP
By Makers of
CORNICIDE.
Expositlon Grounds Daily at 3:30 if
weather is Favoi-ble?Low >Vinds
and No Rain.
TO FINDERS OF CARD
49 DROPPED FROM THE
BALLOON.
"Life's Poetry and Pearls."
Monday, Feb. 5th.
HON. ALF. TAYLOR, OF TENN.*
Y. M. C. A. HALL.
THE VALEf-TINE MUSEUM
ELEv'ENTH AND CLAY- STREETS.
Open dally from 10 A. M. to 5 P. M.
AdmlssUm- 35 cents. Free on Saiurdays.
The Confederate Museum
TWELFTH AND CLA- STREETS.
Open dally frcm 9 A. M. to 5 P. __.
Admission-. 25 centm. Fre_ on Satur
?*__. mftt-tr
OTSSptV'JWONS OV PART.M-_._H11*
ON ACCOl'NT OF BEING COMPELLED
to devot. my entire time to other busi?
ness, I have. this day sold to ThoraaS
M. Stovall my plant. known as .be-Rlch
,rnond Brcom Works. located at-No.-H
south Eighteenth street. Thanking the
public for the liberal patronage bestow?
ed upen me. I sbllcit a continuance ot'
same ur.cn Mr. Thomas 11. Stovall, my
succe_-or.
CKAS. A. METZGER.
In reference to thc above. I wish to
say that Mr. A. T. Chalkley. the popu?
lar an.l stccesafur* manager" will be re
tair.ed and promlses prompt and" 'effiel
ent attentlon to all orders committed to
our bands' We intend to continue the
broom-business at the same stand and
soliclt the trade of the former patron
and the public generallv.
THOS. H. STOVA___
Proprletor Richmond Broom Works..
SITUATIONS WANTE?-?JIi?l?.
WANTEdXv POSITION AS CLERK 0-S
any other position. that requlfta. an ac?
tive young man: can give excellent ref
ertnces. Address G. P. IL. car* ot
'Leader.

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