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The News-Herald. (Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio) 1886-1973, April 30, 1914, Image 7

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THE NEWS-HERALD, HILLSBORO, OHIO, THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1914.
W
iNIffiNATIONAL
swrsoiooL
Lessor i
(By E. O. SELL.KIIS, Dlrector'of Evenlnff
Department, 'The Moody Blblo Institute,
ClVlcago.)
LESSON FOR MAY 3
THE PRODIGAL SON.
LESSON TEXT-T.ulto 15:11-32.
nOT.riRNT TR5TT"T will nrloo Mil e-n
to .my father, and will say' unto him, I
Father, I have sinned against heaven, and
In thy sight." Luke 15:18.
The parables of Jesus are marvels'
of unity and condensation, yet no nec
essary detail Is omitted. This, per
haps hlB most famous, Is no excep
tion even though -It does carry a dou
ble lesson. Who thinks of the older
' brother when this story Is mentioned?"
Though designated the "Story of tho
Prodigal," wo need to remind dur
selves that the word "prodigal" never
once occurs in the story. The open
ing sentence speaks of a father and
of two sons. It Is really tho parable
of a perfect father, the unveiling of
tho true heart of God. Against that
background Is set oft. a self-centered
son lacking in natural affection. Also
alongside the wayward son is the mis
erly, selfish one who lacked all tho
g00(T qualities of his brother, but who
was truly a wanderer and out of har
mony with God the Father. In the
background we bco the citizens of
the far country who helped this young
Jew to his place of want, famine and
degradation'. Remember, it is our
Lord speaking to Jaws. When the
Gentiles of the far country sent him,
to feed swine they Insulted him 'by
compelling him to get his living
through an occupation instinctively
repulsive.
First Fruit of Sin.
The father makes equal' partition
"divided unto them." (V. 12) though
neither son had a right to demand a
partition of his estate. At the bot
tom of the son's request was a desire
to have his own way to be Independ
ent of God. He did not. go away from
home at pnee, though his heart was
already In the "far country."
I. Into the Far Country, vv. 13-16.
Fun is the first fruit of sin, and that
the son readily found so long as his
money lasted (Heb. It: 25). But tho
consequences followed closely on its
trail, for when he had "spent all" he
began to be In "want." There are
many attractive things about this
young man, but those qualities were
perverted, they lacked control, they
were good servants but bad task
masters. It is not always physical,
temporal want that comes to the sin
ner, there are deeper and more in
tense longings soul want and soul
hunger. These always come to the
soul away from God. Being In want
doeB not' mean that a man's will has
been Bubdued. Some prodigals in the
most abject temporal need are as
proud as Lucifer, and boast of their
rebellion. So he "Joined himself to a
citizen of the country." He did not
belong there the citizen did. He was
set to the most degrading task im
aginable for a Jew feeding swine.
Like a Lost Sheep.
II. The Home Coming, w. 17-24.
The first step was for the son to stop
and really think. That is where sal
vation always begins in thinking. He
knew he was lost, e. g., out of adjust
ment, in the wrong place, out of his
element and like the loat sheep,
"ready to die." He saw his condi
tion, money gone, friends gone, hogs
for companions, no food for his sus
tenance. "He saw his value. "He was
more Important than the servants of
his father's home. He saw his fath-j
ers love, already manifested In what
had been given him and we fain would
believe that when he left home he
had the father's urgent plea to re
turn. He saw a way to escape from
his present position. All of this after
ho "came to himself." Before that,
Impenitent, he was morally Insane,
now he has reasoned. Isa. 1:18. With
his reasoning also came the deter-1
mination to make a full confession.
"I will say unto him," not alone con
fess his need but the fact that Jie had
Binned. This is the only wy for a
sinner to come to God, Ps. 32:3-5;
I John 1;9; Lulco 18; 11-14. Ho did
not stop with resolving but "ho arose
and came to his father," v. 20. He ex
pected, to apply for a servant's posi
tion, but never had the opportunity
for the father saw him "a great way
oft" and "ran and fell on his neck and
kissed him." Notice the kiss of recon
ciliation, was given before he even had
a chance to confess. In his confes
sion his first thought is that he bad
Bfnned against God and then against
bis earthly father. The father had
pot once forgotten him; ho "had com
passion" even though the son was un
merciful to himself and to all of his
loved ones. Tho father kissed him
before ho was washed or otherwise
jnade presentable.
'" Neither of tho sons are perfect but
he who uttered tho parable was him
self the true son of the father. He
never departed from his father,
wasted his father's substance, nor
brought discredit upon' his name.
Jesus was in full sympathy with his
father's heart for he welcomed the
wandering publicans and sinners to
himself, took the Journey Into the far
country to find the wanderers and to
bring them home. Christ's mission
was to bring many "sons to glory"
(Heb. a: 10), which means restoring
the' wanderer and fulfilling In Mm the
Krfectaesf of Mnsklp.
The firm of BROWN & AYRES will,
for the season, keep for public service
in their stables at Hillsboro, imported
draft stallions described as follows, viz:
MINOS, Sorrel, Belgian, age 10, weight 2025.
SULTAN, Sorrel, Belgian, age 0, weight 2100.
COMPILABLE, Black Percheron, age 8, weight 1800.
JOSUE, Gray, Perclieron, age 5, weight 2050. "
KILLOGRAMMETRE, Gray Percheron, age 3, weight 1000.
All these horses are sound and all registered In the respective
record books of Belgium and France, and also In this country.
TERMS $15 to Insure a living colt for all, except Killograra
metre which will be $20. Parting with mare after service, without
definite arrangement with stallion owners forfeits the Insurance.
At Lyrrchbunr under the management of Robert Brown,
ARCOLE DESTUYVE, Sorrel, Belgian, 5 years old, weight 1880
JONGLEUR, Black Percheron, 5 years old, weight 1875.
Both sound. Terms $15 as above.
LYNCHBURG.
April 27, 1914.
Mrs. Wm. Cleveland entertained
Lewis Dewey and family of Blanches
ter Sunday.
Mrs. Frank Lacy, of Hillsboro, is
with her sisters, Mrs. S. S. Puckett,
for a few days.
Mrs. Edith Kleckner Fackhatn and
children are visiting relatives in
Springfield a few days before leaving
for their home In St. Louis.
NMrs. George Kessingerhas returned
home after two weeks with her son
and family in Cincinnati.
G. T. DeLaney and wife and H. N
Henderson an wife were in Cincin
nati Wednesday.
Miss Hazel McCann and Miss Mary
West are spending a few days with
friends at Bethany.
W. A. West and family wore with
her mother, Mrs. Bates, at Cuba Fri
day.
Dan Turner and wife spent Friday
with his mother at Martinsville.
Mrs. Eldo Morris left for Columbus
Tuesday where she will join her bus
bind who has employment at that
place.
Mrs. Wm. Bird and daughter, Le
Ora, shopped in Cincinnati Saturday.
Isma Troth spent several days with
his daughter, Mrs. Joe Stabler, of
Hillsboro.
Tom Brown and wife and Mrs. Hor
ace Murphy spent Wednesday at the
home of Mrs. W. R. Pence at Allens
burg. L. L. Farls and family were dinner
guests of Dr. Terrel and wife Friday.
Helen Murphy, of Wilmington Col
lege, was with her parents over Sun- J
day.
Mrs. O. W, Roush returned home
Monday after an extended visit
through the west and south with her
husband who is a traveling salesman
for a New York firm.
Mr. and Mrs. Arbagast, of Blan
Chester, were guests of H. E. Tedrlck
and wife Sunday.
W. H. Smlthson and wife, of Wll
mlngton, were guests of G. H. Smith
and wife and J. B. Hunter and family
Saturday and Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Murphy were
guests. of Frank Hill and wife of
Hillsboro Saturday and Sunday.
Wilbur Dove and faxlly, of New
Vienna, were with Ray Mnrphy and
family Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Townsend and
son, Johnson, were guests Sunday of
her parents at Norwood.
Marlamand Lewis Delianey were
in Cincinnati Saturday.
The Home and School Association
will meet at the school building Fri
day afternoon at 3 o'clock. The pro
gram will be in honor of the mothers.
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Mauntel, of Tay
lorsvllle, were guests Sunday of O. E.
Haller and family.
Miss Hazel M. Galllett, of Coving
ton, was with her parents over Sun
day. Dr. John Srofe and family, of Lees
burg, and Chas. Morrow and family
were with Mrs. S. M. Srofe Sunday,
celebrating her 64th birthday anni
versary. Mrs. Warren Morrow spent Sunday
at the country home of Warren Con
nel and wife. Mr Morrow is spend
ing a few days with his daughters in
Columbus.
Floyd Sonner, of Columbus, was
with his parents over Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Pattoison. of
Blanohester, were guests Sunday of
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Whltacre.
Mr. and Mrs. Ben.iam were guests
Sunday of relatives in Hamilton.
Miss Lillian Chaney spent a part of
last week In Cincinnati.
Mrs. John Srofe and children, of
Loesburg, are with Dr. Garner and
wife this week.
Mrs. Mary Stemple returned to her
home In Ada Wednesday after an ex
tended visit with her daughter, Mrs.
E. C. Meyer, who accompanied her as
for as Dayton where she Is spending
1
several days with friends.
The class sermon for the high school
graduates will be delivered at the M.
E. Church on Sunday evening May 10,
by President A. J. Brown, of Wil
mington. Class play Wednesday
evening May 13 at the Lyric. Com
mencement address at the M. E.
Church on the evening of May 14 by
Sylvester A. Long, of Dayton. Music
by Price's orchestra of Greenfield
When run down with kidney trouble,
backache, rheumatism or bladder
weakness, turn quickly for help to
Foley Kidney Pills. You cannot take
them Into your system without having
good results. Chas. N. Fox, Hlmyod,
N. Y., says: "Foley Kidney Pills have
done me more good than 8150.00 worth
of medicine." They give you good
results. ' adv
Gabbbtt & Ayrks.
LITTLETON.
April 27, 1914.
Mrs. Mary Roush, of Hillsboro, is
visiting her daughter, Mrs. J Fenner.
Misses Kate and Margaret Sherry
were guests of friends in St. Martins,
Wedneaday and Thursday.
Albert Luck and family, of Lynch
burg, spent Friday with Chas. Work
man and family.
Elmer Shaffer and wife, of Hillsboro,
spent Sunday with his parents, Thos.
Shaffer and wife.
Mrs. Wm. Thompson and daughter,
Genevieve, are visiting her parents in
Kentucky.
Rev. A. C. Martin and wife, Mrs.
Grace Baumgartner and daughter,
Eleanor, Mrs. Lulu Davidson and little
sons, of Lynchburg, and Miss Gertrude
Aber were entertained by Wm. Hast
ings and family, Sunday.
Wm. Thomas and wife spent Sunday
with her parents at Danville.
Miss Gertrude Hastings, who has
been inChllllcothe for several months,
is now at home.
Clem Burton and wife and son,
Roush, of Danville, and Alva Roush
and family spent Sunday at the homo
of Jesse Fenner.
Misses Mary Ryan and Mary Cronin,
of Cincinnati, were guests at the Sher
ry home Saturday.
Mrs. Sallie Pegan, of Lynchburg, Is
visiting Wm. Thompson and family.
Wm. Smith and wife entertained
the following guests Sunday: John
Brown and wife and Chas. Brown and
wife, of Harwood, Clarence Smith and
wife, Leslie Smith and sister, Dora,
and Stanley Smith and wife and
daughtir, Mary, of Honolulu.
To Be, To Blossom And To Die.
In memory of Alice Carroll, who
died April 14, 1914 aged 19 years:
The fairest flowers, earliest plucked
Soonest withered lie.
Thus with our human uowers
To be, to blossom and to die.
The loveliest, brightest summer day
Seems shortest, happiest hours
Are soonest spent gone from us
As with the fragile flowers.
The choicest fruits fall soonest
In darkness He the glades
As the wondrous, radlent sunset
To dusky twilight fades
'Tls thus the Heavenly Gardner
Looks down upon His flowers
Sees one mSre flttlng, better
Transplants it to His bowers.
Why, should we loved ones murmur ?
She's with her father dear;
Our tender plant, we'll miss yflu
But we would not keep you here,
April 24, 1014. R. O.
on
The world's production of pig iron
in 1913 Is estimated at 70,500,000 tons,
a new high record.
BLOOD
POISON
afti1!v wnllllnna
1g and millions of
w germi that grow
from on or two that
got under tb akin
and Into tha blood.
DR. BELL'S
Antiseptic Salve
applied right away would hare kllUd thou law
firms and kept that millions from balng born,
o har a He box ol this aalra ready 'or emar
gtnolss, ask (or Or, BM't AniUrpita Sah.
"Tail" It Br Th Ban"
NEW MARKET.
April 27, 1014.
Garry Donohoo, of Dayton, was the
guest of her parents three days of last
week.
Cary Woods and famllv. of Danvllln.
spent Tuesday with D. S. Harshbarger
ana aaugtiter.
Miss Stella Custer visited her sister
at Wilmington last week.
T. R. Vance and wife, of Harris-
burg, attended the funeral of Mrs.
Chaney and took dinner with Aunt
Harriett uoberts, Tuesday.
Wm. Tracy, of Klnirs Mills, washers
last week.
Jas. Eaklns was workintr for Seaver
Parker, at Pike Chapel, last week.
Mrs. McReynolds spent Wednesdav
with her daughter, Mrs. Carey Lemon
W. E Borden has returned home
from Pennsylvania.
Mrs. Harley Parshall called on Mrs.
Roy Harshbarger Tuesday afternoon
and on Mrs. O. V. Purdy, Wednesday.
Lottie Whlsler.of Antloch. was here
Tuesday to attend the funeral of aunt
unarlotte Chaney.
W. E. Barrere spent last week in
Cincinnati.
Maggie Lemon called on Mrs. Isaac
Larrlck Tuesday.
Mrs. John Plummer, of West Union,
was the guest of her parents. L. B.
Custer and wife, the past week.
Stella Garen spent Thursday with
Wm. Capllnger and family, at Swine
Valley.
Nelson Barrere Sr. and wife were
the guests of their son, Nelson, and
family, Sunday.
C. V Purdy and wife spent Sunday
with John Kelley and family, at Bel
fast. MT. OLIVE.
April 27, 1914.
The farmers are mostly done plow
ing in this vicinity.
Ollie McDaniel Is visiting in Peebles.
Ella Holladay spent Saturday nigh
with Mrs. Dr. Mercer, of Vienna.
Dora Beatzel is visiting home folks
near Waverly.
Mrs. G. V. Brown and children called
on Lewis Foreman and family Sunday.
Sunday School every Sunday morn
lng at 10 o'clock and Rev. Foust will
All his appointment here the second
Sunday in May both morning and
night. All are cordially invited to
attend these services.
MARSHALL.
April 27, 1914.
Mrs. Wm. Elliott, who has been
spending a few days with Rev. B. E
Wright and wife, of Marathon, re
turned home last Monday.
Miss Mae Davis, of Cincinnati, and
Mrs. Clark, of Hamilton, were the
guests of Mrs. R.L. Watts and family
Tuesday night.
F. M. Main and wife andJMrs. Grace
Kelly, of Berryvllle, and Mrs. Emma
Miller spent Wednesday with Don
Main and family.
Mrs. Benton Kesler spent Wednes
day with hersister, Mrs. Sallie Butler
of Elmville.
Marie Dick was the guest of her
cousin, Miss Helen Dick, Thursday
night.
The sick are: Mrs. Wm. Frump and
Mrs. Burch Miller.
Several members of the K. of P.
Lodge attended the K. of P. supper at
Rainsboro, Thursday night.
Friday being, the last day of school
the parents and friends met at the
school building with loaded baskets
to give the teachers a surprise. A big
dinner was spread and the afternoon
was enjoyably spent.
Rev. Clark tilled his regular appoint
ment at the C. U. church Sunday
morning and night.
Jim Creed and family and Misses
Maude and Margaret Cameron and
Charley Hunter, Clarence Garen and
Charley Davis were entertained Sun
day by Arch Cameron and wife.
Tom Frump and wife, of North
Union, took dinner Sunday with Har
ley Suiters and family.
HARRISBURG.
April 27, 10U.
Mrs. Daniel Emery, of Jacktown,
visited her sister, Minnie Vance, Fri
day. G. B. Eyler and wife, of New Mar
ket, called on T. R, Vance and wife,
Sunday.
Our school closed Friday with appro
priate exercises and a fine dinner for
every one present,
O. V. Purdy and wife, of New Mar
ket, were the guests of David Sanders
and family, Sunday.
All the old neighbors of Mrs. Char
lotte Chaney, formerly of this place,
attended her funeral at New Market,
last Tuesday.
Burton Vance and wife spent Sun
day evening in Danville.
The suggestion of co-operation be
tween the United States government
and-British Columbia in building rail
ways to connect British Columbia with
, Alaska has met with general approval
in western uanaaa.
BERRYVILLE.
'" April 27, 1014.
Rev. Beetman is visiting relatives
here.
Dr. Mason and family, of Marshall,
were in this locality Sunday.
Rutherford Hetherlnirton and Lon
Elmore, were guests of C. E. Eaklns
and wife, Sunday.
Mrs. Lib Kelley visited Mrs. Luclnda
West last Wednesday.
Miss Ola Johnson is the guest of
Miss Amelia Richards.
Guy Hopkins Is 111.
Prayer meeting will be led by Bro.
nott Wednesday night. All should
try to attend.
Mrs. Hochenberger visited Mrs. N.
M. West last Sunday afternoon.
Mrs. Harry Eiklns entertained a
number of ladles at her home Wednes
day.
DANVILLE.
April 27, 1914.
Jas. Cochran, of Middletown. visited
relatives here Saturday and Sunday.
Gus Calley and wife and Miss Josie
Wilkin and Floyd Roush and family
were guests of nomer Burton and
wife,. Sunday.
Hugh Stockwell left Saturday for
Athens, where he will tslcn asiv wppL-o
course in Ohio University." Raymond
tawley, of Hollo wtown, went with
him.
Mrs. Belle Wood, of Springfield, and
Joe 'Fawley and family, of near Tay
lorsvllle, were visitors at the home of
Mrs. Ella Wood, Sunday.
Mrs. Sarah Custer, after spending
the winter here, has returned to her
home near Marion, Ind.
Walter Lemon and family, of Hills
boro, and C C. Winkle and wife, of
Eist Danville, spent Sunday with L.
C. Stockwell and wife.
Mrs. Gus Shaffer and son. Ralph,
visited Reuben Fawley and wife, at
Lumberton, Sunday afternoon.
Rev. Howard, or Hillsboro, will
preach at the Reformed Church next
Sunday evening.
Mrs. John Roush, who has been
quite ill, Is improving.
Mrs. O. A. Landess and daughter,
Mildred, spent Thursday with her
mother, Mrs. Geo. Vanzant.
A large crowd attended the sale of
Mrs. Lewis Fouch Thursday. Mrs.
Fouch left Saturday for Blanchester,
where she expects to make her home
with her son, Robert Fouch.
Rev. Frank Foust filled his regular
appointment at the Christian Church
Sunday.
Leonard Roush and wife and baby
spent Sunday with Ed. Cochran and
family, north of town.
Mrs. George Vanzant Is visiting
relatives in Hillsboro.
Robert Roush and wife visited the
latter's parents, Chas. Wiggins and
wife, at East Danville, Sunday.
Mrs. Noah Setty left Monday for a
short visit with her sister at Pleasant
Plains.
Richard Roush Is slowly Improving
from his illness of pneumonia.
BARRETT.
April 27, 1914.
W. W. Wolfe and wife and daugh
ter, Elsie, and Misses lone and Jessie
Troth attended quarterly meeting at
Falrvlew Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rowe attended
the funeral of Mrs. Wesley BInegar,
of Monroe, last Monday.
Mrs Rachel Hatcher visited at the
home of Frank Shoemaker Sunday
and was accompanied home by her
sister, Mrs. Martha Wolfe.
About 16 of the neighbors gathered
at the home of Wm. Davidson last
Wednesday night and a very enjoya
ble time was spent.
Hamer Lyle and wife and son, Char
les, were guests of J. S. Lovett and
wife Sunday.
Mrs. Cyrus Stevens and two child
ren, of near Cincinnati, is visiting at
the home of C. M. Stevens.
Miss Evelyn Wolfe spent Saturday
with her cousin, Miss Mary Shoema
ker. Miss Ethel Barnes called on Miss
Clurrle Davidson Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Spence called
on Vawn Cope and wife Sunday after
noon. Ben Bussle and wife, Wm. West and
wife and daughter, Helen, were the
guests at the home of Albert Morrow,
of Beech Wood, Sunday.
Wm. Rowe and wife erjtertalned
Sunday James'Rlttenhouse and family,
C. M. Stevens and wife and daughter,
Mary, and Mrs. Cyrus Stevens and
two children.
Vernon nammond spent Saturday
night and Sunday with relatives at
New Market.
Mrs. Allle Rowe and Mrs. Reda
Lovett called on Mrs. C. M. Stevens
last Thursday.
John Chrisman and family, and
Frank Wright and family spen t
Sunday with Wm. Chrisman and family.
Profttaioned l$rda.
S. R. HOWARD,
VETERINARIAN
HILLSBORO
Both Phontt.ln Office and Residence
J. FKANK WILSON. N. CRAIG M'BKIP
WILSON & McBRIDE,
ATTORNISYS-AT-IsAW.
Office Short St., Opp. Court Brum
I. W. CAREY,
DttNTIBT,
lilenn Big. HILL8BOBO, ,
Home 'Phone 340. Bell 'Phone 148
VB. McCONNAUOHEY, M. D.
a Hlllasboro, Ohio.
irnoi: In Holmes Building, North Blc-
Street, '
Ofkoi HoDiia:-B to it a. m 2 to ana in
8 p. m.
Hoth 'Phones In oaice and Residence,
SIMON HIDER
THE FLORIST.
For Your Flowers.
KINCAIDt& SON
SUCCESSORS TO RUBLE & TUIINKHB
Funeral Directors & Embalmers
!A Full Line of High Grade
BOTH PHONES
HILLSBORO ICE DELIVERY
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
JL V JtLt
Prompt Delhery. Courteous Treatment
Your Patronage Solicited
STEVENSON STEVENSON
PROPRIETORS
Successors to J. C. Koch)
OtllceRear ot Traction Depot
Home Phone J44
Frank Ayresr,'
Representinjr Tsix of.lthe HtrnncrnHh
Old Line Fire insurance Companies.
Most liberal Farm Policies ever writ
ten in the Aetna Co. Also Live Stock
Insurance. D Insuring your horses
againstldeath from any cause.
I represent theJAetna, Fidelity and
Surety Bond Co. One of the largert.
Also with accident policies. Terms as
low as you can get in high class safe
insurance. 9.0
FRANK AYRES
Registered Shire
STALLION
REX HAROLD, 10161
Registered Shire Stallion, will make
the season of 1914 at John Morrow's
farm, one mile north of Oveiman. on
the Hillsboro and New Petersburg
pike.
Rex Harold Is a roan 6 vears old and
weighs 1900 pounds, he Is a sure bretd-
er ana lias line disposition. Terras
$15 to insure colt to stand and suck
N.M. OVERMAN & MORROW BROS
(011)
WANTED IDEAS
Our Four Books sent Free with list
of Inventions wanted by manufac
turers and promoters, also Prizes of
fered for Inventions. Patents seen red
or Fee RETURNED.
VICTOR J. EVANS f CO.
700 Ninth 8t
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Prevents litvlr falling.
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Eft 65 YEARa
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tptctal notice, without charge, In the K
Scientific fltiteri&tt
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culation of any sclentiaa journal 'J'ernia, 13 a
year) four mom us. fL Bold Ly all newatlcitlers.
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