OCR Interpretation


The News-Herald. (Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio) 1886-1973, June 25, 1914, Image 7

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038161/1914-06-25/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

THE NEWS-HERALD, HILLSBORO, OHIO, THURSDAY, JUNE 25, 1914
i
teMllONAL
SlEMSOIOOL
Lesson
(By E. O. SELt.Rns, Director of Evening
I'cpnrtment, The Moody Bible Institute,
Chicago.)
LESSON FOR JUNE 28
REVIEW.
READING LESSON ONLY-Heb. 4:14
6:10. GOLDEN TEXT "The Son of man la
come to (seek and to save that which was
lost." Luke 19:10.
The golden text Is a great summary
of the meaning and the essential pur
pose of all of our Lord's activities.
Each lesson is an illustration of this
simple promise. In them we discover
chlelly our Lord in his work of pre
paring his disciples to share with him
in this work.
Lesson t. The observation of man's
attempt to get the best seats with the
consequent abasement, calls forth the
parable of the great supper. Therein
we are shown man's enmity against
Ood as revealed by his contemptuous
treatment of God's overtures of
grace. The rebuke and the parable
reveal God's willingness and man's re
fusal. In all this our Lord was seek
ing these men.
The Perfect Son.
Lesson II. This is the Easter les
son and is aside from our series. In
it we are shown that Jesus Christ is
himself the chief subject of ljji'3phecy.
Lesson III. The one central truth
here taught is that to be his dis
ciple we must give up all and make
him supreme. In our affections, alms, '
Ideals, yea, make him the sole pos
sessor of time, talent and posses
sions. Lessons IV and V. It Is impos
sible to separate these three para
bles. They are a whole in that each
tells of something lost, sought and
found. The Son, tho Holy Spirit and
the Father aro each seeking. Our
Lord was himself the perfect Son of
tho Father; who never got into the
far country, or out of adjustment with
his Father. He is different also from
the churlish brother In that he re
joices to "bring back his own." These
two lessons particularly illustrate his
work of saving. i
Lesson VI. Beginning with this les
son, our Lord seems to be sifting the
multitude, and at the same time bo
preparing his disciples against their
work of co-operating with him in his
work of seeking and saving. The true
motive In service is in the use of all
we possess for him whom we love. I
Lesson VII. As the last lesson had
to do with stewardship, this has to
do with 'service. This present life is
but the vestibule of the eternal one.
If we so 'live this life as to develop
it and to rule its desires, we shall
find abundant gratification in this
world beyond towards which we are
traveling so rapidly. j
Lesson VIII. Jesus is still instruct
ing his disciples. Offenses must, or
rather, will como, but forgiveness is
the divine attribute, not because he is
indebted to us nor that he is mawk
ishly, sentimentally, sympathetic.
Nothing we do ever places him under
any obligations to us. When we have
done all we will exclaim: "We have
done that which was our duty to do."
This does not set aside the joy which
is ours and his when one of the lost
is "found." I
Lesson IX. Not only did Jesus sift
the multitude and reveal the need of
helpers, at the same time setting be-'
fore them the terms of disclpleship,
but he also emphasizes the thought of
gratitude on the part of those helped
and of those his servants who are
judged worthy to help him. j
Lesson X. The kingdom which our
Lord cameto set up upon earth is to
begin within us and it is not to con
sist of eating and drinking but of
righteousness and truth. The visible
kingdom which our Lord came to set
up upon earth is to begin within us,
and it is not to consist of. eating and
drinking, but of righteousness and
truth.
Lesson XI. The picture of Zacchae
us is that of a man restored to his
right relationship with God; the out
ward evidence being his acts of re
pentance and restoration. This lesson
perfectly reveals the essential work
of Christ, and that to which he is
calling his disciples. Zaccbaeus did
not seek Christ, but Christ came to
seek and save Zacchaeus and all like
him who are lost.
Lesson XII. The great refusal re
'veals that the condition of being
saved or being lost rests with the in
dividual soul. Many elements enter
into the refusal of men but the es
sential one is "and ye would not,"
John C:40. Much possessions will
not satisfy the human soul. There is
the danger that we trust our wealth
rather than God. Lacking one thing,
everything is lost.
Summary. The whole of this pe
riod of our Lord's ministry was that
of conflict and hostility with the
rulers, wonder and amazement with
the people, doubt and uncertainty with
the disciples. As he went from place
to place he showed infinite patience.
His compassion was for men in their
sin and his heart beat with tenderness.
Though his words at times were se
vere, yet his Impulse and passion was
to seek and to Bave. His faithfulness
In dealing with men, guests and hosts,
rich and poor, publicans and sinners,
Pharisees and outcasts is also clear
ly set beforo us.
NATIONS OF FAR EAST
TO EXHIBIT IN 1915.
Copyright. 1914. by Panama-Pacific International Exposition Co. H. S. Crocker Co., official photographeis
K
WONDERFUL TOWER OF JEWELS AND SOUTH GARDENS.
T tho loft is shown the Tower of Jewels, 430 feet high, and the south facade of the main palares. fronting
on half a mile of subtropical gardens of the Pnimma-l'uclfic International Exposition, to open in Snn
Francisco in 1015. At the right Is the Festival Hull.
The commission sent by the United
States gut eminent to this n.ttinni of
tho far cast to request their participa
tion In the I'linituui-I'iiciitc Intoinntlon
ul Exposition nt Snu Francisco ni'Xt
year returned to New York Mny la.
bringing news thut elclit of those gov
ernments will be represented.
The coiumlssioiieis, Including ex
Governor Alva Adams of Colorado.
Thomas G. Stallsinlth. chief of the ag
ricultural department of the Exposition,
and Welton HtulWiulth. secretary, giive
out the following list of countries, with
the appropriations mtulc by each:
China .... Jl.OOO.OOO
Philippine Islands WH000
Japan tOO.OOO
Australia 400.000
Slam &U.000
Dutch East Indies 2M.000
New Zealand 2UO.0U
Cochin China 100.000
This brings the total number of for
eign countries which have decided to
participate officially up to thlrty-slx.
Austrln being the latest to swing Into
line, with an appropriation of $400,000.
half of which is contributed by com
mercial organizations.
Copyright, 1914, by Panama-Pacific International Exposition Co. H. S.
Crocker Co., official photographers.
CHINA TO SPEND $800,000 IN MARVELOUS DISPLAY AT
THE PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION.
TING CHI CHTJ, commissioner of China to the Panama-Pacific
Exposition, states that China's representation at the Exposition
will ehtail an outlay of $800,000, of which at least $300,000 will
be expended on the Chinese pavilion, shown above. Chu is
a graduate of Harvard. Mrs. Chu, as Miss Pinga Hu, graduated from
Wellesley college in 1013.
Copyright, 1914, by Panama-Pacific International Exposition Co. H. S.
Crocker Co., official photographers.
COLOSSAL STATUARY FOR PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION.
I
NTEIMOIt of one of three studios at the Panama-Pacific Interna
tional Exposition to open in San Francisco next year, showing the
partially completed figures, some of them thirty feet in height,
which will adorn the Mint courts.
Copyright, 1914, by Panama-Pacific International Exposition Co. II. S.
Crocker Co., official photographers.
THE LARGEST GLASS BUBBLE IN THE WORLD.
STEEL framework of the great dome of the Palace of Horticulture
at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco,
1915. The dome is the largest ever constructed, being l.TJ feet
in diameter and 180 feet high and surmounted by a basket thirty
feet in diameter, which will be filled with growing flowers. The dome,
lighted from within by whirling colored lights, will resemble a huge
fire opal.
i
la.-
tv I. U 1 UlltlXl
Crocker
I'acillL liiiuluauuiiu. L,xpositiun Lu. 11. &
Co., official photographers.
INTERIOR OF A SCULPTOR'S STUDIO AT THE EXPOSITION.
T
nE picture shows one panel of an enormous frieze, "The Chariot
of Pheaton," by Bruno Zlmrn, for .the outside of the base of the
dome of the Palace of Fine Arts at the Panama-Pacific Interna
tional Exposition in 1915.
PRICETOWN.
June 22, 1914
P. F. Certler and family entertained
friends Sunday.
Mrs Nora Williams, of Illinois, is
visiting her sister, Mrs. J. C. Lsndess
It had been 12 years since they had
seen one another.
Mae Shaffer spent Sunday with
Gladjs Cochran
Krell Bennington spent Saturday
evening with his uncle, John Benning
ton. Mrs. Perry Emery spent Saturday
afternoon with her parents, Perry
Moberly and wife.
Rev. totist and wife were enter
tained by Chas. Roberts and wife at
Sugartree Ridge, Sunday.
Wm. Dale and family, of Washing
ton, U H , were guests Sunday of Ed.
Barker and wife.
Miss Nellie Stultz Is visiting rela.
tives at Hillsboro.
Mrs. Rufus Barker and baby, of
Mlddletown, are visiting relatives
here.
Mrs. Belle Woods, of Sprlngfle d,
spent the latter part of the we k with
Mrs. Bose Ann Pence. Mrs. Ella
Woods, of Danville, was her gutst
Thursday.
Mrs. Nora Williams, of Springfield,
111., Ed. Landess and wife, of Blan
Chester, J. C. Landess and wife a d
Bert Landess and family were guests
of Ed. Lyons and family at BufoM,
Sunday.
John Fenwlck, wife and son, Leo,
of h.owrystown, were guests Sunday
of M. M. Workman and family.
Vera Pratt is visiting her uncle,
Alva Robinson, at East Danville.
Grandma Miller Is very sick.
Chas. Newton and family wne
guehts Sunday of P. II. Shaffer and
family.
D. A. Pulliam and wife had as tin lr
guests Sundaj: Rev. Weil, E N. Pui
11am and wife, O. B. Pulliam and
daughter, Helen, and Herchel Wliu
ley.
Howard Cochran and family at d
Theodore Shaffer and wife spent Sun
day with Aunt Nancy Cochran.
C. U. Sanders and wife, Matt. Pul
liam and wife, Ed. Smith and fami y
and Oreland Cochran and family vi-,-Ited
Woody Pulliam and family, recently.
Get Rid of Your Rheumatism.
Now Is the time to get rid of j ur
rheumatism. You can do it if yju
apply Chamberlain's Liniment. W
A. Lackhard, Homer City, N. Y.,
writes: "Last spring I suffered I rom
rheumatism with terrible pains in my
arms and shoulders I got a bottle of
Chamberlain's Liniment and the thbti
application relieved me. By using uno
bottle of it 1 was entirely cured." l-,r
sale by All Dealers ad
LEESBURG.
June 22, 1914.
Mrs. E. P. Monroe, of Gallon, is the
guest of her parents, F. T. Pavey and
wife.
John Arrasmith and wife visited
relatives In Sabina last Sunday.
G. E. Kerr motored up from Cincin
nati and spent Saturday and Sunday
with his sister, Mrs. Martha K. Van
Pelt and family.
Dr. J. A. B. Srofe and family were
guests over Sunday with relatives in
Lynchburg. - ,
O. B. Cox and wife visited relatives
in nillsboro Thursday night. I
Miss Helen Fulger will leave this
week for Mansfield, where she will be
the guest of relatives for a few weeks.
Union services were held Sunday
evening in the Friends' church. A
large audience was present to hear
Rev. A, P. Smith deliver an earnest
and forceful sermon. On next Sunday
evening the services will be held In
the M. E. church and the sermon will
be preached by Rev. McMUlen.
David Heller aud wife, of Chilli
cothe, were guests of C. P. Keeno and
family last Sunday.
Misses Arethusa and Josephine Hug-
gins left Saturday for Oxford, where
they will attend a six weeks Normal
school.
The members of the M. E. Sunday
school and their friends enjoyed an all
day picnic at the Monroe picnic
grounds last Friday. At the noon
hour a bounteous repast was served
and the day was pleasantly spent in
games. The school greatly appreci
ated the kindness of the citizens who
donated the use of their teams and
and wagons to convey them to and
from the grounds. By selling Ice
cream, lemonade, candy, etc the treas
ury was substantially replenished.
Members of Circle No. 1, of the
Ladies Aid Society extend to the citi
zens of our town and vicinity their
sincere thanks for the liberal patron
age accorded them at their market
last Saturday.
Miss May Johnson Is suffering with
a badly sprained ankle sustained last
Friday when attempting to alight
from a wagon. Medical aid was im
mediately summoned and she is now
resting as comfortably as could be ex
pected. Harold Haas, of Ann Arbor College,
is at home for tho summer vacation.
Mrs. Truman Murphy and llttlo
brother, Delbert Morris, will leave
this week for a visit with relatives In
Wheeling, W. Va.
Earl Henderson, of Washington, C.
H., was the guest of his parents, Geo
Henderson and wife, Saturday and
Sunday. j
i m
The name Doan's Inspires confi
dence Doan's Kidney Pills for kidney
Ills. Doan's Ointment for skin Itch
ing. Doan's Regulets for a mild laxa
tive. Sold at all drug stores. adv
A French scientist Is experimenting
n n.avdnf frtnr Hi? flnfitlncr small nnan-
titles of oil on the surface of rivers to
check evaporation, to which he con
tends fogs are due.
For An Impaired Appetite.
To Improve the appetite and
strengthen the digestion try a few
doses of Chamberlain's Tablets. Mr,
J. H. Seltz, of Detroit, Mich., says :
"They restored my appetite, when im
paired, relieved me of a bloated feel
ing and caused a pleasant and satis
factory movement of the bowels." For
sale by All Dealers. adv
CAREYTOWN.
June 22, 1914
Miss Alice Connell spent a few d.tjs
with Leslie Connell and wile.
Isla Edwards is spending a few dajs
with Mrs. Terrell, of near Iliglilanu.
Virgie Carev, or Cincinnati, isspeud
ing a few dajs with her grandmother,
Mrs. Mary Edwards.
Ed. Wright spent Sunday with
Hugh Purdy and larully
H. C. Sander motored to GreenhVld
Sunday.
Kirby Chane. and family spent Sun
day with Jake Chane and fumlu.
Thomas Priest and wife spent Sun
day with Carrie Priest and wife, of
near Highland.
Miss Grrce Ulevenger spent Sunday
with her grandmother, Mrs. McPher
son, of Highland.
R. H. Ockerman, Philp Oats, Frank
Wallace and their families motortd to
Serpent Mound Sunday.
The charger used by Napoleon, wl.l ,h
was stuffed and placed in a Pari mu
seum, has just had a fourth tall fitted.
All the preceding ones were taken by
visitors as curios.
Eagle eye salVE
GOOD TOR THE IYLS-AND EYES ONUf
EACJIiE EYES?
Do yon Uilnk Hint watery, innftery
eyea are natural? Do yon bvllete
that tyro, granulated Hits, poor
I Kit, KTOWIIm, are naliirnlT Ue
KAH.i: KYK SAIVX and yon bave
Iglo Kycs okoiii.
"Yes, I lunched with the Conserva
tive candidate, had dinner with the
IatlXA tuucc auu iuuui vviwii
alist."
"And then how did you vote?"
"My dear sir, how can you ask. Of
course, the most simple regard for dell
cacy kept me from the polls altogeth
er." L'lllustratlqn
Bllllous ? Feel heavy after dinner ?
Bitter taste? Complexion sallow?
Liver perhaps needs waking up. Doan's
Regulets for bllllous attacks. 25c at
all stores. adv
"Do you know his wife well ?"
"Not at all."
"Would you like to be introduced to
her?"
"I don't think it would be safe.
I'm the friend he always blames for
keeping him out late." Detroit Free
Press.
WRitteiRore's
ffjShoe Polishes
FINEST QUALITY LARGEST VARIETY
8BSa
EDGE I
DRESSING
eESjflsiy1
Wt&CBJinOESl
PRESjRVES I
LEATHER ,
-RtSTORtS.-'
COLOR
lustre P
"CUT EDGE." tho only Udlea' alioc lireeslrp tht
poaiiivcly contains OIL Slack, l'ollebes ana I're.
nerves ladies' and children's shoes, shines without
rubbing, 5C TRENCU CL0SS." 10c.
"STAR" combination for deanlnn and poUihlng all
klndaotruaeetortan shoes, loc "BJINDV sUe, Vc,
"QUICK WHITE" (In liquid form with eponccjqolck
ly deans and uhllcns dirty canvas ahoeo. luc&SSc,
"ALSO" cleans and whitens BUCK, MJBUCK.
StEDE, and CANVAS SII0ES. In round white cake
rocked In line boxes, with sponge, inc. In hand
some, larse aluminum boxes, with sponge, Sic
If your dealer doet not keen the kind yoa vrnt. tend as
tbe price tn ituapi for full also paclcase. cbmxwa luild,
WHlTTEMORE BROS. & CO.,
20-28 Albany Street, Cambridge, Mass.
Tht Oldest and Larseit Manufacturer! of
Shoe folithtt in Ike World,

xml | txt