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The News-Herald. (Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio) 1886-1973, November 12, 1914, Image 1

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THE NEWSHERALD.
j
ft
ESTABLISHED 1837.
HILLSBORO, OHIO, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1914.
VOL. 79. NO. 30
QUESTION OF
STREET LIGHTS
Official Abstract of the Vote Cast in Highland County, November 3, 1914. court news
IS ALL HERE
Oorn'r
U. S.
Congrs
Uenri"
Clerk
Sherlfl
Auillfr
Commissioners
Treas
Recor
Sur
Pros.
Coro
Home
Prohi
Senatr
man
sentlve
Courts
der
veyor
Atty
ner
Rule
bition
s
Will Be, Brought Before Peo
ple at Special Election
Tuesday, Dec. 15
ORDINANCE WAS DRAFTED
Two New Cases Were Filed
in Common Pleas Court
During Past Week
r4 &jtr
PRECINCTS
V
J
And Petition Circulated by Light
Company-Provides Ten Year
Contract at the Cost of
$5,190 Each Year.
The inlatlve petition proposing an
ordinance providing for street lights
for Hlllsboro was filed with the vil
lage clerk, E. 0. Wlsecup, Wednesday
of last week. The petition was cir
oulated by the 'Hlllsboro Light &
Fuel Co. It had 333 signers. The
"sworn statement of the expense of
circulating the petition filed with it
shows an expenditure of $20 10 divided
as follows : John M. VanZant, $2 85 ;
Walter B. Hilllard $7 80 ; S W. Hll
liard, 85.25; Clarence Johnson, $4.20.
The petition under the law must re
main on file with the Village Clerk
' for ten days. It is then turned over
to the Deputy State Supervisors of
Elections, better known as the Board
of Elections, who must call an elec
tion on the fifth Tuesday following
the time It Is filed with them. This
means that this election will be held
on Tuesday, Dec. 15.
The provisions of the proposed ordi
nance with all legal veribage removed
are in brief as follows :
A contract for street lights with
The milsboro Light & Fuel Co. for
ten years, the village paying for the
light each year 35160
The Company is to furnish 16 nitro
gen lamps of 264 watts each ; these
lamps to be located In the business
section ; also 70 nitrogen lamps of 170
watts each, to be located in residence
sections where present arc lamps are ;
also 70 nitrogen lamps of 70 watts
each to be located between present
arc lamps as council shall direct.
Light to on burn all night schedule.
When lamps are out 2 cent an hour
deduction for largest ones ; H cent an
hour deduction for 170 watt lamps and
1 cent an hour deduction for small
size.
All material to be supplied and all
re airs made by Light Co. Council
may change the location of not to ex
ceed five lamps in any one year, the
changes to be made by thd company
If at any time there may be Invent
ed and marketed better or more eftll
clent incandescent lamps for street
lighting purposes, consuming no more
current than the nitrogen lamps, the
Company shall adopt and substitute
them in dace of the nitrogen lamps
without charge to the village.
Current for lighting the city build
ing shall be provided at one half the
rate for commerciaUlghtlng.
The ordinance is to take effect at
the earliest possible time allowed by
law.
The law provides that an argument
in behalf of the lniatlated petition not
to exceed 300 words may be filed with
It by those proposing it ana that those
opposed may file an argument against
it not to exceed 300 word3
The provisions of the ordinance and
the arguments for and against it must
be printed and sent to each voter in
the town at least 20 days before the
election. This expense Is paid by the
town.
The argument in favor of the ordi
nance Is as follows :
This ordinance Is sought to be
passed by the electors of the Village
of Hlllsboro, Ohio, under an Inltative
petition because :
The former contract for street light
ing expired September 12, 1014, and no
provision has so far been made for the
lighting of our streets, and this meth
od affords the people of the village an
opportunity to decide for themselves
whether or notthestreets of our town
shall be lighted. i
The streets should be lighted for the
protection and convenience of its citi
zens, especially the ladles
The proposed ordinance will give
Hillsboroa first-class street lighting,
system. I
If this proposed ordinance receives
a majority of the votes at the election,
the streets will be lighted With sev-1
enty (70) moro street lamps of a more
efficient, economical and modern type
at a saving of $2,040 per year which Is
28 per cent, less man nereiorore.
J. M. IIibbkn,
O. S. Lemon,
' John O. Shaw.
FRANK EmMERLWO,
JoiinO SPAwauit.
The argument against the proposed
ordinance is as follows :
We are opposed to this ordinance
Continued on Page Eight
BrusbcreekN
UrusUcreek ST.
Sinking Spring Corp...
Clay
Concord
Dodson
Lynchburg.
Fairfield E
FalrSeld W
Highland
Leeoburg ,...
uamer
Jackson
Liberty N
Liberty S .,
Hlllsboro NE
Hlllsboro N VV
Hlllsboro S. E
Hlllsboro 8 W
Madison N.
Madison 3 ,
OreenQeM N E
Greenfield N W
Greenfield S E
GreentleldB W...
Marshall
New Market ,
Paint N
Paints
Perm..
Salem
Union
Washington
Whlteoak
Mowrystown...,
Total
Pluralities ,
The vote on State officers follows:
Lieutenant Governor Arnold, R.......
Greenlund.D
Secretary of State Hlldebrant, R
Secrist. D
Treasurer of Slate Archer, R
Brennan, D
Attorney General Turner, R ".
McGhee, D
Judge of Court of Appeals Walters R
Merrlman,
HIGH COMPLIMENT
rNews-Herald Selected as One of
52 Best Country Papers in
- United States.
The News-Herald has been chosen
by newspapermen as one of the fifty
two best newspapers In the United
States. The selection of the newspa
pers In the list was made as the result
of an inquiry sent out by the Depart
ment of Journalism of the University
of Oregon and the editor and publish
ers of this paper feel highly compli
mented over the selection of the News
Herald as "among the best" country
newspapers in the United States.
When it is considered that there are
from 20,000 to 30,000 country newspa
pers in the United States to Deselected
as one of the fifty two best is Indeed a
high compliment.
Newspapers from seventeen states
secured a place in this roll of honor
and six Ohio newspapers were selected.
This Is a high compliment to the
newspapermen of Ohio. The other
Ohio newspapers selected were : Journal-Republican,
Wilmington ; News
Democrat, Geor g e t o w n ; Madison
County Democrat, London; Morrow
County 'Independent, Cardington;
Miami Union, Troy. Four of the Ohio
papers are selected from this section
of the state.
The editor recently received the
following letter from Eric W. Allen,
head of the Department of Journalism
of the University of Oregon which
tells of the selection of the newspapers
in the list :
October 20, 19H
Mr. Granville Barrere,
Editor, News-Herald,
Hlllsboro, Oho.
Dear Sir :
A questionnaire recently sent out by
the department of journalism of the
University of Oregon among the news
papermen of the Uulted States resulted
in the selection by these newspaper
men of 52 country newspapers as
"among the best." Your newspaper
Is one of the 52.
The questons thus put to the news
papermen, the list of the 52 papers
selected by them, and the illuminating
comments upon country journalism
which many of them contributed, will
be published as a bulletin by this de
partment of journalism soon after Jan
uary 1, 1015.
We desire to go father than this,
however; we. want this publication to
be an authorltatlvestatementoncoun
try journalism in the United States,
We know no persons so well qualified
to make these statesments as the edi
tors of the 52 papers selected as types
of the finest tllSre Is among the rural
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press.
We are asking you, therefore, to
write for us from 200 to 500 words that
will express concisely your personal
views on present day country journal
ism ; how to succeed in it; how it can
best serve the community ; what the
departments ot journalism may aim to
accomplish In this particular field, and
what evils they should warn their
I students against and what tendencies
encourage ; whether you can recom
mend your occupation for young men ;
and so on we want your real views
and the form and subject matter are
up to you. We prefer signed state
ments, but will omit your name if
asked. .
We realize that the successful coun
try editor is a very busy man, and It
Is only in the knowledge that he Is also
public spirited that we venture to ask
you to take part in the symposium.
An answer to the question, "What Is
country journalism today ; what ought
it to be, and what can it become ?"
would be a really valuable contribution
to knowledge. We believe this matter
has never been treated with the con
sideration it deserves, and that a state
ment of the case from a selected group
of notably able country editors would
go far towards starting a general dis
cussion that would prove very useful.
Most of our schools of journalism
have started their work with a consid
eration of the metropolitan paper.
Will you aid us In making a sound
start toward a consideration of the
country paper?
Thanking you for any trouble you
may take In this connection,
Yours ve'ry truly,
Ehio W. Allen.
To Organize Basket Ball Team.
Hlllsboro will have a basket ball
team this winter. The team will bo
organized In the next few days and
most of the old stars are expected to
be in the line up. The first game will
be played here on Thanksgiving after
noon. Games will be played In hall
over Hlllsboro Auto Co., Carroll's
Hall. The first practice was held
Wednesday night.
Death of Donald Conard.
Donald Conard died at the home of
his father, Prof. Harvey Conard In
Columbus Tuesday. The body will be
brought here this morning and taken
directly to the Hlllsboro cemetery for
burial, Short services will be held at
the grave, ne was 10 years of age
and death resulted from tuberculosis.
He was a grandson of Mrs. Kate Dog
gett, of this place, and formerly lived
here his father having been superin
tendent of the Hlllsboro Public
Schools.
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Chief Justice Supreme Court Nichols osoo
Taggart 2046
Plurality 451
Judges Supreme Court Crow 562
, Jones 2119
Matthias .'. 21 69 50
Wilkin 2329210
Woman's Suffrage Yes 2213
Woman's Suffrage No 2959-716
Taxation Amendment Yes ' 1005
Taxation Amendment No .3500 2495
Increase of Tax Rate Yes $932
Increase of Tax Rate No 3752820
The Progressive Party cast 354 votes; Socialist Party 89 votes
Clarke-Patton.
Miss Margaret Patton and Charles
F. Clarke were married Wednesday
afternoon at 2 o'clock, Dr. W. II.
Shields officiating. Mr. Clarke was
sick In bed with fever and the cere
mony was therefore performed In his
room at the home of Mr and Mrs. II
II. Maddox. Only the Immediate
members of the families of the bride
and groom were present.
It had been planned to haxe a quiet
wedding at the home of the bride's
mother, Wednesday afternoon, but on
account of the illness of Mr. Clarke it
was necessary to change the arrange
ments. Both the bride and groom
however, insisted upon not postponing
the marriage.
Mr. Clarke is the county surveyor
elect. His popularity and the high
esteem In which he is held are shown
by the flattering vote he received at
the recent election.
The bride Is the youngest daughter
of Mrs. S. N. Patton. Her brilliant
wit, her beauty and many charms have
won for her a wide circle of friends
and made her a social favorite.
Beautiful New Quarters.
Moorhead Bros, moved from the
Opera House building Into their new
quarters across the street Friday.
I They had their opening Friday evening
; and Saturday. An attempt was made
to get everyone who visited the store
! during the opening to register and each
person registering was given the oppor
tunity to guess on the number who
would register, a prize of $5 being
offered the person making the closest
guest. The prize was won by George
Hall who gilessed 685. The number
registering was 091. The guesses
ranged from 13 to 16,113 Music was
furnished by an orchestra on Friday
evening.
The Moorheads are to be congratu
lated on their new quarters. Things
are conveniently arranged and good
taste and good judgment is evident
everywhere in the planning and carry
ing out of the details. The south side
of the room is given over to the shoe
department. The clothing is in the
center and the furnishings and hats on
the north side of the room. The cloth
ing is kept in dust proof cases which
have glass doors and glass tops, the
doors being on ball bearings. The show
windows are on the style of many
of the best city stores and afford
an exoptlonal opportunity for the
attractive display of their goods.
The Moorheads have every reason to
be proud of their new home and de
serve the commendations and congra
ulatlons they have been receiving upon
its furnishings, arrangement and
appearance.
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FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE
Breaks Out In Fayette County
and A Number of Animals
Are Slaughtered.
The epidemic of foot and mouth
disease of stock which has been sweep
ing the country according to latest re
ports is under control. It is now
thought that the quarantino of ihe
Chicago stockyards will be lifted Sun
day. During the epidemic 13 states
were quarantined and thousands of
valuable cattle killed and the shipping
of stock practically stopped
No cases of the disease were found
in this county. The neighboring
county of Fayette, however, did not
escape Officers representing the
United States bureau of animal In
dustry and the Ohio state veterinar
ian's office Monday afternoon InsDec-
ted the cattle, hogs and sheep on the
John Perrl II farm five miles west of
Washington 0. H. and found a dozen
cases of foot and.'mouth disease among
the cattle. The disease was spread
lng among the swine. They ordered
the immediate killing of 58 cows,
which were last Thursday shipped
from Chicago, 125 hogs and 12
sheep.
A trench seven feet deep and four
feet wide Is being dug on this farm
and as soon as completed the 195 head
of stock will be covered with quick
lime and burled. Fayette county has
been quarantined.
Dr. Dyson, state veterinarian of
Illinois, has issued a statement in
which he claims that the disease has
been checked and gives as his opinion
tnat-a similar plague will never again
visit American live stock.
Automobile Accident.
The brakes failed to work on the
automobile of M. S. Glaze as he was
driving down the steep hill of Ft.
Ancient, Sunday. Mr. Glaze ran the
car into a telephone polo to keep it
from getting beyond his control. The
lamps were broken and the radiator
badly smashed, but fortunately none
of the occupants was injured. The
other occupants of the car were Mrs.
Glaze and two of her nieces, the Misses
Ilugglns, of Leesburg. They were on
their way to Hamilton where Mr. and
Mrs. Glaze's daughter, Miss Marjory,
was visiting, expecting to bring her
home on Monday.
The roof of the building, which
James Ramsden occupies as a plumb
ing shop, caught on fire Thursday
afternoon. A considerable portion of
the roof was burned. The loss is esti
mated at $25. The fire is thought to
have started from a spark from a
chimney falling on the roof.
UNUSUAL DIVORCE SUIT
Wife Brings Action Two Days
After Husband Leaves Home
Additional Petit Jurors
Drawn-Other News.
Two new cases were filed in the
Common Pleas Court during the past
weeK.
W. A. McCrea, an Individual doin
buslne under ths name of W. A Mc
Crea Mills at Canton against N. a.
Mann, of Mowrystown, is an action
on an account. The plaintiff says
that the de'endant purchased from
nlm on Oct. 2, 1014 a bill of goods for
which payment was to be made on
Junel, 1914; that there is still due for
this merchandise $111.30 for which he
asks judgment with Interest.
Ethel Sharp asks for a divorce from
John Sharp on the grounds of gross
neglectofduty. The petition discloses
several unusual facts. The parties
were married on Aug. 2, 1914. T,e
plaintiff says that on Nov 7, 1914 tie
defendant deserted her and l)as since
absented himself from their home ;
that he left her wholly without means
of support ; that his son upon orders
of the defendant has threatened to iuc
her out of said premises. The plaintiff
further says that the defendant is
the owner of In Lot No 9 in the village
of Highland and lots Nos. 24 and 2.5 In
the Fairview addition In Fairfield
township adjoining the village of High
land; that the defendant Is threatening
to dispose of liis property. She asks
for reasonable alimony pending the
trial of the action ; that the defendant
bo enjoined from disposing of his prop
erty and that she be granted a divorce
and permanent alimony. Tl.e actkn
for divorce was brought within two
days after thedefendant left the plain
trll. The temporaiy injunction was
gi anted by Judge New by and ' o
motion for temporary alimony set ' r
hearing on Wednesday, Nov. IS,
will give decision krida
Jii'lge New by expects to give In
decision in the case to oust Prof W"
II Vance as county school superin
tendent on Friday. This decision wl'I
be on the demurrer filed an.i unless
against the plaintiff, Dr. Srofe, will
not finally determine the action.
JUDGMENT FOR 1'LAI.MTIKI
The Enterprise Lumber & Silo o.
secured a judgement against W. H.
Pommert Mfg. Co. for 5-320.81. The
case was tried before Judge New by an i
a jury. It was an action on three
promissory notes given by W. H. Pl
mert Mfg. Co to the plaintiff company
for lumber purchaser by the defendi'ir
of the plaintiff. The plaintiff secured
a judgment for the full amount of
the notes with interest.
ADDITIONAL rETlT.IUHOUS.
Six additional petit Jurors were
drawn .Tuesday. They are as foil, .as:
Earl Carter, Paint; Frank Sharp,
Union ; W W. Rains, Madison ; James
Fields, Dodson ; Charles Keen, Fair
field ; Charles Igo, Concord.
Presbyterian Home Coming- Da
.
On Thursday, Nov. 12, the Presby
terian church of Hlllsboro w 111 ha- e i
home coming day for all its members
and friends In other Presbyterian
churches In the county. Families wl'I
bring box lunch and the church wi I
provide coffee. Lunch at 12 in. and
0 p. m.
Church will be open at 9 a. m. an.i
remain open until late In the evening.
The women will sew for the European
children and local charities and the
men will visit and talk and there will
be a real social atmosphere. If you
cannot arrange for the whole fami y
to come to both meals, come to one
The object of this gathering is 'jr
all Presbyterians to become better
acquainted.
U. B. Church.
Next Sunday will be an all day Rally
at the U B. Church. Sunday School
at 915. Dr. C W Hrewbalcer.Sundiy
School expert from Dayton, Ohio, will
speak at 10:30 and 7:30.
U. K at 0 o'clock with Chas. Lewis
as leader. The topic is the C. E.
Pledge.
Mrs. Balkam Schoyer is the guest of
her sister, Mrs. G. B. Beecher. Sim
came here from Pittsburg where she
had been visiting a sister for several
months. Mrs. Schoyer lives most of
the time in Europe.

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