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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, May 29, 1873, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1873-05-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE VINTON RECORD,
JO UN T. KAPEIC,
.Editor ami Proprietor.
. Corner of Main and
Logan Sts., Oopoaite Oourt Houae.
13 A YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
DavU Smart. Samuel W. Kiberf, Jr.
fEstsblishtd 1861.)
fcMAUT & KILVERT,
WJCCESSOR8TO DtVlP BHART1
; Wholesale Grocers
t
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Prompt Attention given to tlie
Transfer of PIO IKON and
other Property from and to
ICailroad and Canal.
Mbo Agents for the Columbus and
' Portsmouth Packets,
Water StreeUbetvieen Paint and Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
Tuarlllhottly
WILLIAM POLAND,
WHOLESALE GROCER,
Lienor and Commisaioa Meronants
NO. 20 WATKR STREET,
CHILLICOTHE. OHIO.
Ala in Barred, Half Barrelf and Bottle.
. novSSlf
(JIQAE FAOTOBY N0.1, 12th DIST.
CIGARS! CIGARS!
SHAEFFER & KEAMEB
Paint St., Four Doors South of Water,
OHILUCOTHE, OHIO,
nave now on hand a large stock of dry Ci
gar. Several choice brands I.a Kose,
Clear Havana, 1. X. I., No. A. King Brand, Ms
lappa, o. ,(nnd the finest brands of ohewinx
and smoking tobacpo known trronghout lha
United ritatr. Wholesale lrl I reduced on
all kind of Tobacco and Cigar mdilDyl.
FOB SALB.
TOWN LOTS AND LANDS
In Zaleski.
THE Znleaki Company, with a view to the
development of the local intercut of Ja!ea
III, to secure ita permanent pioperity, aid lo
add to it populating and wealth, are now
ottering to actual settleis, town lota andfurm
lands at low price", and on liberal term.
Persona defiling to examine the property
and to buy cheap houses will apply at the
Company' offices to
K. TIIOMP-ON, Manager.
Zaleski, Ohio, May 18, 1871. tf
The Most Desirable Eos-
dence in MoArthur.
IFOIR, SALE.
I OFFER for tale my residence on North
atreet. It consist of a splendid dwelling
bouse, well Itmi-hed, Inside and out, with
eight roo-nsand a good cellar. Agonaofflce
building, atable, wood and coal hotwejtnd nth
"er nereiary on t lniihluigs. 'I he premises
contain acres, im luding I acre of vinetard,
all thrifty Hearing nines; there are also thirty
hearing sple trees best variety of urn nod
fruit, twenty-live hearing pencil trees best
bud-led fruit, cherries, quinces, plums, and a
vnriety of smxll truit Kor luriht-r particulxrn
Inquire at the nfhce of this pnper, or at the
premises. Terms easy.
dec3isiin 8.8. D0LLI80M.
Wheeler & Wilson
Was awarded the highest premium at the
WOBLD'S FAIE, LONDON IN 1862
.And at the
Uposwios vxirensniE, pabtsisisx,
K staiiHard machines competing. In May of
tins year we introduced to this county the
New Improved Wheeler & Wilson
hitsh not only aurpaiscs all other machines,
"hlit If as far ahead of the old Wheeler A Wil
son as the old wan ahead of other machines
It is the best for laurly sewing, makes the
lock stitch and ranks highest un a, count ol
the elasticity permanence, beauty and general
desirableness ol its stitching, snd the wide
rsnge of Its application. Hews faster, requires
less power anil ta more durable
Than any other Machine in the World
Bay no other until you try
th Hew Improved
Wheeler & Wltmm.
'The Sewing Machine World
is challenged-
"Old machines read neted and put in perfect
'order ata tuning cost by calling on either ol
'the agents.
for sale by
RICHARD CRAId, t i-u MeArthur O
6r.OKtiB W.tilda0N.A,"W'MC,llUO
sug 17 1871
A Fine German Chromo.
rt srsD aw blcoant rnmwo, mofmtid asd
1IAOT rOB rBSMINO, rBB TO Hilt AOIMT KB
UNDERGROUND
OR,
"LIFE BELOW TIE SURFACE,
BYTIIOS. W. KNOX,
342 P'gs Octavo. 130 Fine Engravings
Relates incidents snd accident beyond the
light of day; startling adventures in all parts
ol the world mines and annUe of working
them; undercurrent of society, gambling
and its horr rs; cavern and their mysteries,
.the dark ways of wickedness; prisons snd
their secrets; down in the depth of the sea
Itrsnge stories of the detection of crime.
The book tresis ol the experience wit h brig
jtada; in opium dens and gambling hells, life
-in prison; stories of exiles; adveot.ires
among Indians; Journey through sewers and
catacombs, accidents in mines; pirates and
piracies; tortures of the Inquisifon; wonder
ful burglaries; underworld of the great cities,
eto., eto.
AGENTS WANTED
Jnr thi work. Exclusive territory given.
Agents can m kt two per week in selling this
hook. Bend for circular and term to agent.
j. n. nvnn uroE,
HAETFORD, CONN., or CHICAGO. ILL.
lama 1873
'A BOOK FOR THE MILLION f
Horriago
A srirsts CevBMlsr t ts
Marrle ar IhoM abaa,
marr ss Ik. pbrtttloitcsl
Guide.
airaltrfcra sad rvvalaltaoaaf
ib.aaiaal aTaitaa. with tha
latsH iimvtrtsf Is pradasla aa rstaaUa staprts.
kov u praMrva laa aoaipUilaa, s.
Ttalstaaa latarsaUB wara anwa aaaaiaq aaa amy
vaffM, with aasMraaa sasravlata, aa4 aaalaloa valaabls
Jalaraullaa lor Uw was tra auni,aroaUBplataaiar
rlan. SUHlltaa sash thataafhllaaaa.pt aaasr laa
Salter, aa asllal saralawlv abaat tha haaaa.
It aoalalas tha aiparlaaee aa adrtea a t a phvisriaa
' Whan rapauUaa 1. warla-WIS., iho.U aa 1 a tha pri
vauraa.rar arr aiala aa faawla tkraataaat ih. aaUfW
- slob.. II aaihracas tiTjMat aa tha lablm a f lha (as
ami. iTitaaa lhat la wank haaia,aa4 sissktkal I
aotrubilibed la aoT athcr wark.
Oat la aav aaa (fraa at paata)rr1nT CaaU.
IddraaaOr. BoWDUpsaarj,la.ias.hihthrtrtt
St. UuK,Ma.
.Notice to ths Affllc;ed mi Unftrtunite.
Ksjra applvtnf ta lha sslsrlesa saaekiaba a4vanlsa la)
S.blla paptra.ar aala aar aack ramcdlaa paraaa Dr.
ana' sark a aiauar wkai year Siaaaaa la, ar saw Saplac
.aklayaar aaadiitaa.
Dr. Bulla aeeaala a doabla haaN at twaaty-aartal
laaBaitaisdaraad by saaaaf lhawaalaaklraiad-dl-.
salpraftaacca af Ikla saaalrr so Xarapa. aad aaa aa esav-
.sailed peraaaallaar ay Ball, oa laadiaaaMaaMnUsaed bs
Karka. OOoa suit parlars, Xa. U M. Ilfhtk aUSSt,
MallarkalaahaasmtUaia,lla. ,
VOL. 21 -NO. IK
. 'ysJ
MOARTHUR, OHIQ, MA.Y
mum.
29, 1873.
WHOLE NO. 1,20 1
O. T. CUNNINC,
LAWYER,
OKFICB AT DErO SfOKB, MAlIf 8TBIET.
X2aug 1872
EDWIN N. BAKKIIILL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
MUD
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Office JicArthur. Oblo,
Will attend promptly to all batine entrnsted
to his ear. novlt
(J. S. CLAYPOOLE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
(PROSKCOTII.O ATTOKNET.)
McARTHUR, O.
Will practice i.t Vinton and adjoining conn-,
tie. Busiieasenlriiated to hiscsre pionipt
ly attended to. Office in Court liou.e.
jan'All872ly
1IOMEU C. JONES.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MAIN 8TRELT.
McARTIlUR, OHIO.
Ornci: One door west of Dsn Will A Broa.
Hoie.
,anf30yl
AMERICAN HOUSE,
OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT.
1IAMDCN, OHIO.
R. FOX, PROPRIETOR.
Livery Stables Attached.
ME A 1.8 BEADY FOR ALL TRAINS.
The House has just been refurnished
throughout. Hooms rlesn snd cnmfortalile,
the table supplied with the heat the market
sHonls, and no pain spared to accomodate
guests. mart IB09 ly
HTJLBERT HOUSE.
Main Street, Opposite Oourt House
McArthur, Ohio,
JAMES WORKMAN, Proprietor
I HAVE taken posseaiinn of the ahove hotel,
renovated and partly refurnished it. snd
will be glnd lo serve the old eii-lomers of ihe
house, and especially my old friends of the
Hocking Valley who may be visiting this
point ihe table will be furnished with the
beatthe market srlords, and care taken lo
mnke guests eomlortnlile. Good stshlir.g at
tnched to the house; Charges reasonable.
13inar 1873
PEYTON cox,
AUCTIONEER.
WILL attend to all business entrusted to
In care.
P. 0. ADDRESS:
II EE li 8 MILLS,
teuton County, O.
8octl8721m
HEiNKY MAULE,
Merchant Tailor-
Ha jurt received hit
FALL AND WINTER STOCK
Of the latest style of
Cloths, Cassimeses and Yestings,
Which 1 will sell Yery Law for Cash.
ClURTOM work dons in the most fashions
hi and durahle manner.
Thankful for ths liberal patronage extended
to me heretofore, I solicit a continuance of
the same. Remember the place
Second Street. Second Doer frem Ian
Ing'a C'eraer.
n. maitle.
JOHN BIEGEL,
Formerly ot Hnmden.
ANNOUNCRSto hi friends in Vinton and
adjoining counties that he ha bought the
Hotel Formerly Kept by Ohas. Smith
Three doora weit c( Madison, on
FRONT ST.
PORTSMOUTH, 0.
He has refitted it thronghont, snd la prepared
to entertain the liaveling publio at ressonshle
rate. land
McARTHUR
RorUfeMt corner;of Main and Jackson street
McARTHUR. OHIO
GEO. W. BRUNTON, Proprietor
Manufacture
Carriages, Evgaiei. Expresses, etc
ALIO, WAaOM AMD ALL IIHUI Of WAQOB WOkB
done to order on short notice.
Painting and Trimming
ol all kind executed in the neatest and most
artistiu style.
BUPA1K1NQ ot all kind In my line will be
promptly and neatl. done.
Work done at this esiaMishmcnt i war
IMDU-d to ba substantial, put up solid and ex
ou'edio tka most worku-aolike manner, not
to oe excelled in any respect bv any other ea
tablishmentin theooiDtr.
THAT WHICH IS
WORTH DOING
-is-
WORTH ADVERTISING,
PEKT AND PEOSPEB.
James Dunklc's Estate.
Probate Court, Vinton County, Ohio.
NOTICE is hereby given thst RarnetAikeo,
a guardian of Lmma J , Robert A.. Joha,
ttsrah K., Arminua, and Nancy B. Unnkle.
minora, ha Bled hi e.-conntwitli said ward.,
severally, lor hnal setil.metit with the first
nsmed, snd for partial settlement with the
others; and that ssid several accounts are sat
for bearing on the loth day of May, A. S.
,1878, at l" o'olock, A. M.
H . B. H ATO; Probate ndg.
Important to those
Who need Furni
ture. The extensive Furniture
Ware Rooms of W. Er
BUSERha73 just been well
filled with an entire new
stock of elegant styles and
of the newest patterns.
Call arid see the Cottage
Bedstead with very fine
bracket rail that he is sell
ing at $5.50. Also the
quarter Marble Bureau
with fine fruit carved han
dles at $20.00. In fact all
other goods arc sold lower
than the lowest.
22 PAINT STREET, .
Bel. Second and Water,
CHILLICOTHE, O.
SPRING AND SUMMER
OLOTHiinsra-
F II AN It IIELLMAN,
At his ne place of business,
COET'S BLOCK, 0PF0SITE UBION
HOUSE.
CHILLICOTHE, O.
II A3 TUB
Choicest Stock
OK -
Spring and Summer Clothing
IVEtl breught to this market, embracing
lnll the hitest and most Oiahinnable styles,
cm in accordance with the latent tnahions.
When you want a nobby suit dou't tall to call
on r'rauk. lie also CUTS' and
Makes Garments to Ordei.
and has a full line of
Gents' Underwear
HATS AND CAPS, ScC.
All clnthlng marked down to the LOW.
F.ST FIUUKKS. Give me a oil snd 1 will
warrunt satislaution
-iair FRANK HEI.I.MAN. .
WALL PAPKK.
WINDOW SHADES.
YEU & CO.,
Union Blook, Seoond St., Chillioothe,
INVITE th e attention or houseaeepers o'
this place and viuinity to their stock of Wall
Pnper.
ALL NEW STYLES,
FOR TUB
Spring Trade of 1873
A large assortment just received. Call and
examine when you are in Chillicothe.
Linen and Paper Window Shades. Rus
tic Shades, at cost; a good Assort
ment of Miscellaneous and
School Books, Stationery, Fancy
Articles, fc.
A GOOD BOOK
AGENTS WANTED.
Dick's Enrtclopkhia of Practical Rb-
cbiptb and Piovbssxs. Containing, 422 prac
tical receipts, written in a p ain and popular
maimer, and illustrated with explanatory
wood-cuts. Being a comprehensive book of
reference lor the merchant, manufacturer, sr
tian, amateur and housekeeper, including
medicine, pharmacy and domestic economy
The scope of thi work is entirely dinVrent
from any other book ol Ihe kind. Besides
being a complete and almrst indispensiule
be ok of reference for the thousand and one
receipts and articles needed in every bous
hold , farm, garden, etc.. it includes clear snd
easily understood direction for the applies
lion of many of the arts usually acquired only
by long experience, and so divested of tech
nichahiies, or the technicalities ot terms used
ss tully explained as to bring the entire sub
ject within the comprehension of any person
of ordinary intelligence, t'romiinent among
Ihe immense maxa of subject treated of in
the book are the Pillowing:
The Art ol liyeing, Hard Bolt and Toilet
Soaps, Tanning, Instillation, Imitation Liq
uors, Winrs, Cordials and Hitters, Cider,
Brewing, Herufmery.Flavonnii Ei-sences, etc.,
tosmencs, Hair Dyes and Washes, Pomades
snd Perfumed Oil, Tooth Powders, etc., By.
tups, Alcohol and Alcoholmetry, Petioleum
snd Kerosene. Blesohing and Cleaning, Vin
egar, bauces, Catsups and Pickets, Keceipl
tor the Garden, To r emove 6tmns,8poU,,et,
Pyrotechny snd Kxplesives, Cements, etc.
Waterproofing, Artificial, Gems, Ink snd
Writing Fluids, Aniline Colors, Psinls and
Pigments, tainting and Paper-hanging, K'
somineaod Whitewash, Varnishing and Pol.
isb ng, Lubricators, Japanning and Lacqner
irg.Bootand Harness Blacking, Photog.aphv,
Metals snd Alloys, Gilding, rillvering. etc.,
Electrotyping, Electroplstmg, etc., Patent
Medicines, Medical Receipts, Weight and
Measures. OUT pages, royal octavo, cloth.
Price IV00 mar
lilCh FITZGERAIil', Publnshers, N..Y.
J OB WOKE
EXECUTED
NEATLY & PROMPTLY
-It
LANDPOOR.
I've hfttl unotlier offerer! (e twenty
acre3 more. i .
Of 'bigh ami dr? pmlrio lnJ, at level
as a "floor, . .'
I thought I'd wait tr$- spa yog first,
as litwyer Brady suld.
To tell bow chlnjra will mm out best,
a woman's still iliei,d.
And wbfn Oils lot k ( tld for and we
have got the ieiki.
I'll say that I am entUfi :J It'a an the
land we need. J
And next we'll ae a p. -rut tha yard,
- - aad flxthe houaf, up aome.
And innnnge In the envrse of .lime to
tave a better ho'uo.
WIFE.
There Is no ne of talklhjr, Charlei
you buy thnt twenty more,
And we'll (to acrlmplnj; all ourdive,
and al ways be land pot.
For thirty year at lugged and
saved, derylng halt our needs.
While all we have to show for It is tax
Teci'ljtta and detxla! .
' s
I'd sell the land if It were mine, and
have a better home.
With broad, light rooms to front the
street, and take life as It come.
If we could live as others live, and
have what other, do,
We'd live enough sight pleasantcr,
and have a plentj too.
v
While others "htrve amusements, and
luxury and books.
Just think how stlngv we have lived'
and how this old place looks.
That other farm you bought of Wells,
that took so many years.
Of clearing up and fenciiig In, 'has
cost me many tears. . .
Yes. Charles. I've often thought of It,
a hundred Mines or more,
And wondered If it really paid to al
ways be land poor.
That had" wo built a oosy Tiouse, toolc
pleasure as It come.
Our children, once so doarto us, would
never left our home.
I grieve to think of Waned weeks, and
years and months and days,
While for itall we never yet have hafl
one word of praise.
Men call us i ich, but wo are poor
wonlJ we not (Veelv give
The land with all Its fixtures, for a
better way to live?
Do'nt think I'm blaming you, Charles
you're not a whit to blame,
I've pitied you these many years, to
sec you tired and lame.
It's jut the way we started out, our
plans too far ahead ;
We've wo n the cream of llfo fway,
to leave too inuuh when dead.
'Tit putting off enjoyment long after
we enjoy.
And alter all too much ot wealth
seems useless as a toy.
Although e'vek a rjie sLiu., tpo late I
what all must learn at last, -Our
brightest earthly happiness Is
burled lu the past
That life is short and full of care, the
end is nlwavs nigh.
We seldom half begin to live before
we're doomed to die.
Were I to start my lite again, I'd mark
each separate (lay.
And never let a single one, passunen-
joyed away.
If there were things to envy, I'd have
them now and then,
I'd have a home that was a home, and
not a cage or pen.
I'd sell some laud if it were mine, and
lit up well the rest,
I've always thought, and think so yet
small farms well worked are best.
[From the Portsmouth Republican.
Account of the First Steamboat
Voyage Down the Ohio,
in 1811.
Ed. Ke publican: Happen
ing to get bold oi a late Pitts
burg paper, I read a long and
rather fanciful account of the
first steamboat voyage made
from Pittsburg to INew Or
leans. As it is rather too Ion g
for publication in your paper
entire, I herewith send a syn
opsis of Ihe principle incidents
ot the voyage, together with
my own recollections on the
subject.
Robert Fulton and Chancel
lor Swingston, after th suc
cessful application of steam iu
the propelling ot boats iu the
eastern waters, obtained the
right from congress for the ex
clusive privilege of navigating
the western waters by the use
of steam. In order to test the
practicability ot navigating
the western rivtrs by the use
of steam, they sent out Mr.
Nicholas J. Roosevelt to build
a boat, and to ascertain to a
certainty whether boats could
be successfully propelled by
steam power or not. Mr.
Roosevelt went to Pittsburg
in 1809 and before building
bis boat, made a trip, acoim
panied by his young wife, in a
boat fitted out tor the purpose,
and explored the whole river
from Pittsburg to Nevr . Or
leans, and acquainted himself
with such facts concerning the
navigation of those rivers as
would enable him the better
to perform his intended voy
age by steam. At New Or
leans be took Ebip and sailed
round to New York. Here
ported to bis employers that
the scheme was entirely prac
ticable. They took him into
partnership an4 famished him
suitable 'toaat and take her to
New Orleans. Mr. Roosevelt
arrived in Pittsburg early in
the year 1810, and immediate
ly set about the work ol build,
tag his new steamboat. 'She
was to be one hundred and
siiteen ieet long, and 'twenty
feet beam, with a iritable
depth .not iven. Rather a
s man hoat, but sufficiently
large for experimental pur
poses. Shipbuilders and ma
chinists bad to.be brought
from .New York, and owing to
unforeseen difficulties, she was
a long time in being built and
equipped for (he voyage.
I must here give some of
my own recollections on the
(.nbject Traveling, to a ton
cider Able extent, was perform
d at that time, in skiff. Sev
eral persona who might be
traveling together, would strike
the head waters of the Ohio at
some convenient point, and
either buy or build a skiff to go'
down the river in. Tliey would
row all day and land at some
cabin on the bank and stay all
night. Through the medium
of these travelers we kept tol
erably well posted aa to the
probable time that we might
expect "the boat down.' We
were always very particular to
inquire al! about her, as to
her shape, size and looks. 'One'
man who had saen her very
minutely described her as be
ing as wide as a house, and
shaped just like a smoothing
iron. Then we all knew ex
actly how she looked just
like a flat iron and aa wide as
a house. Tben there were mar
V0Uus4.cries as to her speed.
Some averred that she would
run eo,jaat that unless we were
in a good position and had a
fine chrnce, she would pAss
and be out ol sight before we
could see her. Therefore we
were on -the lookout for her a
long time before she came
Wo were nfraid to leave the
river for fear she would pass
and we would miss (he sight
of her. And after all our
looking and watching she
passed down in the night and
we did not get to see her at all.'
One man, Jesse Thomas, who
lived just above the mouth of,
tho little Scioto, said be saw
her. He happened to be
awake and hearing some un
usual noise, jumped out of bed
and ran to the river just as
she was passing, but he said
she ran so fast he barely got a
glimpse of her before she was
out of sight. He described her
ub making a noise like the
flutter-wheel of aeaw mill.
tie was a great lion after that
be had seen the steamboat.
But to return. The boat was
finished after overcoming al
most insurmountable difficul
ties at a cost ot $38,000, which
at the present day would build
a pretty good steamboat. Af
ter it was ascertained that Mrs.
Roosevelt intended to accom
pany her husband on this per
ilous voyage, the good people
in Pittsburg almost raised in
arms against it. He was told
that although he might have
the right to tnrow his own life
away, he had uo right to im
peril that of his wife and in
fant child. But she was a he
roic woman and determined to
accompany her husband, let
the danger be what it might
A cabin was fitted op aft for
Mr. Roosevelt and wile, and a'
larger one forward for the of
ficers and crew. There was a
captain, an engineer named
Baker, Andrew Jack, the pilot;
six hands, two female servants,
a man waiter, a cook, and a
large Newfonndland dog, called
Tiger. Thus equipped, the
New Orleans began the voy
age which changed the rela
tious of the west which may
also be said to have changed
Ita
The people of Pittsburg
turned out en matt to ee.e Jier
start, very few of whom ever
expected to see a steamboat
come up stream. The boat
passed down to Cincinnati,
which the. account says she
reached the second day out. ;
If eke did, there are but few
boats of the present day that
can make much better time.
tVhen she rounded to at Cin
cinnati, the whole town, as at
Pittsburg, turned out to see
the new wonder. Mr. Roose-i
volt's Tormer accquaintances
whom he -had made on his for
met trip, congratulated him on
his success in navigating the
Ohio in a steamboat, "but ihey
said that any boat conld go
down stream, but that would
be the last they would 'ever
see of him. Louisville was
reached on the night of the
fourth day after leaving Pitts
burg. The morning after the
arrival at LouisvillA, Mr
Roosevelt's acqi a i n t a n o e s
came on board; here the same
things were said fhathad been
said at 'Cincinnati. 'Congra'tu
lalions were without excep
tion accompanied with regrets
'that It was the -first and last
time a steamboat would ever
be seen above the falls of the
Ohio. As the river wa too
low to cross the falls, theyliaa
to wait for a "rise. One day
Mr. 'Roosevelt asked a number
of citizens of Louisville k
dine with hiro aboard the boat.
The cabins of steanrbnats in
those days "were down in the
huTl of the hoat. So whfle
they were all seated at dinner
tmr'boat gradually tejan Jo
move. They ran up on deck
in the greatest consternation,
supposing the boat had broke
loose tvnd wits drifting on to
the falls. But what was their
surprise to see the boat mov
ing up stream. The captain
had privately given orders to
raise stoam and put the boat
under way while they were at,
dinner. So after giving them
a pleasant steamboat ride of
a few miles, returned to their
anchorage again.
The river continuing low
without any prospect of a rise,
they made a trip up to Cincin
nati, thus demonstrating be
yond a doubt that a steamboat
could stein the current of the
Ohio. Early in November the
waters took a rise ro that she
passed over the falls in safety.
They now had plain sailing the
rest of their voyage. They
met with few incidents until
they got into the Mississippi.
At one time they feared an at
tack from the Indians as they,
came round in a threatening
manner, but was a little too
fast ior them to get aboard.
One night as they were pass
ing through the Indian nation,
after Mr. Roosevelt had retir
ed and fallen asleep, he was
suddenly awaked by hearing a
tremendious shouting and
trimping of feet upon deck.
Supposing the Indians had at
tacked the boat, be siezed a
sword and ruBhed upon deck
to take a part in the fight. But
he found a greater difficulty
than that. The boat had tak
en fire and it was with the ut
most difficulty that the flames
could be subdued. It was in
the fall of 1811 while the great
earthquakes of lhat year were
shaking the earth to its foun
dations. They landed at New
Madrid just after a large por
tion of that ancient Spanish
town had been sunk by an
earthquake. The inhabitants
which were not engulfed by the
earthquake were running for
their lives to a place Tjf safety.
They were almost at badly
scared at the sight of the
steamboat as they Were at the
earthquake. But some of them
looked 'npbfc ITle ateamboat as
aaj-y
ADVEltTISLNQ TEItJlS.
One square, .'......, $1 iO
Each additional lm,ert!oh ... fco
Cards, per yeai rj flO
Local notices, per line, 3h
Yearly advertisements $100 (Hi
column, and at proportionate rate pi f
less space. Payable In advance.
tSTTho Record being the ofilcls)
paper of the town, and having tl
largest circulation of any paper in tl a
county, offers sujierloi'lnJiieeiiieLf
to qilyprtlaera.
"aaaaaaaaasaaaaaaaaaasaasasasSBaasajaaW
deliverance. A great many
begged to be taken aboard and
saved from the impending cal'
amity. Cut that being impose
sifele without eadangering their1
own safety, they continued
the voyage. Jtey found the.
aavigit on of Jhe Mississippi,
very dangerous a account of
the coutluual falling f limbec
into the river, so tbey had to
keep the middle of the river
They had to stop every night,
and lay sp all night, and ret ia
their atock of fuel lor the next
day. There were no wood-
yards iu those days, bo they
had to cut the wood for them
selves. They found it was safeT
to tie up at the foot of an
island than to the main shore.
on account of the falling tim
ber. One night they anchored
as usual at the foot of vn
island, and after laying in their
wood for the next day, Tetired
to Test. But imagine their con
sternation next morning to dis'
cover-that .their island bad dis.
appeared, flunk and gone for-'
ever, and they wee anchored
in the middle ol the river with
no land in sight They cot
their hawser and put off flown
the river without knowing
where they were. Thev nassed
some flat-boats of whom they
inquired their Whereabotrts.'but
the 'flat-boatmen were as much
lost as themselves. Tbetivef
had undergone such great anA
rupid 'Changes that they had
lost ail their 'land marks and
bearings. However, they go
safe down to "Natc'bes, where
they received the vooomtulaa
lions of their friends, upon tho
safe. iejodaaUoisf Jitait? peril
ous voyoge.
One romantio incident can
here be related, and then the
voyage may be considered fin
ished. The 'caDtam who h&
been employed to navigate the
boat down, being a yonng wan
and somewhat susceptible 6f
the tender passion, made love
to Mrs. RooaflveU'rt w Alt in
- r
maid, and as soon as 'they
landed at Natches, a -parso.
was procured, and the 'mat
riage ceremony ;performi
tne boat.
President 'Bergh, -the Newr
York humanitarian,"has writ
ten' to the Mayor, suggestion
that in view of the approach-
ing'season when it is supposed!
that dogs are most inclined to
become mad, the city shall ap
propriate a lot -of ground aad
erect a small building tbereotu
to be used for the destrootaocu
ot doga 'by carbonic acid.
Thirty years ago a man liv
ing near La-Crosse sold a pair
of "boots for a gun, traded th
gun for a pony, -eold (he Donv
for thirty aores of ewamp land1,
and now owns slxty-eix city
lots, worth $800 each.
a a
Democratic papers coutiatie
to speak of Virginia aa the
"mother of 'President Will
they neverlearn (hat lady
is far "past the age of child
bearing!"
ifon hundred "and KeYenty
five yards of rag 'carpet in ten
months, besides all the house,
'has'beeh achieved by an old
woman of Beventy-lwo, at
Morris, N. Y.
Thk tolr tlay tOoTorirJS)
Sentinel boasfs'that It is pub
lished at a ;greatet thUude
than any 'other paper IB tha
world 10,000 feet above th
level of theea.
Bret Hartk denies that he
is the laziest man in tho world k
hot Bubmits lhat he don't see
the nse of rushing around
when it isnt his boarding house
that's on fire.
i)a. H. O. Boltoh suggest
the use of the magnesium
light for observing the true
colors cf precipitates by night.

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