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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, July 10, 1873, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1873-07-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE VINTON RECORD.
JOHN T. KAPEK,
Udltor aud Proprietor.
prFI0EK. . Corner of Main and
Logan Sta., Orjposite Court House.
$2 A YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
DavU Smart. Bamuel W. Kilvert, It.
Established 1862.
MIAUT & KILYERT,
8UC0E3S0tt8 TO DAVID SMART'l
Wholesale Grocers
&.ND COMMISSION MEBCflAHTS.
Prompt Attention given to the
TraiiHf'cr of PIU IKON and
' other Property from aud to
Railroad and Canal.
' Also Agents for the Columbus and
, Portsmouth Packets,
' Water Street.betteeen Paint and Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
, mar lllhou ly
WILLIAM POLAND,
WHOLESALE GKOCEIt,
liquor and Commission Merchants
NO. 20 WATER 8TRKBT,
CniLLICOTIlE. OHIO.
Al in Barrel!, Hair Barrels and Bottles.
covsiv
CIGAR FACTORY N0.1, 12th DIST.
CIGA.KS! CIGARS!
SHAEIFER 4 KRAMER
Taint St., Four Doors South of Water,
CHILUCOTHE, OHIO,
nave now on hnnii a large stock of dry Ci
gars. Several choice brands La Hose,
Clear Havana, I. X. I.., No. A. Slug Brand, Ma
eppa, 4o., and the finest brand' of chewing
-and amoving tobacco known 'rroughout the
United States. Wholesale Prli t reduced on
all kinds of Tobacco and Cigars mchl9yl.
TOB JS-AJLIE.
TOWN LOTS AND LANDS
In Zaleski-
THE Znleaki Company, with a view to the
development of the local interests of Zales
ki. to secure Us permanent piosperity, ni.il to
'dd to itH population and wealth, are now
ottering to actutd setlleia, town lota and farm
lands at low price, and (in ittxral terma.
IVrsorm desiring to examine l.e property
'And to buy cheap houses will apply at the
Company' ottices to
K. THOMl'-'ON, Manager.
ZnlesW, Ohio, May 18, 1871. If
The -Most Desirable Res-
anni in MnAvr.hne.
UU11UU . U UV. MUM-.
FOB S-XjEJ
I OFFER for lale .my residence on North
street. It coiiiIS'of it splendid dwelling
liouse, well finished, inside and out, with
eight roo-nsaiid a good cellar. A goon office
Wimbling, stable, wood and coal hnusentid otli.
er nece-sary outbuildings. The .premises
conlnin acres, including I acre ofvinetard,
till thrifty utviring vinen; there are also thirty
"bearing apple trees best. varity of vraflvd
fruit, twenty-five tearing peach trees best
.bud led I'ruil, cherries, nuinc.es, plums, and a
-variety of small fruit ror further partit-irlars
inquire at the othce of this paper, or at the
jtremises. Terms easy.
decJiMim 8.8.TX)LLI80.
Wheeler & Wilson
Was awarded the highest premium at the
WORLD'S FAIR, LONDON IN 1862
And at the
t
IXrOSlTIOW VSlVEltSELLE, IMJtfS J.V18U7,
S2 standard machines competing. In May of
this year we introduced to this county the
New Improved Wheeler & Wilson
htch not only siirp.hses all other machines,
tint Is as far ahead of the old Wheeler Wil
eon ai-the old was ahead of other machines
1 1 is the best for lain'ly sewing, makes the
1 ock stitch and ranks highest m s count ol
the elasticity irnisnence, beauty aad general
desirableness ol its stitching, and the wide
range of its application. Sews faster, requires
dens power ami is more durable
Than any other Machine in the World
Buy no other until you try
line lew lnifirrfved
Wheeler. WIIhvu.
The Sewing; Machine World
is challenged.
Old machines read usted and put in perfect
Wder ulaintting cost by calling on either ol
the agents.
Kor sale by
aug 17 1871
A Fine German Chromo.
wt nxo am ri.rnAKT nru"o. HOt'jnr.D and
aKADY roa ra.Miixo, rur.i, to kvebv aukxt roa
UNDERGROUND
OR,
LIFE BELOW THE SURFACE,
BY Til OS. W.KNQX,
942 P'g Octavo. 130 Fine Engravings
Hetfltea incidents and accidents baynod the
light of day; startling adventures iu all pans
ot tbe world mines and mode of working
them; undercurrent ef society, gambling
and its horr irs; caverns and their mysteries,
.he dark ways nf wcksdues; prisons and
Their secrets down In kite depths of the fen
iraiga stones of the detection of crime.
The book trealsol Meexpeneaee with brig
nils; in opium dens and gimhliog hells, life
,n prison; stories of exiles; nriventire
'among Indians; journeys through sewers and
catacombs, accidents in mines; pirate and
piracies: tortures of the inquisit on; wonder
ful burglaries; underworld of the great cities,
etc., etc.
AGENTS WANTED
for this work. Exclusive territory given.
Agents can m -lit f UK) per week in selling this
book. Send for circulars and terms to agents.
J. B.JIVRIt HYDE,
BARTTORD, CONN., or CHICAGO. ILL.
16msy 1874
fA book ronnriE million x
1 arlral. CmbmIm u tk.
ssaCM aaMgw
Guide.
bj.tcric. sad rvv.latla.Mf
. Mi ..I .riusi. with th.
aimnr M tb. IbTribkcleU
IW StMSnriM I. rri.s as4 raita abaruix,
fcrM.mlha.lniM,. .....
ThUl . a. IsurMUag nrt . f tw. aa.4rl saa riitf
arss.wtUi ..atarsu .agr.vl.ts aa4 Mauls, valaahl.
An rrmftUo. Ir UiaMwa.ar.MarriAtarwateaplaUB,.r.
rlat. (US III., hwk Ull..blU) ksaa4acAMAT
aa hf, aa4 Mi laM wmIt absat Ihs Smn.
II Maiaia. ih. tip.rt.aa. aa4 aArks . f a p.Trtet.1
hnrMaiallMl. w.rH-U., aaA iknii atla ih. frt
au AnvtrW mr, aial. aad fMal thraa(ha1ilth.Bllr.
Ms. lt.airaM..r.rTUila.Ut.aaieH.rih.tn
aratlvt) triMa lhat r vanh tMWta(,a BaskltvMW
sh pahlUbad la aay alkw tsrt.
Sn l u aa. aaa rrf f bp Ht Fifty Cuts.
Addrat. Dr. AtaAAS' DUauaarf, 1 a . Ktskla ttrn
St. UaU, MS.
ITotlfB to the Affllcul ani Vnlbrtuiuta.
SafwaaaiSrl.t w th. Mtsrisa. .UMfca wha adarttM I.
Siabll. a,ra,.r ..l.f aay ..ach rraadAt. acraa. Dr.
fc.lil' wart a. aiaiur ahal jwu dta.M la, at htw daalar
avbl. r.ar aalit..
Dr. Satu Maaalrt s Isshs) km f tavatv-atna
aaaai.;laAair.a hr taw.fla. saMtata.ar.u4 aMdl
4aalfrfi...rif ihUat.auy aa4 Karaacaadaia aaeaa
.alKdaaraaatllv ar hr Ball.oa thadlMawi MiUoud la
kl. warh.. OSes sal aarlari. Ma. II At. lUIUI SUash
kalwara Mutllaa4 CAna.t, at. Lati, M..
' -9
Ill ftjfff lif If t L
1 . T .
VOL. 21 -NO. 17.
MC ARTHUR, OHIO, JULY
10, 1873.
WHOLE NO. 1,213
I
I
I
O. T. CUNNINC,
LAWTEB
IvI'A.S.THXTR, O.
0NFICB AT DRrO 8T0RB, MAW 8TSRBT.
22aug 1871
EDWIN N. BAKNIIILL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Offlce JleArthur, Ohio,
Will attend promptly to all business entrusted
to hi earn. oovll
a. S. CLAYPOOLB,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
(PROSKCUTIKG ATTORNEY,)
McARTHUR, O.
Will practice n Vinton and adjoining eoun
ties. Business entrusted to his care piompl
ly attended to. Office in Court House.
jan2U18721y
IIOMElt C. JONES.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MAIN 8TREk.T.
McARTUUR, OHIO.
Orrici: One door west of Dan Will t Bros,
ttoie.
,snf30 yl
AMERICAN HOUSE.
OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT.
HAMDEN, OHIO.
R. FOX, PROPKIETOR.
Livery Stablee Attached.
IIEAI.B READY FOR ALL TRAINS.
The House has just been refurnished
throughout. Honms clean and comfortable,
the table supplied with the best the market
adonis, and no pains spared to accomodate
guests. mart 18U9 ly
HULBERT HOUSE.
Main Streot, Opposite Court House
Mc Arthur, Ohio,
JAMES WORKMAN, Proprietor
I HAVE taken possesion of the above hotel,
renovated and partly refurnihed it, and
wil lie glad to serve the old eulcmeis of the
house, and especially my old friends of the
Hocking Valley who may be visiting this
point The table will be furnished with the
best-the market aftords, and care taken to
make guests enmloMalile. Good stabling at
tached to the house; Charged reasonable,
lllmnr 1873
PEYTOi COX,
AUCTION EEE,
W ILL attend to all business entrusted to
I his csre.
P. O. ADDIJESS:
HEED'S JI1L,S,
Vinton County, O.
3octl8721m
HEiMtY MAULE,
Merchent Tailor,
Has just received his
FALL AND WINTER STOCK
Of the latest styles of
Cloths, Cas8imc8es and Vestings,
Which 1 will sell fury Low for Cash.
CUSTOM work done in the most fashiona
hie and durable manner.
Thankful for th. liberal patronage extended
to me heretofore, I solicit a contiuunnce ol
the same. Remember t he place
Hecend Street. Hernnd Poor 6m I.nn-
sing's Comer.
dec-o
il. MAULE.
JOHN B1EGEL,
Formerly ot Hamden.j
A
uwniTNrca In hi. friends in Vlntnn and
adjoining counties that he has bought the
Hotel Formerly Kept by Ghas. Smith
Three doors west cl Madisaa, on
FRONT ST.
PORTSMOUTH, O.
Ha h.. refilled it thrnnahoTlt. and Is prepared
to entertain the tiavehog public at reasnnshle
rates. 'n
McAKTHUR
North-east corner of Main and Jackson street
McARTHUR. OHIO
GEO. W. BKUNTON, Troprletoi
Manufacture
Carriages, Buggies. Expresses, ett
ALSO, WA00S8 AMD ALL US Or WA0 W0
done to order on short notice.
. Painting and Trimming
ot all kinds executed in ttie neatest and most
artistiu style.
BbPAlKlNO ol all kinds hi my line will be
promptly and neutl. done.
ajt. Work done at this esisblishmcnt is wsr.
isnu-U to tie siibslantial. put up solid and ext-
uu edin tbe most workicaulike manner, not
to oe excelled in any respect b any other es
tabhshmentin thecointrv.
THAT W IllCll IS
WORTH DOING
-is- .
WORTH ADVERTISING,
PRINT AND PROSPER
James Dunkle's Estate.
Probata Court, Vinton County, Ohio.
NOTICE is hereby given that Rarnet Aiken,
as guardiao of Lioma J , Boliert A , John.
srsh K., Armimui. sod Nsney B. Iiunkle,
minors, has riled his s -count with said wards
severally, lot Dual eel ilement with the first
named, and lor partial setilt-mvnt wiih the
others; and that said several accounts are set
for hearing on the lAih day of May, A. D.
1878, at imo'ciock, . m.
H. B. MAYO; Probate Judge.
April 84, 1873. It
I
M A5r-i
JO'S Sw
er4
O
O
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O
t3 m Sn
r1
0
s Q.
IH
0
SO
w H
S 9 tsoS
ICO H h H
D i-H
2 to 23
wM 1
HCQ Oh P4
pq
0
en
CO
Eh
t t
SPRING AND S UMMER
CLOTsiiisra
FR4K HELLltlAN,
At his ne place of busluess,
COST'S BLOCK. OPPOSITE UHIOH
HOUSE.
CHILLICOTHE, O.
HAS THE
Choicest Stock
OF
Spring and Summer Clothing
EVErt hr.ught to this market, embracing
nil the latest and most fashionable styles,
( in in accordance with the latest fashions
When you wnnta nobby suit duu't fail to call
on Frauk. He also CUTS and
Makes Garments to Ordei
and has a full line of
Cents' Underwear
II ATS AND CAPS, &C.
All clothing marked down to the LOW
i;NT i'ltUl'liEN. Give me a c ill and I will
warrant satisfaction
IBspr FRANK HELLMAN.
U t.U
IS .0 2
WALIj PAPKK.
WINDOW SHADES.
YEC & CO.,
Union Block, Beoond St.. Chillioothe,
I NVITK the attention of housekeepers o'
this place and vicinity to their stock of Wall
Paper.
ALL NEW STYLES,
KOH THE
Spring Trade of 1873
A large assortment just received. Call and
examine when yea are in Chillicothe.
illicit and Paper Window Shades. Pus
tic Shades, at cost; a good Assort'
ment of Miscellaneous and
School Books, Stationery, Fancy
Articles, ttc.
A GOOD BOOK
AGENTS WAN1ED.
Dick's E.Nfwct.oPBnlA of Practical Rb-
ci ins anii Paocsssis. Contnimngn,422 prac
tical receipts, written in a plain and popular
mai ner, and illustrated Willi explanatory
wood-cuts. Being a comprehensive book of
r. ference lor the merchant, manufacturer, ar
tisan, amalenr and housekeeper, including
medicine, pharmacy and domestic economy
The scope of this work is entirely ditWent
from rny other book 01 the kitiu. besiiles
being a complete and almrst IndispejisiMe
brok of reference for the thousand and one
receipts and articles needed in every house,
hold, farm, garden, etc.. it includes uiear and
easily nnd.istood directions for the applies
lion of many ofiho arts usually acquired only
by 'ong experience, and so ilivested of te h
niciialuieK, or the tecJrnicnlilie. of terms used
so lully explained as to bring the entire sub
ject within the comprehension of any person
of ordinary intelligence. I'romiinent among
the immense mass of subjects treated of in
the book are the following:
The Art ol Dyeing, Hard 8olt and Toilet
Soaps, Tiimi'ug, Insiiilatinn, Imitation l.iq
uora, Wines, tjordials and Hitters, Cider.
Brewing, Peiufmery.Kl.tvonns Essences, etc.,
I.osmencs, Hair Hjies end Washes, Pomades
and Perfumed il, Tooth Pow.lers, etc.. By,
tups, Alcohol acd Alcoholmetry, Pelioleum
and Kerosene. Hle.ich'ug anil Cleaning, Vin.
egar, B.mces, C ii'ps and Pickels, keceinla
toi uieliunleu To Pemove blnina,Spnts,etn.,
Pyro.echny and Exples've". Cemenla, eio ,
Waterproofing, ArtiHcisl, Gems, Inks and
Writing Fluiiis, Aniline Colors, Paints and
Pigmen. lainlingend Paper-hanging, Ka'
somineend Whitewash, Varnishing and Pol.
ish ng, Lt'brieators, Japanning and Lacquer
irg.Hoo. ann Harness Bla-.king, Photog aphv,
Meials and Allovs, (iilding, tiilverinj, ett! ,
Electrory ping, Kletirnplating, elo.. Patent
Medicities, Medical Receipts, Weight and
Measure. OUT pages, royal octavo, cloth.
Price VOCI timer
DICK at FITZGERALD, Publnshers, N.;Y.
J 0B WORE
EXECUTED
NEATLY & PROMPTLY
[From the Marietta Register.]
TO OHIO.
I have left thee, dear (ilo,
But my memory atill,clings
To the grtj aud towerinjr rocks,
An J thy ever guaiitnf springs.
To thy meadows in tha valleys.
Where the crystal waters shine.
To thy hills, where erslthc sunshine,
Flashes through the (waving pines.
To thy forests where lto eungster",
Warble forth their notes of glee,
All these ties, beloved Ohio,
Bind my youth lui h4irt to thee.
Oftentimes I have wandered,
In the sii in liter' quiet hour, sic,
Through thy groves to Jiep.r their uiu-
Or o er the lawn to pluck the flower.
When the grass upon t2e meadow,
Waving green was still unshorn,
And the hillsides, steeptand rugged,
All were tmseled o'er with cum.
I lime strolled umonghy streamlets,
lXt k-:d with pebbles Washed ashore,
And the cadence of ihuir waters,
made me love tVe more.
—R. S. Naylor.
ADLERS' OBSERVATIONS.
A woman who is considering
tbe matter of her spring bat, is
an interesting subject for con
templation. First she buys a
straw frame that looks as if it
had been struck with a hurri
cane and then sat on by an en
tire coroner's jury.' After that,
when she rides in a street car,
she drirvj VvJSt details of ev
ery spring hat that enters, and
learus them all by heart, and
does mental sums over the
menial cost of the ribbon, and
makes up her mind to have
flowers in hers like those worn
by the woman in the corner,
and lace like Iliac gawky-look-
ing creature in the middle.
And when she walks down the
street she studies all tbe hats
that come along aud when a
woman passes her with one on,
she twists her neck to see how
it looks behind, and is disgusted
to see that the woman also is
disclosing her neck to see how
she trims her hat. When she
arrivei in front of a millinery
store, 6he lingers'unlil she has
analyzed all the spring hats niP
ine window, and she deter
mines to trim hers nineteen
different ways, aud decides not
to have .flowers like those ol
the woman who sat in the cor
ner. Then she shoots into the
store, and asks to (,see hats1'
with the air ot a person who
has a whole female seminary to
rig out wiih eighty dollars head
gear, fcjhe examines every hat
in the establishment, overhauls
ten .bushels of flowers, gets
about twenty dollars' worth ot
work; out of the saleswoman,
aud then says she will ''louk
lurther." Then she goes home
with her mind fixed on thirty
ei,gut or nine different styles, in ,
wnich 6 he wants to trim her
hat. Alter awhile she begins
to think she ought to have a
leather biu it, and 6he passes
two or three sleepless nights
trying to decide whether to pu',
one on yr not. At last she re
solves she will. Then she lies
awake lor two more nights en
deavoring to determine whelh
tr it shall be red or blue. She
fixes on blue. Sue buys the
trimming and sews it ou iu sev
enty successive positions, her
tniud filled witn deepest anxie
ty as-, to whether the leather
should go ou the right side, the
leltside or ou lop. ahe puts it ou
the right side,but juat iheu Air
Brown passes the trout wiu
Uow with a leather on the lett
side ol Lers'aud so sbe changes
a. The next uiormug Mrs.Fer
gusou vails and berateaiher is
uu the right side, aud Iheu au
uiher change is made.. At
church the next day, Mrs.
duiliu has leathers uu boiti
Bitlca, hUd Mrs. Jubusou bas one
uu lup. ilieu wore sleepless
uigbls and more paiulul un
certainty. At last in utter de
spair, bbe lakes the hat to a
Uiiiiiuei aud pays leu dollars lu
have it iriuiuied. Wheu it
comes home sbe pronounces n
'-hatelul," aud picks it all to
pieces, and broods ovtr it and
worries aud Ireis, aud loses her
appetite aud leels lite lo be a
ourdeu lor a week or two long
er, uutil suddenly she hits just
the right thing, and becomes
once more serene and happy,
and puts the hat on and goes to
make millions of other women
miserable, because their bats
are not trimmed exactly like
hers. As a wife, woman is a
blessing; as an organizer of
spring hats, she is simply an ob
ject of compassion.
Old Soldiering.
"Pore soldier!" exclaimed a
lone old widow in East Tennes
see, as a battered veteran in
blue appeared at her door, and
meekly asked for a cup of cold
water. The good old lady
brought out a black bottlo,
from which the battered veter
an poured a teaspoonlul into a
glass ol water, and took a vig
orous pull at the bottle when
her buck was turned. Then
she placed before him a sub
stantial supper of ham and
eggs and corn bread and coffee,
upon which he advanced in
gallant style. "And you are
mighty young to be a 'soldier-
in'," she said, looking at him
beuignantly over her specta
cles. ''Yes, mum; I am the
only son of my widowed moth
er; but my country called me,
and my duty to my country is
is only second to my duty to,
my Creator. MSbol Why you
talk as peert as a minister.
Uaveyou ever been wounded?''.
'Very often. I was once shot
through the heart." "Through
the heard Lawful sakes! Didn't
it kill you?" -Not quite. Tbe
intercostal muscle was pene
trated longitudinally and ex-
travasated with varicose veins;
but the bullet ranged across
the left lobe of the arachnoid
artery; producing a comminat
ed fracture of the anterior pro
cess of the cerebellum, and
causing a lesion of the spl
nal viscera and the bypophos
p hates of tbe fibuls, and thft
dehiyed my recovery." "You
don't mean to say that you
lived through all that?'' "I was
spared, mum, to be an humble
monument ot the mercy ol
Providence. I must be going
now, with many thanks for
your kindness. It is nearly
lime lor our evening prayer
meeting, aud I must be there to'
open it. Have you such a
thing as a pocket-bibie to spare?
Mine Was destroyed in tbe last
battle, being struck by a bul
let in my coat pocket. It was
the last gilt of my beloved
mother and saved my life."
"What a blessed thing it 13 to
have a biblel There is one
that belonged to my Matilda
Jane; but I know that you will
make a good use of it. I will
remember you in my prayers,
pore soldier!" lie walked up
the road until he was joined by
several more battered veterans,
who came out from the corner
ol the fence. Two of them bore
a keg, others carried tin buck
ets, others had their arms full ot
boHles. "Have you it, boyp?"
asked the veteran to whom the
bible had been presented "All
right, my covey. Ten gallons ol
peach brandy, a keg of apple
jack, and ever 60 many bottles
of blackberry wine. Tbe old
gal was well fixed." "You made
such ad 1 of a noise that she
would have smoked you if I
hadn't been there to throw her
off the track. Let's go and di
vide. I ought to have the big
gest s'.jre, as I had the hardest
part of tbe work." It is thus
that pairiotism and virtue are
rewarded.
Comfortable.
One of the latest inventions
is a portable traveling led,
which can be rolled up like a
shawl in arylindm al pact-a. e
some two feet Ion,?. It consists
of a light bair mattress, inclu
ding 6ingle or doable air pil
lows, a fine woolen coverlet, a
camp stool, attachments and
cords for adapting the mattress
as a hammoch,' and apparatus
for filling the pillows with air.
Agreeing and Thinking.
Every man bas bis specialty,
which renders It impossible
for him to take the shape, the
color, the proportions, tbe ex
act elements of discrimination,
which belong to the mind of
any other person. No two per
sons ever agree. No two per
sons ever 6ee alike, or hear
alike, or feel alike, or think
alike. I have a kaleidoscope
at home (just now that is the
plaything), and in turning it
round probably five hundred
times, and causing thousands
of combinations, I have never
seen two combinations in it
that were alike. There are
jutt so many (.twenty or thirty J
n n a n f 1 f ... . . ,
piciios oi giusu iu ii, ana me
sphere is very small in which
they work; and yet the combi
nations are never repeated,
are never reproduced. I do
not know as tbey would be ii
I were to turn the kaleido
scope five hundred years.
Although there are only
twenty or thirty of these bits
of glass, there Is always some
little difference in tbe combi
nations which they form, and
which report themselves lo the
eye.
It that be so in respeet to
twenty or thirty little bits ol
class which maintain their own I
individual forms, and can only
change in their relative posi
tions, what h kaleidoscope the
human mind must be that has
thirty or forty feelings, which
are neverv the same, winch
are always changing quality
and intensity, and each ot
which forms endless combina
tions with the othersl No two
men think like each other, and
no man thinks like himself in
any two consecutive moments.
Henry Ward Beecher.
Curious.
Coal is carbon; carbon com
bines with oxygen to lorm car
bonic acid; there is carbonic
acid in tbe air, and it is an in
teresting question how much
coal in combination actually
exists in the atmosphere about,
us. Savants assert that the
total is not less than eight
hundred and fifty thousand
millions of tons. But this is only
a fraction of that which for
merly existed in the air when
the world wa3 young. The
coal mines ot the world are es
timated as containing five mil
lions of tons, all of which was
primarily taken irom the air
by the rank vegetations ol
primeval times.
Of course in those remote
eons the atmosphere, contain
ing say seven times its present
percentage of carbonic acid,
was unfitted for tbe animal
life now flourishing on the
globe. But as the carbon was
withdrawn the oxygen wa3 pro
portionately increased, and
re-p ration became gradual y
possible to animals of higher
and more complex organization
and requiring a more rapid ox
ygenation ot the blood. Ucnce
as the atmosphere changed by
the growth of the coal-forming
vegetation, the organic crea
tures progressed from the ear
liest reptiles that crawled in
hot and wide-reaching ever
glades to the being that, crown
ing the ' strange long scries,
was made in the image of his
Creator, by whom "into-his
nostrils was' breathed the
breath of lite."
Iron is king. Tbe iron mar
ket of America now rules that
ot the world, and we are sell
ing our iroruin England. The
supply of available ores and
coal in England is well nigh ex
hausted. a.
Mr3. Partington tl Inks that
some butchers ought to hire a
music teacher to teach them
the scales correctly. Mrs. P's
head is level there.
Led astray a spent ball.
ADVEKTISlJiO TEItMS.
One square, q qo
Eacli additional lut,ert!on ... "
Cards, per yew. 10
Local notices, per line, If,
Yearly advertisements $100 ((
column, and at proportionate rate pel
IcMnpace. Payable in advance.
IW Tho Keeord being the offlcli.
paper of the town, and having tl c
largest circulation of any paper In trc
Wrunty, oftera supcriorinJucemectx
to advertiser.
Shipping Iron to England.
It is not long since it was be
lieved that "sending coals to
Newcastle" was a probability
so remote as to be unworthy of
serious thought. Yet ctals
have been shipped Jron the
United States on tbe orders ot
British dealers, not only to
England but in large quanti
ties to other sections of tbo
globe on British account. Ant1,
now a telegram from England
informs us thaf'there is quite a
demand in England for Ameri
can iron," and one of the larg
est iron manufacturers in
Pennsylvania says this has be
come a profitable branch tf
trade.
If we inquire for the cause of
this remarkable change in the .
usual course ol trade, it will be
found to proceed directly from
the system of protection to
home industries." By this 11 e
importation of iron was check
ed, and the investment of cap
ital in our own irou industries
made profitable. Develop
ments followed with a rapidity
of progress never before
known. Millions of capital
were employed in building
new furnaces in Pennsylvania,
Michigan, Missouri and other
States. Tho aggregate product
of iron was iu consequence.
largely increased, while at tho
same time prices were reduced,
until competition in the Eng.
lish markets has been made
profitable.
A3 a single, but at the same
time a most forcible illustra
tion of the results of protection,
take tho article of steel-faced
rails. Formerly the tracks on
our railroads were laid with
iron rails. In 1S58 to 18C0 the
superiority and the economy of
steel rails were established.
Just then Professor Bessemer
bad completed, most success
fully, his method of converting
iron into steel by a now and
rapid process and al a much
ess cost than was formerly ro-
quired. England reaped the
benefit of the discovery, and
went largely into the manufac
ture of steel rails, not only for
ber own railroads, but for ship
ment to the United States. But
British steel rails cost $200 per
ton; yet one of the great rail'
road men of this country re
marked that he would "rather
p&y that price for steel rails
than use iron rails if tbey colt
him nothing."
In 1862 and 18G3 capitalists
in the United States purchased,
the right of using Bessemer
patents, and immediately com
menced the erection of estab
lishments for the manufacture
of steel rails. Congress put at
duly of one Cent a pound on
imported rails, and in 1SG3 rails
of American manufacture were
supplied in limited quantities
at 175 per ton. The price of
English rails was immediately
reduced with the view of con
tinuingdhe monopoly cl tho
American markets. But our
product ol steel rails had in
creased in 1SG4 and 1SG5 and
the price was lurther reduced
to $150 per ton. The English
competitors fell even below
that figure in the price of their
rails, and the competition con
tinued until our manufacturers
reduced tbe cost of rails to
$100per ton for large contracts,
and $112 for small lots.
Yet at that price tbey assert
that the business under the
present tariff can' te made en
tirely successful.
Without the 'cent a pound
duty, no American capitalist
could have been found to in
vest in an enterprise that
could not possibly have suc
ceeded in its infancy against'
British cnmntit inn.
Eoss col ty w 'i dp i re
ported heivy, but-firm rs de
cline to S9.1 at forty cents; that
being tbe hichest figures of-lered.

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