OCR Interpretation


The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, August 21, 1873, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1873-08-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE VINTON RECORD.
JOHN t. u ape it,
Editor aud Proprietor
OrnCEU. W, Corner of Main and
Logan Sts,, Ooposite Court House.
$2 A YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
Dafii Smart. Slmilel W. Ril-ert, Jr.
tfcaUbliatud 1862
MI A It T & KILTERT,
SUCCESSORS TO PAV1D SMART'
Wholesale Grocers
OD COMMISSION MEECHANTS.
Prompt Attention riven to the
Transfer of PIU IKON and
other Property from and to
Railroad and Canal.
Water Street.behoeen Paint and Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
mar 11 lniu ly
"WILLIAM POLAND,
WHOLESALE GltOCElt,
liquor and Commission Merchants
NO. 20 WATER 8TRKKT,
CHILLICOTHE. OIIIO.
Ale in Barrel, Ualf Barrel nd Bottle.
novisu
TOWN LOTS AND LANDS
In Zaleskl
THE Zaleki Company, with tiew lo the
development of the local interests of Ja!ea
ki, to aectire it permanent piospority, ni.il to
add lo it population and wealth. are now
ottering to actual eetllei a, town Iota and farm
l nils hi low price, and nn liberal terma.
Persona desiring to examine the property
and to liny cheap hiiUHe will apply at the
Company' office to
R. THOMPSON, Mannjjer.
Zaleskl, Ohio, Mnv 18, 1871. tf
The Most Desirable Ses-
w- arJjU 77 denoe in MoArthuT.
FOB S-AXjIE.
I'lFFER for mle my reaidem-e on Nnith
street. It riliH-luf it splendid dwelling
house, well ftnlt-hed, insnle and out, Willi
eijlht roo'n.and a iood cellar. A koihi office
li 1 1 1 . 1 1 ii stable, wood mid colli hoiiaenndotli
er neie-saiy out buildiuga. 'I he prviiiiarr
contain acre, ini-lndiUM I acre ot unoiard.
ill llirilty ne.iriiiK vniex; there ire also t lit at
hearing np le Ireea heel vali.'ly of vrnl'ieil
fruit. twenty-fle tearing peach treea lied
bipl led fruit, tdierrieii, ifiiiiieea, pliiiiiM,and
variety of himII hint I'm lurilur particular!
Inquire tit Ihe nlhre of thia paper, or at the
premise., l ei ilia euay.
dec;a.,m 8. 8. POLLISON.
A Fine German Chromo.
wa ar.M x ri.rosT iiiu-mo. aorsTr.n amo
ai-AiiY rm rn.tjii.su, rai.it to kvkui admit run
UNDERGROUND
tut,
LIFE BELOW THo SURFACE,
UYTIIOS. W.KSOX,
942 P'gs Octavo. 130 Fine Engravings
Relate incident and accident- I evnu-l III.
lahl nl d.ivs alariliii.Adttiiitiirea in nil i.ari-
! the world inin.H and modii of working
them; undercurrents of aoctely, K inildni j
ait'l its h-trr ir-j caverns and their my-tenes
the dark waya of wcae luessj prisons ami
tueir se-rets; do'Vn in thedeplh of the sea
a'raiiu al i-.ca of the delecli-.n of i-tnno.
Tile laiok treats ol the eApeririice with biitf
-nda; in opium dens and x iin'.hiifj lulls, HI.
i pris.ir; alorie of exiles; aiivenl ire
mining Indian; jiMimeya throiMli aewer and
raiafdinliH, accidents in tinner.; piralea and
piracies; t-rtuie oftlie implicit o'i; wonder
at I burglaries; underworld uf the great citiea.
etc., civ.
AGENTS WANTED
for this work. Kxeluaive terilinrr given
A enls ean m .kf nn per week in aclling Una
hook. Sm I for circtilura and terma to ageulp.
j. b. iiv nn ti nroE,
II AFTF'tRP, CONN., or CUlCAliO ILL.
lSniny l7t
'A BOOK FOR THE MILLION t
laIariagi..r,,n1.
. - marry ea tbt r
IprWauCoanitloMotha
r tboM anoui t
UUlttO.
I marry en tht pbyslf logical
myaterira aud revtlatlooiof
the at iual Tattu. with to
liltit dlierrli la producing tod prtvtBUag ffaprlnf.
hot ta prtarvt lha empkiloo, Ae
Thlala an intcreaUag work oftvd fcoDrlrd and atitf
agea.wllh Bumeroua engravlnita, and cootaina valaabl
lororMatloB for Iboaa who art bar Med, or cob tempi ate mir
riant. Still Ilia a book thai aught to bt kepi uadtr lock
tad kef, and aot laid cartleaily a boat tbt bouto.
IleooulBt tbt txperlenct and adtlct of a phTilelaa.
wboat reputation la world-wlrle, and hnald b la the pri
Taw drawerof every malt and female throughout tbt eailrt
globe. It embracea tverjlblag oa tht aubject f tbt gea
aratlrt BTitem that It worth kaawiag.aad Bach that It
ol pabllahed In any other work.
flcnt to any ont (free or postage) ftrPlflr Centt.
Addrenlr. Butu' PUpvDiarr.Nh 13M. klfbthttrttl
8t. LouU, U.
Notice to tiia Afflicted And Unfortunate.
Vcror applying to tht otortaaa qnaeka who adferttst la
Enblla papert.tr ualng any quack remedies peruit Dr.
una' work no matter what your dlMatt It, ar bow dtplor
blojoiir eondUion.
Dr. Botta oMuplel a donble horn tf twenty. ttTa
ffooait : I 1 1 ndoried by tome a f the moat telebrated medl
alprofetaora ofthlteouatry and Kurnpt.and ean bt eon
alted personally ar by mall, oa thtdlieaata mentioned la
ft la works. Omet and parlors, No. IS N. Klgata lUtV
alt Market asd Cbtiaul, St. Ltuia, Mt.
THE GREAT ALTEKATIVE
AMD BLOOD PDBIFIER.
It li not a quack nostrum.
The ingredients are pnblished
on each bottle of medicine. It
Is used and recommended by
Physicians whereTer it has been
Introduced. It will positively
cure
SCROFULA
and Undred ilttattn. RHEUMA
TISM, WHITE SWELLING, GOUT,
GOITRE, BRONCHlTlS,SER VOUS
DEBILITY, IS C I PI BUT COJP.
SUMPTIO.VmA aU dlseuea arlaing
from an impure condition of the
Blood. SeDd for our BoaADAiJ Al
lc aw ao, lit which yon wUl nud oertlfl
cate from reliable and troat-worthy
Fhyaiclana, Violiteri of the Ooapel,
ana other.
Dr. R. ITilMa Catrr.of BalU.
more, amy he ha need It In caar of
Scrofula and other dieaea with
much aatUfaeUon.
Dh T. C. Pugb, of Baltimore,
recommend it to all peraoo aufler
lug with diHased Blood, laying it la
upertor to any preparation he haa
erer need.
Ber. Dabaey Ball, of the BaU
tlmore M. E. Conference Sonth, ear a
he has been ao much benefitted by
ita nae, thot he cheerfully reoom
mend it to all hia frtendaand ao
qntlntance. Cravea tc C., Dnggiata, at
Oordonarllle, Va., aay it oarer haa
failed to glte aaUafattion,
' ' Oanael O HcPaalaea, Vfniv.
freeaboro', Tenneaeee, aay It eared
him of Bhenmatiaai when aU alee
XHK HO&ADAIJ8 TH OOKHBOTIOHWrTHOtlBJ
mm
vmenra Cnffl and Ferer, TJrer Complaint, Dy.
senela. eto. We guarantee BoaADiua aupertor to
tUottaer Blood Purifier. Bend for DeecrlpUTj
OlrcnX or Almanac
Addreaa, CLEMENTS k CO.,
i g, Commerce Bt, BaUtmart, Mi.
aQjgahjr lo atk TOW DraggUt tqttmBua..'
IHU
mm
rm ill I I t v
VOL. 24 -NO. 13 .
I I Y V . A " A ,
mil f If
MC ARTHUR, OHIO, AUGUST 21, 1873.
WHOLE NO. 1,219
O. T. CUNNINC,
LAWYER
ONFICR AT n . 8I0RB, MAIN STREET.
Kiaug U
EDWIN N. DARNHILL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC,
OlHce McArtliur. Ohio,
Will attend promptly to all buiinea entmated
to hi car. uorll
U. S. CLAYPOOLE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
(PBOSECUTIICO ATTOHNEY,)
McARTHUR, O.
Will practice 1 1 Vnton and adjoining eoun
Itea. BuaiLC entmated to lua care piompt
ly attended to. Office ill Court Houoe.
jan2ui8;2ly
1IOMEU C. JONES,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MAIN 8'1'REtT.
McARTIlUR, OUIO.
Ornoi: One door weal of Dan Will A Broa.
Uoie.
,an30yl
AMERICAN HOUSE.
OPPOS1TK U.R. DEPOT.
II A M DEN, OHIO.
R. FOX, PROPRIETOR.
livery Stablei Attached.
MKAI.8 READY FOR ALL TBAIKS.
The Houae haa lut been reftirniahed
ihrniiKhottt. Konma clean and cnmfiirtaiile.
theluhle anpplied with the heat 'lie market
irtonls, and po pains enured to aceomndale
nuesln. marl 18ii ly
ilULBERT HOUSE.
Main Street, Opposite Court House
McArthur, Ohio,
JAMES WOBKMAN, Proprietor
I HAVE taken poelon of Hie ahnve hotel
renovated and pmllv refuriiilied it, am
il la? iflad lo ere the i. Id eutniera of tin
house, and eapeeitilly my old liienda of th-
liM'kinx Vnllry ho may I Miiini( tin
onil ihe liili'lo wul he lurnifhed with tin
hestlhe market atlnrda, and eare taken li
make guest enmlnit'ililH. linnd i-hihli'.K at
taelied to ih- houae; Ch iri- reaauniildo.
IJn.ar If7d
ri:Yio. cox,
AUCTIO N EEE,
ILL attend to nil huiloes entrusted tr
f' hia care. .
I'.' O. AUmtES: v ' "
IlKhirS MILLS.
t'ittlon Couuly, O.
:loetl87ilm
llEiNKY MAULK,
lYlerchent Tailor,
llaa jurt received hia
FALL AN I' WINTER STOCL
Of the latest ftylcs of
Cloths, Cassim'ses and Yestings
Which 1 will sell Very Low for C'nab.
CaJTSTOM work Hone in the moat fahionu
lile and durahle manner.
Thankful tor the Itlieral palrnnaueexteiiHe
n me heretofore, I aulieil n cnntinuiinue
he aaino. Uomeinber i he place
Second Htreet. Second Door from I.nn
aitiAj'a Corner.
ctei-9
II. SIALI.E.
JOHN BIECEL,
Formerly ot llnniden.l
NNiCNCK8 to hi frienda in Vinton an
; Vil'tjn ningrountiea llial he llaa h.myht th
l3tel Pormerly Kept by Clias. Smitl
Three doora west cf Madiaon, on
FROaNTT ST.
PORTSMOUTH, 0
le ha. refitted it throughout, and la prepare.
o entertain the liavehng public at reaannal )
rata.. Ian"
MeARTETTJR
0AREIAGEFA0T0RY
North-eaet cornet of Mi In and Jackaon atreet
McARTUUK.OHIO GEO. W. BltL'KTON, Proprletoi
Manufactuies
i .
Carriages, jivyaies. Ixjresses, eh
ALSO, WAOOa AMD ALL KIKII Of WAOO WOBa
.tone to order on ahort notice.
Painting and Trimming
d ail kind executed in the neateal and mo
..P.IU Bl l,
I KINO ol all kind In my line will b.
promptly anu neaii aone.
Work done at'thia ee'abliahmcnt i war.
kuU'U to I auhalantittl. nut un aohd and exe-
uu'edin the moat workiranhke manner, not
o oe excelled in any respect b" any other ea
taoiianmeniin inecoiutry.
THAT VVUIUU IS
WORTH DOING
is
i WORTH ADVERTISING.
PRINT AMD PROSPER
James Dunkle's Estate.
Probatt Court. Vinton County, Ohio.
MOTlCEiaherehy gnen that HarnetAtken
i.1 a iruardian of Ltnuia J., Kotwrt A . John
-arsh K., Arminoa.and Nancy U. 1'iinkle,
minora, haa filed hia account with atd wards
severally, lor mini aetilement with the firat
named, and lor partial aenh mini with the
nthere; and that aaid aeaeral accounts are aet
or neanug on ina torn ij or may, a. u.
ibis, at i"0 ciocK.a. n.
H. B. 1AI0; Probate. Judge..
aprii it, iet a at
.a
o
k2
0
n
i
I
0
D
H
1 ? boflt: Q
fl
C3 ts
V2 o
at
W
pq h S S3
H
Ed U
0
D3
E i
CO
O f-i S 59 a tr
E-h
e c g g w
. S P P . r I
MHH (0
,13 .
1
Ph.
CI
w d n
o
rH O O S M
en
CQ Oh P4
SPRING AND SUMMER
OLOTEciisra-
FRAKH I1CLLI.1AIV,
At hi ne place of huaiiteaa,
OOEY'S BLOCK. OPPOSITE TJBION
HOUSE.
CHILLICOTHE, O.
HAS THE
Choicest Stock
O F -
Spring and Summer Clothing
IJVER lirtiht In Ihia market, einlirnctna
jail the luteal mid timet liiahinnalili. at y lea
in in iievordiinee with the latest. Intimitis
hen yon want a imlihy suit duu't tall to call
n r'rauk. He alfo t U I and
Marls Garments to Oudei
and haa a full line of
Cents' Underwear
II ATS A i D VA B'S, &C.
ll el ilhintr marked down to Ihe LOW.
I.ST Utii lll N. Give me a o .ll and I wul
iirranl aatielactlutl
jair FRANK IIF.I.LMAN
VA.L,I, PAPKH.
WINDOW SHADES.
YEc & CO.,
Tnion Block, Second St.. Cbillioothe.
I NVITK til e att niton id' honaeKeepera ol
ttliia place anu vtciuiiy to tntir etocK 01 wul
aper.
UL NEW STYLES,
KOli TUB
Spring Trade of 1873
IntHf naaurlnieni jilat received. Call an.
examine when y.iu are in t.'hillicollie.
Linen and Paper II indnui Shades. Hus
tle Shade, at cost; a yood Ansnrt-
ment of Miscellaneous uud
School Looks. Stationery, Fancy
Articles, tCc.
GOOD BOOK
AGENTS WAN1ED.
)Ii:k'b E.Nf YCI.OPEI U OF PRACTICAL Rk
kipts and I'aoi tssr.s. Cnntaintnua.4 2 nrni1
icnl receipts, written in a p:ain and popular
nni ner, ana illustrated with explanatnn
ooiI-piiIs. Hemic a eonlprehenaive honk ol
isan, amateur and h'ltiaekeeper, includins
terenee nr tre merchant. maniHHctiirer. ar
iienicine, L'li.irmncv anil domeatie econnmv
'tie acopu of thia work la entirely dirh-ront
rom any other book ol Ihe kind. Beadles
einta cnmidete and nlmi at indisneniihle
k ok of reference for the thousand and one
eeeipta and nrticlea needed In every huua
lold.fiirm, Harden, etc., it include idear and
-asily nndkrstood directiona for the apiilicn
ion of many of iho arta usually a.'qilirednnl
iichalniea, or the teclinieahliea ol terma used
y inn! expenen.'e, anil o itveate'i ol ie n
.o tully explained aa to bruiK the entire aub-
l"ct within the comprehension of any person
f ordinary inlellixcnce. I'romiinent ainoun
he immense mas of anhjecla treated of in
'he book are Ihe 1'illowinm
The Art ol Dyeinir, Hard Snlt and Toilet
lora, WinPH, Cordials and Hitlers. Older.
Oflpa, lannins, I'lflillalion, Imitation l.lil
brewing, Ferurmery.Flnvnrinii Kseences, etc.,
osmenca, niur nyes ami WHsnea, fomada
lips, Alcohol and Atcnhulmetry, Pell oleum
ind Kcroaene. Bleaching and Cleaning. Vin-
na rennmeit una, Tooin fowilera. etc.. v
var, ennrea, vaisupa nna ricKet, itec
ir the Garden, To remove Mama. Snot
ar, Saures, Catsup and Pickel, Receipt"
eto
I'yrotechny nod hxi leaivea. Cemenla, eto
nterproolfti2, Arlifioial. Oema. Inka and
iVritinii Fluida, Aniline Colon, PainU and
Hiltmenta, I ainltniinnd f'aper hanmnit, Ka'
online and Whitewash. Varnishing and Pol.
ish nn, Lubrica-or. Japannim and Larmier
ri, Hoot and Harnea Bla-.kinx. Photon aphv,
Melnla and Alloya, (iildinif, Silverinu, eto
Klecirotvninir. KlectroDlatinir. etc.. Patent
dedicines, Medical Receipts, Weight and
Price 5.00 xmar
nee.su res. on paxes, rcyai octavo, cmth
DICK A FITZGERALD, Publnahera, N. V.
JOBWOM
EXECUTED
NEATLY & PROMPTLY
--A.T
THlSrOFPIOE
3. 2
w " v
What to Drink in Warm Weather.
tuer. i
,
,
The Country OeotlVmnn says
this season ot the year the far
mer and his laborers require
some cooling but palatable
beverage that will quench
their thirst, and not heat or in.
toxicate their blood,-, yet will
afford a grateful stimulant to
their digestive power. And
among all stimulating substan
ces which are employed in
making these drinkflhere are
none superior to giltger, and
none more easily pre ?u red or
equally rerreshiig.fy Almost
every man likes it, and a mix
ture of it with maple sugar and
water, or honey and sirup and
water, in an extempc rized
drink of which thousands par
take with great relish, while
some will add to it a tetspoon
ful of cream of tartar, and then
stir in half a teaspoooful of sal
eratus or Boda, and thus pre
pare a tumbler of foaming liq
uid, which is a wholesome ton
ic, as well as palatable drink,
tor carbonic acid, which is
formed by the fermentation,
adds greatly to the pleasant
taste of any drink. It is also a
good plan for every farmer's
wife to make a keg of hop beer,
and keep it upon tap duiiiiR
the haying and harvesting of
he summer in out lis. Spiritu
ous liquors, containing alcohol,
are not conducive to the health-
fulnens of any man; but the lit
ter tonic of hops flavored with
the essence of spruce, sassafras
roots, or wintergreeu leaves, is
tl ways desirable.
IIp Beer. Take a three-
junrt kettle full of boiling wa
ter and add to it One quart ol
hop blossonip, or a small quan
tity of pressed hops; boil twen
ty minutes, addingjnytliing
you please lor flavoring and it
olhing else can be had, three
table spoonful ot powdered
nger will answer your pur
pose, strain tnrougn a cloth
or sieve into a jug or bucket,
ind add to it three quarts ol
molasses; Btir it until well mix
ed; then let it stand until milk
warm, and add half a coffee
cup ol uaKers yeast turned
"ver a slice of toasted bread.
Let it ferment over night. Next
morning remove the scum and
if fermented in a bucket, bot
tle it aud cork tightly; if in a
jug, pour off the foam, and also
cork tightly. Keep in the ice
house orcsllar, so it will not
ll W a
sour quicKiy. n is wen on
large farms to make a fifteen
gallon keg of it, and let the
men drink of it freely, and
they will rarely care or ask for
rum or whisky, and when this
evil can be done away, surely
the housewife will not gruJge
the extra labor she incurs in
preparing a beverage which
will cheer but not intoxicate.
Ginger Beer. This is also a
very agreeable drink, and high
ly relished by ladies of weak
digestive powers, as well a? by
strong laborers in the fields.
Take four ounces of race gin
ger, well pounded, and three
ounces of cream of tartar, and
nnx them well with Gve pounds
of white or brown sugar and
six lemons sliced fine. Pour
over tin's mixture five gallons
of boiling water. Let it stand
alter stirring it well, for twelve
hours (it is well to mix it over
night), and then add one tea
cupful ot yeast; let it stand six
hours, and then bottle, fasten
ing the corks with strong wire
It will be ready for URe in two
days, and will foam deliciously
The bottles should be laid on
their sides in an ice house or
cool cellar, so that they wil
no' burst llitir corks. It may
be made in a keg and kept on
tap.
Mr. Bailey, of Danbury,
says: "I do not lecture myse.f
1 am married."
Dr. BowEiiS, Dentist, McAr
lUur,U.
Sad Failure of a Brilliant and
Promising Speculation.
[Saratoga Correspondence of the New York
Tribune.
Some years ago Mr. McGratb
got quite interested in Spiritu
alism. There wasn't much
racin; going on, so he 'could
give the subject his undivided
attention. Lie invited a friend to
go with him and see Foster
or some other circulating me
dium and my friend went But
he told me that it surprised
him very much to see Mr. Mc-
Uralh Blip a full deck of cards
nlo his coat pocket before
starting.' It scarcely . seemed
possible that Mr. McUrath in
tended to propose a game of
spiritual seven-up, or to at
tempt to beat some unhappy
ghost out of every rap he had
at draw poker which is sup
posed to be an emphatically
blue-grass game. Well, away
they sailed and found Foster
n. I found him out once, im
mediately after finding him in.
osier gave them his usual cir
cus, and Mr. McOrath sat it
hrough in solemn awe and si
ence. bomatimes a shade of
mpatience was visible, but his
face looked radiant at the con
clusion, lMr. Foster," he said,
as he laid lh usual honorar-
runi down on the table, "this Is
wonderful, and you deal a
square game, you do, I do be-
leve. But there's iust one
- -
hing more I want you to try.
and if you do it and I don't
cive you just the best farm in
entucky, my name ain't Trice
McUrath, and down went his
lands into his coat pocket, and
out he fished the pack of cards.
"There," giving them a scien
tific bine grats shuffle, end slap,
ping them down on the table
backs up, "You just, tell what
that first card is without turn
ing it over," and his breath
came slow in expectation
I'rice McOrath's did. Foster
couitint, ana Mr. JMcurath
turned sadly away, leaving the
cards bohind him in his bitter
disappointment. "It Foster
could just a told me what that
card was," he said to my friend,
as they slowly walked un
- a
Broadway, "I'd a just made our
everlasting fortunes. I'd a ta
ken him with me, and we'd
abu8ted every faro bink in this
country. And then it I wouldn'i
a-made their hair curl at B-
den-Buden and Monaco I'll be
Dee Deed." Mr. McUrath al
ays says that he'll be Dee
Dt'ed vvhen he feels solemn and
wants to round a sentence
handsomely.
Toe Mt Pleasant Journal
tells a story of a Burlington
girl: "We felt sorry for a Bur
lington girl who came up on
(lie 'bus one day last week.
As she gracefully threw her
literary appendage over her
shoulder in order to sit down
comlortably it became slight
ly disarranged, and a copy ol
the Uawk-Eye made its ap
pearance. This wasn't so bad,
but one particular advertise
ment read kind of funny, as
follows: 'Waned, a strong
man, for g ienl woik. In
quire of tie im 'ersipne I cn
the premises." V felt like tel
ling hor to take down her awn
ing, but We didn't know but
that she was a traveling bulle
tin board,so we kept our mouth
shut about it and always in
tend to."
Tub Chicago Times, which
has baen intensely Democratic
until lately, certainly knows
whereof it affirms when it
saye:
Hardly a Democratic party
"leader" can be named who
has not favored all manner of
special legislation; all manner
of protection to special inter
ests; all manner of monopolies,
and rings, and swindle, and
steals, from slave-owning to
alary-grabing.rt
Advertisements Inserted at fair prices.
Mr. R. R. Seymour s Gains on
Raising Fine Stock.
[From the Hillaboro Gazette]
Mr. J. M. Trimble, of this
place pointed out to us the list
of cattle sold by Mr. Seymour,
three animals bred by him
These cattle were boaght by
Mr. Seymour at Mr. Trimble's
sale of thoroughbreds,-in this
place, in the year 18(54, as fol
lows: Queen of Highland,"
"Ross Bluebell" and "Raspber
ry 2d." It will be . seen by the
schedule below, that "Queen
of Highland brought at Mr.
SeymoorV sale' $350,' "Ross
Bluebel," sold at "$300; "Rasp
berry 2d" was not sold.
It will be well enough to say
that at the time of Mr. Trim
ble's sale ot thoroughbred cat
tle, in 1864, that the breeding
of fir.e cattle in this county
was not a profitable business,
aud that after a few had been
sold, besides those purchased
by Mr. Seymour, the sale was
stopped, owing to the small
prices oflered.
Now, let us see what Mr.
Seymour has boen enabled to
do, as a skillful breeder, with
the three heifers he purchased
at Mr. Trimble's sale, and their
products 6ince 1SG1. As will
appear below, Mr. Seymour
hid at his sale all the produce
of "Queen" and only part ol
those of "Bluebell' and "Rasp
berry 21."
First, a3 to the "Queen ol
Highland" and her product.
Queen of Ilighltind brought. ..$350
2d do
do do 410
do (died) cult gold loO
3d do
4th do
5th do
fth do
7th do
8th do
0:h do
10th do
1 Ith do
do
brought 41")
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
700
575
350
,.210
200
160
200
730
liull Hillsborodo
do.
do 2d Ciiuot of Oneida do
dn 3d do do
du4tli do do
, 300
, 300
Totul fur Queen and Produco...$i810
Second. Uf "Robs Bluebell''
and produce, owned by Mr.
Seymour on day of 6ale, sold
as follows;
Rosa Bluebell brought $300
do do 2d do 230
do do do do 400
Total. $030
Third. Of "Raspberry 2dV
produce sold on day of Bale,
cows and bulls, were as fol
lows:
Raspberry 3d brought.
$2'
do 4th do 170
do 5th do m 1275
Hull Lord Helleficlil brought 90
do Duke Cumberland do 50
Total f 1860
By adding the aboe totals
together it will be seen that
Mr. Seymour realized at Ins
sale the sum of 8,000 for Iwo
of the cows he bought of Mr
Trimble, the produce of one, a
part of the produce of the oth
er, and part of the produce of
the third. If he had kept the
produce of all ot these animals
until the day of sale, it is reas
onable to suppose the amount
would have reached the sum of
15,000. It is true, Mr. Sey
mour is an exelient judge of
cattle and understands thor
oughly the art of breeding
them. And, it is not likely
that every one would be able
to do 83 well as he has dune.
Vermont must be the "Ban
ner State" as regards the con
dition of its finances. The debt
of the State is only $195,049,
while the treasury contains al
most a quarter ot a million dol
lars, and is credited with a
large amount of uncollected
taxes. The current liabilities
ot the State are only about
$30,000; the Government is
economical, and it Has no
Tweeds in prospect. Last year
SS2.500 of the debt was paid
It seems to be possible for Ver
mont to rid herself of all debt
in a year or two, and if things
go on i i this way it will soon
have a surplus tund. the inter
est on which will pay ihe cost
of government and taxes .may
be abolished.
ADYEltTLSlNfl TKltMS:
One aquafe,... 1 CO
Each addition, aiertion ... ttO
Card-, perye . .,,.m.,H) OO
Loral not loc pc line,.... . . Ifc
Yearly adt-artUumeiit SlOO OO
column, and at proportionate rate pel
lespiapace. Payable In advance.
KTTho Kccord being the official
pope of the town, and having th
largest circulation of any p.?rin tie)
jounry, oflera aupcrlorinJuccnjcUs '.
to ailvertlnera.
Hereditary Sagacity.
Says an essayist in the Leid
ore uour: I bad a black kit
ten brought into my house
from a deserted shed, where it
had been born. It Was hall
wild, like, its mother, and fof
some days would not tolerate
any overlures of friendship;
but it grew to be a fine, frisky,
companionable creature, and
at last, with much trouble, I
taught it, for my little daugh
ter's amusement, io sit quietly
upou my shoulder during meal
times, jn hope of now and the.it
securing a dainty morsel.' It
also learned to beg, and to say
grace before meals, which It
always did by rubbing its bead
against the hand of the person
who fed it; but it needed HO
instruction to distinguish thd
dinner bell, the Bound of which
would bring it from the top of
the garden first of the house
bold toits place. The first kit'
ten of this cat was given away
to a neighboring family, and
surprised them not long after
wards by jumping upon the
shoulder of the only male mem
ber ot the house ns they sat ut
meals a practice which it
continued; yet it had never
been taught, nor had it been
allowed any opportunities of
observing its mother in parlor
company. I havo since been
told that black cats hare a pe
culiar habit of jumping on the
shoulder, but from my trouble
in teaching our cat should
t'ojbt this. The act was mora
probably prompted in her kit
ten by hereditary habits. In
reference to this subject, I have
heard that, whereas the former;
generations of cows manifested
universal fear at the npproach
of a railway train, their de
scendants will often continue)
their ruminations undisturbed.
The calf of a cow accustomed
to feed by a rail way is less tim
id than the calf of an animal
bred elsewhere. Can an agri.
cultural reader say whether
there is sufficient foundation,
for this statement?
A Joke on a Bishop.
The Bishop of Litchfield some"
time ago walked from a church
in the Black Country to the
rail way station where he was
to take the cars for home. On
the way he happened to ob
serve a group of men, and im
mediately resolved to "say a
word in season'' to them.
"IVell, my good men," said ln'9
his lordship incognito," "what
are you doing?" The response
Of one of the men was not cal
culated to plense the amiable
prelate. "We bin a loyin, hd
said. "Lyingl" said the horri
fied bishop; "what do yott
mean?'' "Why, , ver 800," was .
the explination, "one on us fori
a kettle, and we ben a tryin
who can tell Ihe biggest lie td
have it." "Shocking!" said thd
bishop, and straightway im
proving the occasion he pro
ceeded to impress upon the
sinners the enormity of lying.
lie informed them that he had
bean taught that one of the
greatest sins was to tell a lie
and, in fact, so strongly had
this been urged upon him that
never in the whole course of
his life had he told a lie. No
sooner had the excellent bish
op made this announcement
than there was a gleeful shout,
"Gie th' governor th' kettle;
gie th' governor th' kettlel"
The grave of lion Tom Cor
win, it is stated on good au
thority, is still unmarked, 1106
having so much as the simplest
headstone to indicate Who
sleeps below. Why should not
the Stale" which was so honor
ed by her loved and distin
guished son rescue his grave
from oblivion which will soon
blot it from the knowledge ol
men j
.Dft." Bowers- denthf, McArJ
thur,0.

xml | txt