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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, August 28, 1873, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1873-08-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE VINTON RECORD.
WA-AV JL . Ijlhi
iSditor and Proprietor.
OrnOETJ, W. Comer of Main and
Logan Sts., Ooposite Court House.
2 A YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
Pavll Smart . Bamnel W. K II vert, Jr.
fEetabliahed 1862.
MI A It T Sc IULVERT,
BUCCESSORSTOPtVlDSMARTi
Wholesale Grocers
iSD COMMISSION MEECHANTS.
Prompt Attention Riven to tlie
-Transfer of PIG IKON and
other Property from and to
ICuilroad and Canal.
Water Street.bettoeen Paint and Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
mr II ihi.u ly "
WILLIAM POLAND,
WHOLESALE GItOCElt,
Liquor and Commission Merchants
MO. 20 WATKR STREET,
CIIILLICOTIIK. OniO.
Ale in Barreli, Half Barrels aod Bottles.
nonUlT
FOR SALE.
TOWN LOTS AND LANDS
In Zaleski.
tnE Znleakl Company, with a view tn the
development of the local interest nf .Sales
ki, to secure it. permanent pinsperity, ai.it to
add to its pnpulniinii and wealth, are now
ortering to actual settleie, town lota and farm
lands at low price, and on liberal term.
Persona devil inn to examine the property
and tn buy cheap house will apply at the
Company' offices to
B. TIIOMP-ON, Manager.
. Ealeakl, Ohio, May 18, Mil. if
The Most Desirable Bes-
dence in If oArthnr.
IFO-H, SALE.
1 OFFER for iale my residence on North
street. It cnnila of a splendid dwelling
house, well Itiiii-hrd, inside and nut. Kith
eight ron-n and a good cellar. A noon ollii-e
building, Htiiblo, wood and coal holuteiillii oth
er iiece-snry oiit.buildings. 'Ihe premise
contain t acres, including I acre oft met nrd.
all thrifty iwiiring vine; there are also tlnri)
hearing P le liees beet vnri.My of unified
fruit, twenty-live hearing pearh trees best
hud led fruit, cherries, quince. plums, and 11
variety of am ill Hint rorlmilitr particuliri
Inquire at (he othce nf tills paper, or at (lie
premises. 'I onus easy.
decUUtiin 8. 8. POLLISOH.
A Fine German Chromo.
wi sr.o aw ti.tntNT rnmmo. HntNTcn and
ui.adv rig ru.tMi.NO, rata to kvxm AutM rua
UNDERGROUND
on,
LIFE BELOW THfi SURFACE,
UYTIIOS. W.KNOX,
942 P'gs Octavo. 130 Fine Engravings
Heinle incident and accident- lievnud Hit
hxht ul l iv ; startling adventures in 1 1 mri
nl the world 111 mux and iiioiIh of workim
tjiein; ii'iderciirn-nts of society, gnnhbnn
an I IN h irr ir.; caverns and their mysteries
the durk way of wcae-iuess; prison nmi
their -e roll-; doivn in the depth-of i ho fen
a' range, sto-ie of the detection of prima.
The hook trcnisnl Ihe experience w uh brig
and; hi nniuui den. and gimlding helix, lilt
t i prison; alone of exiles; advent-ires
among Imihins; journey tl.rouiih sewers and
rniiicoiiilm, Hccidenia hi mine; pintle anil
pir ioie-: lurlin ea nf tlie inquinit on; wonder
till liurglnneit; unilororlii of the great citiee.
etc., etc.
AGENTS WANTED
for Ihia work. Kxclimive tenHorv given
A eni can in Kf Slim per week in nellinv thm
book. Sen I lor circulars and terms to agenls.
j. it. it i nn ft uniE,
1IAFTFORD, CONN., or ClIICAtiO ILL.
IftniH v law
'A BOOK FOR THE MILLION t
i print Consaeler to the
mm marry a i
I marry a ihepbyakloiteal
mjateriea aod revclallouaor
ihtHinal inUn. with tha
I r iboit about ta
ltit dlaMTsrlet U pradoelnf aod prtf f BtlBg affapriBf,
liaw to prciervo tb cnrupleiloot Ae.
Ttalata aa InteroaUof work of two hundred and ility
Jiagea, with aunerooi oucravlnf a, aod ooouioa valaablt
d for nation for tboae who art married, or ooo template mar
riato. BtUlltla book tbatotigbt u ba kept oadtrtook;
ndkr, and aot laid earoleul about tbtbouao.
It oontaloa tho oiperieoco and advlca o I a phTilelaa
whoaerepHuUoala worldwld, and iboold be Id iht prl
wau drawarof ery mala and femalo tbroaahout tb tottro
flobt. It tmbracei orerytblon on tbe au eject e f tbo f ea
ratlro ajatem that i$ worth knowing, and much that la
ot publlahed In any ether work.
' Bent to any one (frto of pottage) for Fifty Centa.
Add re. Dr. BulU' Dlipenaary.Ne. 1 2 H Slgbth itrtel
St. Lotila, lis.
Kotlce to tie Afflicted an! Vnfbrtn&ate.
Vefnreapplylng te the netorloaa qnaekt who adrerttae In
voblls parera,or Halng any quack ramediea peruae Dr.
Batta work no matttr whntyour disease la, or how deplor
bleyoar eooditlon.
Dr. Batu ooeuplei t doable lionae ef twatyaerett
Toema;! a indorsed by eoanoertbe moaleelebrattd medl
walproreaaaraorthlaeoantry and Raropo, andean be eon
olted personally or by mall, on thedlieaaee mentioned In
ttworka. OfDee and parlors, No. U M. Eighlb etrte
vetween Market and. Cbesont, ll Leula, He.
w W U THE GREAT ALTERATIVE
p-Vl AND BLOOD PURIFIEB.
It is not a anaok nostrnm.
Tho ingredients are published
on each bottlaof medicine. It
is used and Teoommended by
Physicians wherever it has been
introduoed. It will poeitiTely
euro
out. Arirr a
If dt 1 Wd Undnd itieata. RHBUNA.
Ini TISM, WUITBSWHLIIIIO. GOUT,
Lf 1 'I aniTBK MMSCMTIS NRRVCillk
DEBILITY, INCIPIENT CO
1 BUMfllOXtDi aoi diseases arising
flu from an Impure condition of the
I I I Blood. Bend for our BoeADiLia AL.
fi mahao, in which von will fliidoertlfl
fhralciana, lllniatera of tboOoape),
and other.
Dr. II. vrilaaa Carr,of Baltl.
mor,aayt he Las used it in caa, s of
Scrofula and other diseases with
tnach astiaf action.
a Jfr. V. oi nainmor
1 I teoommenda It to all peraons suffer.
I 1 log with diseased Blood, saying it U
l , I superior to as preparation ha baa
I ever naed.
Bsjt. EHtkaMiy Hall, of the Bal
timore M. E. Conference South, says
he has been so much benefitted by
its use, thst he ehserf ally recom
mendi it to all hit friends and ao
qoalntanoea, Crave 4t Cm., DrngRista, al
Oordons rills, Vs., ear it never baa
railed to give avtlsf acUaav.
aawaacl G McVada'ea.Hiir
freesboro'. Tennessee, ssts It cured
him of Bnen-i't'ia when all else,
failed.-
TU B08ADAIJ8 IS OOWTBOTIOW WITH OUH
wm curs Ohms and Tbtot, Liver Complaint Dya.
Denaia. etc We gnaranteo Bosadius superior to
LTcin Blood iViflera. Bead for Descriptivj
CtrcOAaior Almanan.
i Address, CXESCKNT8 It 00.,
I a. Commerce Bt,, BaUianirs, Mi.
Pflntvahae to ait toot Praafrt tt BoSAWMfc
C i
a , . ., . . .. . . . . -
ygLA NO. U. MO ARTHUR, OHldj AUGUST 28, 1873, WHOLE NO. 1 220
ay i jm iv . . .... v-t j mi .
-. ... v . . . : .
O. T. CUNNINC.
LAWYEH,
M'ARTH t, O.
0NFIC8 AT D , ST0BB, MAIX STREET.
CMUg IS7X
EDWIN N. BAltNIIILL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC,
OUlce McArthur. Ohio,
Will attend piomptly to all business entrtmted
to his earn. uovll
(7. S. CLAYPOOLE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
(PROSECUTIKO ATTORNET.)
McARTHUR, O.
Will practice i t Vinton andadiolninirronn.
ties. Bnsii.ena entrusted to hiacare piompt
ly attended to. Office in Court House.
jBO.TUDiaiy
1IOMEIC C. JONES.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MAIN 8TRE&T.
McARTUUIl, OHIO.
Omen One door west of Dan Will Bros.
Hoie.
janrJOyl
AMERICAN HOUSE.
OPPOSITE R.R. DEPOT.
II A M 1 E N , OHIO.
R. FOX, PROriilETOK.
Livery Stablti Attached.
MEA1.8 RF.ADY FOR ALL TRAINS.
The Hnune has hint been refurniahed
throughout, ttonm clean and enmfortalile,
the table supplied with the let the market
Hltnrils, and no paina spared to aceomnilate
quests. mnM i iy
HUIBERT HOUSE. .
Main Street, Opposite Court House
Mc Arthur, Ohio,
JAMES WORKMAN, Proprietor
I HAVE Inken pnsseaiinn nf the above hotel,
renovated and rnirllv refurnished It. and
wil lie fflnd to nerve Ihe old eiiloinerri of ihe
hniine, and enneeially my old frienil nf the
noiut Thetiible will he tiirniHhed wnh Ihe
betthe mrket ailord. Bnd care taken to
innke guetN coinfortable. Good tiihhr,i( at.
tached tn ih house; Charges reaaunHble.
l:iinar T.
MiM'Kirg vnuey aim may ne vmung una
riiYTON cox,
AUCTION EER,
V Iliac
I LL attend to all business entrusted to
are.
l. O. A DDK ESS:
itt:i:ivs jtm.i.s.
I'inlon Cotinly, O.
SocllS72lm
liEiNKY MAULE,
iV3erch?nt Tailor,
llaa juct received his
FALL AN I WINTER STOCK
Of the lalt'ttmylea of
Cloths, Cassimrses and Vestings,
Which I will sell Very Law for Cash,
(ITSTOM work Hon in the mont farhiona
yble an I durable manner.
Thnnkfnl lor tha libeml patmnnge extended
n inn hert'lnfore, I solicit a rnntinuiince ol
heaiime. Remember the place
Second Street. Second Door from I.an
inil'a Corner.
rte.9
II. MAl'I.E.
JOHN BIECEL,
Formerly ot llnmilen.l
VNNOUNCRS to hiv friends in Vlnlnn and
adjoining counties that he has Imuuht the
Jjtel Formerly Kept by Chas. Smith
Three doors west cf Madison, on
FEONT ST.
POHTSMOUTH, 0.
te haa refitted it throughout, and la prepared
10 entertain the tiaveling public at reasnnnble
rates. lanA
McA RTFTXJR
CAKRIAGE FACTORY.
North-east corner of Mi in and Jackson streets
McARTHUR, OHK
GEO. W. BKONTON, Proprletoi
Manufactuiea
Carriages, jjuuuies. lxj,res$es, etc
ALSO, WAOONS AND All WCV OT WASOS W01K
done 10 order on short notice.
Painting and Trimming
I ol all kinds executed in the neatest and most
artmuu sijie.
KKP.UKINQ ol all kinds In my line will be
promptly and neatl done.
n Work done at thin ea'ablishmcnt is war
anieu to lie auheiuntinl, put up solid and eits
vu'edin Ihe mot worknanhce manner, not
o oe excelled in any respect bv any other ea
taDiianmeniin uiecatnirv.
THAT WHIOa IS
WORTH DOING
is
WORTH ADVERTISING,
PRINT AND PROSPER.
lameti Dunkle'8 Enlate.
Probate Court. Vinton County, Ohio.
J OTIC E la hereby given that Barnet Aiken.
A.i aaguaraiao ot Linina i., nonert a , John.
arh E., Arminoa, and Naocy B. Imnkle,
minora, has filed hla ajcounte with said warda
everHll v. lor tinal set ilen.ent wilh Ihe firat
named, and lor partial aeiiliment wilh Ihe
otbera; and thataid several accounts are set
1 mr fiearing on Ihe loin lay or May, A. D.
lelS, at 1i o'clock, A.M.
H. B. U.AX0; Probate Judge,
i April 14, 1873 ft
H ti :
CO
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0
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9 1 81 ft
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2 aj.jH.M
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cog
sens . s
Mo O O e t
P-i
i o
ICQ
O) S M
CI
SPRING AND SUMMER
GLOTsziisra-
FRAM&. IICLL9IAIV,
At his ne ptnee ofbualuess,
COEY'S BLOCK. OPPOSITE UKION
HOUSE.
UHILLICOTIIE, O.
HAS THE
Choicest Stock
O K
Spring and Summer Clothing
IVF.R breiifthl to Ihia market, embrscina
iill the liiteat and moat fiiMliiouHble atvlei.
in in accordance wilh the )Htei.t la-hion.
When you want a nobby amt dou'l fail to csll
on Frank. He al CU'1 and
Makes Garments to Oiidei
aud has a full line of
Cents' Underwear
II ATS AND CAPS, AC.
All cblhintr mnrked down lo the LOW.
y.ST l lta Ki:N. Give me a a, II and I wul
warrant satutlnctiun
"air FRANK HELLMAN.
WALL HAPH.K.
WINDOW SHADES.
YEt & CO.,
Union Block, Second St.. Chillioothe,
N Vli K til e atti ntuin of hoiiaekeeperH of
this place a nd vicinity to their stock of Wall
t'aper.
ALL NEW STYLES,
fox rim
Spring Trade of 1873
t liirjie ailiiuni jin-t leceiveit. Call and
examine when yu are in t lni licnihe.
Lt'nen and Paper W indow Shades. J,'
fi'c Shades, al cost; a yud Assort
ment of Miscellaneous and
School Doiiks. Statimiery, Fancy
Articles, fcc.
A GOOD BOOK
AGENTS VARIED
Dick's Encyci.opeiiu of Practical Rr-
caiets saa Paorr.niH. Contsminan.t.'i nrac.
tnnl receiptc, written in a piain and populur
mm ner, nod illiiKtrated Willi explanatory
wooricuta. Hemx a comprehensive hook of
t lerence lor the merchant, manufacturer, r
tian, amateur and hoimekeeper, iniluilinn
medicine, ph.irnmcy and domestic economy
The scope of this work la entirely dirt-rent
from any other book 01 Ihe kind, baubles
heiniia complete ami almrat lndniensible
bi ok of reference for the thousand ami one
receipt and articles needed in every house,
hold , farm, garden, etc.. it includea clear and
ennly understood direction for the applica
lion of many of ihe arts usually acquired only
by long experience, and o divested of tei h
nichaliuea, or the technicalities ol terms used
ao lull v explained as to bring the entire sub
ject within the comprehension ofan.v person
m orniiiiiry intelligence. I romilneni among
the immenie mans of subjects treated of in
the book are the billowing:
Tho Art ol Dyeing, Hard Bolt and Toilet
Soaps, Tanning, Instillation, Imitation l.iq
uors, Winpn, Cordial and Hitters, Cider,
Brewing, Perufmery.Flavnrinii Essences, etc.,
Cosmeiica, Hair lives and Washes, Pomades
and Perfumed Oils, Tooih Powders, etc., 8y,
tups, Alcohol and Alcoholmetry, Peiioleum
and Kerosene. Hleaching and Cleaning, Vin
ear, Sauces, Catsupa and Pickets, Receipts
lor the (inrden. Tn N emove Staina, Hpnta,etn.,
Pyrntechny and Explesives. Cetrlents, etc,
Waterpronling, ArliHcial, Gems, Inks and
Writing Fluina, Aniline Colors, Painta and
Pigment, I aiming and Paper-hanging, K'
eomine aod Whitewash, Varnishing and Pol.
lah ng, Lubricators. Jaoannina and Lacaner-
irg.Hoot and Harness Blacking, Photog aphv,
.-neutis ana Alloys, aiming, Slivering, etc..
Klectrotyping, tlectrnplsting, etc., Patent
Medicines, Medical Receipts, Weights and
Measures. 6u7 fagea, rcyal octavo, cloth.
Price li.Ort timsr
iilUK a FITZ(iERALI, Publnshera, M. T.
J OB WOKE
EXECUTED
NEATLY.&IPIIOMPTLY
TH1S:0FFICE
aS CJ C3
at;
ed
bi o
THE HUSBAND'S LESSON.
The clock key," asid Mrs.
a arqanar, predsing her hand to
her bewildered ftrow, 'Well, I
declare, I can exactly re
member what 1 did with it."
"That is singular; very singu
lar, indeedl" oracularly observ
ed her husband,! fussy, bald
headed little man. "And how
am I to wind thf clock with
out a key, I'd lite to know! I
never lorget Mrai 'Farquhar.
Did you ever know me to for
getr And the long and short of
the matter is thai I snail have
to buy a new clock key a new
clock key, Mrs. EWquhar, just
at this time, oV all others,
when our expenses aro so over
whelming." .
"A man with a wife and six
children cannot expect to live
for nothiug," said Mrs. Far
quhar composedly. ''Starch,
rioap, candles, flannel 1
"Yes, yes exactly so," said
Mr. F., "But I have not time to
argue the matter this morn
ing." "And ll you had," merciless
ly persisted Mrs. Farquhar,
'you might argue from now
until doomsday without alter
ntr the state ol affairs. Uere
is your hat, my dear; and don't
forget the paregoric and Wil-
ie's Biioes and Harry's hat and
the plumber's bill."
The long business day lapced
slowly away, and Mr. Farquhar
returned home just an the graj
shadows ot dusk were closing
, greatly rejoicing.
"Fifty dollars clear gain,"
said he, rubbing his palms to
gether hs he sat down to the
tea-table. "Jones borrowed It
ol me p month ago, and when I
'ad heard he sailed for Cali-
'urnia, I put UUovvVas a dead
oss. Never expected to see or
tear from the man again, and
when he turned up to-day wi'h
a now filly dollar bill I give
you my word it seemed just
ike a present."
"And what are you going to
do with it'' said Mrs. Farquhar,
who was fasteniug the baby's
bib.
"I don't know I haven't
thought yet. I might go to
Washington with Allen, nod
Ferguson, and the other fel
lows."
'You might," said Mrs. Far
quhar, dryly, "and I might
have it (or a new cloak. But
I think it would be rather a
more sensible way of spending
the money to pay the doctor's
bill."
Mr. Farquhar laughed.
"Well, my dear, I don't know
but you are right," said he,
"and I guess you may go
around and pay it to morrow."
The arrival of Master Tommy
and M.83 Lizzie, (resh from the
nursery, broke up furlhei fi
nancial discussion, and Mr.
Farquhar thrust the bill in his
vest pocket.
About midnight Mrs. Far
quhar awoke her husband to
tell bira about the burglary
next door.
"Eh,'.' said Mr. Farquhar, a
little uneasily. "A burglary?
At Mr. Morris! and what was
takenF
"Watches silver clothing
everything," sail Mrs. Far
quhar, lowering her voice to
a mysterious whisper. "In the
dead ot night, while the family
were asleep. Lemuel dear, are
you sure you recollected to
bolt the front door, and put up
your chainf
"Oi course I recollected it,'
said Mr. Fai quhar a little cross
ly. "I make it my business to
recollect everything. Go to
sleep, my dear, and don't fret!"
And just as he was sinking
off into a delicious slumber,
Mr. Farquhar bethoughi him
sell of the fitly dollar bill,
"just where the thieving scoun
drels would be most apt to lay
their hands upon it. I wish I
had Bent it to -pay the doctor's
bill to-night instead of post
poning it until to morrow.
Hallo, though I have ill" as a
bright inspiration flashed into
his drowsy brain. "Nobody
would ever dream of looking
into an old boot It will be
safe there until to-morrow, and
1 11 get rid of it as soon as I
can"
Mr. Farquhar went to bed
and slept the sleep of the
righteous; and the next morn
ing, totally obvious of all tbe
whole proceedings, he arose
and put on his slippers in a
beaming mood.
"What's that, Bridget? A
beggar at the door? he demand
ed. "H says he's no shoes, sir,"
said Bridget, "and the toes oi
bina are on the bare ground
entirely."
"Poor lellowl And it's, a
sharp, Irosty morning" said
Mr. Farquhar. "Give him my
old boots, Bridget. I was going
to have them soled, but I guess
this man needs them more
than I dol"
"Where are they sir," said
Bridget.
On the floor, by the bed, up
stairs. Run quick and don't
leave the door open. Run,
that's a good girl."
The beggar took the boots
and went cn his way rejoicing,
and just as Mr. Farquhar was
buttoning up his overcoat to
depart for the regions down
town, Mrs. Farquhar entered
the room.
"Don't forget to give me the
$50 bill, Lemuel, before you
go for the doctor, you re
member." Mr. Farquhar's hand drop
ped to one side his face turn
ed a dull, tallowy tint.
The flity dollar bill,"
repeated he mechanically!
Good heavens, it is gone!"
"Gone gone where?"
Mr. Farquhar made a blind
rush at the door, as if to over
take tbe beggar who had shak
en the dust of the threshold off
his feet two hours ago, and
then stood still. It was bad
enough to lose the $50 bill but
it was still worse to be com
pelled lo confess it to his wife
Yet what loop hole of escape
was there left?"
'I've lost it," said he dog
gedly. "I put it away, and lor
got all about ill"
Mrs. tarquhar's eyes spark
led mischievously.
"I thought you never forgot
anything, my dear," said she.
"I'm a fooll" confessed Mr
Farquhar "and a conceited
fool, tool But,".with a piteous
infliction of his wife, "I wo'd
like to have paid the doctor's
bill The times are hard, and
but never mind. I won't get
that new overcoat I was think
ing of. This one is a litt le thin,
but I dare say I cau make it
do."
"Yes, you will get the new
overcoat, Lemuel dear," laugh
ed Mrs. Farquhar, producing a
slip ot crackling brown paper
from her pocket. "Here's the
$50 bill."
Mr. Farquhar caught at it
like a hungry woll at a piece ot
raw meat.
"My dear Bessie, where did
you find it?"
"Where you put it, my dear,
in the boot. I heard you get,
up in the night and go prowl
ing around. I perceived in the
morning that you had entirely
forgottsu the whole transac
tion, and I, myself, took tbe
bill out before the old boots
became the prey of the beggar.
Here it is, and all I have to ask
of yon is to be a little more
careful the next time."
"My dear,"said Mr. Farquhar,
"you are a trump?"'
"And now,1
ishly asking
USQ Vf H AVgtWVr-
"are we quits
about the clock key?"
Mr. Farquhar thought they
were.
[From the Cleveland Leader.]
"Petticoat Allen."
The Democracy of Ohio have
nominated an old fossil who
has been buried out of sight
for the last twenty-five years,
with tbe exception of a short
period when be made a feeble
effort, like a thorough Copper
head that he was, to aid the
cause of that archtraitor, Val
landigham. Justice to the
memory ot one of the bravest,
purest and best men this coun
try ever produced, requires ns
to show up the record of this
venerable fossil, William Al
len. In 1840, when General Ear
risoc, the hero of Tippecanoe,
of Fort Meigs, and tbe Thames,
was running as tho Whig can
didate for the Presidency, Mr.
Allen invented and circulated
a story to the effect that Har
rison was a coward at all three
of the above battles, and that
the ladies of Chillicothe, to
show their contempt for him
as a general, presented him, in
public, a red flannel petticoat.
So macilestly false was this in
famous story, that the people
denounced it as such, and with
one accord they called him
"Petticoat Allen." Nearly ev
ery Whig procession carried
an effigy draped in a red pet
ticoat, labeled "Petticoat Al
len." Ladies ail over the coun
try sent him their cast-off pet
ticoats, labeled as above, to
show their appreciation of his
slanderous utterances. When
ever he appeared ia the
streets, the very boys would
yell out, "there comes old Pet
ticoat Allen."
Of course, General Harri
son's record being invulnera
ble, the slander fell to the
ground, and the 'hero of Tip
pecanoe was triumphantly
elected.
This is about the only con
spicuous fact that is recorded
of "Petticoat Allen," and for
the last quarter cf a century
he has been utterly unknown
as a politician or a man oi
note. And yet the Plaindealer
rpeaks of him as "the peer ol
Webster, Clay, and other great
mun,''
a-a v ui
Asthma in the Oil Regions.
The Titusville Herald says
that asthma is of very rare oc
currence in the oil regions and
that the cause of such exemp
(ion is found in the fact that
the atmosphere there is strong
ly impregnated with the va
pors of petroleum, which act
almost as a specific for the re
lief of asthma, and at the same
time as a preventive of con
sumption. It adds:
Let any one who is afflicted
with asthma, and feels a par
ticular difficult spell of breath
ing coming on, go in the vicin
ity ot a producing well where
petroleum vapor hoverj in the
neighborhood, and he will find
great relief and continued pres
ence in such a neighborhood
will be the best mean of a per
manent cure. We look forward
to the time when physicians all
over the United Slates will re
commend to their asthmatic
patients a journey to tbe oil re
gions, and we hope some suit
able preparation will be made
for their entertainment and di
version. Tbe prospect of an
infirmary for such subjects has
been seriously discutted by
many of our citizens, but has
nod yet taken definite shape.
Advices from Prof. Horsford
one of the Commissioners to
the World's Fair at Vienna.
state that the cartoons lepre
seniing bog slaughtering and
pork packing, and the State's
trial tables, all prepared under
the auspices of the Cincinnati
Pork Packers' Association, bad
received jhe highest meda
within the gift of the com
uiittee.
Dr. Bowers, Dentist, MoAr
tnur,u.
ADVERTISING TEItMS.
WIm1 n
Each addition, asertlon ... fit)
Cards, per yea . io t
Local notictf pep line, if,
Yearly adwrtlsemenu $100 00
column, and at proportionate rate pci
leaggpace. Payable In advance.
W The Record belnjr tbe fflcir.l
paper of the town, and baviug tl i
largest circulation of any paper in tl u
sounty, offers superloi inJuctmcLts
to advertisers.
[From the Ohio State Journal.
It is usual with Democratic
Conventions to place peculiar
stress on what are alleged to
be the oppressions of labor.
No Democratic platform would
be complete without some
thing particularly emphatic cn
that subject. But when we
come to look aroand lor what
the Democratic party has done
for labor, we find precious lit
tle to its credit. On the other
haad, we find it charged with
the enslavement of labor lr
more than half a century. It
degraded labor into beast of
burden, and sold laborers liko
cattle in the market We do
not mean, of course, that tha
Democratic organization bo't
and sold 6laves, but that by
making itself the champion
and apologist of slavery, it be
came morally responsible
therefor, and for all its con
comitant crimes and miseries.
n this connection it should be
also remembered that the sys
tem of Southern peonage to
which the Democratic party as
sumed the relation of protector
and friend, degraded the while
race no less than the black.
degraded alike those who
participated in it, those who
connived at it, those who ei-
enily tolerated it. But more
than all, it degraded labor.
Once admit that any class of
aborers may bo boaght nnd
sold as chatties, as the Demo
cratic party has repeatedly ad
mitted and affirmed, audit nec
essarily follows that the same
privileges of ownership may
be extended over every other
class. The slaveholders wero
not Blowtoaee this, or timid
in making use of its Wi!
'orce. Mr. Fitzhugh, a propa
gandist of pro-slavery Democ
racy, repudiated the idea that
slavery was defensible only a
scriptural curse laid upon a
particular race, and defended
it on principle, as equally ap
plicable to &l races. "Slavery,
black or white." said he. i.
' y
lght and necessary." A South
Carolina paper echoed in theso
words the same sentiment;
'The great evil of Northern
free society is that it is burden
ed with a servile class ot me
chanics and laborers, unfit for
elf government, andyet cloth
ed with the attributes and
powers of citizens. Master
and slave is a relation in socie
ty as necessary as that of p i
rent and child; and the North
ern States will yet have to in
troduce it. Slavery is the nai
ural and normal condition r f
the laboring man. whether
white or black."
The Richmond (V.) Enquirer
expressed Ihe same views A3
ate as 1856. It saidi
"The South now maintain
that slavery is right, natural,
and necessary, While it is fir
more obvious that negroes
should be slaves ihan whiles.
for they are fit to labor, not U
direct, yet the principle of
slavery is itself right, and docs
not depend on difference ot
complexion."
These doctrines were proba
bly not largely entertained bv
Northern Democrats, but they
were popular with the South
ern wins: of the nartv. an;!
1 9
were the logical sequences of
the party's principles an J
teachings. We have not hear J
that the party itself has ever
rebuked or disowned them, al
though they are insults to
American labor snch as should
make every workingman's
cheek burn with indignation.
F. D. M., writisq from Putin-Bay
to the Cincinnati Times'
says: The temperate inebriate?
who occupy "Whisky Row,"iri
the West Cottage, have fox a
coat of arms a wine bottle,
rampant, with the motto: "I
came, I saw, 1 concord."
AdTcrtiaaasemU baaertai at fait frloaa.

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