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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, October 30, 1873, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1873-10-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE VINTON RECORD.
-JOfIN t. rape it,
lidltor and Proprietor.
OmOE'H. W. Corner of Main and
Logan Sts., Ooposite Uuurt House.
$3 A YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
mm
M I I I I aaj MrkJ
VOL. 24 -NO. 23.
MCAUTIIUR, OHIO, OCTOBER 30, U73.
WHOLE NO. 1,229
DtU 8mrt. Samuel W. Kllvert, Jr.
(Eatablishcd mi.
HAUT & KILTERT,
SUCCESSORS TO DW1DSMART1
Wholesale Grocers
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Prompt Attention given to tlie
Transfer of PIG I HON and
other Property from and to
Uailroadand Canal.
Water Street.betuieen Paint and Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
mar II Uua It
WILLIAM POLAND,
WHOLESALE OltOCEK,
-liquor and Commission Merchants
MO. 20 WATKR STREET,
XHILLICOTIIE. - OHIO.
Ala in Barrels, Half Barrels nod Bottlei.
POR SALE.
tOWN LOTS AND LANDS
In Zaleski.
THR Zaleskl Company, with It tIsw to the
development of the I will interests of .Ssles
'ki, to Recur its permanent pioapeiily, ni.il to
d1 to its population and wealth, urn now
ottering to actual setlleis, town lot ami farm
lends at low prices, and on liberal terms.
Persona desiring to examine the property
nd to buy cheap houses will apply ut the
Company's offices to
K. THOMP-ON, Manner.
.Saleaki, Ohio, May 18, 171. tf
benj. f. Armstrong"
a tto rney at iv
IttrAHTIIIIlI. OHIO.
OFFICE In Darin' Building, oppo lie
4 he V.,,;o County Nnttonal Bank, up stairs,
ljull7;l ly
A Fine German Chromo.
Wl SXN. AN IIHHST IIIH'DIO. HOI'NTrA ANI
' imdi rua raiaiNU, rani to aviat auint yub
UNDERGROUND
OR,
XIFE BELOW THE SUBFACS.
BYtllOS. W.KNOX,
t)42 P'gs Octavo. 130 Fine Engravings
Relate undent and accident, lieynud lln
light of day; startling adventure in nil part,
f lha world mines and innile of working
them; undercurrents of society, gmnlilin
wad it liorr ir; caverns and their mysteries
the dark ways of wickedness; prisous ami
their secrets; down In the depths of the sen
atmntie atones of the detention of crime.
The book treat ol the experience uiih brig
aads; in opium dens and simliling helix, life
in prison; stories of exiles; iiiivent ir
among Indians; journeys through severe ami
atoninlis, accident in mines; pintles anil
piracies; tortures of the iiuiitisit on; wonder
lul buritlariea; underworld of the great sine
!.. etn.
AGENTS WANTED
for tin Hork. Kxclmove leinioi) xiveti
Aeot. ean m ik Slim per week in selling this
book. Hend for circulars and term In agents.
J. It. HI IlK A' II I ',
HAFT Ki IK ), CON N ., or Oil 1CANO I LI..
lAmsf 1S7.I
"A BOOK FOR THE MILLION J
Xlarriago'1
I Harris or those about m
ituarry om iht pbyilnloi leal
mrs (cries and revelation sot
I ftHvateCoaaielaMfttt.
Guldo.
htMl tUMortrto la f rodQtlog ao4 prtvtaUog oBptio,
iw prssttva iht emu pies. Ion, Ac.
TaUt m UurtitlDg work t itro kondrM and ilitf
Cfef.vhh aunrqe tnralafs, ant aontalos valuabl
roraiatlna for tkoHWBoartaitrrtcd.oreobUniplkteDki
ftaga. ill) (ilea book thkiouht to t kept UDdvriHk
m kr, an4 Mlal4 carelessly about the kouit,
II ooaula iht ti per It act and advica o f a bhvstelai
VktM rtpuutfoa It world-vide, and should bj la ibt urt
M drawar of svtry wait and female throughout iht emir
fleho. Il tnhraM tTtrythlog oa tbt luhjtclof tht gfD
triUfiniuntbii U worth knowing, and aatblbklll
I pablUhod la tar othtr work,
f tot to any tat (rroo of poiugO fr Flflr Ctali.
id Jri ur. Batu Dlastawr.Ma. Xfl M. ftlgkih ttrtai
LtaUt Mt.
lTotlc U iht ifflic:ed and Unibrttmate.
t fbrt appljlaf to flit aotorloai qaaeko ho advoftUt Is
ibllt napori.or tiling any quick remedial ptruao Dr
katia' work nam altar what jtardlitMtlit tr ho daplor
febla yoar ooadliloa.
Dr. Batta oeoupUi a doublt heaaa tf lwtaty-Hra
loona;l alndoraed hf oomooftbo noat airlibritad medl
Valprofaaaerier ibtaooanirr and Kuropo, and etn bo eon
alud ptraooallf or hf Bill, on thodUoaiai ntntlooed I
ill work a omea and par I en, No. 13 N. Kigkih atreta
iaiwaia Markti aid Chtiaot, fiu Louia, Mt.
lithe mat if item, with that
LXtitoUii'S WINK Of TAIL.
Ton yrnraofa pnla
He It" I hits provril Ur
CitHik's H I ne ol' Tnr ic
liiivn iiiiiio iiii'ilt tlinn
nuy Kliiill.'tr pii panitlnn
tvi r olli'ti'il Id the ptil
I to. It i.t rlcli in Hie
medicinal qtmllllra ol
Tnr, ami iiiiciiiiilcfl fm
iIIjm'Iiscm of the lliront
anil I. it . pcirnrniliiil
till) MOST ItKMAKKAlll.B
etlffS. It KKKKt-rUAI-LY
(r-y K l oJilsj. It hits cured ao
niitny ensrs of Aalliiiin
ntnl Itroi:cliltlN, t ) nit II
liu liceti pronounced a
apeelllo for tltcse com
plaint. For 1'iilnn la
1 1 in ItrcHst, Niilc oi
llnrk, sirHvel or 141(1'
ihvt It ai'HNO. lllHKIUHef
bf the I rinney OrKnut. Jmiiiilice, ot
8ny l.lver onilii(ut It lilts uu equal
1 in MInu f mini-rlar Ton r,
it r I ore the Appetite.
RtremclheiiM (lie K.vlcm.
lleatore Hie ViriiW nml l bililntnl.
'niiK I lie Komi le ll(Ptt,
llemnvra l.vKpoiiilit nml Indliccatlon.
I'rcveiiln Mnlitrinuai t'evera.
Ultra tone to yonr jrMlem.
Hat Pah, Tellow. SicHy-Iookin Slit
la clintirrcd toono of fn-alinoaii end health
Those niaensei. or the Skin, Pimple
lHktuleii, ntntrhewand F.rnptlonsj an
removed. croruln,-rrrtrfilon Itlnenaei
of the Kym. Wh te Nwrllina:, Uleersi
ll Korea or any kind of Humor rnpldl)
Jwlndle and illstippcnr under Its Influence
n fnrt It will do yon more Rood, and curt
Jrou moreapeedHy M,nn Kny "n'" n" othei
hrcpnrntinna combined. Wlitllttt It Is nay
Urea own restorer! Aaolnbleoxyd of Iroi
mmlilned with the medicinal properties a
Poke Boot divested of all (llsnurceuble quul
Itles It will cure any t'hronle or Lonar
htatidlnar ntaeawe whose real or dlreo
rinise Is bud blood. Rheninotisim.PoliM
In l.imlMor nonea,'onntllntiona or
lieai lon bv Mercurial or other polaona
J re all cured by It. For Syphilid, or Syp
title In . there la notnine equal to It
A trial prove It. ANU FOR DR
IHNK'lP('nFOl)NO SVRIP Ol
rttHK HOOT.
FARM FOR SALE,
1UA WITHIN K mile cf the M.AC. R.
ri ?T R The (arm contain. SO acres
lifSl tortjr acrea cleared. Fair Improre
"""inenta. a KOod coal hank open and
working. t)4 feet beat coal. For aai a cheap,
iaept H.C.J'NE.
T TT.ITT'I T TTT17I
I AM prepared to furnish the best quality of
fresh lima from mi silo. 1 mil tnnh nf.
mcannur, at one aniiat pa nan el at la. sua,
puyer. rurnisniuii wetr u.. a rjarret.
w-U 4a
;
O. T. CUNNINC,
LAWYER
ONFICR AT D . STORB, MAIN STREET.
2Jaug 187'J
EDWIN N. BAKNUILlT
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AND
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Office McArthur. Ohio,
Will attend promptly to all business entrusted
to his care. uorlt
(J. S. CLAYPOOLE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
(PROSKCUTIKO ATTORNEY,)
McARTHUR, 0.
Will practice t.t Vinton and adjoining conn
Ilea. Buaii.es. anlrnsted to his car piompt
ly attended to. Office in Court Bouse.
JanJI87'ily
UOMElt V. JONES,
AI TORNEY AT LAW,
MAIN STREET.
McAKTIlUIt, OHIO.
Orrtci: One door west of Dao Will A Bros,
itoio.
,an30yt
AMERICAN HOUSE.
OPPOSITE R.R. DEPOT.
HAMDEN, OHIO.
R. FOX, PROPRIETOR.
Livery Stable Attached.
MKAI.S HEADY FOR ALL TBAIN8.
The House haa lust been refurnished
ihronxhoitt. Itooms clean and cnnifortalile,
thetaMa Bimnlied with the tst the market
nrlorda, and no pains spared to accomodate
KUeats. mart isov it
EULBERT HOUSE.
Main Street, Opposite Oonrt House
McArthur, Ohio,
JAMES WORKMAN, Proprietor
Til WE token possession of the above hotel,
ronntntod anil Dnrllv refurnished It. and
wil be ulad lo serve the old customers of the
house, and especially my old irienuaoi ine
Hooking Valley who msy be isiiin this
..nml The liilile will he furnished with the
hestthe market attords, and care taken to
ninke guests romfortittile. Oood statilir.s; at
tached to the house; Charges reasonable.
l:imar If "3
PEYTON COX,
AUCTION EEE,
W
r ILL attend to all business entrusted to
his care.
l O. A DDK ESS:
UEEIVS JliLI.S,
f Union County O.
:lort18721m
llEiNKY MAULE,
lerch-nt Tailor,
Has just received his
i'ALL AN I W .NTER STOCK
Of the latest styles of
:loths, Cassimfsei and Vestings,
Which I will sell Very Law for Cash.
ITSTOM work done in the most fashions.
I ;hle and durable manner.
Thankful for th. liberal patronage extended
o me heretofore, I solicit a contiuuunce ol
ne same. Remember the place
devt
II. MAULE.
JOHN BIECEL,
Formerly ot Ilamden.l
VNN"UNCH.8to his friends in Vinton am
adjoining counties that he hashouu,ht the
Hotel Formerly Kept by Chas. Smith
Three doors west cf Madison, on
FRONT ST.
PORTSMOUTH, 0.
Mehas refitted it throughout, and ia prepared
10 entertain the liaveling public at reaaonsl lc
at. Inn
McAKTFTITH
OARRAG EFA0T0RT.
North-east corner of Mi In and Jackson street
McARTUUK, OlllO
GEO. V. BKUMON, Troprietoi
Manufactuiat
Carriage, xtuuuiet. Jit&nttts, eU
tLSO, WAOOXS ASD ALL USDS Or WAOOS, WOBS
one to order on short notice.
Painting and Trimming
.l ail kinds executed id the neatest and most
.irtistiu style.
Kfc.WAlhl.NU ot all kinds in my tibe will be
promptly and neatl. done.
.Wurk doue ai'thises aWishmcnt ia war
auUrd to t substantial, put up solid and eie
uu'edin the most workn aolike manner, not
o oe excelled in any respect b any other ea
vabhBlimentin thecoLntrr.
THAT WHIG J IS
WORTH DOING
IS
WORTH ADVERTISING,
PRNT AN L PROSPER
The Favorite Fine-Cut
H E 'Chewers' Choice, ia now taking the
X lead ot all other Brand. B nght in color,
pleasant in taete, touah and laaiiu( in chew,
this tobacco posiise erery quslity to suit
chewers, sod sella by the lu pound bucket
fully lue cheaper per pound, than any other
brand of the same grade and perhaps less
quality. 1UU bucket ol this celeniaied brand
hate been sold in Chillicotha sIodo within
the last two moolhs, and trade still increaa.
Ing. -Try It" rCHKrtK KHAMKR
Olullicothe, Ohio, are the MsntifacturerS'
agenusoo- sellatlOtttaHJIKtori fnoea..
Soil
8
03
o
Q
Er-
CO
at
o
M
Mm
11
0
i
i
15 BTZ a
H
0
0
H
r. a p w o &
CQ M g J
Kj " VS M
o hnm S H
sf III
Bp
03 (J
E i
5 S
E-h
O O a t
3 a d
EH O Q P M
H w oh p,
SPRING AND SUMMER
CLOTHiia
FRAK IICLLilIA,
At his ne place of business!
COEY'S BLOCK. OPPOSITE UBION
HOUSE.
CHILLICOTHE, o.
HAS THE
Choicest; Stock
0
Spring and Summer Clothing
EVER br.ughl to this market, embracing
nil the latest and most I'nshionablu styles,
cm in accordance with the latest tnhion.
When you want a nohhy suit don't fail to call
on Frank, lie also CUT: and
Makes Garments to Obdei
and has s full hhe of
Cents' Underwear
HATS AND CAPS, AC.
All clolhinir marked down to the LOW.
EST I Kil KlK. Give me a c .11 an. I I will
warrant satisfaction
Uiapr FRAVK HF.LLMAN
W A U . PAP t" I i.
WINDOW SHADES.
BUsWIMBBMkflBKaBaw
YEi & CO.,
Union Block, Scoond St.. Chillicothe,
iNVITK til e atti niton of liouselteepem of
this place and viciuiiy to their stock ol Wall
i'u per.
ALL NEW STYLES,
KUM THE
Spring Trade of 1873
i hi rue assortment just leceived. Call auu
examine when you are in Chillicothe.
Linen and Paper H indmo Shades. litis
tic Shades, at east' a good Assort
ment of Miscellaneous ami
School Vuoks. Stationery, Fancy
Articles, c.
A GOOD B00K
AGENTS WAN1ED.
Dick's Encyclopedia of Practical Rk-
( Sihts ani Paoirssas. Containing i,422 prac
tical receipts, written in a pmin anil populur
tniu ner, and illustrated with explanatory
aoodcuta. Bemtf a comprehensive hook of
r- lerence lor the inen'hant, mnnuf.icturer, nr
tisan, amateur and housekeeper, including
medicine, pharmacy and domestic economy
The scope of this work is entirely di tic rent
from any other book ot the kind. Besides
heing a complete and nlm st indtspensiUe
tx ok of reference for the thousand sml oue
receipts and articles needed in every hniis
hold , farm, garden, etc., it includes clear snd
easily understood directions for lh applies
tion of many of iho arts usually acquired only
by long experience, snd so divested of te h
nichalities, nr the technicalities ol terms used
so lully explained as to bring the entire sub
ject within the comprehension ofnny person
ol ordinary intelligence. I'romiiiient among
the immense mass of subjects treated of in
the book are the follow inc!
The Art ol Dyeing, Hard 8olt and Toilet
Soaps, Tunning, Instillation, Imitation Liq
uora, Wines, Uordials and Hitters, Oider,
Brewing, l'erUfmery,Klftvorinu Essences, etc.,
i osmetics, Hair Dyes and Washes, Pomades
and Perfumed nils, Tooth Powders, etc., 8y.
tups, Alcohol and Alcoholmetry, Petioleum
and Kerosene. Bleaching and Cleaning, Vin
ear, Bailees, CnNtips and Pickets, Heceipts
tor the Uarden, To r f move stsms.Hpots.eUi.,
Pyrntechny and Exnlesives, Cements, etc
Waterproofing. Artificial, Gems, Inks anil
Writing FlUms, Aniline Colors, Paints and
Pigments, I aiming and Paper-hanging, Ka-i-ominesrid
Whitewash, Varnishing and Pol.
ish ng, Lubnca ors, Japanning and Lacquer
irg.Rootaod Harnesa Bla king, Photography,
MetaN and Alloys, (ulding, Silvering, etc.,
Klectrotypmg, Electroplating, etc., Putent
Medicines, Medical Receipt, Weight and
Measures. 6U7 pages, royal octavo, cloth.
Price I5.CI0 t.mar
MUh A FITZGEKALI', Publnshers, M. Y.
J OB WOKE
EXECUTED
NEATLY & PROMPTLY
-.AT-
THIS OFFICE
ABOUT DOGS.
BY ROBERT CHAMBERS.
From Wood's Household Magazine.]
Notwithstandiug all tnathas
first an'l last been said aout
dogs, still mere caa bo said
so broad, genial and interest
ing is the sulject. Ail dogs
tncKP or less are susceptible oj
being taught, and teachability
infers culture of the Lrain, the
possibility of an enlarged intel
ligence, i
It may be in part through in
stinct that a olit'pberd dog per
forms nmny of the important
services which he ren lers to
his muster in the drtng and
te ding of sheep; but it can
not be a!t 'netlif r throush in-
stinct, for the best shepherds'
dogs have been carefully train
ed. Even that which the shep
herd's dfg does without train
ing and which seem3 natural to
him from his puppyhood, is
probably very much to be as
cribed to whht ib called hered
itary instinct, the truit of the
training of many successive
generations. But all can not
be ascribed to instinct, whether
natural to the race, or acquired
and become hereditary. How
can any one think so who has
observed a shepherd's dog at
his work, and marked his
prompt obedience to the com
mand of his master; how readily
he understands each word or
sign, and at once hastens to do
what he is bidden? Perhaps to
bring in a number of sheep
from a distance, which he ac
complishes very quickly, and
yet without hurrying them too
much, for he is very careful not
to do them any harm, and his
barking, although sharp, is not
angry, nor do the sheep seem
to think so, or to be Tn the
least alarmed, for they also
have pnfited by experience,
and they know him and his
wavs. Let the object of the
shepherd be to get sheep
through a gate; the dog evi
denlly perceivep it at once, and
knows what to do, to bark be
hind tha sheep, to run before
them and bark, to drive them
to tlie gate, and to prevent
i heir pacing it. Most remark.
able still, and most decidedly
an evidence of the possession of
reason, is the fact that a good
shepherd's dog will assist a
she p to rise when it has fal
len, rolled over on its back and
can not get up again, because
in consequence of its thick
fleece it can not get a foot to
the ground. This often hap
pens, especially on hill pas
tures, in the latter part of
spring and beginning of sum
mer, before the sheep sheafing
time, and the shepherd must
visit his fl ck several times
day, lest the sheep that have
rolled over on ihair backs
should die But his dog eaves
him much walking and fatigue,
scouring over the hill for him,
and as soon as he finds a sheep
on its back, proceeding to turn
it over wiih his muzzle, till it
gets its feet to the ground e"o
that it is able to rise.
No wonder that the sheep
dog is a kind of humble friend,
he is not turned into a kennel
nor into an out-house when be
comes home from his work; his
place is at the fireside, where
he often wags his tail and puts
on a very intelligent look) as
he understood some part ol the
conversation that take& place
Certainly "Collie" knows well
enough when he ia spoken of,
and dogs oi some other ki.tds
do eo too. They know when
they are alluded to in terms of
praise, and when With blame)
in the former case, giving un
mistakable signs of delight; in
(he latter, hanging their heads
and looking ashamed. Sir Wal
ter Scott mentions this con
cerning a favorite dog that he
bad, a noble hound, of a very
rtiftVrnnt turn trnrrt the fihdm
iierd's dog. But it is Tery ob
if
servable in the shepherd's dog.
The shepherd's dog, or, at nil
events, t e collie of ;hd south
of Scotland, which I take to be
the moat rt fined and cultivated
bned of the shepherd's dog.
shows h;ni'elt al o very nm-i.
ble of adro it, and v x d bv it.
lle.has a ret dy appeti e for oat
cakes oatmeal in one form or
other, but most y hit of por
ridge, beim? a c';i t pirt of his
food, as it is of bis master's aud
he will at any time gladly re
ceive a bit of oat-cake; but let
any one hold out to h.m a very
large piece, and he evidently
thinks it a cruel j st, feels him
self insulted, turns, away his
head, and will not look a, the
Ctke, far 'ess accept it. We
know ol no other kind of dog
that so generally shows his fas
tidi 'Usnesa. We have tried the
experiment with collies, and
always with one result; they
would have nothing to do with
a very larga pie:e of bread.
We have tried it also with oth
er dogs of various kinds, but al
ways with the opposite result.
No piece that was offered
seemed too large for any one
that we ever tried Newfound
land, pointer,terrier except In
one ca e, that of aSkye terrier,
which lurned uWay, as if aware
of heing mocked, if a whol
slice of bread was held out to it,
and would bot approach the
sugar-bowl even if it was set
upon the floor, although very
fond oi sugar, and ready to beg
long for a little bit of it.
It is worthy to be observed
concerning the shepherd's dog,
ihat no severity is ever used in
his training. The Shepherd has
no dog-whip. A Bingle punish
ment, such as a gamekeeper
often finds Cr thinks it neces
sary to inflict on a pointer
would spoil a collie altogether,
and make him Worthless for
life. lie would not resent it
by turning savagely on his
master, but he would at once
become broken-spirited and in
ert. Words of commendation
or of censure are all that he
needs, all that suit his nature.
The same thin may be ob
served in Animals of some oth
er kinds as in the elephant
and in the finest breeds of
horses. The fine feelings of the
Scottish shepherd's dog, and his
capability of having his feel
ings deeply wounded, are some
tims very strikingly illustrat
ed. The grandfather of the
present writer had an excel
lent collie, by name Wattie,
which was a gfeat favorite, and
greatly attached to him and to
all the family. When the dog
grew old and feeble, it was nec
essary to get another one; but
on the new dog's arrival, poor
old Wattie left his place at the
fireside and went out to a green
bank beside a bond, where he
lay down, and no persuasion)
could induce him to return to
the house. lie wagge'd his tail
a little when kindly spoken to
but he contiueud to lie in the
same spot and would not rise.
He refused food and in two
days he was dead ne seems
to have felt that his day wad
over, and that his services Were
ho longer valued, and his old
place no longer his, and took It
all to signify that his time had
come to die. His death, how
ever seems not to have been
the result of mere old age, but
to hate been hastened by his
wounded feelings!
Everybody knows how the
Et trick Shepherd pleasanly
tells of the dogs that used to
accompany their masters to
church, in the pastoral district
in which he lived how they
lay quiet and patient during
the whole service, till the last
psalm was sung, and the min
later and the congregation
stood up tor the blessing, when
their 'delight at the prospect
of immediate emancipatiofl
I rinnlit nn InnrfAr Ka tAarrainnrl
: bat ejtoressed itself by joyoat
barkid:. In the pa toml dis
tricts of Scot'ai d, the number
of dogs present during divine
service always very mu h at
tracts the uotice of strangers.
We heard from the minister of
one of the moat strictly pastor
al parishes m Tweeddale the
following anecdote. When he
entered on I. Is charge, being a
stranger to the district, he was
both surprised and annoyed at
i he presence of the numerous
dogs in church, regarding it
pretty much as the husband of
Jeanie Daana regirded the to
bacco pipe with which the
Highland gentleman solaced
himself during the service, and
condemned it as unseemly, re
questing the shep terds thence
forth to leave their dogs at
home. The shepherds, per
haps, wondered a little, but
the request was generally com
plied with f.ir a time. Uowev
er, there was one fplendid col
lie that soon made his appear
ance again, and took his place
on the pulpit stairs, which he
had long specitlly appropriat
ed to nimself, lying very quiet
ly, unless some othur dog ven
tured to set foot upon the stairs
an intrusion which he would
not permit One dny the min
ister met the shepherd, the
owner of the dog, accompan
ied, of course, by his faithful
attendant. The shepherd im
mediately referred apologetic
ally to the nubject." 'To see
sir," he baid, "after what ye
s iid to us, we tried to keep the
dogs at harae; but this ane was
ower gleg too sharp for us
We steekit s'mt him in lor
two Sabbath days, bui ever sin'
that, we ne'er see him on the
Sabbath mornin', he just slips
awa some way on the Saturday
nicht, and the next we see o'
him is dn the pulpit stairs
when we come to the kirk." The
intelligence displayed by the
Jog in the anecdote just relat
ed, implies a power of think
ing such as we hardly expect
to find in the lower animals,
besides a remarkable strength
of will, for the dog certainly
lost a breakfast, and probably
also a 9iipper, to gratify his de
sire of occupying his place of
honor on the pulpit stairs.
We once witnessed an ex
traordinary scene in which
shepherds' dogs were the ac
tors'. An EJinburg minister
was to preach a serrilon, on a
summer evening, in an empty
wool barn in one of the most
lonely dales of the southern
highlands in Scotland, and the
inhabitants of the dale, mostly
shepherds and their families,
were assembled to hear him.
The wool-barn was in the up
per stofy of a two storied build
ing, and, and the approach to
it was by an outside stair with
out a railing. The congrega
tion consisted of some forty or
fifty people, but the barn would
have held a much greater num.
ber, and there was a wide open
space between the table at
which the preacher stood and
the nearest seat placed for bis
hearers. This the dogs which
the shepherds had brought
with them at once appropriated
to themselves as a fit pfaee for
amusement They evidently
did not suppose themselves to
be at church, and fell under no
obligation to quiet and orderly
behavior. They were in a very
frolicsome humor, and at first
it seemed doubtful if divine
service could he proceeded
with. Occasionally they all
rushed out by the open foor
and down stairs, but soon re
turned again to resume their
gyrations on the barn floor.
Fortunately, however, it hap
pened, ere long, that one ot
them, in rushing out, touched
an earthenware plate which
was set upon the landing place
at the top of the stair for tht
collection, usually made in
Scotland on every occasion oi
publio worship, and' knocked
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1LI
it over the edgd. The plate
was broken, bud tb.9 coppers
scattered on the ground, bub
the service went on without
further interruption from the
dogs. Immediately on the
smash and jingle being heard,
every dog disappeared from,
the bnrn, and not one ot thert
showed face ogain till the eon
gregation was dismissed. The
evidently knew that they had
committed a fault; one of them
had done tha mischief; the
were all art and part; and tak
ing blame to themselves ac
cordingly, they fled ashamed
What communications they
had among themselveR out of
doors, and whether or not any
chastisement was Inflicted on
the careless dog that overturn
ed the plate, we can not tell.
One of the dogs whose way
we have watched with the
greatest interest, was a fine
Newfoundland. His name was
Oalder, from ' the name of A
neighboring stream. He was
a noble animal, very largSj
very gentle and playful, witb
an expressive lace, large hang
ing ears, a great quantity of"
rich Curling hair, and a bushy
tail, that sometimes, when 16
was whisked incautiously,
brlished things oil the tables
He was a very intelligent dog,
and evidently Understood many
things that was said to him.
We are very 6ure that he knew
the names of many thiiigs, for"
he went to seek them when he
was told, and brought the thing"
named; He seemed to feel
much pride in carrying any
thing with which he was in
trusted, and nothing gratified
him more than to be permitted
to carry in his mouth his mas
ter's snUg box; although, il ib
was presented to him open,
be drew back from it with signs
of great dislike, making grim
aces, and uttering little short
barks. When his master hap-'
pened to leave home without
his eunQ-box, he sometimes
sent Calder back for if, andj as
the omission had probably al
ready been discovered, the)
purpose of the dog's returit
was speedily understood, and
the snuff box intrusted to him,
with which he made all has(e)
to hid master, never failing tc
carry it sa'ely. He was some
times permitted to carry A
walking stick or an umbrellai
which evidently afforded him
great delight. To carry an tini
brella, especially, was an hon
or which he seemed to ftpprd ;
ciate as highly as any mace
bearer or Usher of the Blade
or White Rod can appreciate)
the duty of his office. To grafe
ifyhim in this particular ai ib
was found that a good umbrek
la was not Improved by beiUg
carried in his mouth, an old one
was given him for his 6wn es
pecial bertefit. On one occa
sion he made the mistake of
taking the umbrella with bin
when he went for a swim in
lake, along the side of which
the road led. He happened to
let it go while be was in tbe
water, and it sank to tbe bot
torn, and that part Of the laKo
being shallow, his swimming
and diving stirred np so mtJeh
mud that he rbuld hot dridit
again, and had to be Called off.
It was interesting to see how
shame-faced he was whet he
came home, and the rtory of
the lost umbrella was told. He
bore all reproaches' meekly,
but hung his head arid let hist
tail d'oop. A week or tent
days afterward, however, he
was ordered to seek for and.
bring the umbrella, which mis
sion he) faithfully executed, re
turning triumphant with ther
lost article in hi mottb.
There was nothing in which,
he more dtteligted thin to ear
ryanegg. He never brokeone
that we know of, an& never
seemed to think; of an egg as ft
Continued, on fbartH column 4th pagt.

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