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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, December 18, 1873, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1873-12-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE VINTON RECORD,
JOHN T. RAPElt,
KUltoraud Proprietor.
0FTI0E fl. W. Corner of Main and
Lo'gaa SU., Oopoiite Court House.
I8 ATEAK, IN ADVANCE.
BENJ. F. ARMSTRONG
A'TT ORNEY AT L AW.
HcAKTIlUK, OHIO.
OFFICE la Davit Building, opposite
the Viniua Uouoty fictional Dank, up amirs,
Ijull8?l I;
UOMEH C. JUNES.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MAIN STREET.
McARTHUR, OHIO.
OmcK On door west of Dsn Will Bros,
ttoie.
jo?30 jl
EDWIN N. IJAKNIIILL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
( AND
NOTARY PUBLIC,
v Otllce McArthtir.Oliiu,
Will attend promptly to Mil uiuineseentrnsted
to hit or. uovll
u. s."claypooleT
ATTORNEY AT JiAW,
i (PRosECUTira attorney.)
McARTHUR, O.
Will practice 1 1 Vinton ml adjoining roun
del. Bumi.e-e entrusted lo In rare piompl
)y attended lo. Office in Court Hou.e.
O. T. CUNNINC,
LAWYER
M'ARTH B.t O.
ONFICK AT 0 . STOUB, VAIN STREET.
22allg 1871
AMERICAN HOUSE,
OPPOSITK r. r. depot.
HA M DEN,' OHIO.
R. FOX, r R O P It I E T 0 K.
Livery Stable Attached.
MKAl.S READY FOR ALL TRAINS.
The Hnuae haa lust been refurnished
throughout. Konma clean nnd cnmfortnMe,
the luhle aupplied villi the lst ihf market
attnrda, nod DO pains apared to accomodate
guestf. mart lHiitl ly
HULBERT HOUSE.
Main Street, Opposite Court House
Mc Arthur, Ohio,
JAMES WORKMAN, Proprietor
I HAVE taken possesion of the nlwve hotpl.
renovated nnd partly refurnished it. and
wil he Rind to aerie the i.ld eiiloiera ol the
hone,an especially my old friendx ol (he
Houkina Vnlley uhn may lie visiting Ihis
point Thetiili'le will lie lurnish.d with the
hestthe market allnrdx.and rare lukin in
muka giie-l inmliirtalile Unnil stnllir, at
tached to lh house; Charge, reimonnlile.
l:tmar IH73
WILLI A 91 POLAND,
WHOLESALE G It O C E It ,
Liquor and Commission Merchants
NO. 90 VT ATKR ITstKKT,
CITliXICOTIlE. OHIO.
Alain Uarreli. Half Barrel and Hutllra.
MVl.IV
Dayi! Smart. Samuel W. KiUcit.Jr.
f Kslal.lish.d UM
JiMAttT & KILVEKT,
SUCC E8.H0IM TO I' V 1 H 8 1 A RT1
Wholesale Grocers
&.ND COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Prompt Attention gl ven to the
Transit-rot 1'lli iii(i. nntl
other Property from and to
Ituilroauariu canal.
Wttr Street.between Faint and Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
marlllKnaly
JOHN M. GCEHNER,
.... tf.S..
DEALER IN
Italian and Vermont Marble
ANJJ
SCOTCH ClIAXITEMOXLllEXrS
ALL KINDS OK
GRAVE-YARD WORK
Neatly and promptly executed.
Mulberry St.,bet'n Second AWatei
Cuilllcothc. Ohio.
1 tinerintend all my own work in neraon
I execute all the Aner rieaign. use the beet
material, and can lot he undersold. Peraona
wishing any work in my line are invited to
limine work, awe a anil price", oeiore man
inn p.onlracla.
1 personally snpatintend the careful setting
up or iooi a ana monument Dougni n mj
estaUiMinifnt.
Bv buying at this ahop you will aire from 15
to super cent, paia to atoms. irupns
S. T. BOCCESS,
jiesidet deiist.
Jackson, C. H., Ohio.
On at a times be found at his oBce.
TKhTH FX'IKACTED"
AbaoieAaly without pain, nnd with perfect
pnieiv. uj v,
LAT7.GHING GAS.
j in may fin.
mm
VOL. 24-NO. 30.
iMO ARTHUR, OHIO, DECEMBER 18, 1873.
-)
1
WHOLE NO. 1,23
JUST RECEIVED
A In lot of
PLAIN & FANCY STATIONERY,
INITIAL PAPERS,
BLANK BOOKSj&O.
FINE C1IK0M0S
-AT-
LOW PRICES.
FANCY CANDIES
JU3T RECEIVED.
Also a full line of pure
jresk Drugs, Medi
cines, Chemicals, ' -
. . Glass; Putt?, .
Paints,
Oils,
and Dye
Btvffs, Perfum
ery, JSotips, loilel Ar
ticles, Notions, Jewelry, etc.
large Lot ot Notions
very low Prices. .
at
WOLF.PEARCE&CO,
North Side Main St, two Doori
West of Market,
McARTHUR, OHIO.
injui 1871
J. ROUZER,
Manufacturer of
BUGGIES, OAERIAGES
-AND-
EXPRESS WAGONS
Of latest, moat fashionable and elegant atyle.,
Second St., Near Mulberry,
CI11LLICOTIIE, 0.
I make it point to no all my work of the
het miilerixl, and aland reroud to none in
iiility of Aniih or durnhiliiy. I employ no
iiiliTKir workmen, ihere are no nppieulice
)ov iH'oiil my etnhhhiiient. Aim I run not
lull to I'lcii-e any person oho wanta the heat
tiirnniit made in the voiiniry. I refer wnli
pride to n.v riKtmnera Ihroligliont foiltnern
uliio aa to the ehnrneier of woik coming
Inim my fartnrv, nnd uuiiraulea all my uu
tuinura perleul autiat'ivtinu.
All kinds of Turnouts finished and
ready for sale, or made to Order.
Call and examine my Stock-
Rcpalilng, Repainting, Etc.
Will receive pmmpt intention.
1 have constantly a atock of
SECOND HA-ISTTO
Carriages, Buggies and Expresses,
ltd with me for aale, repaired nnd almost an
good aa urw,soiiie ot iliem
VERY CHEAP INDEED.
lu.nl ia
FAuL AND WINTER
CLOTHinSTG-
FR.4H IIELL1A!V,
At hia ne place of huaiuesa.
COETS BLOCK. OPPOSITE UHION
HOUSE.
CHILLICOTHE, O.
II AS THE
Choicest Stock
OK
Fall and Winter Clothing
IpVER brensht to this market, emhraeinx
,H the luteal ami most fashionable styles,
cii in nccoMance Willi ine iniesr rasnion.
When you wanta nohhy amtdou t util to call
on Krauk. lie also CUT? and
Makes Garments to Okdei
and haa n full line of
Gents' Underwear
II ATS AND CAPS, &V.
All olothine marked down to the LOW
EST FIUVUKN. Give ine a oil and I will
warrant aatialavtion
iiiajir FRANK BELLMAN.
McA "RTHTJK
0AEEIAGEFA0T0RT.
North-east corner of Main and lackaon atreett
McARTHUR, OHIO
GEO. W. BKUNTON, Troprletoi
Hanufactuttt
Carriaget, nuyuies. ixiresscs, ett
U0, W400HB 1MB AIL KIKVS OF WA80I WOII
done to order on short notice.
Painting and Trimming
ol all kinda executed in the neatest nnd moat
artistiu style.
KtfA IKING ol all kinda Ir. my line wiU be
promptly and neatl. done.
ajt Work done althis esiabliahmcnt is war
anu-U to he sulMtitntial, put up solid sad exe
cuted in the moat arotku aolike manner, not
o oe excelled in any respect b' ny other ea
tabli.hmentin thecointry.
JOHN BIECEL,
Formerly ot Hamden.
ANNOUNCES to hit friend, in Vinton and
adjoining countiea that he kas bought the
Hotel Formerly Kept bj Ohas. Smith
Three doors west cf Maduon, oa
FRONT ST.
PORTSMOUTH, O.
lie nas reniiea innrnnanom. pan le preperu
. . . . 1 . . W , J
toentrUiatbUTeiinBpubiioft.reasonaui
rates. '
I
32 P w
3A K. H
O
o
CO
M O ,W
0
o
r
I
I
H
3
o
Er-
tv a m
3 03 P OJ
0
p S fans
'us H
id C
UK
M-t
CO
0
n v Qj
r I . r-H 'r-t
y y .r
, 40 3 i
W Q Pi
T3 O
O
O D P H
CO oh P
CI
I L TOLLET,
8 llIDi; LINE, N.Y.
IMPOHTKH
AMD DKALER1N
Foreign and American
WATCHES,
JEWELRY
Watch Materials,
Watch Makers'
ToolSjEtc.
Old Wiilcli Cnaca nnd old (.old and Sliver
bounlit.
ORDERS
lnpiiKT:t
SOLICITED.
S F. CRAMER,
HAMDENt O.
MANUF C l'UKEH AND DEALER IN
InrnrsM, S.nltllos,
ItrMlcN, II alt ri,
Ulilps, purti, Trure
Chains. Hnmes, and all
Other Articles of Saddlery.
Mv IriemN and the punlin uenerally are invit
ed to call and examine my slock and iu
ce I mnke boi1 honet work, use the
hest atock, and atll nl the very lowcal pricca.
Fl K P A"l R I N G
ami mnnurHciiirini; done to order, and nil
Work Warranto'' as Represented.
C. J. BHUNGHURST,
PHOTOGRAPHER,
nnd dealer in all kinds of
PICTURES,
ALBUMS,
PICTURE-rOKD,
aud
PICTUEE-NAILS,
COPYING
carefully dne, and the smallest oictures
enlarged to any site, and
Finished in Oil,
WATER COLORS,
or
IXDIA INK,
or any other style that may be desired, at the
LOWEST RATES.
Larue and finely finished Photographs
can be snade from old aud failed, or
scratched pictures.
Pictures of all kinds framed to
Order,
and all work jrarrauted to giro satisfaction.
I may 1K7S
The Best and Cheapest
WRITING INSTRUMENT
I3OSE0F
JOHN HOLLAND'S
COLDPENS
Circulars Sent Free,
GOLD PENS EEPAIRED,
MANUFACTORY No. 11 WKHT 4th at.
i , r --- y - mt
) UXX 1 Xil
Drunkenness in McArthur, O.
McArthcb, U.. Dec. 3d. 1873:
E'Ij. Signal: Annexed is a
communicatipn, which was pre
sented to thejeditor of The En
quirer, at this place, for pub
lication, but, was refnsed on
the ground that its contents
were were too true, and he dare
not publish fl for fear ot of
lending certain saloon keepers
and whisky-suckers, lie ad
mitted that every sentence was
correct, and that it was hia sen
timent exactly, but dare not
put it in- 'pri'jt. I should have
I
et tit matt") drop right there
were it not or tue inconsist
ency of some journalists, who
jluim indeptindence and yet
dare not denounce that which
hey know is against law, or-
er and decency, just because
hey might offenj a particular
set of. men! The proprietor of
the Enquirer had a perfect
right to reject the communica
tion, as the paper is lm own,
but we do seriously object to
lia inconsitency. lie is very
strict with his employes, and
will not employ a pn iter who
drinks, if he knows it, and also
lorbids the use of tobacco in
lis oiOce, and yet dare not
publish anything derogatory
to i lie sale ol intoxicatinpdrinks
or drunkenness, or that which
will put the ; evil out of the
sight of his employes.
The communication was not
handed to the Record, for the
reason luat our automaton
Marshal is supposed to have
lis headquarers there, and of
course we would get no hear
ng in that quarter, so our only
recourse is ine Signal. The
Mayor dared not take any
action, the nasi few weeks, be
cause he ww 4. candidate i'or
Justice of the 1'eace, and to
lave arrested and fined a
drunken individual found up
on the street, would have cost
lim a lew voles with the liquor
fraternity, lie has been elect
ed, and his luture action is yet
o be developed.
But the communication:
[Communicated.]
Editor Exquikkk: Believ
ng that your columns are
open to the discussion of any
topic that will encourage and
improve tue morals ot the
community, I lake the liberty
lo say a few words in regard to
the increase of drunkennesss
n our midst with a suggestion
lor its abatement.
What a sad comment upon
the morals oi a town are the
wrecked and reeling sped
mens ol humanity who every
day afternoons generally
can be seen up:n our thorough
lares in a beastly state ot in
(oxication. They are the daily
panoramas of "Ten Nights in a
Bar Room," with all its con
comitanls, and many offspring
of these besotted hummis in
McArthur can truly sing;
Fattier. dear father, come home with
me now.
The clock in the steeple strikes three;
The home ia so lonely the hours are
so long
For poor weeping mother and me,
The question has often been
asked; "Have we no Mayor
and a Marshal?" By the care
lessnes? and indifference of
those who should be tbo guar
dians of our town, we should
answer the question, "Nol"
There is a law, however, in
this State enacted for the re
lief and benefit ol wives, moth
ers and sisters, which we are
glad to see is being put in force
by one or two wives iu thi
community, and it Is a wonder
to us that many others do not
apply lor the same relief. We
reter to the liquor law, where
in the wife and mother can for
bid the intoxicating drinks to
her husband or son, and if the
warning is not complied with
the wife or mother can bring
suit against the saloon keeper
for damages to the amount of
three hundred dollars or more.
It is , therefore, the part ot the
wife and mother, to ear wheth
er they will submit to the en
croachments of liquor and the
destroyer oi pence and happi
ness.
I now come to the sugges
tion. If the Mayor and Mar
shal have a desire to serve the
best interests of McArthur
and her people, we suggest
that they arrest and fine every
man (and woman too, for there
is occasionally one,) found up
on the streets in & state of
beastly intt xication, and ap
ply the Iqnds realized from
fines, to the improvement of
our streets pnd cross walks, etc.
We think a handsome sum
would be realized in this man
ner during a year, and at the
same time vastly improve the
morals of the town there
would be less exhibitions ol
drunkeuuess upon the streets.
UNO.
Making A Fortune.
Samuel McFadden was a
watchman in a bank. lie was
poor, but honest, aud his life
was without reproach. The
trouble with him was that he
was not appreciated. His sal
ary was only four dollars a
week, and when he asked to
lave it raised, the president,
cashier and board of directors
glared at him through their
spectacles, and frowned on
in, and told him to go out
and slop his insolence, when
le knew business was dull,and
the bank could not medt its
expenses now, let alone lavish
nig one dollar on such a mis
erable worm as Samuel Mc
'Vlden. And then Samuel
felt depressed, and the haugh
ty scorn of the president and
cashier cut him to the heart-
lie would then go to the side-
yard, and bow his" venerable
twenty-tour inch head and
weep gallons and gallons of
tears over his insignificance,
and pray that he might be
made worthy of the cashier's
and president's polite atten
tion One night a happy thought
struck him, a gleam of light
burst upon him; and gazing
down the dim vista of years
with his eyes all blinded with
joyous tears, he saw himself
rich and respected. So Samuel
McFadden fooled around anJ
got a jimmy, a monkey wrench,
a cross cut saw, a cold chisel,
a drill, and about a ton of gun
powder and those things. Then,
in the dead of night, he went
to the fire-proof safe, and work
ing at it for a while, burst the
door and bricks into an immor
tal smash with such perfect
success there was not enough
ot that safe left to make a car
pet tack. Mr. McFadden then
proceeded to load up with cou-
pons,greenbacks, currency, and
specie, and to nail all the odd
change that was lying any
where, and so he pranced out
of the bank with over a mil
lion dollars on him. He then
retired to an tinassumming
residence out of town, and
then sent word to Ihe detect
lves where he was.
A detective called on him
next day with a soothing note
from the cashier. McFadden
treated it with lofty soorn.
Detectives called on him every
day with humble notes from
the president, cashier, and
bovd ol directors. At last
the bank officers gave a mag
nificent supper to which Mr.
McFadden was invited. He
came, and the officers bowed
down in dust before him.
Before he drove away in a
carriage, that night, it was
fixed that McFadden was to
keep half a million ot the
money, and be unmolested lr
he returned the other half. He
fulfilled the contract like an
honest man, but refused with
haughty disdain the offer of
the cashier to marry his daugh
ter. Mac U now honored and re'
spectea. He moves in the
best society, be browses around
in purple and fine linen and
other clothes, and enjoys him
elf. And often now he takes
bis infant son on his knee, and
tells him of his early life, and
instils holy principles into the
child's mind, and shows bow,
by industry and perseverance,
nitro-glycenne nd monkey-
wrenches, cropg-cut saws and
familiarity with the detective
system, even the poor may
rise to influence and responsibility.
Postal Suggestions.
The "Fat Contributor" is dis
satisfied with some of the de
cisions ot toe l ostollice De
partment, and submits "a few
improved rulings" of bis own
concoction:
Monthly magazines, publish
ed weekly, must be charged
letter postage when delivered
daily. Powder magazines, ex
ceptto regular subscribers, are
not permitted to frank their re
ports. If no stamp is affixed to a
letter retain it. If, however,
Ihe postage is overpaid, letter
ripl
If you feel any doubt about
a paper going with a one-cent
stamp, have two sent.
Seeds can go through, the
mail as merchandise. The
postmasters are cautioned
against any old seeds to go
through their mails, however.
Signs can not be sent with
out paying letter postage, three
cents on every letter.
Calico prints, any foreign
prince, reprints and foot prints,
all go as printed matter, and
pay tax accordingly. Vacine
matter must be properly (pocK)
marked.
Poetry in its various sfages,
including the Edgar A. Poe
stage, must be sent post-paid,
whether it ever paid to read it
or not.
A postmaster is not permit
ted to make any material
change in the site of his post
tilfle without nffixing a two-cent
stamp for every two ounces.
He can charge double postage
for a sight ot the postmaster.
Shirts may be mailed at tbe
rate of two cents lor every two
ounces of shirt. If tha owner's
name is on the shirt, letter
postage must be charged. This
rule is indellible.
A subscriber residing in the
county in which a paper is
printed can take the paper,
provided he pays in advance
and urges his neighbors to
subscribe. If he does not live
in the county in which he re
sides, and the paper is not
printed in the same county
where it has its press-work
done, then the county must
pay double postage on
the man we mean a two-cent
county must be affixed to every
postage.
Editors of newspapers and
their families shall be allowed
to pass tree in the mails.
Postmasters shall be respon
sible for the payment of all
subscriptions on newspapers
sent lo persons residing with
in three miles from any post
office. It any person refuses
to take the paper, the postmas
ter shall be compelled to read
it. Postage on newspapers
shall be paid or not, at the op
tion of the publishers and aub-
s ribers. If prepaid, tbe pay
ment may be made at any time
most convenient to cither, and
may be either in cash, or coun
try produce. Ine rate per
ounce shall be determined by
the editor, and the weight
shall be calculated at not leBS
than forty-lour ounces to the
pound.
A Cassopolis, Mich., man is
carrying on a game of chess
with a cit'zen ol Detroit,
Michigan, by meaua of poa
tal cards.
ADVEUTI8LNO TEKM8.
One square, $1 00
Each addition, flsertion ... 50
Cards, per yev 10 OO
Local notiect per line, 1A
Yearly advertisements' JMOO OO
column, tnd at proportionate rate pel
teg apace, rayioie in advance
W The Record beinr tbe official
paper of the town, and haying ttaf
largest circulation of any paper In tr
county, offers luperiot Inducements
to advertisers.
Postal Suggestions. Nebraska, the Homestead State
Within five yean ending
with June, 1872, more than
two-and-a half million (2,561,
705) acres were bomeiteaded
in Nebraska. This area wai
more than one tenth ot all the
acres taken up as homesteads
during twice that number of
years in all the Union, namely,
25,173.369. Up to 1868, Min
uesota and Minnesota alone
was a greater favorite than
Nebraska with homesteaders.
This preference may have re
sulted from Nebraska's being
supposed liable to droughts
or Irom its fertility not having
been fully proved or from
the speedy completion of the
transcontinental railroad not
being certain. But every year
since 1868, Nebraska has been
the homesteader's first choice.
Within four years of that data
the Nebraska acres bomsstead
ed out numbered those thus
taken in Minnesota by almost
600,000 ia exact figures, 590,
202. Multitudes of Nebraska
homesteaders took up farms,
with which they had fallen in
love an they passed, west of
the Missouri, freighting to
Pike's Peak, or Salt Lake, or
overland to California, or build
ing the Union Pacific Railroad.
The moment their occupation
as freighters was gone, they
were ready to begin as farm
ers. The American Desert
bug-bear had no terrors for
them. They had seen the soil
to be proof against both
drought and deluge unsur
passed in its yield either ot
wheat or corn and the per
fect paradise of stock-dealers. '
Their first markets were th
best, namely: leedirtg the
migratioual waves which flow
ed over and beyond them; then
they sent their crops to mines
and military posts; next, their
urplus streamed down the
Missouri to Saint-Louis, but
was soon diverted in part irom
both Southern and Western
markets to Chicago especi
ally when stowed in bags of
hog-skin and cow-hide.
Nebraska will long be the
Mecca of homesteaders; .but for
the last three years it has been
equally the resort of buyers of
railroad land. Over three
thousand settlers have bought
ol the Burlington & Missouri
River Railroad. Some of them
also homesteaded. Those who
did not, judged railroad lands
better than free farms, consid
ering their position, quality,
and the terms of sale long
credit first pay-day far oft.
ow interest, prices, free and!
half fares and halt freights,
ereat premiums for speedy
Ullage, &o.
Postal Suggestions. Nebraska, the Homestead State Burned to Death.
Irene, a child but four years
of age, and daughter of Orm
Hewitt, living on Chillicothe
street, between becond and
Third, was burned so badly
last Saturday that death csme
to her relief the following day.
Uer mother had gone out oa
the sidewalk to listen to a
German band that was playing
in the street near by, when
she was attracted by the
screams of the child inside.
She found it cowering UDdetrhe
table. She tried to smother the
flames, but was excited, and
made but little headway. A,
gentleman camn in and jerked
the clothes ofi the little suffer
er, but too late to save it. This
hould be a warning to moth.
ers. Little children should not
be left in a room where fir
burns in an open grate, with
out an older head to watch,
them. Such nnfortnnate oc
currences are common during:
the winter months, and par
ents can not guard too care-
the infants un
Porte
Porte mouth Times.

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