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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, January 15, 1874, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1874-01-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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A i T - i
THE VINTON
RECORD
Tn ifv m A nci
Editor and Proprietor
OniGIr, V. Porn'er of Mala and
Lrogaa Sta.,OopoBite Court Home.
2 :A EA.lt, IN ADVANCE.
,, r HOMEB C. JONES.
jTJORNEAT LAW,
. Mix fnr .-.
t MilK BTRSfcT, -
:;:.,irJKAjrnnm, oino.
.til Hl -
it -wl I p
rii 0mte-One door west of Dsn Will Broa.
. tteie. . i
EDWIN N. BAKNUILL,
AITORNEY AT LAW
I
-AHD-
vOTARY PUBLIC,
?v,T '.' - Office JleArthur. Ohio,
"WitriUtsnd promptly toall baiin.ssntrniid
v. bj. urn j uw'ii
v tJ, S. CLAYPOOLE
-ATTORNEY AT UW,
(PROSECUTING ATTORNEY,)
McARTHUn, O.
. Will practice i t Vinton auiladjolningroun-
111. uuei.ea entrusted to inarsrs pionipt
' If attended lo. Oilier In Court Hou.e.
' Jan2M87Sljr
AMERICAN HOUSE,
OPP081TK R. R. DEPOT.
. II A M D E N . OHIO.
3VJi CARTWKIG11T, Proprietor
iT livery Stable Attached.
IIBALS MADT rOR ALL TRAINS.
The Rohm has lut bert ininwhwi
throughout, iloomi clean and enmforuVile.
ha labia supplied with tlje best ih tnarkot
VaVor4a, and no paise spared to accomodate
gueat. man too. it
. - HULBERT HOUSE.
DC aia Streot,' Opposite Court House
" Me Arthur, Ohio,
JAMES WORKMAN, Frorrietor
tTRATB taken peasrs.lon of the ahove hotal,
I r.nnvatod and Dartlv rrrnmif.h.d It. and
wil. be glad to serve tha old miKlomers of the
kouMt.and eanecialljr my old fri.ndii of the
nooning vaiifj wno may tm tikiuun imn
Kint The table will he furniahtd with the
as the market atlords, and rare taken to
make suet comfortable. Good tahlir.c at.
teched to the houae; Charge, reasonable.
... ISmar 1871 .
WILLIAM POLAND,
WHOLESALE Oil OC Ell.
Liqjior and Commission Merchants
NO. 30 WATER STRUT)
CniLLICOTHE. OHIO.
Ale in Barrela, Half Barrel! and Bottlea.
Bona It
.DarH Smart.
Bamnel W. KlWert, Jr,
fEtlbll.hd 1861.1
SIAUT & KILVERT,
0
SDCCKaflORSTO PV1D 8MART1
.Wholesale Grocers
IND COMMISSION MEBCHANTS.
Prompt Attention riven to the
Transfer or PIG IKON and
'other Property from and to
Itallroad and Caual.
Water Street.betteten raintand Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
marlllHiiDlT .
JOHN M. GGELHNQR,
DEALER IN
Italian and Vermont Marble
ANJ)
SCOTCH CKAMTEMOXLMESTS
. ALL KINDS OF
GRAVE-YARD WORK
Neatly end prompllr eieeuted.
Mulberry Ei.let'n Second iWatei
Cnilllcothe. Ohio.
superintend all my own work In pel
t axecute all the finer deaigna, uae the
n.Kral. and san tot ha nnrteiaold. Pel
eraon.
bent
Peraone
wiahina any work in my line are touted lo
xamina work, strick and prices, before mak
IMMUllfMU.
iBeraonally snpet intend the careAil aetting
up of atoare and monuments bought at mj
MB.alJt&lkmjinf.
Br buying at thia ahop yott wL!l saTefrom 1ft
to so par cant, paid to agents. x.ari
DENTISTRY.
$10 0N1T FOB A SET Of TEETH.
Tietli Extracted FUhout Fain
..... . .... andV, !.
PERFECT SAFETY
by the use of
LAUGHING GAS.
Caa always be found at my offloej
. . , - In. H. T. B0UOE38, Jackson, Ohio.
Sjanl74
ROBERT CLARK & 00.,
FUSUSHtU WgOLXSALI AIIO RSTAII,
Booksellers, Stationers. Printers,
, liliiilers,
! i And
BLANK BOOK li Alt 'FACT UB EES
Dealers la
Un, Mrdioal, Thboumicru School,
SDd MuOaXAMBODS BuOKS,
65 Wat Fourth Strut, Cincinnati.
avroatalogues tamiahel gratoitoaaly on
anrlieation and any book sent by mail, posw
tgt paid reoaipt ol pobliibad prloa.
7X.'.nwir.C3i''..rs.ni a
o
ta
VOL. 24 -NO. 44 .
tjf :.a2 ...:;.a
MC ARTHUR, OHIO, JANUARY 15, 1874.
I
-1 ,
. WHOLE Kn i on.
WHOLESAlE.
I Ail
Paint and Second Street.
CIIILL1C0TIIE, 0.,
YVUID rwtiuilT InTite tha attention
t r si ouyara to nia alocK or
DRV GOODS,
Ortored at wholeaale pneei a low ai anj
Hto on Sale lull lines of
Brown ft Bleached NikUim,
Callcoei.t becks, Kit I pes,
Ginghams, Canton Flan
nels and Jeans. L
I' .'.Hi
WOOLEN GOUDS OP ALL ZISDS.
White and Gray Blankets
HOSIERY and NOTIONS,
HI. facilities for biiainena are unequalled,
enabling him lo otter induoemeula to th.
trade equal to an; 01 ber house.
18ep
J. ROUZER,
Manuboturer of '
BUGGIES, OAERIAGES
AND
EXPRESS WAGONS
Of latest, most faahionahla and elegant stylea,
Second St., Near Mulberry,
CHILLICOTHE, 0.
I make it a point to do all my work of the
beat material, and aland recond to none in
quality of Sniah or durability. ( employ no
interior wnrxmen, mere are no nppieniioe
bov about my e'tabliahment. and I can not
lail to iileaie any perann who wants the beit
turnout made in the country. 1 refer with
pride to my cuU,mera throughout Poutuvrn
Ohio aa to the character of woik coming
Irom my factory, and guarantee all my uua.
tomera perleut aatisttclmn.
All kinds of Turnouts finished and
ready for sale, or made to Order.
Call and examine my Stock.
Repairing, Repainting, Etc.
Will receiT. prompt attention.
1 have constantly a stock of
SECOND HAND
Carriages, Buggies and Expresses.
left with ma for sale, repaired and almost as
good aa now, aome ot inern
VERY CHEAP INDEED.
lOjul 1873
FAuL AND WINTER
FRANK IIELLMAN,
At his ne place of buHlueaa,
COET'S BLOCK, OPPOSITE UNION
HOUSE.
CHILLICOTHE, O.
t HAS THE
Choicest Stock
OF
all and. Winter Clothing
EVER Draught to thia market, bracing
all the Intent and most ftmhionm,. styles,
rui in accordance wun tna laiext iainions.
When you want a nttiby uit dvn't fail to call
on Frank. lie also CUT? and .
Makes Uarme&is to Ordei.
. and has a full liheof
Cents' Underwear
HATS AND V APS,
All clothing marked down to the LOW
EST FIL'U8. Give me a ell and 1 will
warrant aatiafaction
Siapr FRANK BELLMAN.
McAHTHUR
CARRIAGEFACTORY.
North-east corner of Mnin and Jackson streets
McARTHUR.OHly
GEO. W. BltUKTON, Proprietor
ManuCacturea
Carriaget, jtuvt- i'xprettet, ttc
AUO, WASOKS AMD ALL IlKVS Of WASoa WOSS
done to order on short notice. .. .
' Paihtiiifl and Trimming
.otail kinds eiecuted in the neatest and most
artiatiu atyle.
KKPAlKlNd of all kinds in my line wiU ba
promptly and neatl. done.
a. Work done at thia esiabliahmcnt is was.
snusd to be aubstantial, put up aolid andeie
ou'edio tha most workn-anlike msBnar, not
oe excelled in any respect b any other e
isiXishmeotio the cotntry .
JOHN BIECEL,
Formerly ot ilamden.r,
ANNOCNChS tohi. friends in Vinton ad
adjoining counties that be has bought tha
Hotel Formerly Kept by Ohas. Smith
Three doors west cf. Madison, on
FRONT ST.
PORTSMOUTH, 0.
Behal refltted lt thronabout, and Is nrapsred
entettaid the UaTl)l pubuo atreasoaabta
ratsa. ... Ilan
7A. 7,l
Jr -
BOBT.B.SMART
nHirn- . '
m a.
,H C3 Cj P P
0
i
I
o
2 M-1H o
as
Er-
6
oil 2 8,f
S itlfi
H
h
4
03'
U
w
sens
r-i H i-h ri W
o 8 s 8
W 1 ffllM
u i iii luuiJiJij
8 MAIDEN LAIME, N.Y.
1MPORTJER
AND DKA1.ER IN
Foreign and American
WATCHES;
JEWELRY
Watch Materials,
Watch Makers'
ToolsEtc.
Old Watck Case, and old Geld andKllT.r
bought.
ORDERS SOLICITED.
at a or 1873 .. . .. , .
St F. CRAMER,
HAMDEN.O.
MANOFaCrURER AND DEALER IN
llarneM, Saddles,
llrldlFN, llallera.
Whips, purs, Trace
Chains. Hames, and all
Other Ar ticles of Saddlery.
My rrtenda and the piiolio genera! ly are innt.
ei
d to call and Mamma my aioca ana pit-
ce.
bet stock, and sell at the very lowest prices,
nonei wora, use ine
REP AIRING
and manufacturing done to order, and all
Work Warranted as Represented.
C. jrBIlGHURSf,
PHOTOGRAPHER,
and dealer in all kinds of
PICTURES,
ALBUMS,
rictiKE-cos:D,
and
PICTUKE-NAII.6,
caretiiiii o
enlarged to
done, and the smallest pictures
sny mie. and
Finished in Oil,
WATER COLORS,
or
INDIA IKK,
Or any other style that may be desired, st the
LOWEST RATES.
Large1 and flaely nhhed Pkotagraaha
east bo. ssaate fraaa aid aad faded, r
aeratchad alctarea. . ,
Pictures of all kinds framed to
7 OiderV. . .' :,.
and all wofk warranted to glre sallahchod.
.. Imay lutst
. The Best and Cheapest '
WRITING INSTRUMENT
Id ONE OF
JOHN HOLLAND'S
CCLbPEN S
Circulars Sent Free.
GOLD PENS REPAIRED,
-!!(! 1. -..!' 'Il- ' ' . I "I ,
MAN0FACTOBT . Ill WEST 4tb si.
LOGIC.
lis strange, but true, that a common
oat . - ..,... j : .1 .
Has got ten tatU-uat thluk of that I
Don't see It. eh t The fact Is plain.
To prove it so I rise t'explaln.j
We gay : A cat has but one tail
Behold bow logic line the veil :
Jfo cat baa nine tails ; don't yoo se
9nt cat has one more tall than she f
Now add the one tall to the-tiln,
You'lt find a full ten Ullad feline. '
... . .1 . , !
As Holmes has said. In bis "One bone
c Hhuy, iii.' ,
Logic is Loglo. that's all I My, , ,
From the Ohio State Journal.
The Governor's Message.
, It is a oointnendable' feature
ot the Governor's 'Message,
tl.at it is coufined strictly to
S'Me matters. The tempta
tion to Jaunch oat into discus
sions of National . quest i'6aa it
one which many, of our Gov'
ernors have lound it impossi
ble to resist, and the example
ot all such as. have confined
themselves to their, own juris
diction is, ons to. be highly
praised. Another feature wort
thy of special mention and ap
proval Is, that Governor iWes,
wr.h his accUstoroed straight
e' . - .
torwara iranKneu has not
sought to throw the respond
bility upon the incoming Ad
ministration, but has heartily
assumed the responsibility oi
recommending such economic
al expenditures of the public
money as have seemed lo him
judicious and proper. The
whole Messsage breathes an
air oJ courtesy toward the in
coming Administration which
is pleasaot to see in this day
of mutual recrimination, wbeu
publie men are esteenWd virtu
ous in proportion to their mean
and degrading suspicions of
each other, and when a reputa
tion for probity seems to de
pend upon such shrewish qual
ities as would have brought
any woman in old . times to a
ducking stool, as a common
. The Message, while it Is fall,
is not long. It gives a brief
glance at State and local finan
ces, and calls attention to the
(act so strongly emphasized by
Governor Uayes in bis several
Messages that the Slate debt
proper is a small harden, by
comparison with the County,
town and township debts, gen
eral and special. Every well
informed citizen will be pre
pared to echo the recommenda
tiou of the Governor, that the
mania fur going in debt should
be restrained as lar ai possible,
by legislative resttiction if
need be The lefy, for State
purposes in leas than one-sixth
l he entire levy, and this fact
shows that it will not do to
eave county comtlissidners,
or local boards of any sort, un
restrained power to. create
debts.
The Governor recommends
a
an aonrojyjajioa of t&00fat4
nsn culture; ue anues to toe
evils of last reiphtjities and
other railway grievances, re
commending State optional
interference; recomnpnds that
the contract system br convict
labor be abolished, and the
State take charge ofthebusi
ness directly reom mends
more accurate anc circtim
scribed penalties fo; criminal
offenses, which thall secure
greater uniformity tf punish
ment for like Senas, discuss
es the question of a State Mil'
itia, ordnance siipplj from the
general government and war
claims recommends prosecu
tion of the two per cnt; claim,
"which passed the loner Uouse
in Congress by an overwhelm
ing mnjority and was d3feated
in the Senate by only me vote',
recommends encouragement
of the Centennial Exhibition by
appropriation of $5,0)0; sug
gests that Congress shoald
take charg of Confederate
graveyard near this city, now
owned by private parties or
in the absence of such actioo,
that the State government
- "' ' .
rjrMride.for its carej wirmiy
commends the Ohio Agrlcul
toral and Mechanical College
to the Legislature, and suggests
the changing of one or both the
old State Universities to State
Normal Schools; recommends
liberal measures for the com
pletion of the State Geological
Survey and the utilijation of
labors already performed; gives
a gooo wora to all the State in
slilutions, urging specially the
completion of ihe Central and
Northern LunatlcAsylums; and
finally, closes with an eloquent
eulogy of Thomas Corwin,
whose grave U marked by only
a bed of myrtle, urgiug the
.j m
erection or an appropriate mon
ument to. commemorate his
name and fame. ' .
Now, that is a good message.
We do not well see bow anv
man of either party can take
exception to many of its state
ments, qr recommeudutions.
All difference, of opinion must
be difference upon questions of
mere policy. . ..,''.'
What is a Grange?
The society known as
Grane-es, or Patrons of Hus
bandry, is Strictly' a farmers'
society,1 composed mainly of
practiced working fartners,their
wives and daughters. Recent
ly it has received, the attention
and met the general approval
of the farmers in the West,
and is now spreading like wild
fire throughout the length and
breddtb of the land.
Its meetings are held at
stated periods, for the purpose
of interchanging views, for so
cial purposes, intellectual im
provement, and the transac
tion of any business that may
properly come before it. This
of. itself is enough to com
mend .it to the patronage and
support of all intelligent far
mers. It seems to be a matter
of necessity that there should
be some understanding among
those engaged in agricultural
pursuits, as 'well as other
branches of business, that re
quire the holding of conven
tions to pass resolutions gov
erning their action. These
meetings give the larmers a
holiday, a relaxation from the
cares" and labor of the farm,
which they so much need. In
fact 'he Granges hi ay be con
sidered a school, when instruc
tions are given and received of
practical benefit to all. It
leaches lesbous ot thrift and
economy, as well as how to
niase larm lite pleasant and
profitable. Political questions
are let t at the door, and ques
tions are discussed as per
lain to business in which re
are engaged. The Grange
tepobes its members to buy
and sell for cash, and at all
times steer clear of the credit
system by which so many have
been finaneiaUj' ruined. It
wages no warfare nptfLany oc
cupation or trade, and is ?0t
hostile to any legitimate pur
suit. Its object is to bring the pro
ducer and consumer nearer to
gether, thereby benefitting
both. It oilers an earnest pro
test against injustice, and only
asks ' that its members may
have aa equal footing with
those engaged in other branch"
es ot. the w orld's industries.
But many object to its being a
secret organiaation, and say
"why not make it public?'' Its
secrets' are its life and support
the most successful business
man keeps his business to him
self. The best regulated and
happiest families keep their
family secrets. tVben Con
gress or the Cabinet have any
important business they hold a
secret session and transact it
successfully. Tne merchant
has his secret cost mark. In
fact, all have secrets known
only to faithful friends. The
8eereta; of the Grange are di-
vblgelto any farmer..w!shing
'!. .1 - t-j it il. !T
w itwwbwhw jm fl"?Z
I
egetv It la ready to clasp hands
with, any, all, Outside the
Grange, who favor progression
and advocate reform. That it
possesses advantages essential
to the farming communities
can not be well denied. Its
permanency is thoroughly es
tablished, and is being verified
by the thousands who are ral
Marshal
Marshal (Michigan) Express
From the Ohio State Journal.
An Older Citizen Still.
I see in Wednesday's State
Journal a short item relating
to Mr. Walter McFarland. of
whom the writer says: Some
Of his neighbors belioro falm
to be the oldest citizen of
Ohio." Not so. Colonel Au
gustus Stone, of Iiarmar.Ohio,
I believe, came into Ohio per
haps in 1791 or 1192. lie is
now in hin ninety-fourth year
healthy and sprightly.
Wra. Corner, now living in
Marietta) jVashinglon county,
and myself, Edwin Corner, his
brother, now residing in Col
umbua, were brought into Ohio
by their famjly, in September,
1795, and have ever since made
Ohio our home how over Bev
enty-eight years. We have a
cousin, Win. Corner, living in
Malta, Morgan county, who
came into this Statt as early
as 1796. Respectfully.
EDWIN CORNER.
Corner is not quite cor
rect. Colonel Stone came here
in 1730, when ten years old.
But our venerable citizen,
Ebenezer Battelle, of Newport,
who was 95 years old, Aug. 6th
last, came here with his father,
Col Ebenezer Battelle, from
Boston, arriving at Marietta, ib
December, 1T88 eighly five
years ago this month. Father
Battelle has undoubtedly been
a citizen, of Ohio longer than
any other person, now living.
He was married, in Beli3re, to
Mary Greene in 1800, who died
July 24, 1871 their married
lite extending the length oi
seventy obe years.
It mty here be remarked
that Mrs. Sarah (Brown) Gilles
pie, born in Pittsburgh, 1788,
arrived with her family at Cin
cinnati, Jan 10.1700; thatWm.
Moody of Cincinnati was born
there, March 17, 1790, and they
R. S. in Marietta
Register.
A parson, who was not over
promptly paid by his parish
ioners, on entering the church
one Sabbath morning, met one
of the most wealthy of his
flock and asked the loan of a
sovereign. 'Certainly,' said the
man, at the same time hand
ing over tne coin. Dominie
put it into his pockety and
preached his preach in most
capital style, and on coming
downj banded the identical
sovereign . to the man from
whom he borrowed It; 'Why,
fcXclPiuied tho lender, 'you hsve
not used the money at all.'
'It has been of great service to
me nevertheless,' replied the
parson; 'I always preach so
much better when I have mon
ey m my pocket.' The bint
was taken, and the rest of his
salary was. got together the
following afternoon.
Ah Irishman had a dream
which taught him the danger
of delay. 'I dreamed, said he,
I was wid the Pope, who was a
great jintleman as any one in
the districts, an' he asked me
wad 1 drink. Thinis I, wud a
duck swim an seein, the ln
niahowen and lemons and bU
gar on the side board, I told
him I didn't care if I tuk a wee
dhrap oi punch. , 'Cowld or
hotr asked the Pope. 'Hot,
your Holiness,' I replied; and
be that he etepped down to the
kitchen for the bilin' water.
but before he got back t had
woke straight . up. And now
Ua dirtttasing me I dida't take
(a nvlA.
ADVEUTiflLNO tfEltMSc
vdb square,... - aji lit
Each addition, .asertlon ... fib
Cards, per ye. . ..... 10 OC)
Local notlro er line, J ft
1 early advertisement $ldO 00
column, and at proportionate rate Ml
,e!Pce- Payable in advance.
W The Record being the - offlefai
Pper of the town, and having tb
largeat circulation of any paper in tie
county, offers supettoi Inducenrer-ta
to adrertlsert.
Register. One of Tom Corwin's Jokes.
vorwin's humor and sarcasm
were oi too delicate and subtle
a nature to permit of their'
transfer to paper, with much
effect. Ilia wit was spontane
ous and unpremeditated, but
wonderfully telling. Wheq;tbJ
abolition excitement was at ltd
height, he was invited to ad
dress a public meeting at Gov
ington, opposite Cincinnati. II
was apprehended that the ultra
slavery men . might interrupt
him, so he determined topropi
tiate them by an anecdote.-j
"Fellow citizens," said he, "it
is quite possible thai some o(
yon may auppOSe Ulat mjr r, .
pathiet are with the negro to-
such an extent that I would be
glad to see them prosper at the
expense of the superior race
I don't propose to refute this
notion byargument or assertion)
but I will give ray bit of exDe-
rience in relation to the hjacksj
from which vou will be able to
infer what my feelings toward
them ard likely to be. Wheil
1 was quite a voane man
t
went down the river to New
Orleans da 8 fiatboat. t re
mained in that rather lively
city for a couple of weeks, see
ar w "
ing what was worth looking at,
until, triv monev beinc ahonll
af a . w
spent) I; bethought myself of"
returning. But bne thing I had
not seen, which I was (old
was one Of the Inevitable
sights of the place. I must gd
to a quadroon ball. So, dressed
in my best clothes, I called for
a ticket to the ball, and was
repulsed with the declaration')
Uolored folks not admittedl' "
Corwin was quite as dark ai
a quadroon i
A good advertisement in
sures a business connection on'
the most permanent and indeJ
pendent basis) and is in a cer
tain sense a guarantee to thd
customer of lair and moderate)
p.ices. Experience lias shown
that the dealer whose wares'
have obtained a public celeb-
e)
rity is not only enabled to sell
but is forced to sell at reasona
ble rates, and to furnish a good
article.
If all business men would
use the "return" stamped en
velope, there would be scarce-'
ly a pofsibilty of letters being
accidentally loRt or miscarried
If the letter should be put id
without any address at all. ai
is frequently the case, it would
be immediately returned to the"
sender, if his card was printed
on it.
te
Mrs. Goddard, a daughter 6?
Congressman Vinton, Of olp
Whig timoA,has written a man'
uel of etiquette which is red
ognized at Washington. The"
first code was written by John
Quincy Adams, when he was
Secretary of Stte. and. slight--
ly amended, is still in force. .
"PATVsaid a traveler, "why
did on make the stone wall
around your shanty so thick?'
"Why, please your honor, f
hear they have extrornora high
winds in Amerlcy,so I thought'
if i built it about as thick as'
it was high, if it should blow'
over it would be just as higf.
as it was store, yer honor."
Tdat dogofyoorn flewatr
me thia morning and bit the bnV '
the leg; and 1 notify you that i
intend to shoot it the first tifflfy
I Bee it." "The dog is not mad."-
Madl I know He's not mad.
What has he got to be mad '
about! It's me that's mad"
IhAtb anything thatocodp-es-'
more space than it is worth. I .
hate to see a load of band--boxes
go along the street, and-,
I hate to see a parcel ot big:
words without anything ir
Hazlitt.
Arrratttialito reminds VvOdIb of
it.:. ilia liaA daan ttaHnv all.
' "'fe" J "T , ' '

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