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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, February 26, 1874, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1874-02-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE VINTON , RECORD.
JOttN T. RAPEIt,
JSdltor and Proprietor.
OTFIOE T.W. Comer of Main and
Loxaa 8ti. Onpoaita Court House.
'
i A YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
" ' UQMElt C. JONES.
ATTORNEY AT LATV,
'' VAIR STRKkT.
, .McAKTHUR, OHIO.
.' ' OrnoK On door wm! of Den Will Broe.
ater.
. rayMj
EDWIN N. BAltNHILL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AND
' NOTARY PUBLIC,
Office MeArthur. Ohio,
Will attend promptly to all batmen entrusted
'teblieer. ooll
. 17. S. CLAYPOOLB,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
(PU0fciCUTir:0 ATTORNEY,)
' McARTHUR, O.
Will nolle i Vinton and adjoining eons
tt(. rJusiieee entrusted to his care piompl
j attended t. Office la Court House.
JanMliTJIy
AMERICAN HOUSE.
OPPOSITE B.R. DEPOT.
HA AID EN. OHIO.
C, F. CABTWRIGHT, Proprietor.
, Jittery Stable Attached.
MBALS READY FOR ALL TRAINS.
' Th Hons has ust been refurnished
throughout. Koom clean and comfortable,
the tarn aupplled with th teat the market
aflorUa, and no paina spared to accomodate
guests, mart 1869 If
HULBEET HOUSE.
Kain Street, Opposite Court House
McArthur, Ohio,
JAMES , "WORKMAN, Proprietor
'YHAVE taken possession of the alote hotel,
Arenovnted and partly refurnished it, and
will be glad to serve the old customers of the
house, and eapeelally my old friend of the
Kooltinc Valley who msr he iling thin
jioiol The table will be furnished with the
test the market affords, and rare taken to
make tueate comfortable. Good etahlir.g at.
tsched to the house; Charge reasonable.
. Umar 1(71
WILLIAM. POLAND,
WHOLESALE GltOCEIt,
Liquor and Commission Merchants
MO. 20 WATER BTREKT,
CHILLICOTHE. OHIO.
Ale In Barr.li, Half barrels and Bottle.
OtWlT
atH Smart. Bamuel W. Kilvert, Jr.
'Established 1861.1.
SMART & KILVEUT,
8UC0B880R8TO DtVlP SMARTi
Wholesale Grocers
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Prompt Attention given to the
Transfer of PIO IKON and
other Property from and to
Uallroau ana uanui.
Water StreetMtueen Paint and Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
. mar 11 liii I y
JOHN M. GCEHNER,
. DEALER IN
Italian and Vermont Marble
AND
SCOTCD GRAN1TEH0XUMEXTS
ALL KINDS OF
GRAVE-YARD WORK
Neatly and promptly executed. .
' , i i
Mulberry 8t,,bet'n Seoond iWatei
Cnilllcothe, Ohio.
1 anMnntend all ml own work In person.
I execute all the Sner designs, nee trie best
material, and oan lot be) undeieold. Persons
wi.ninf, any worn in my lion are romea k
examine wore, swob ana price., wore ni
In contracts. ' '
" 1 personally supeilntebd the careful setting
op or .loses sou monument nougn at mj
tablitnrnenh
B buying at thisshbp yob wilj sarefrore 16
DJENT lTRY.
110 OILY JOB A SET 0i' TEXTS.
Teeta Extracted, Without laia
and with
fPEISTECT SAFETY
. ' V bf theisaaof'
LAUGHING GAS.
Caa always b Hum at my ofrloe. "'
tJaDll7t
ut. m. v. jhk.S3B, jacxton, onie.
a
B0BERT0LAEK&O0,
FtrausB
aMWioixH ajt.BiT.il.
BopkseVers,. "Putloners. ., Jointers,
Bladen, . :.'
Aid
' BLASTS BOOKMAN 'FACTUREKS
T r-r . ...... ,
veaiera w . '
'AW, -MRpWiL, TROWOiqlL, 8CHOOL,
Vfjf mr SjrpL fif
.MrtistaJognei fbmitbel gratuitously oa
-p)ioioB aod aoy book MDltr tuajl. Mat
t raOwilHMpt,
PfJp
mm
VOL. 24- NO. 50.
MCARTHUR, OHIO, FEBRUARY 1874.
WMM'Mm$
WHOLE rip. 1,246
JDvy Goods
-AT-
WHOLESALE.
Ail
Paint and Second Street.
CIIILLICOTIIE, O.,
WOTJLD respeetmllr invite lb attention
of buyers to bi stock of
DRY GOODS,
Ottered at wholesale price, a low at any
in any other market.
Have on Sale lull tinea of
Drown & Blenched Muslins,
Callcoes.Cbecks, fit. I pes,
Ginghams, Canton Flan
nels and Jean.
W00LEH GOODS OF ALL ZI5D8.
White and Gray Blankets
HOSIERY and NOTIONS.
His facilities for business are unequalled,
cabling him to oiler lnlucemenl8 to the
trade equal to any oiher home. 18sep
J. ROUZER,
Manufacturer of
BUGGIES, CARRIAGES
AND
EXPRESS WAGONS
Of latest, most fashionable and elegant styles,
Second St., Near Mulberry,
CHILLICOTHE, 0.
I make it a point to do all my work of the
best material, and aland eerond to none in
quality of finish or durability. I employ no
inferior workmen, there are no appienlwe
boys about my ettabliehment, and I can not
lxil to pleaie aoy person ho wanta the best
turnout made in the country. 1 refer with
pride to my customers throughout Houtnern
Ohio aa to the character of woik coming
from my fiu-tory, and guarantee all my cus
tomers peneci sauerujiion.
All kinds of Turnouts finished and
leady for sale, or made to Older.
Call and examine my Stock-
Repairing, Repainting, etc,
Will receive prompt attention.
I have constantly a stock of
SECOND HAND
Carriages, Buggies and Expresses,
left with ma for sale, repaired and almost aa
gnoa as new,eome 01 inem
VERY CHEAP INDEED.
10jUl 1873
FAkL AND WINTER
CLOTHING
FRANK IIELLR1AIV,
At his ne place of bnslness,
COETS BLOCK. OPPOSITE UBIOH
HOUSE.
CHILLICOTHE, O.
HAS THE
Choicest Stock
OF
Fall and Winter Clothing
Eioi
VER brought to this market, embracing
all the luteal and most fashionable styles,
cm in accordance with the latent fashions.
When you wanta nobby suit don't ball to call
OB Frauk. 'He al CU'l'e and
Makes Garments to Obdei
' and baa a full line of .
Cents' Underwear
II ATS AND CAPS, fctJ.
AM clothing marked dowa to the LOW
EST HtlUKfA. OiTemeaenlland I will
warrant aau.laotion
liapr ' FRANK BELLMAN.
MoARTHUH
carriageJfaotory,
North-eaatrornar of Mulaand Jackson street!
Mo ARTHUR. OHIO
GEO. W. BKUMON, Proprletoi
.. Manufacture
Carriage, jtuyule. Jkfyretiet, tU
auo, waooas iiiU aiau of waooa woss
don to order oa short notice.
.Painting and Trimming
ot an kind executed id lb neatest aad moat
nrUstio style.
KKfAlKlNU ot all kind ia my line will b
promptly ana aU, done.
jju Work doue at this eeiabllebment i ware
ou'ed in the moat workia-anlik manner, aot
o o aoeUed ia aoy mpeot w aay other
Ukbluitinieulm thebotnUTV ' , .T
JOHriBlECEL,
Formerly ot Bamdea.
ANNOCNCfcS tobis frlenda in Vinton nd
dJoiaiaa couptlee that h baa bought th
Hotel Ipniierl Iept by Chas. &mih
Three doon weat cf Madnon,oa
r. FQNT.ST.
PORTSMOUTH, O.
Be has tefltted it tbronvbont. sad i prepared
to en ty Ufa th hayea ptiUw at reaeoaeU
fasv -i 1 1 p, ew , iivlfrjs)
E ..IT
.
A
Pfc! 2
en
l wmmm in wr a
O
o
Q
at
E-
ui
rr ih y en
Kl 1
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o a si.?
M3e3S
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I l SS-S m
llaiii
a o 8 0 8
EH M wh P
1 a. tdlm,
8 KIAIDEIX LANE, !N.Y.
IMPORTER
AND DKALERlIt
Foreign and American
WATCHES.
JEWELRY
Watch Materials,
Watch Makers'
ToolSjEtc.
Old Watch Cases and old Gold andNiWfr
kuht.
0RDERSS0LIC1TED.
24nprl873
S F. CRAMER,
HAMDENi O.
MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN
llarnfKs, Saddles,
llrldleN, II u Iters,
Hlilps, rpurs. Trace
Chains, Hames, and all
Other Aracles of Saddley.
My friends snd the pnolm generally are inwtU
e.lto call and examine my slock and pn
cea. ImnkK gnnd hnnert work, use the
lien stock, and sell at the ery lowest prices.
REP AIRING
and manufacturing done to order, and all
Work tVarrante'1 as Represented,
C. XBIIaIGIIUEST,
PHOTO GRAFHEH,
and dealer in all kind of
PICTURES,
ALBUMS,
PICTCRE-COltD,
and ' : .
PICTTJEE-NAILS,
COPYING
esreflilh 'dne, and the smallest oictures
rnlarg.'d to any use, and
Finiohedin Oil,
WATER COLORS,
or
INDIA INK.,
r aay other atyle that may be desired, It th
LOWEST RATES.
Large nad taely alaheal Phataaraph
cma be waade lraa aid aad faded, a
ocnucka aictare.
Pictures of til landj framed to
Order,
and all work warranted to cit satlsftcboa.
lmay Mill
The Best and Cheapest
WRITING INSTRUMENT
JOHN HOLLAND'S
tqpL.DjEr.s
Circulars Sent Free,
GOLD PENS REPAIRED,
' HANUFaGTUBi- No. Ill WSbTitbal,
T 2 b bp 2
W JJ
Dr. J. G. Holland in Scribner for March.
Dr. J. G. Holland in Scribner for March. THE DELUSIONS OF DRINK
King Solomon has the credit
orbeingthe wisest man that
ever lived; and he declared
that he who is deceived by
wine, the mocker, and strong
drink, the raging, is not wise.
The delusions of drink are as
old as drink itself, and are as
prevalent now. as in Solomon's
time. There are men who hop
estly believe that alcoholic
drink is good(for them; yet
there is not cne of them who
would totnh it except as a pre
scribed medicine if it Were not
for its pleasant taste. ; The de
lusion touching its healthful
ness grows out of a desire o
justify an appetite which may
be either natural or acquired.
If a man likes whisky or wine,
he likes to think that it is good
tor biro, and he will take some
pains to prove that it i so, both
to himuoll and others.
Now, alcohol is a pure stimu
lant. There is not so much nu
triment in it as there is in a chip-
It never added anything to the
permanent forces of' life, and
never can add anything. ltd
momentary intensification ot
forcn is a permanent abstrac
tion of force from tbe drinker's
capital stock. All artificial ex
citants bring exhaustion. The
physicians know Ibis, and the
simplest man's reason is quite
capitbleof comprehending it.
If miy man supposes that daily
drink is conducive to health,
he is deluded. If he possess a
eli'guish temperamflnt, he may
be able to carry -his burden
without much apparent barm,
but b irden it is, and burden It
alnays will bp.
Alter a man has continued
moderate drinking long enough,
then comes a change-Va de
sire ti.r more drink. The old
quanti'y does not suffice. The
powers which have been insen
ibly undermined, clamor uii
der the pressure of business, for
increased stimulation. It is
applied, and (he machine starts
off grandly; the man feels
strong, bis form grows more
portly, and he works under
constant pressure. Now he is
in a condition of great danger,
but the delusion is upon him
'that he is in no danger at all
At last, however, drink begins
to take the place of food. LI is
appetite grows feeble and fitful.
He lives on his drink, and, of
t'Ourpe, there is but one end to
this viz: deathl It may come
suddenly, through the collapse
of all his powers, or through
atrophy and emaciation. His
friends see that he is killing
hims If, but he can . not see it
at all. lie walks In a delusion
from his early manhood to bis
death. .. ...'.;.. '
A few weeks ago one of our
city physicians publicly read a
paper on the drinking habits of
women. It was a .thoughtful
piper, based on a competent
knowledge of facts. It ought
to have been of great, use to
those women of the city who
are exposed to the: dangers it
portrayed, and. especially
those who have acquired tbe
habits it condemned; Soon af
terward there appeared in the
columns of a daily paper a pro
test from a wilier who ought to
be a 'good deal more intelligent
than he is, agaiust tbe doc tar's
conclusions, ine neaun ana
physique of the beer drinking
Englishwomen . were placed
over against , the health and
physique of tbe watef drinking
American women, to the die
advantage of the latter. Ihe
man is deluded. ,It is pot
ear since Sir UeoryThompson,
one of the most eminent medi
leal men in England, a man
notoriously beyond the reaih
of any purely Const ian consid
erations, declared, against the
beerj drinking of England "bn
amcUy sanitary grounds. Onr
iiteraleur declares that the
English w otoaa caa otWIl hef
a
her American sister. Thatde.'
pends entirely upon the period
of life when the task is under.
taken. The typical English
woman who has Blood by the
beer diet until she is more than
forty years old, is too tat to
walk anywhere easily out of
doors, or gracefully Within.
During our late civil war
this matter of drinking for
health's sake was 'thoroughly
tried. A stock of experience
and observation was acquired
that ought to have lasted for a
century. Again and again,
thousands and thousands of
times, was it proved that the
man who drank nothing was
the better man. tie endrired
more, he fought better, he
came out of the war healthier
than the man who drank. Noth
ing is more easily demonstra
bio than that the liquor used
by the two armies, among offi
cers and men alike, was an un
mitigated curse to them. It
disturbed the brains and vitl
ated the councils of tbe offl
cers, and debilitated and de
moralized the men. Yet all
the time the delusion among
officers and men was, that there
were both comfort and help In
whisky.
The delusions of drink are
numberless, but there is one of
them which stands in the way
of reform so decidedly that it
calls lor decided treatment.
We allude to the notion that
it is a nice thing to drink nice
liquors or wines at one's home,
to offer them to one's friends,
and to make them minister to
good fellowship at every social
gathering, while it is a very
different thing to drink bad
liquor, in bad places, and in
large quanties. A man full ol
good wine feels that he has a
right to look with contempt
upon the Irishman who is full
of bad whisky. It is not a long
time since the election of a
professor in a British universi
ty was opposed solely on the
ground that he neither drank
wine nor offered it to his
friends; and when, by a small
majority, his election was ef
fected, the other professors de
cided not to recognize him so
cially. There are thus two
men whom these sticklers for
wine despise viz.: the man
who gets drunk on bad liquor,
and the man who drinks no
liquor at all. Indeed, they re
gard the latter with a hatred
or contempt which they do not
feel for the poor drunkard.
The absolute animosity i with
which many men in ' society
regard one who is conscien
tiously opposed to wine-drink
ing, could only spring from a
delusion in regard to the real
nature of their own habits;
The sensitiveness of these peo
pie on this subject, however,
shows that they suspect' the
delusion of which her are the
victims. , They claim to be on
the side ol temperance They
deprecate drunkenness, arid
really don't see what iB to be
done about it. They wish that
men would be more rational in
their enjoyment of the good
things' ot Ihe world, etc., etc
but their eyes seem blinded to
the' fact that they stand in the
way of all reform. Tbe horri
ble drunkenness df the larger
-a - a) 57
cities of Great Brit tain, wnh
which no hell that America
holds can compare for a mo
ment, can . never be ; retormed
until the drinking habits of
tbe English gentry are reform'
ed. With eleven twelfths of
the British clergy wine drink
ers, and water-drinkers tabooed
in society, and social drinking
the fashion in all the high lite
of the fe'alnijthe workman will
stand by bis gin, brutality wi.ll
reign in its own chosen centres
undisturbed, and thoe centres
will increasingly become what.
(o a irighttol extant, ther al
ready MeAJesteli'ng sores upon
the body social, and stenche
in the nostrils of tbe world.
The habit, neither of Great
Britain nor Ameiica, will be
Improved uh'ti! men of influ
ence in every walk of life ate
willing to dispense with their
drinking customs. Hundreds
of thousands of English speak
ing men go to a drunkard's
grave every year. There is
nothing in sanitary considers
tions as they relate to the mod
erate drinker, and surely noth
ing in the pleasures of the mod
erate' drinker, to mitigate this
curse. It is all a delusion. The
water drinker is tbe healthy
man, and the happy man.
Spirits, wine, beer, alcoholic
beverages of all sorts are a
burden and a bane, and there
is no place where a good man
can stand unshadowed by a fa
tal delusion, except upon the
safe ground of total abstinence.
LTutil that ground is taknn, and
held, by good died everywhere
there can be no temperance re
form. The wine-drinkers of
England find America have
the whisky drinkers in their
keeping. What do they pro
pose to do with them?
Purity of Character.
Henry ard Beechr drawB
the following beautiful parai.
lei:
"Over the beauty of the
plum and apricot there grows
a bloom and beauty more ex
quisite than the fruit iUelf; a
soft, delicate flush that over
spreads its blushing cheek.
Now if you strike your band
over that and it is once gone,
it is gone forever, for It never
grows but once. Tbe flower
that hings in the morning ira
pe&rled with dew arrayed
with jewels once shake it, so
that the heads roll oil, and you
may sprinkle water over it an
you please yet it can never be
made again what it was when
the dews fell lightly upon it
from Heaven. On a frosty
morning you may see the panes
of glass covered with land
scapet-, lakes, trees, mountains,
all blended into a beautiful
fantastio .picture. Now lay
your hands upon tbe glass, and
by the scratch of your finger
or the warmth of the palm, all
the delicate tracery will be ob
literated. So is there a beeu
ty and purity of character
which when touched and de
filed can never be restored; a
fringe more delicate than frost
work, and which when torn and
broken will never be re-em
broidered. A man who has
spotted and soiled his garments
in his youth, though he may
seek to restore their color can
never whollyido it, even were
he to wash them with bi& tears.
When a young man leaves bis
father's house with the bless
ing of his mother's tears stii
wet bn bis forehead, it he once
loses that he can never make
whole again. Such is the con
sequence of crime. Its effect
tan not be eradicated; it can
only he forgiven."
Tust have a span of horses
in Depere, Wisconsin, which
are kept lor trading and Spec
ulation exclusively. They sold
ia green Bay for 65 cents.
Then they rapidly rose In val
ue until they broiight $5. Ex
citetnent running high, and ap
pearanees indicating that they
would soon be able to stand
alone, they were put up at a
raffle and seventy-five tickets
were sold at $1 each. A De
pere man wou them, and
thought himself lu2ky, but al
ter feeding tbemflO worth oi
hay and oats, he became din
couragtid, and sold them at 74
cents. Tbe man who got them
traded them to a barber foi
two months" shave, and tb
barber went but the other da
aud hung himself. The resit
is that the horseS are how wiu
Out a protector. ' - "
a,
ADVEIITJSLNG TEHM.4:
One square, $ rjU
Each addition, asertlon .... , CO
Cards, perye io Oil
Local notlcti- per line, 1,
Yearly adrartlsemenU ftlOO (Hi
column, and at proportionate rate pri
lesaapace. Payable In advance.
ty The Record being tbe officii) )
paper of the town, and having ttr. r
largest circulation of any pnpt-r In tr i
county, offers luperloi InJocemcLti
to advertiser.
Mild Winters.
The mildness of the present
season, both here and in Eu
rope, has induced some cf the
book worms to look up prece:
dents. ,The result ia that so fair
least, as Europe is concerned
for we haVe not the same rec
ords here to fall back upon, the
present bears no comparison to
home of the winters long gone
by. In 17T2 the temperature
was so high in England that
leaves came out on trees ii
January, and birds hatched
their broods in February. It.
1283 the winter was equally
mild, and the maidens t Co
logne wore wreaths of violef
and corn flowers at Chrlstmai
and oh Twelfth Day. In 142i
the tree's flowered in the month
of March, ahd the vines in the
month ol April. Cherries ri
pened ia the same month, and
grapes appeared in May. Ih
1573 the trees were covered
with leaves in the month of
January, and the birds hatched
their young as in 1172; id
1585 the same thing was !re
peated, and it is added that the
corn was in ear at Easter. Therd
was in France neither snow nor
frost throughout the winters of
1538, 1607, 1609, 1617, 1659; fli
nally, in 1662, evec in th'eWrtli
of Germany, tbe stoves were
not lighted, and the trees flow
ered in February. Coming to
later dates, the winter of 1846
7, when it thundeied at Paris
on the 28th of January, and
that of 1866, the year bf the
great inundation of the Seine,
may be mentioned as excen-"
tionally mild. '
The Twins.
The Philadelphia Dispatch
says: 'In the Siamese twins
tutopsy the first day was takett
up by photographs of th
corpses, which were taken in &
number of positions, and from
different points of View, io ih
to put on permanent redOrd t&J
external appearances, the first;
cut looking toward the autopsy
was made in the abdomen ' of
Eng. A hand was passed in &i
the opening, and the fingers
carried nearly to the center of
the fleshy band of union. Thirt
shows that the lining of th
membranes of the general ab:
dominal cavity has lines open"
ing into this fleshy band.
uCasts have been taken witit
hichlv successful result. A-
well known artist, conversant
with the subject from practice?
in the army hospitals, has beeii
engaged to make drawings bt
tbe internal pacts as they ar
developed." .
Sugar From Sawdust.
It is reported in England
that a French firm has 'dis-
Covered a method' Of making
artificial sugar from materials
so cheap that it can be sold at
a farthing a pound. Concerning
which the Manufacturer and
Builder says: ''When we con'
aider that sawdust il theap'
and rich ih lignite, which, by
chemical treatment with
mineral acids', may be changed
into grape suear. we should nob
at all be surprised that tbt
above report turns out to be)
r be; and the sawdust is thd
material from which this cfieajt
sugar is obtained; Changing!
old linen; rags into sugar -is
well-knoWd chemical experi
ment. Such rags are almost
pure lignite, while Sawdust alsrt
consists ,01 lignite, boweVeVi
with . some . other ingrediehr,
easily removed. From, rags lb
sawdust is but one Step;" '-'"I
The office ol ihe McArthur
Enquirer has been enlarged so
as to accommodate the rdtafll
rocer businest s iu which the
publisher has e m b a r k e fl.
Hocking Sentinel.
Il the editor of tbe Enquirer
vould have embarked in that
'Usiness lf'iig ago,' thfc Demo
raey bf that etonty would.
Logan
Republican.

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