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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, March 19, 1874, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1874-03-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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VINTON RECORD.
JOHN T. RAtER,
Editor and Proprietor.
OrnOEU, . Corner of Main and
Logan StaH UupoBite Uourt Mouse.
$3.Jk,YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
lIOMElt C. JONES.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MAIN STBEhT.
' . McARTIlUR, OHIO.
OrnoK Ondoor west of Dn Will Bros.
Vote.
nnr30 jl
EDWIN N. DA1CN111LL,
ATTORNEY ATy LAW
Oiliue JlcArUmr.yUio,;,;,; :
"Will alton't promptly to all butmrm nHBi
1o.ia earn... , . r y , - 'UoWJ
u s. claypoolbT
; Atto r k e y at -laW,
. (PROSiXlVirO ATTORNEY,)
; McArthur; o.
Will prsdic it "inlon smudlolninircoon".
1iM.' Busi.e-lsniruMPii to lii.cara nioinpi
ly tlrn.lmi lo. Uflte In Court lloltoS.
janitllB78ly . - j .
AMERICAN HOUSE.
, 0PPU8ITRR.B. liEIVr.. ,
IIA MDEN Oil l O.
C, F. CARTW Proprietor,
j , . Livery . Htablett Attached.- ...
MBAI.S RRADT FOR ALL TBAINB.
The House has ut ben rvrurniHhcil
throughout. Hooms clean and rnmfortaMe.
the taMa supplied with the lt iha market
alforiia, and po pains spared to womn.W
.guests. . ,. 'marl Wk ly
.HULBERT HOUSE.:
Main Street, Opposite Court House
.File Arthur, Ohio,
JAMES WORKMAN, Proprietor
I HATE takaa pnasmwlon of the ahoy hotel,
rennynted and pVrllv riliirni-lieii it, and
ml. b liid to re the.. Id e,inier ol the
houe, anil eNHWlnlly my old Irn-l it. ol Hie
Hocking Valley ho may he- swims; ihi
point the Ixl'le .will le nmn.ht-d with Hie
Dsattnt JunrKet annfiia, anil rare Kn 10
raaka gueala nmliirUlUa Uood nUMir.tf at.
tai'hed to the lionet-jr Cbxrfrrs reaaunHlda
lSiaar, WS . . '. .,
ly L.J A JH tT Vaj A U,
WHOLESALE GUOCEK,
Liquor and Commission Merchants
NO. 20 WATER STRKKT,
CntLLICUTIlE. , .r . OHIO.
Ale in Barrel!, Half Barrels and Rottles.
norMl
Dayii Smart. Samuel W. Kilveri, Jr.
V ) r , IEtabirhd 1853 f '
MAt' & KILVERT,
- BUCCESflORSTO rtVlPBMART l
. Wholesalo-. Grocers
AND COMMISSION MEECHANTS.
Prompt' Attention yrivento tlit
TranslVr of IltON ami
other l'ronvrty from and tn
Kailroadand Canal.
Water Street.between Paint and Walnw
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
mar II lw.li It
70HN M. GCEKNJGxi,
DEALER IN
Italian and Vermont Marble
AMI
SCOTCH GIIAMTEMO.L:IIEVrS
ALL KINDS OF
GRAVE-YARD WORK
Neatly and promptly exeruted.
Mulberry St., het'n Second &Watei
" Cnillicotlie. Ouio.
iiaupermtend all my own work In peron
I ezeufeall Hie finer leijMi, 'ie Hie liet
miter ial. and cxn mt he I 'S'leicolil. P.rona
wiahinn any work in line are invited to
ex mme work, stock and prirre, lieiore link
inn cnnlracia. , , -
t pereonally aniieiinlend the onrefni aetlini
op of alim s and nionuinu'Hf bought at in)
eetai'lishroent. ,
Hr huyuiK at thl ahop you will savefrnm 1ft
o 29 percent, paid to av nts. 2tapi73
BtGNTl fTUY.
$X9 ONU FOB A SET Of TEETH.
Teeth ' Extracted Without Fain
and with . ' ." '1
PERPEOT SAFETY
by ihe aas of
LAUGHING GAS.
Can always be fuuud at my office.
' Pr. 8. T. BOUUBsd, Jackson, Ohio. .
janl874. .. . .
"SOBERT CLARK & CO.,
Posu.uiai WaotasiLi asd Rst.il '
Booksollers, ;. Ptatloners. Printers,
'Binders, .
. ; . n '. . ..
BLANK BOOK MAS 'FACTUBEES
- . . Dealers la .. f .
r '
Lav, Medioal, Thbolooiorl, School,
'. Sod tI80KLAMK0D8 BuoKS, ...
65 Wat Fourth Street, Cincinnati.
'WCatalojraes fnrniahel gratailouely on
appllesbon aid aay book eent by mail, poet
aje paid on receipt otpubliahad prioa. ,
THE
I -iri , ;v . -
1W
VOL, .2.5 -NO. 1.
mwtm
MO ARTHUR, OIIIO, MARCH 19, 1874.
WHOLE NO. 1,219
-AT
WHOLESALE.
Paint and Second Street.
CHILLICOTHE 0.f
tVOCI.D resp,'liu') inrita tht attention
Y I ol buyer to his .took, of
DRY- GOODS,
Offered at wholenalr prices "Its (o as any
in any other market. ''' ',''
' .i' I Hay on Fair full lineaof ; ... c
Brown & nienched Muslins,
i '
j CIICOCfXllCtiiS, fl.lpCH, '
Ginghams, Canton Fliio-
nclsund Jeann.
W00LE5 GOUDS OF ALL Ilimk
White and Gray Blankets'
HOSIERY 'taf NOTIONS,
' Bl l.cilitis for hnnnens are unequalled,
e.a)lii'ii him in i Hr inihicenieni In the
trade eiUa4 In spy ni her hoiie . 1Hei
J. ROUZER,
t-i: - Manufai'tirer of
BUGGIES, CAEMAGES
-AND
imi . . . '
EXPRESSWAGOHS
Of latent, most faahionahle and elegant styles
Second St., Near Mulberry,
CHILLICOTHE, 0.'
I make it a point to no all my work of the
heat inaierixl, and eland Feepud.in none in
l"H.liiynl OiihI) or durhilii. I employ n .
nHerir wnikmen, there are no aiipieniiee
laiya nlaiiii e lii liliahneid. and I ean ihi
tail lo hlea.e miv nerenn a ho aanla the tai
nininnt mnile in Ihe cnimiry. I refee miiIi
hriile lo ii y iittniiera lliruiiahoiit Miuiueri
'JJild aa lo 1'ie ehami'ier of hoiH ronni.i
irlin my fH- lurv, and unarauioa all ml vua
toinara perfect miimI .I'lum.
All kinds of Turnouts finished and
ready for sale, or made to Order.
Call and examine my Stock
Repairing, Kvpaliitliiff, Etc.
i. .,
Will recoive pmmpt attenlloa.
1 have conatanily a atock of
SECONDHAND
Carriages, Buggus.and Expresses.
ltd with me lor aide, n paired end almost
good na n w.M.ine of ihrni
VERY CHEAP INDEED.
ki.uI i:a
DIPLOMA.
Aair.nBy tus
American 1 nstitute,
TO J. W. McKEE,
OK '
Embroidering and Fluting Machines
It la ingenn.nl and will het Ihe wnnia ot
every umlion in Ihe land.''
Exhibition of 1872.
Jo in E. fiimt. Km- s.o'yi F A. Pamard,
. bamiiel 1. 'I'iIiiihii. Corn apoiidiuij
cei''Y,
New Vnrk. Noreml erVNi, lf7J
This simple ai.d lim moi a mai hine la
llaellll Ma Mat aewlhtf liiai-nine. a, id .. Ia. he
eiiniiiiK pKpimr nh lali,a, in Ihe I l u-i o
exp ni.e nieille wink, ila wnrk heiiiu iniieh
lump hai'i't-i n e. n qiiiini n.m h Ii -a nil"
anil nit one-te.Hh i ait lie expense la
dy'a lnllel I. eiilllplPleHlllioill it Am chm
ailli illi htrnted fin l'- nil'' lull Inm ti t.
aeni on reeen t ol I'i or t)ii.heil in sil.e plat
tnr2 75.
Adureaa, The AfrKce Mnnn netmlns Co.,
:a , It.antt... Aei. ! ra.
AfiENTS WANTKD.
.;.M i'A.HTH TT.I t
CARRIAGE.rACTORY.
Nurih-east cornel of Mi In and .Taokann streelf
, 1 McAKTUUR. OHIO
GEO.' W. BULMOX, rroprictoi
llHuulautuiss ' ' '
Uarrtaies, jsuuuits. Sxrenet, etc
ALSO, WAOONS AMU ALL SIKHS OF WAOUS WOSI
uon to order on uliorl notice.
: Cfimtina and Trlmrnina r
utall kluu eAi.uieu tu llle Lbaiva. uu M.uvl
arliot.u atjle. . -
ribi - or all kinds in my line will be
pro pti uu'i nenii, uuuu, ,
ju Worn doiifcHlthie ea aulialinK'pt is war.
Mlik u to l eiioslaullal, I.UI Ul, eoliU Mini exe
cu rdiu ihe iuoi aorkn siilike maimer, not
u oe exet'lleu in any resK;vt b any other es
lablialmieuiiu iheuoLUUT. I, ' i )
JOHN BIECEL,
. , ' Formerly ol iiuunieu.i. "
AM.Vi.iUNCfc.8 to his frienda in Vlnlon and
adjo.nina counties that he has bought the
Hotel Formerly Kopt by Ohas. bmith
Three doors west cl Hadmon, on
. -.i . .
FRONT ST.
Portsmouth; o.
He has refitted it Ihronahoul, and la prepared
lo aotertaiu llie tiavelma publir si rew.nalle
. , . Jans .
Chas. BoDHAan. ,.' '
11. H. Horraa.s.
BODM N'S
LEAF TOBACCO AEEHOUSE.
EaUhliahe.1 1H61 67.69,61 and KjUeat Fn ntat.
Koot of -ii.enaioo Hndve, III KOlN 1 1. 0.
I'has. H..DMAN t o., Proprielora. tally ain
lion and private eilea of leaf tba--o. Buh.
neaa airi lly rnmima-lon. I H-eml ad an'-ea
ma.e on .'-.
$7.00 CjAtvAA hi,
Agents wanted eyerywhera Bi t neaa atriet-
IT lenitimaie. l-srtlculars Jfreo. Address J i
W0BTU,8t Louis, Mo UaaptlT -
DriDin d cmah
nUDl.D.OlUM
9
a 2 S PlW 5.
N d S S MP O
u
Hi
0
1 9 cdAkT Q
a a o JdeTj
eg
Z o
1 i win . h.
O S S 8 SS.&
H
hi
H
as
CZ3
eJ LV 4
6 fc I rt
M SsS.2 co.
JssIb-
HW oh ft
W. A. TOL ET,
8 II I 1 1)1. MIVU, .Y.
IMFORTKu
ANIi M6A1.EBIN.
Foreign and1. American
w
; JEWELRY
Watch Materials,
. ; Watch Kakers'
"'Toole, Etc.
Old Watch Cases and aid Cold andMllvrr
buukht.
UHDERS SOLICITED.- --
itprlK7:i
S F' CRAMER,
II AISIDLCN'O.
M ANUF tOI'UHER AND DEALER IN
HarnPkfl, SadtlloN,
iti ldi n, II it 1 1 v r n,
WhN, i ii rn, 'I r re
' Chains .Hmes, and, all
OtherAr.iesuf Sjtdtllejy. -
My Irienda ami he plinth i(eneji:isreinlt
ei to eall ami examine my alock imhI pit
' 1 nmkrt inioo. .Iu.ue.-t" nl k.' liee lh
' ed alci k .iiiirt h. II al the ec) (owist prlcie
U K V aTT tI I ' Nd
and nmnnriidurint; done loonier, and all
Work VarranteJ as Represented
C. J. EEIINGIIURST,
PHOTO GHAPHEP.i
anddHilerin all kinds of
PICTURES.
ALB OB'S ,
riCTUKE-fOKD,
Sod
P I C.TXJ n E-IT A.1 3LS,
oopTiwcv
cerefulh d' ne, and 'he malleat idctnres
iHartii il to any use, aint . .
Finished in Oil,
WATER COLORS,
or
t I N;D,I A I N it !
0 any oitaerl)le that may be desired, at Ihe
1 OWl-ST RATES.
I.nrar and Bnely flnlahed Fliotosraiiba
i nn It . Ii win old and Ikueu, or
crutclieu pictures. - .
Pictures of all; kinds framed lo
Order,
and all wnrk arrauted to jpya satishclion. -
I may imii , r
.,i I ,v '.(! , , . ' ' .1.1
The Best and Cheapest
WRITING INSTRUMENT
IdONEOir -
JOHN HOLLAND'S
C0LDPEN3
Circulars Sent Free.
GOLD PENS REPAIRED,
' MAHUFACTORT No. 119 WKST tb st.
g- -r -a.' rs T "Vt.TWt ' A m f
J 1 J (JXjLN JN .U.J.e
llmsj 1871
r3
rl eG
K .3 .ti
L 1
If 11 1 VJ1JU
The Value of Coal Lands.
We copy the; following lrom
the Jackson fetandard. The
letter ia in reply to a question
put the week beion what is
ihe value per acre of the coal
contained in a four feet vein at
one centjoer bashel, one-fourth
of the coal being allowed for
pillars and wastage:
I saw Allen! Austin at the
Gibson UouselaBt Saturday,
he in'ormed mibat the sals of
Lesley's and JIcU bee's lands
hud been completed. As stat
ed last week, Mr. McGliee
cleared thirty thousand dollars
on tiiis land. .And yet I am
sure that he lost ten limes that
amount by not holding bis land
a year or two longer. Mr. Aus
tin said that hh bud sold lor fit
ly dollars per'acre, the lands
immediately across the road
lrom the McGhte farm, only a
lew y ears ago, and then that he
was getting a good price lor it.
I stited Ids!' week that 1
believed the l3uiidy Ir-ict. ol
1,000 acres, ja"inw worlh SI,
000,000. , Was i hat an txtruva
gunl asheriion?. Let u.s see. On
daiurday night 1 iound the iol
lowing in the Posh (lice:
JACKSON, O., Feb. 21.
"Mr. Macklky: in the per
usal ol ibis week s paper, I note
i be problem given b.v you lobe
prepared by some school boy
or your next article. Now, 1
mi a lit le sc hool girl, mid not
it lo; bul knowing that you
are a "woman's "rights" editor I
ni noj airuid at ail; lor women
ire iily litile girl groan tail.
I now - submit 'the solution
inch is at your pleasure 1
find iii my arnhme ic thai 43,
560 eq It.' make an Hi re; then,
niiiti; lying by 141. I have 6
272G40 sq. in. which 'is' one
tne. Now, allowing oiie-lourih
il ihe veiii ( which ia 4 If thick.)
r pillare-uftd waiUire, I It tve
3 It , or 36 .'in. in height;
hem iunliipling bv 36 I have
225S15f)4() en.' in if comI;' then,
nviiiing 225 815040 cu. in. b.v
2, CSS cm. in., the niimh' r in a
oshel, I have 840,008 bu
which at one cent gives $840
0S, the vulue ol an acre ol
1'1'mI.
,lI am a constant reader of
our spii-y. Standard.
' "Hopefully yours,
"EDIE SCOTT."
Very well. It will be seen
that at tin's very liberal esti
mate, the Mctihee farm of 400
teres, al 840 per acre, is worth
?33(3.000. Practical coal min
eraarrure me Iba' one-fourth
or pillars and waste is totnlb
ral ar. estimate. I am also
hsured tbat my price is much
o low. I am inlormed that
v'ood coal in the ground, as
'asy ol access as the great Mi'
irm vein, And lying right on (or
under) a railroad, is always
woitb filly cents per ton. Al
that price, what would an acre
of coal be , worth? , I will not
i-k Miss Edie to give me the
solution,, but J 'will attempt it
mvself. One acre contains 84.
08 bushels A bushel weighs
80. lbs. . This would give 28
hiiKhels fo the ton. Divide 84,
000 bv 28, and we have 3 000
ions per acre, whirh ai 50 cents
per Ion is ' wort n $1 500 Frank
Anxtin ' has ihe coal under
1,400 acres, which he proposes
to sailor abouf $100 per acre.
Take thjs from $1,500 ihe price
of one acre ot Conl at 50 cents
- - - . y
per ton, ' and we bate $1400
peculation on eacb acre. Mul-
i;ily the profit on one acre
(1,400) liy Ihe n urn tier ol acres
in the tract, (1.400) and we
have the enormous sum of $1
960 000' profit on the Austin
lands.
J Ypu will Btly that this is en
tirety too r extravagant that
there" are no snch 'field tor
speculation, 1 or capitalists
would' rash in 'and occupy at
tee. There is a mvslery in
all such matters. Ills marvel
ous why sensible men often let
eo'den bppnjtunilies'lhus pass
l.eyond their reach, ' But so it
is.' ,. . -. . . . -
'There" can be ro question
at'oul this coal Leinu there, just
as I estimate It. Th pfx-e put
is as low as . it can ever reach,
-and figures cannot liew .
An Admirable Speech by a
Good Old Man.
From the New York Tribune, 13th Feb.
Tho admirable little speech
of Peter Cooper at the Area
dlan reception the other night
was studded with terse expres
sions of the philosophy of life
to which his noble experience
hasledhim. lie was constrain
ed to say that one of the things
which how rriost surprised him
in his reminiscences, was to ob
serve how much be had seen
come to pass and how little he
had himself been able to do.
The recipe by which he had
preserved at the age of eight-
three his .youthful cheerfulness
and buoyancy was this: always
lo give a friendly welcome to
new ideas, never tojeol too old
to learn, never to lose faith in
humm nature, believe iri the
progress of man to a better
social condition, and trust, in
the ability of man to establish
and maintain elf:eovernmenr.
Hp recognized that while the
object ot business is to m:ke
money in an honorable manner,
the object of life is In do good.
To phrases like these we can
add jn a Saturday's issue no
pleasanler conclusion to thesp
remwineences of the old phil
anthropist's latest appearance
(long may it be before we must
say his last!) than the words
with which he ended his mod
est response to speech in his
honor: Let me snv Ihen.in con-;
elusion, that my experience of
life has not dimmed my hopes
for humanity; that my sun is
not setting in clmids and dark
ness, but is going down cheer
lully in a clear firmanont light
ed up by the glory of God, who
should always be venerated
and loved as ihe infinite source
and Inuntain of all liirht, power,
ii-idihim ntirl vAOitnaio 'I
in
od
it.
if
Family Attachments.
One ot the saddest things
about a large family who have
lived together for years under
the old roof tree, is the scat
tering to distant homes, which
lakes place as they grow up,
one by one, to years of maturi
ty. It is often the case that,
in the cares and bustle of bus
jtiess, fellers grow mors tin
frequent, and finally brothers
and sisters will sometimes en
tirely lose fight of each other
These kindred ties are too sa
cred to be thus lightly served.
It takes such a little., while to
write a letter, and the expense
is so trilling, that there can
hardly, be an ' excuse lor the
neglect. A loving family cir
cle, thus widely seven d. adopt
ed a curious but beautiful plan
of kt eping inlormed of each
others, wellare, Ihe two tn ist
remote, on the 'first of each
month, write a part of, a page
on a large sheet containing the
principal news of the month,
and this is pealed and iorard
ed to the lamily next in order.
Some member of the house
hold aids a little contribution
mid sends it on to Ihenex', and
so on till ihe circle is complete
Thus the family circle goes i's
rounds twelve times a year,
and each one is kept well in
formed of the j'ys, sorrtiws,
plans and puriui s ot the oth
ers. Family "gatherings are
Irequelit in iuch household,
and the o-d home attachment
never grew cold. '
Sons, in particular, away
from Lome are - apt to grow
very neglectful : of - letter wri
ting. - It they knew how many
heartaches such neglect' often
causes to the loving breast that
pillowec their tired heads in
childhood, they would not be
so thoughtless. If they knew
the joy. that a letter brought,
and could see how, its lightest
words were dwelt over, and
talked over by the fireside,
they would not be so sparing
of those messages. Ate no
some of os sadly iu arrears in
this particular! . : ! . .v..
it
at
I
in
he
I
a
Selecting a Wife.
We have heard ol this tet an
plied to servant girls, bnt John
blarkley was the man who an
plied it to the selection of a
wife. The Sfarklevs a id th
Belknap? had been hind
through several generation.
In Ihe present generating there
was, m theStarkley familvjone
son, and in the lamil.v ft Bel
knnps there were fiv) daught
ers; and it had been trranged
between the parents that Ihe
heir of the" Starkleys should
take him a wife from amonirlhe
daughters 'of Belknap. John.
the heiraloresaid, at the age oi
five and twenty, had returned
lrom his travels, when his fath
er bade him select the daught
ers of the friendly house the one
he would have for a wile. John
was a dutilul son, and his haatt
was who'e, and as the tn tidens
were all fair to' look unon, h'
accep'ed Ihe situation, deter
mined to master it if possible
John spent several evenings
the company of the young
ladies, and it was difficult to
decide which was ths mst
charming, though his fancy rest
most lingeringly upon the
youngest not that she wa
handsomest, but she appeared
the most sensible.
One day John wns invited to
dinner, and in a advance of the
family be made his way into the
hall, and threw a broom upon
the floor directly across the
passage to the dinfng room. By
and by th summons sonnld
for the meal, an! Jotn watched
for the rps'ilt. The eldest rtaugh-
terstepned over the brorm loft-
ilv. The second went around
The third gave it a kick
from her path. The forth gave
an ex'ra kick. The fi'ih-tht-youngest
stooped and picked
broom no. and took it to the
tar corner of the hall, and se
carefully out of the way.
And .)nhn select.! the meek
evpd fair haired maiden who
had thus stood th tpst. and he
nevpr had occasion to regret h;s
choice. She preyed to be a wife
who looked well to' Ihe wavs of
her household, and her heart
had no lack of faith and love.
Italian Railroads.
A correspondent writing
from Italy saysi-Ilcr railroad"
are magnificent s'ruetu'es, the
waiting room elegantly fres
coed, and the seats of the finest
silk velvet. When the train
stops for dinner they give you
one hour to eat your meal.
The railroad beds are the
smoothest I, have ever ridden
rver: the embankments are all
liuilt of solid masonry of the
most substantial nature, 'and
the bridges are all massive
stone.. Il the bridges!, embank
ments and' road beds of th
New York Central Railroad
were built like those of the
High Italy Railway, that road,
with its immense revenues,
could not pay a h ilt per cen
dividend 'on the cost ot its con
ruction: . ' ; - .!l '"
"The expense of running rail-
rnads in Italy ' is enormous
Every tun of coal is bought In
England, costing ten dollar
per tun, and transported at hh
enormous cost to Italy. The
88tem is admirable; Of course
do not like the carriages; but
every other respect they ex-
i - .
eel us Americans. Ltlsimpos:
ble for a traveler to get into
the wrong Irain orcar, even it
does not 6pe tk a word ot
either French or Italian. Eve
ry man connected with a rail
road wears uniform, and -the
guard lifts his hat to you as he
politely examines your tioket.
h-ive traveled nearly 4,OXJ0
miles in Europe, on many dr
lerent roads, and 1 never missvd
train or knew one tn be, five
minutes behind time,- -. Si.relv
,. .... . 4 . :..J. t.
stub tacts attest '.he txcellrnce
of the railway system in Italy.?
ajsaasMfiiiiiiiBJw i ";,.- gg
ADVEUTJJJIfla TKKM8.'"
One gqnare, ......Tj J
Ijicliadilltloc. nsertion ,,.
Cards, per yes- . .; iO i 0
Local notice, per line, ir
Yearly advertisements $100
column, and atproportronaterate i i
lessapace. Payable In advance.
WThe Eecord belnff the cfflcihJ'
PSUerof the town, anil liavtno- tl r :
tartest circulation orany n:rrin trW
county, offers luperloi'liijucemcts
to advertisers.
i " t '
' Tnu second edition ' of th4
Medical Times sajS the aatopsr
of the Siamese twins was contin
ued on Friday lat, resulting in
some interesting disclosures; II '
sayst "Ou Friday tne commission
continued the autopsy on the '
Siamese twins, and made some
important discoveries. The,
found that the two liven wbirft
were supposed to be joined only
by biood vessels were really one
body, sarencaymatous tissue be
ing continous between them, so ,
that when they were removed .
from the bodies and placed on
The so-ca'led traet of portal con
tinuity ia therefore liter tissue.-'
It will be remembered that .Changs
was said to be possessed of one'
more pjuch than Eng. WLeo tl e
liver was removed, however, an
upper hepatio poach was found
alHil nrnroArliiirr frnm V.nit an
that the band contained four
pouches of peritoneum, beside
liver , tissue. These disclosures
sbow that any attempt during life
to saparate the twins would in all
probability have proved fatal."
A Philadelphia correspondent
of the Boston Journal of Com-'
rnerce tells how money is spent
a t Centennial headauartera:
A ,.
Thomas Webster receives S300 ai
month for special . literary ser-.
vices, B. II. ilaines receives
$500 per month, and William B
ilubbins $250 for the same sort?
of work, which consists mainly iri
copying circulars. The other ben- .
eficiuries are J. E. Peyton, who;
as general viator to different
Siates, gets $300; Hart, general
editor, $300; a man named Blake j
$500; a mau named Petit, $300;
aiid Charles B. Norton, $400
per mouth. At this rata it will
take about the amount donated.
by New Jersey to keep thesef
copyists and runners going urrr
til '76. '
Fkom the loiiowmg from th 6
Pomerny Telegraph, it apfearrf
that Judge Plants means that
i here shall be no mercy for vi
olators of the Liquor Law who'
come before him s ;'
1 Two ltacine druggists wern
up before the Court of Com-'
mon Pleas yesterday, charged-
with selling liquors in viola
tion of law. They plead guilty,
and were fined one hunderd
dollars each, and required U1
give bonds of $1,000 to observer
the law in the future'. This is
but the commencement of the
thunderings of the law in this
county. No one need wonde
if our county jail is filled ujr
with violators of the liquor law'
within a month.- ' "
Mike McNeai., . a , boy, ':wa
an ted by the police of Craw-
fordsville, Indiana, for theft.'
About -diidqight a Mike McNest
was found, whose Bother ' sc
ftouily' protested, hii innocence
and was So stricken by the ac-
cusation, that the officer consent-'
J .1... '1. 1 -'''' - .
ea (o go oacK io neaaqaarter j
and see it there bsd not beei
some mistake- There tbey learnei
ttiey bad nit upon a nimestxej
and that the thieving Mike Mc
Neal was another bori RetarnJ
, . . ; : -I .. J j 1 Ti r ' . " XI
fig to ten in motner oi tne error
iney lotina ner aeaa. ado saocw
had helped heart, disease kill her
Poor.Tweedl. ffe thongHf
him as we beheld ..the throns
about the, luxurious .,iletropol-,
it an Iiotel the other day whea
the body of .jcommlasionor4
Smith, was taken lo tha City;
llntl .nJ kaanl a kotsnsr
mark on his appearance' laelJ
week at Blackwell's - IsIanrJi
Bis head is shaved,1 his' ibrril
attenuated, ' his ' countenancrf
sad.' His departed friend, liW
o 7 , V .I.li.it k.M .. filial
day, and -his son goes everyi'
morning to the island to taker
ihe 'moruing paper ' and' comf
r,.rtu'unif .1!icarle"to reWevc -
N. Y. Siln.
Aatamtlsssassrls tsnW s .Or ,1 f

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