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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, April 23, 1874, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1874-04-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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Kdltor and Proprietor.
OrjTCTeXcfiwI Oorner-of Main ana"
Logan its., Opposite Court House.
32i! TKAaXN: ADVANCE.
ITOMElt c:' JONES '
. J i.'l J I it i
MAIN STREhT.
McARTUDR, OHIO?
iai..i
OrrioK One door wut of Bjaa Wili A Bron.
Wore.
idt3o jri
EDWIN N. BAUNIIILL,
ait-je-i. V t k iM. I
ATTORNEY, r AT LAW
NOTARY-PUBLIC,
Oltiee McArthur. Ohio,
Will attend promptly
k an Diumeea eniriiniea
M ma eara
UOfll
q" a CLAYPOOLE,
A 1 T.O II i IS Y ) A X '.LiiY ,
(PWSKCUTII.'dT ATTORNEY,)
13WVI ..Vi i I -' " " . Si' ' i
;MCARTHUR, O.V , .v
Will pjM4e ( Vinu ami idjotnma-eou
ilea. Buau.eMentru.tetl to ma care piompi
! ttenilrt to. Office ill Court UoUoo.
wm.:, - ,. . ;
AMERICAN HOUSE,,,
rl , (OPfOSITB B.B. DEPOT. , ,.. ,
HA MDEN 'OHIO'.
C, Fi 'iCAitlAtniGlitl Proprietor.
Ztoerv. Stable Attached. ,
MKAI.S
Tr.e..Hoa.hae ,)(iiobl
rtfhrniahed
the iiJile .npplied with the IhI the market
thrriiiuhnnt. Konnm clean anil enir.fortal.le.
ettor.la,.and oo BUD! aparea to aocnmo.iaie
HULEERT HOUSE.
Main' 'Street,' Opposite1 Court House'
McArthuK'Ohio,
JAMES WOUKM AHT Proprietor
IHaVe taken poplon of Hie annye hotel,
renovated and partly refurnished it, and
wit. be Iliad lo aerie thei.ld iMitiniere ol ihe
houae, aud eaperially my old fiiiTiilc of Ihe
Hooking Valley alio may he flaking I hit
point fholiililn w.iH.e lurniahrd wiih Ihe
beat the market allorda, and rare taken lo
make kucih oointni tuliln. Good atatilir, at.
Inched tu Ihe lioune; Charge. reaoiRlile.
l;lmnr 173
Darri Smiirt. ttainuel W. Kilvert, Jr.
. . Eatnbliahtd 18A1 l ,
MIAUT & KILVERT,
, 8UCCE3SOK8TO DtVU BMARTl
. ...... , ,
Wholesale Grocers
A.HD commission merchants.
Prompt Attention given to tlie
TraiiHl'i r of i'IG IlCQN and
otlier Property from and to
ItaHroaddOaiajii.'
Wate) StraLbelkein TaMani Walnut
CHILLICOTHE. OHIO.
DikYll IHi.a ly
JOHN M. GCEHNEJR,
DEALER IN
Italian and Vermont Marble
" ' AMI ' "
SCOTCH Gll.iMEliWlIEXTS
ALL KINDS OK
GRAVE-YARD WORK
Neatly and promptly eieouled.
Mulberry St..bet'n Second &Wate
. Cnillicothe. Ohio ,
..' ' : .
1 anpetliitend all my own work In perann.
I execute all llieflnfr deaitna. nee the bei-t
material, and can tot he undeceolri. Pcraona
wiabin any work in my line are invited to
l imine work, itnckancl pnrea, liefore mak
ln contraoia.,
t peraonally anrjeiintendtlre careful aetting
op of aton'f and monument bought at mj
vatahlitnraent. , , ....
Hv buyinu at thia ahop yo will aaye from IS
to to percent, paid to an nta. 24npr73
$i0 ONLY TOE A SET OP TEETH.
Teeth' Extracted 'Without Pain
and with ,
PEilPJBCT SAFETY
., by the dm of
LAUGHING.;- GAS.
Ca klwayi be found at my eflloe.
Pr. 8. T. BOtiUEsS, Jackaon, Ohio.
an174 ' '
lOBERT CLAEK&OO,,
FuiLitBiai WoLtti.i ap Bitaii ' ;
Booksellers, Stationers, iPrlDtera,
-Blutlers,-
BLANK BOOK MAN 'FACTUBEBS
eaicra ib
Law, Mbdioai, THEotooicBr, School,
, and dUBCKLAXBOUS BOOKS,
ti Wut Fourth 5ri, Cincinnati
dWVl.Yninea fnraiJhel (ratuitoaal on
MBtJeatton and any book aent by mail, poaU
age paid OB reef tpt ot puuialieo price.
i a" doatable
M&Wk FOUNTAINS
1 I - MO, $SO,$75AND ,100.
1 ( Good i Durebieand Chesp
II If BHIPPEn BEAKY OBU8K
A' VK 'rf i- MMMfaotwclby ,
CHAPMAl Co., Maa..
, -- eon, inn.
. raaioracl9 ca.
mi in i r iiMin! in i
,yOL. 25; NO.' 6.
JA.ftTT r 1
XL
Is: Hi
LiT.
V Mr
mm
MCARTHUR, OHIO,o APIL
,23, 1874.
WHOLE-NO.' i;254
i
From Hearth and Home. March 7th.
GENTLE WOMAN ROUSED.
A STORY OF THE TEMPERANCE WAR
Concluded. .
Thejudge'a family was just
sitting down to breakfast when
we arrived. ' . ; ; i
"Why, Mrs. Elliott, and Mrs.
fit- , too!" exclaimed that
good JaJv, in onleigned sur
prise. "What is the .matter?
Surely, this is not a social call,"
I'Noaiiid Mrs. EJIipt.t inapeV
uou8ly,'iliB not, Mrs. Anhnian.
U lake back all I .said about la
dies going to uquor saloons, in
order to break jhem'ujrj if they
e'an.1 am going to. Harry Uill's
trilay, if I-go'Talone. "."He
about the same -aa murdered
my pusbaua j last nigbf," and
she bViefly1 fold her story' 'l
am fishery Ihis very.rnor-
ing."she ccnlinuea. Hie must
' '.'''Vr 'T '" T' , ; - i
reKiBf a wife's' 'prayers and a
wflfejs eurseslfjie sells m? h.u'gr
band oiie drop more. Will you
go4wrth"ml'-,' -
Mr?. Ashman's feat'jjjes werf
working with deep emotion,
but j6a stately judge nbw joi'nJ
ed us Irnm Ihe dining-room, and
remnnaMrated : . ! :
"Really, Mrs. Elliott, I great
Iy s.vmpatritz' with tou, for I
have rend the painful.accoant
In the mornintr paper, but I
hope you will do nothing rah
You will only expose yourse'l
to insult, and accomplish noth
ing. Perhaps vou may obtain
some legal redress."
With a dignity and impress
iveness which even he had nev
er possessed upon the bench,
the aroused ito silenced him
with a gesture. .
"You are not. .equal to this
matter, Judge Ashman," she
said, "nor ar your legal fortriR.
During (he past night I have
een my own grave open, and
in it buried life,;' youth, happi
ness.. What, is far-worse, I have
peen the yawning grave of .my
husband, and I know it. lo he
the mouth of hell. And do yon
ask me to go to law about such
matter-? Harry Mill and hi
kind are" digin1 these gravrs.
I never realized it belore
Surely he does not Unles he
it a fiend he will cense his vile
traffic when I tell him the
truth I tell you I vohl go. if I
go alorifl You may as well
ask the liehlning nof lo strike
when the storm is si its heiirliil''
George," cried Mrs. Ashman
in a voice of anifuish, "how of
ten has your son been drunk at
thnl same Harry riiliVf"
Tl e judge turned pale and,
abruptly left the room.
"You shall nof go alone." con
tinued Mn. Ashman, sobbing
on Mrs. E lion's shoulder; "a
score of women that i know of.
smitten by this terrible curse,
will go with you if you will
ead ihe way. So mi are rich
and some are poor, but we all
have 'common ground in this
matter. I will sendiliem wv,rd."
After a little consultation it
was arranged that we should
8tHrJ from Mrs. Judgo Ash
man's at eleven.. Much 4 I
shrank from the undertaking, I
determined to remain at me
side ol my beloved Mrs Elliotl.
We called on a few personal
Iritnda nnd stated our purpose,
but bo far from joining us Ihey
seemei dismayed at-the very
idea,.' j
Mrs. Elliottthen returned to
ber unconscious husband. - One
look- at him seemed to torn her
delicate Ira me into steel, and at
a- little before eleven, she walk
ed to Mrs. Ashman's, with. as
firm a tread -al . ever a soldier
marched into battle. '
I shall never forget the group
that we found assembled in the
judge's parlor. ' There were
yoUng ! fades ; present, besides
that of Mrs. ;,Eiliott.A But all
were pale and lined with care
all were colemn with an ear
nest puipose, and touched with
the deWpatliOa ot offering.
..-. T. .U i-. M- VII, nlf "
Lsdies.' this in Mrs. Elliott,1
BaidMis. ABhman.'BimeJ. -';
All rose to receive their lead
er, and she assumed control
with the simplicity and dignity
which only noblq. .natures can
attain. ,
"In the main you' are st'an
gers to me, sha said, "but our
common danger and pur, com
roon wrongs knit our soils to
gether as one; Thejevil which
threatens our lives and homes
ha grown io desperate that it
seems to require a desperate
remedy, it is a terrioie cross
for us weak, timid women to go
on this mission, it brings
hack tTu.a the dayffoi7rnarty';
dom-.f Yesterday I thonght J
would die
rather than do th)
No w feel that I would -dieif t
did pot go, for a dearer lite Jhan,
mine is in peril. I believe that t
brjt,,1nrperf$cf,Jr exjress '.' jhe,
feelings' of ech oneliiprej Gjdd;
seems to. be enabling our. sis
ters in other places to save
Cthelr dear ones. In .-Hit name
let lis kneel to Him in silent
prayer for help and 'guidance.
We knelt but the prayer was
not, sifent. There were sobs
and 'groans and involuntary
cries.-
At last we silliel forth, pile
but aa determined a little phal
anx as ever assaulted a death
swept breach. It was sleeting,
bur we carried no umbrellas
This was not a pleasure excur
sion. We marched as soldiers
do. -.
.Our appearance upon the
ftreet soon attracted attention
People spoke hurriedly and
exciledlv together. .
"By ihunder, it's broke out
hertl" . I , heard one man ex
claim. b Where will ihey strike
first?"
"Harry Hill's as you live,"
was answered, "for that's Vint.
Elliot's wife a leadin'."
The news spread fast, and
soon we had. an ample but non
descript following. 4JIJJI the
crowd, was respectlul. The
worst man who had caught a
glimpse of Mrs. Eluotl a . face
could not have been otherwise.
By turning a corner we came
8uidviily upon the entrance of
Hill's saloon. There wag.a bgs
tle within as it they would lock
ihe door against us, but we
were too prompt lor;them, and
entered. The crowd thronged
in alter ns, and w'lh boe al
ready litre, filled tlio, place
completely. . - '
Mrs. Elliott advanced atonco
lo the bur and we grouped our
selves around ' her, and such a
croup as. we hud never seen
in our city belore.
"Where is Mr. Uill?" asked
our leader m a nrm voice.
The bartender elared at her a
moment in bUnk dismay, and
then called out : , , .
-Mr. Hill, here, quick, for
God's SHkel" .
"Yes, tell him to come tor
God's sake and hiKnaniiy'seaid
Mrs. Elliott, giving a'deep
meaning to the fellow's profan-
"What the devil does this
. - ..nuur.
ng Irnm an inner room with a
lace-on winch Burprise.and an
ger contended for Ihe mastery.
tie was a flurid, low-browed,
and,. thick-set man, showily
dressed, ahdJ with a hard sinis
ter eye. Alter one glance at
hi m, I hoped lit tie Irom Mrs
Elliott's appeal. 1 turned to
look at the crowd for a mo
ment in order 'o see on whose
side sympathy would assert it
sell, but the expression this
time was one of eager curiosity
and excitement. But imagine
my unmeasured surprise when
I 6aw a bide door open and Yin
ton Elliott overlooking the
scene, with a white, appalled
face. But all were too intent
on the scene before them to
notA his entrance,, for with a
voice that trembled, and yet
with diguity, Mrs., Elliott had
commenced speaking. '.V.i
aad Bomblano oi: t 'rjawaiid
"Mr, iU,.yoq nave tnetoru)
-4
. - - .... "
wo Jtiyo juu i no viaum vi- jjuo-
sessing the heart of one.- -You
cab not realize .the , r.etmlts of
your traffic.' as we poor women
can whose homes 'you" ire de
stroying, 'whose heart yorj are
breaking. What is life to us if
. ,i . . ..
our fathers, our brothers, our
rhudahdi (ohr bow. .'her voice
thrilled at that word) go down
into the darkness and' infamy
of a drnnkardV gravel Can
you not see' that such life
would be to us butiviog death
and prolonged agonvl ,. And
yet not for ourselves .are we
pleading but fo ihopo whom
you are destroying.. Perhaps
we may find a heave in herear
'terbut Mhey can pot.. You
poison both Body- aiKT.sool at
once. Wei are, desperate in
view of ,tbe peril of. those we
clove. ' .'Yesterday ther'ewas not
in all the city a more proud
and-happy woman Ibap II LVp'.
py in my home! happy -in my
husband! happy fin my hopes
f'or the lutiiTel proud, of his rich
promise and good name But
now my heart is breaking; "on
how it has ached since vou sent
him staggering home to me
long past midnighil What but
hell broth ' cnuld' have so
changed my noble, manly hus
band? Yesterday all honored
him. To-day the finger of the
town .will be pointed at him.
Oh! believe me air, a few dol
lars can not pay you for indict
ing all this shame and misery.
I beseech you sir, promise that
you will never- sell .' another
drop of the accursed poison."
There was a momentary and
death-like silence, and then
Uill with difficulty, found his
brazea voice. -
"Now, look here,mada.n,"
he. began. "I've -goj my-, rights
as welf as you ' and Otlfer peo
ple. .This Is my. . business.
Ydu' ve ' h6 right' ' he 'without
my consent: You all make
yourselves liable tojndloiraent
for trespass. - Besides it ain't
the right thing tor ladies to go
ramping through the streets
followed by a rabble, and med
dling with .things that don't
concern them.- It isn't lady
like. It's lanat " '
"Hush, in a word, answer
mel" cried Mrs. Elliott in a
voice that went lo every heart
like an arrow. "Will you
promise me not to sell my hus.
band another glass of liquor'''
"No," shouted Hill, nor any
other woman's husband.: . 1 will
promise to sell to all1 who'll
pav." - '. '-. . ;
There was a sodden hoarse
murmuring on the part of the
crowd, but in .a momprt. it was
hushed, for J he ; insulted wife
had knelt on the floor before
Ihe bar. We all dropped on
our knees around her. '
"O God," she pleaded in a
tone that must have thrilled
the very soul. of. tbi r(!.ojt har:
dened present, . "shall - human
love and human-anguish plead
before thee in vain? . 'Art thou
not a God of mercy, and vet
vttimir-js crnsmngf usrrjwt
Urou bod a uoa oljukilm, and
vet we are being robbed of -all
that' makes lift endurable?
thou ; didst stop; the rtirtuVb of
lfops'J IleVe in :our fchrletfarl
land are human hearts more
savage. Thou didst preserve
in the furnace selen' times
heated. Beneath obr church
spires burns the more remorse
less and destructive passion of
avarice. Wilt thou not break
the stony heart befcre us, and
bend his stubborn Will to thine?
Thou knowest that because of
our love w could die for our
dear ones, but we believe that
thoilflost loy ihien'even morei
Wilt tboa not an nrcy change
their) destroyers 4ntameu?
Wilt thou not taki this awful
6ul killing temDlVion1 out of
their path? We jead in the
name of thy dea Son, who
gaVenis life for bsill.
Si ranee losay Ih'ere was a!
re.poasiva Aae from
Amen.rcharacteryi would gladly die
iheiiioitv who iacei 4J.0 niAUex lite
rough crowd; that .would have
done honor, to , a, , Methodist
class meeting, and as I lookpd
round on rising,. I saw manj
eys wet with tears where I bad
expected only looks. of scnr.n.
I did qodare to meet Mr. EUl,
ott's eye, though Iie remained
standing spell bound io the
doorway still. ,. . . t
Pat the . tragedy went , for
ward without a moment's
pause., Mrs. Elliot took a aUp
nearer the rumiplfer, pointed
up with an impressive, gesture,
and bent upon him a lo? k sucb
as 1, never. ,saw pn . a i woman's
face before, for a mirror in the
bar opposite revealed her form
and features perfectly, u, and
gave her back to the audience
as .a.st&jrtling .picture..,) .Hill
tried to meet ber eye, but coujd
not, fir hisjsank guiltily .and
confusedly to, the, fln)iN .
Mr, Dill," she said in , a lo,
genUe vojce, and yet it ret
minded me bf tbe:ustill rsmall
voice of : God," it was go pen,
trating andT awe! inspiring,
"once mora ' T ask you,' l be
seech you, answer me as you
will wish yoa had answered be
fore His judgment seat, will you
not cease this dreadlul busi
ness?'' A death-like hush followed.
Hill was evidently cowed and
overcome, and alter a moment
mumbled out: :
' "It's not in man to resist you,
madam, 1 promise I will not
sell any more to your husband,
though he will get it elsewhere
if he wants it. I think, it's a
pily he can't stand up for him
self, without sending his, wife
around a praying and beseech
ing for him.' -
"Give way there" cried Vin
ton Elliott's voice, and he
sprang down from the raised
doorstep and struggled toward
his wife. There were, murmurs
and ejaculations ot intense ex
citement' on the part of the
crowd as this new element en
tered into the drama, and all
gave way before him. Mrs.
Ejjiott started and trembled
violently at bis voice, and the
moment-he reached her, elgnjj
to his arm and hid .her face
sobbihgly on his shoulder. All
her wonderful nerve aud self
control seemed gone. In a
clear, ringing tone, Elliott said:
"Mr. Hill, you have spoken
some true words this morning.
This is no place this is no ac
tion for ladies like my wife
and other honored women that
I see here, and believe me,
they would not be here if you
and I, and our like, had not
driven them to desperaton.
God knows you have enough
to answer for, but you only
are not to blame. You can't
force us to throw away our
money and manhood here. Jf
half is true ol what I have
read concerning myself in the
morning paper, I 'wonder that
my wife did not leeve me for
ever in utter disgust. Instead
pf nt, with", woman's taithful
ne.ss, sue uiiiui,-;i... I0 plead
tor my satery. -cut 8he-j
never be called to pass through
an ordeal. .again, - J,, thought;!
could; drink in moderation i at
your oar, as i naa lor yearsj
but vou have taught me better,
sir. -Vinton Elliott can aj and
alone, but he will stand aloof
from you and your kind. Kfod
and yoa, fellow citizens, be my
witnesses that I will drink.no
more, and may He palsy my
band if it ever raises another
glass ot liquor to my lips."
Mrs. Elliott gave a low, glad
cry; . : y ' ;
"I make no apology for what
Qopqrred'.iast nighr, he con
tinued.1 ffThe case 'admits' ot
none.': I deserve your contempt,
but it can not exceed that
winch. I have 'for toyself.
Were it not for my wif, and
the ' hope of retrieving mv
" Hurrah! three cheers for KU
a man! cried a voice from the
crowd, and they were given
with good will. " " "
, Mrs.1 Judgo ' Ashman ' now
came forward and said: ' 1 " '
i 'Mr. IIill, tbls'; won't answ'er.
My son is as dear to me as Mrs.
Elliott's husband to her. We
all represent 'some imperilled
member ol our households. -
You must promise to quit the
U...l.i"! iii!L It. .f ...
uuBiaess aitogemer in our
Mir " ' i ' -' '
, ''Do yoa see tbaiP asked a
pile, thin woman, a mechanic's
wife, and she lifted her hafr and
showed an ugly scar across her
temple. "My "own husband,
OBce so kind and good, gave
me. that blew. .11 went in deep.
It nearly cost me my Jife; ' But
it made a dee per scar rtay"
heart, -People must stop sell
ing; rsmi to my husband, 'W i
can't live: -I .Mhat I will do
something flespe'rate.'' " "
Oh please dtf"proruise, Mr.
Hill," pleaded' a'meek looking
little wojnan, with streaming
eyes. '1 "My only on has come
home drunk twice of late.'and
he says he got the liquor here.
Now look lere, ladies," said
Mr. Hill, trying to work him
self into a passion, "business
is businessi A man must live.
I've stood Ibis longer now than
He was interrupted by a tall
gaunt woman who strangely
reminded me of the stern old
prophets. Without a word of
prelude, she stepped forward
and commenced singing in a
weird - minor key:
0 Thou who for humanity
Wept blood at every pore,
We come in kindred agony
Thy mercy to implore. ' . '
Must we;, for aye, sigh hopelessly
In worse than Egypt's bonds t
Must we, despairing, hopelessly
Endure destroying wound t . , .
Most fcnrlul Is our enemjs - -
For when he strikes a bow, . , .,,
Two liearts are pierced and perlshlng
A household stricken io'w. 1
Uh'glve to us thy sympathy,' ' 1 '
Awae;thlne Brm' of power,
Shake off the nation's apathy, . . ; .
Troclalm the battle hour. , .
"Mr! Uill,"taid Mrs. Judge
Ashman, "we propose to' stay
here till you make us this
promise, unless you thrust us
forth with violence."
"Let him try that if he dares,"
cried a dozen voices from the
crowd. . ; 1
Hill considered a few mo
ments and then said: "rVell,
madam, I've thought it over
indeed, I thought it over be
fore you came, for I expected
this infernal movement would
break out here. I have an es
tabliohment In New York State
and the '11 stand good liquor,
such as I sell, there, to the end
of the chapter. I'll go there
for the present and stop sell
ing here till this thunder gust
blows over. This is the beH
promise I'll make if you stay
here a month. So please va
cate and I'll put up my shut
ters." Alter a brief consultation
the ladies concluded it was the
best they could do, and there
ware those of their number
who, wished to visit other a
loons. : By this time the strain upon
Mrs. Elliott's delicate, frame
had been too long and severe,
and she grew, very white and
faint. Her. husband had urged
her to go home with him, at
once, bat she had refused to
a -
leave ner companions alter
having gained her own. point
Bat now she sank helplessly
in bis arms and he carried her
to an adjacent drug store, sent
for a carriage, and we' were
soon in the blessed refuge of
her home, t - '. ; : :
But before an hoar passed
her pulse grew quick and her
cheeks feverish. Her husband
bung about ber in an agony 61
solicitude. :; :: , -,q ; .
After doing what I could 1
lett them, thinking they were
better alone. i v .: '
Wteatha Wening jhadowi
I : a.i.oi.f'ui'vM'Vimw.'jl
One square,..-.- $1 ta .
achddltloBk.;aiert!oa ;. ,i
-tUf
Local notU-t per llne,.... J,
Yearly adTkrtUements $100 Kf
Column, and at proportionate ( p "
itwanpnce. rayaoie in aavance.
ty The Becord being thtt ofSefll
paper of the town, and hating tt
largest olrcuhttfoa afaiiy pnpertn ttn
countv. ofteri junerloi InJurienirLttf
to advertisers." z
gathered, as I was sitting' in,!'
my room by the light of the i
fire, Mr. Elliott entered unnaa i
noflnced and said:' s ! ?:Ji , :;a
"OMre.. M., I rear Kellie if
going to be sick," and he gave A
way to 'such aa agony of griefs
aa I never saw convalse a man';
frame before. . -II . ic' ' A
I came and put tny hand 0 -his
sbouldor, but only said: ''
"God help yoa both."1' V ' '
At last, ' he .aid, "Now, Tb '
better.' Please stay with be if.
while I go for the doctor. .'; ;
For a week ..Vinton I and; t
have watphed at' 'Nellie's 'bei-.i
side.) Her mind has iwabderedj
all the timet and eight and dayj
she.. Is pleading - for and wilkv t
r huhbandkri: ; .1 ;h:: -j'. '-u
1 He has Bcarcely slept Cr ate
Ilis: raven hair isi becominj
streaked .with gray; hu,rudyj
cheeks: Tare, growing pale: t
wan, anu:-4u,iry breath al
most is a prayer, . '-77 :7 . r.n
; "God spare, my darling. ."
What the end. will. Jbe, QoJ ;
bnowst ' ' . : ;
From the Washington Star.
A Postal Card Item.
The; first postal card: .wa
issued on; the 15th of May, last ;
year, or ten months and a hal
ago, and up to Ihe 1st instanO.
exactly -. 100,000,000, :, or the i
whole amount' -'estimated for
the fint year, were delivered
to the Government. Of thi'
number, the 'fifteen largetV,'
cities in the country took '(),''
000,000-New York City alone;
taking ' 11,500,000, ' or nearly '
eight per cent, of the Whole.
Next to New York came Bos
ton, which took about 5,6oO,00),
While Washington required for 1
her use considerably over 1,- '
000,000: It is estimated thai'
about 10,000,000 more will be '
required to. meet the.demanl1
for the first year since their lu 1
iJj..w.'.- '-. 1 ' I.-- t
iruuuciiun.
)3
At Muskegon, Michigan, oatJ
Tuesday, Charles Moriarty first
shotbia'wife and then attempt' ,
ed to shoot, his children, of
which he had four, but. was
prevented by his daughter, and
then turned and shot himself.
The cause is family diffioultisi'
Neither of the shots are neeea
sarily fatal. Moriarty had juitv
returned from New York wherw
he was employed as proof read-.
er on the Daily Graphio. Hw
was in an insane asylum sever'
al years ago, but had been dis
charged as Cured. .
' Tub most astonishing esse of
spontaneous nuptials has 0 oc
curred in Hardin county, Iowa,
where a couple was recently"
married, and after ' the cere
mony the bride was- obliged It
ask her husband what her new
name was. The parties had
been acquainted Only a 1W
hour ;
A Chicago paper says that;
a prominent blind man, wbt
does a thrifty business in thaU
city by begging on the street
corners, .was observed, a -few",
eveniugs ago, examining hU
postal currency by the light ot
astreet lamp, to see if it Wait
all goodk " , , '
A FeUAlb in confession ac
knowledged that ' she used
rouge. "For what purpose?'
asked the father. "To tntki
me appear captivating," Wat
the answer. "But does it make
won mniA kmhllfl U I 1 . . a
j wa luwis UOBUMIUJI Ae IVHDife
holy father, I think it does.ttA
The priest took 'the ; penitent" .
out of the confessional 'into'
the light, and looking in hei
face observed, Madamj3 yot i
may paint ' without' offense, ljr r
you are still very ugly. ' ;
Tub Indiana have invented , a
new. method of scalping vis
tims,80 that now a bald header I
man stanSs no more show thait
any one else, j This ia as , It
should be.- t
'
Wa will send the Record and
Cincinnati Oalerii .MWribarftjOBk

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