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The Vinton record. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1866-1891, September 24, 1874, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038222/1874-09-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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TtiE;iyiNTON RECORD,
JOHN T. ItAPEK.
. Editor and Proprietor.
- C .v.; r- r-r-,
OrriOE N. . Qoraer of Main and
Logan St., Ooposite Court House.
$3 ,A -YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
THE ELLAS HOWE
Sewing ' Machine.
TheGrratest Production
the World Crer Knew.
iUR olaims for the superiority of
vstbi Elias Uowe Maobmea can nov
er be' disputed, This most enviable
reputation has been obtained by its own
merits.'! We do not claim that we offer
our machines for the fewest dollars, or
on the longest line of credit that ban be
"obtained by buying other class of ma
chines. But we do claim we hare the
BEfcf IN THE MARKET.
THE BIST IS THE CHEAPEST,
We are wanting agents to sell our
fachines J In- Vinton and Hocking
'''counties, for whioh we propose to pay
liberal commission; furnish three or
more - wagons if an agent will use and
push them for the business. We in
tend operating on an entire new basis
for this reason we want good, lire men
to run the thing. . .The reputation ot
(he Uowe is well known throughout
Vinton and Hooking oouutiesaa well aa
over the entire world.' You will find
me at the UULBEKT. UOUSE, Rlc
ARTHUR, 0., any time this month,
ready to administer to your -wants.
w. c. Mclaughlin, .,
Special Agent.
10eptlR71 3i
UO.HEK C. JUNES,
AITOKNEY AT LAW,
MAIN 8'1'REh.T. .
McARTUUU, OHIO.
Orrice: One loor weal of Dan Will A Broe.
"atoie.
. DfJO jt
EDWIN N. BA UN 11 ILL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Olllce Ak'Arthtir, uiilo.
Will Rtlentl promptly to All btiineiitniid
to his earn. uovll
d S."CLAYP COLE,
ATTORNEY AT-LAW,
PBuaucUTirO ATIOKNKY,)
McARTHUR, .
Will practice 1.1 vinion end adjoining t-oun
tiea. Buti..eeiiirupteil lo hi care pionipl
j ettendeil lo. Urtk-e in Court Hou.a.
joils7)jr -
AMERICAN HOUSE.
orPOSITK B. R. DEPOT.
II A M D 13 N 'OH I O .
C, F. CAKTWUIGIlt. Proprietor.
, Livery Stable Attached.
UEAI.S RKADY FOR ALL TBAlNS.
The Houae hue uM bern refurnihed
throughout, ilonm. clean .mi comforulile,
ths talile an p plied with (he lft ihr market
rtonla, anil no paina upar.ii to oomoUle
gueaU. niar MV ly
J. C. COLEMA.Mjffl.U.
JIu permnDcntly located in
"McATtTHTJR, 0.,
or the practice or
MEDICNE and SURGERY,
which he will do'e hia entire alieotion.
KKM'liin liuvia' HuiMling up alturn. opo
. h Vinton County Hank. .
Ka-iuaaoe
i1oiuh. Samuel W Kilyert,Jr.
fEatabliahtd ISM-l
& KILVERT,
' 8U0CEBflOR8TODVlP8MARTl
Wholesale Grocers
;UD COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
rompt Attention flven to the
TrauHl'er of T1U IKON and
. other Property from aud. to
ttallroadaud Cuual.
Vater Gtreet,betmen Paint and Walnut
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
MM II l0 I, .
EOBERT CLARK & CO,,
' ftreuMaaa Wholuals Bruit
Booksellers, Stationers. Printers,
1 1 Hinders,
And
BLANK BOOK MAN 'FACTUEERS
' eaters Ik
..'' r ' :.'
Law, Medical, ThboLooicri., Scbool,
. and Vhscklaiibous Books, ,
! 65 Wat Fourth Street, Cincinnati.
VCfttalojrues furnuhe gratuitously -oa
application nd any book enl by aiMl, poM
2 paid oa receipt ol publiahed price.
I '
I -
The Best and Cheapest
WRITING , INSTRUMENT
Id OJEOP
JOHN HOLLAND'S
GOLD PELS ;
i circulars . Sent C Pre e.
" J
ir; -'I
Ji .J
.u H ir. . X. '
VOL. 25 -NO. 28.
MQ ARTHUR, OHIO, SEPTEMBER 2 1874;
WnOLE NO. 1,276
Salmon P. Chase as an Editor.
Article in the Cincinnati American, 1830.
[EXTTRACT FROM WARDEN'S LIFE
OF CHASE.]
i "Thirty five'years ago, over
all that la now Ohio, thera
stretched one rast wildernesB,
unbroken, except by the small
spots of civilized culture, the
one at Marietta, aifd the other
at Cincinnati. At these little
openings, hardly eacb Vpin's
point upon the map, the' arm
of the frontiersman had leveled
the forest and let in the sun.'"
"These are the words of Dan
iel Werster in h!s first speech
on 'Foot's resolution.' .. They
usher in a splendid description
of the wonderful transforma.
lion of the, territory' that 'now
constitutes the Stale of Ohio,
from- a- wildernesa in- which
dwelt savage .men andVatage
beasts, inio- a' rnagnificeni
abode ot civilization, opulence,
taste, and power. . It is a
brvathidt, inlage of what- has
been., ' The description was
molded upon facia and took
their exact shape.- Lo'y nnd
grand though it be, it can not
be grander or loftier thin. I he
scene it pictures.
Thirty.flve years ago, our
city was, as lie said it was, a
little opening in the midst of a
vast unbroken - forest? And
what1 la it now? Let us look
around us. Let us walk around
Cincinnati and lake note ot
what we see. First, there is
the great landing sloping down
from Front street to the water's
edge, a declivity of between
sixty and seveuty feet irS-per-pendicularelevHiion.Aiid
reach
ing along the river mi're than
two squares. The noblestream
is up now, and a partol this
immense work is hidden Iron
tiew. .Yet enough is visible lo
show that it would be a diffi
cult matter to Gik a structure
like it anywhere. If the rise
of, water hides the landing, it
allows the steamboats, lor the
usfl ot which I he landing was
made. There they are, of a
stately structure, fitting the
river on whose bo3om ihey
rush along, and (he mighty ler
ritory whoce productions they
carry to a distant market. As
if Providence had designed this
spot lor their use, the river,
generally, careering on with a
rapid current, here sweeps
round an eddy, and thus forms
a natural harbor, as it were, (or
them. They are discharging
and receiving their cargoes
to-morrow almost every one of
litem will be gone and their
places will be filled with oth.
ers.
As we proceed eastward,
coming up into the city a little,
our ears are greeted with the
sound of buty occupation, and
our eyes with the sight ol nu
merous lactones.- There ar
the steam mill, and the cotton
laciories, and the saw mill fac
tories, and the engine laciories,
and others that we have not
room to enumerate. Herein
the principal source of the
wealth and prosperity of our
city. Jl it labor that gives vaU
ve t) everything. 'The raw ma
terial is worthless till it is
wrought What purpose serves
the iron in the earth? ' What
good does the cotton ere it be
gathered? Labor must be ap
plied belore value can be crea
ted. Ever since the decree
went forh, 'in the aweat of thv
face shall thou eat bread, little
has been the worth of the
earth's spontaneous produc
tions, and so will it be ever.
Wnrre the sweat of the face is,
there will be bread; and where
the laborious population je
there will be the prosperous
city and the flourishing empire,
We do not mean to assert that
all our vigorous growth and
early maturity is due to me
ohanid labor alone. Commerce
has X. Share, and..qhter .cajjses
lays had their share of itnfla-
suit. We ouly intend to say
that the Vinacbanio was the
principal, not the sole agent of
the prosperity of the city.
' We Dass on 'eastward until
we coma to ; the water works,
and then climb up the hill that
lies just down. upon the river,
until we attain, a commanding
position, for a panoramic view
oi the valley. Tjie first thought
that strikes us is that this spot
must have been marked out for
a high destiny in the councils
of heaven. That wide amphi
theater must have been' scoop
ed out on purpose to be the
eat. of a ..great city, bo all
sides it is gutrded by the ever
lasting hills, which seem, from
this point, to be arrayed around
the whole valley in the form" of
an elli'pse.nWe erifT'uTMU
Riviere': entering it from' the
north-easUrlt sweeps, around
in a beautiful curve, and we see
It again Jar oft, and seeming
like a zneiof silver, binding
nature's verdant appareling,
gliding awav tranquilly toward
(he mighty Missis ippi. ' From
'.he north and the south several
small streams are seen pouring
in their cAnty.,tribute. J The
canal comes in from the north,
aud is covered with boats. We
clohe our eyes for a moment
and listen. We hear from ths
river, the roaring ol the steam;
from the canal, the notes ot the
bugle; and from the entire city,
that contused noise ot the rat
tling of wheels, arid the jar ol
machiiies, and the 'clamor of
voicea, which always indioate
the presence of a multitudin
ous populatiou. We open our
eyes again, and we almost irn
ayme we see the city grow.
We do not see all the symp
toms of vigorous growth. There
are lactones, more than we saw
in the valley, and in every part
ol the city. There are many
churches, boine ot them grand
in their proportions, audsplen
did in their architecture There
are the residences of some of
our private citizens that show
like palaces. There are. ex
tending streets and multiplying
erections ot every description,
on the twoleveU that, with l lie
connecting declivity between
them, form the area of this vast
amphitheater. There are the
markets, nol quite so neat fab
rics as they might be, but filled
to overflowing w,nb the abund
ance of the surrounding coun
try, and "crowded by the great
multitude! who live lb eat, or
eat to live. There, too," is not
alas! that we must say so a
city hall worthy of the great
ness and opulence of our city.
"Having now cast a general
and rapid glance over the
scene belore, us, we descend
the hill, and we meet with men
not as yet in the. prune of life,
who tell us -that wheli they
were boys hey used to gather
grapes, and hunt squirrels and
wild turkeys, over the very Spot
where those thick-crowding ed
ifices now stand. ,'
"This is a faithful outline of
Cinciunati as she now is. We
intended, when we began, to
sketch in the same brief way,
her history, and cbaracter.'and
prospects; to speak somewhat
ot the inducements held out to
emigrants, and to say , what
classes ol men would, probably,
find advantage iu coining here,
but we have no room to do all
this now. ' Perhaps we may re
stime the subject in our next or
some iulure number. ' In the
meantime, we may observe
that we do not expect to edify
our city Iriends with a descrip
tion ot what they see every day,
but to gratify the natural curl
psityypf those who, 7liyijjg at
some . distance; ,. from ' os, have
frequently expressed a wish to
know something Jw)re7 a" bout
PiuciqnaU than they '; could
learn irom geographies."
't l-i h-i .1 i'"" riva'V
f -i..,i''. ts1-, 't- t.''l
' ASTststofBsata Luemat fVOr pricM
OF CHASE.] How Mules Came into Fashion
, Few of the farmers oH this
oountry are aware what a debt
ol gratitude they, owe George
Washington for the introduc
tion of moles into general oie
for farm purposes., '. ' " ' '' i ,
Previous to 1783, therA were
very tew, and those of such in
ferior order as to prejudice lar
mars against them as rjnfltto
compete withhorses" in 'work"
upn. M foiprilitriilt CConi
sequently there were no jacks,
and no disposition to increase
the stock; but Washington be-,
catrio convinced 4haithe Intro
duction of ; mqles generally
among the Southern planters
would 'prove theal ac great,
blessing, as they were less Iia
able late injured thin-torse
by careless servants.
A .oonaa jt. bfeanse knQwn
that the illustrious Washington
desired" to. stuck ifs) Mount
Vernon estate with mules, the
King of Spain sent 'him a jack
and two jeotists from the Royal
Stables, and LalayeU sent an
other jack and,, two jeoneta
from the Island 0 Ajata.v .
The first was a'gray color, 16
hands high, heavily" made, and
of;sluggish nature.-, -lie. was
named4 the' Royaf 'Gilt.' The
othet was called the, Knight ol
Malta; he was about as hijh
lithe, fiery, even to lerocity. , ,
The two different sets ot am
tJiah gave him the most favora
ble opportunities ot -making
improvements by cross-breed-iug,
the result ot which was the
favorite jack, Compound, be
cause he partook of the best
point in both the original.
The general bred his blooded
mares lo these jacks, even tak
ing those Irom bis laruily coach
tor that purpose, and produced
such ,uju1s: that the country
was all agog to ' bfeedlome ot
the sort, aud they soon became
quite common. This' was the
origin ol i.nproved mules In the
United Siates. There are now
some of the third and fourth
generation of Knight of Malta
and Royal Gilt to be found in
Virginia, and the groat beneJts
arising from iheir introduction
to the country are to t'e.seen
upon every cultivated acre in
the Southern States..
Horrible Indian Crime.
Omaha, , August 22. A
shocking murder accompanied
by torture was perpetrated in
a lonley spot in Coltax county,
this state, on Sunday. A num
ber of Indians, supposed to be
Pawnees, camped' near a
homesteader's cabin, aud two
squaws went in search of food.
Tney carhe to the house when
the man fas absent and t went
through it, in spite of the
wile's remonstrances. Finally
they-, attempted "to Hike away
the family provisions, to wKlrih'
the wile objected. The two
squaws beat her over ths head.
Juki, -then the husbind came
in, and seeing his ' wifo wounct
ed, tooK his gun and shot 'one
of the' rquaws. The Other
squaW'Tanto the Jndiao camp
a id reported what hnd beeu
done.T, Twelve of the Indians'
then .entered the house, cap
lured the, homesteader, Bkin
ned him, cut his bauds' off 'and
bis Veart out. - This was' done
in the presence 0f his, wife.
A large party ol pureorers has
lelt West Point lu search of
the Indians, but it is almost
certain that they will , not fiud
them.
' Whin a Tennessee husband
will '-'horsewhip -his wife1 'for
washing potatoes in his Sunday
plug-hat, it is time to, inquire
whether this geneiation of
mpn) isit't Vftettlng ?M loo
confounded high toned for the
age of the .oointry?
-A' imaLL Milwaukee'1 boy
thinks It absurd to, ask ; fiity
dollars for a thrashing machine,
when' his mother .only - pays
tq 4oHars; pafotKppew
Saving and Having.
Either a man must be con
tent with poverty all bis life,
or elsejbe willing to deny him'
self some luxuries, and, save
to lay the base of independ
nee in the luiure. But if a
man defies the future,, and
spends alt he earns (whether
Ills earnings' be one 'pound or
ten pounds every week) let
him look for lean and hungry
want at some future time, for
lor it will sufely come no mat
ter what he 'thinks.' ' To save
is '.absolutely the only way! to
get a solid fortune; there is no
other mode on earth.' Those
who shut their eyes and ' ears
to these plain facts will be for
ever poor; aud for their obsti
oate rejVctions 'of the truth,
mayhap will' die in rags' and
filth.' 1 Let thbm so die and
thank themselves, JJut.. nol
They take a sliort, recompense
in crushing; fortune. Great
waste in breath! They ' might
as well curse the eternal hills '
For I , can tell them : fortune
does not give away her real
and enbbtaatial goods. She
sella then . to the highest bid
der, to the hardest, ' wisest
workf r for. ;the J boonl , !Men
never make so fatal a mistake
as when they' think they aire
mere creatures ot fate; 'tis the
sheerest folly In the world.
Every man, may make ot mar
bis liley which ever ' way he
mayi choose. 'Fortune is for
those who by diligence, hon
esty, frugality, place them
selves in a position to grasp
hold of fortune when it ap
pears in view. The best evi
deuce ol diligence is the souud
of the hammer at five o'clock
in the morning. The best evi.
dence ol IrugalityVisj 'the "five
hundred pounds or more stand-,
ing ia your name ai the sav
ings bank.. The best evidence
of. honesty are both diligence
and frugality. ' . . '.
How to Succeed.
your seat is too hard to sit
upon, stand up. If a rock rises
up tnyourpalb, roll it away,
or climb over it. If you want
money earn it. If you wish
for confidence, prove yourself
worthy of it. Il takes longer
to skin an elephant than1 a
mouse, but the skin is worth
something, Do not be content
with doing what another has
done surpass it. Deserve suc
cess and it will come. The
boy was not born a man. ! The
" . - : t , , i ,
sun does not rise like a rocket,
or go dowu like a , bullet fired
from a gun; slowly and sureiy
it 'makes its rounds, and never
tires. It is as, easy to be a
leader as a wheel horse. If
, e
the job be long, the pay will,
be greater. II the task be hard
the more competent you must
be lo'-tio it.
' When the late General Thorn
as, U. 6. A., was asked for a
futlough by a backwoods sol
dier, in order 'hat be might
visit his wife,'(o'wboru he bad
been married but three' months,
he replied: "Why, my dear
ellow. I havn't seen my wile
lor three years." The back
woodsman stared increduously
at the General for a moment,
and then broke out, "But you
see me and my wife an'tlhat
kind." ' "
A Paris journal, speaking of
the great scandalsays' "Mon
sieur Beeches' was an actor
before he turned clergyman,
and that "Monsieur Til tin is
an English lawyer who bad
gained a wide. reputation . in
Boston its a prosecutoi of crim
inal suits.
wPRnrKssoR, will you have
a. cigarP said a. man'in the'.of
flee of a Boston hotel. Nine
feet) men stood np and replied:
Thank yootjon't care If t do.'
If yoo tell " thaV.'jarn in Mis
soori, sobs tit ate H30lonel"ot
pteMOt.-'1; -' ' ; '""
O. S. Journal.
To take Qnatmed men out
and have a merry making of
shooting them in cold blood
this is southern chivalry. To
take weak and terrified color-
ed men out, with no arms in
their hands, and butcher them
like sheep this is southern
chivalry., A. moBt, noble chit
airy, . descended in the direct
line from . the chivalry that
scourged helpless women with
the lash the chivalry, that
ravished women made beautiful
with the while blood ot its own
fathers the chivalry that sold
its own daughters to the slave
pens for the beastly arms of
men who paid the price of the
noble Caucasian blood ia their
veins I he chivalry that heap
ed up for this Nation against
the day pf wrath tuch. moun
tains ot infamy and crime as
all the blood of eaVlh coold
not wash away, We have lost
hundreds of thousands of our
best and bravest in the effort
Ihe north, has btavely ac
cepted its share of the punish
ment due to complicity now
let us have an end of it. Let
us , have, no more complicity
with the shedding of blood that
shall be upon us and our cbil
dren to cry out against us and
them to God's eternal justice.
Let us give thete cowardly
murderers to understand that
the , Nation will demand of
them life for life until these
outrages cease. It is not loo
late to begin the entire work
of reconstruction over again,
and make thorough work of it,
if there Is no other wav to
slop, these hellish outrages.
Better have -years ot suspend
ed States in the regions where
the State is too feeble to resist
or is in complicity with crime,
than that the blood of 'one in
nocent man should cry ty God
for vengence, because of a Na
tion's cowardice or perfidy.
, Mr. PresUleut! We, , the peo
ple of Ohio want to , see you
moVe upon their works! 'Make
a clean and workmanlike job,
of it this timet The day for
lorbearance has passed. The
name Ku-Klux stinks in the
nostrils ot' the people.' Noih
ing purifies jike fire. Let us
try a little judicious fire, of
the army blue pattern. ' ,
A small boy from the rural
districts, being in town 'the
other day, followed Bill Reed,
the letter-carrier, for sereral
hours, watching him open the
letter boxes Oh the lamp posts
in the hopes of discovering the
secret of making gas. -
With a sardonic grin, Wix
poured some mucilege into his
empty hair oil bottle, one day,
and the next morning 'he hair
of one the Wvant girls was
stuck so tight no Tight that she
could not shut her mouth.
A gentleman who landed
from an "Erie express train at
tracted universal attention by
the magnificence of his dia
mond breastpin. He was sup
posed to be a hackman from
Niagara Falle. ' '
.' . : t.
Nothing appeals more to the
sympathies of a kind-hearted
person than the spectacle of a
starved dog, sitting on the rag.
ged e'1ge of anxiety wailing
for a bone. , ' "!
"Thod rainest in this bosom,',
was the remark of a Lothario
wheo his fair one threw a basin
of .water over hira for .""catMj
waoliogV under her chamber
Window. ::;. ; '1 f t: : !
- A JMiunksota minister who
said . that the gYasehoppers
were a plague "nt to punish
the gvaflers is Coming east to
find another . .pulpit 1 - They
couldn't b'efieVff KirriV
f -;''' l i'i ' ' -r
i As Eastern debating society
is trying, to "settle which is the
hardest Vk'eWk' diiry w "in
BtnUellia i Vi,r:" ' ,iB''
.
ADVEIMLHIXGr ,XEMS. - -One
quar,.'.. ' 91 C(l
Eachadditlona.at:lott ... fi4l
Carda, per yr iO 041
Local notion jer line, lr
Tearly adwrtliemenU . $100 0r
column, anil atpropotiionataraUpti
lea apnea. Parable in ad vanea.- .
HTThq Becord belna; the afflelll
paper of the torn, and having 1i e
larjct circulation of any pnrla tr
jountr, offers supcrloi InJuceuects1
to advertisera.' i . . :.... ;
AnoTukr comet has been dii
covered by M. Cogfcla, the in
dustrious 'observer it 'Mar
seilles, who made himself 14 t
mo'us by bis cometary dlscof
ery of last spring." The: new
celestial visitor is a imall one,'
aud is described as. moving-
slowly southward. It position
is right ascension three hours'
fifty seven minutes aud fifty
eight seconds, and its polar diat.t
tance Mxty-two degrees and fii ,
lyfive.minitef. A search for'
ibianew comet (with a tele-,
teJeBcope) will discover bfra at '
about twelve degrees loath of h
the Zenith. lie does not seem, i
destined, however, to., maksj, ,
much ot a ''shine" in the world ,
( . . . ' -t . .. i
NoTumo is -laore- fjatnst
worthy than tombstone lritnt L
unless it is an averageBrool -!
lyn "statement?' But ten
Brooklyn "'Vlateaient'' is'.th
very Btrdngfiold of truth in !
comparison with theDemocrat''
Buffalo Express.
Vfalo Etpreu. ' ' ' ''"
i. . ,'i
Susan did.no i sit ia Theo'
dore's lap. She merely sttim-,
bled over a rockingcba-ir and .
fell into his lap. Parties doubt
ing this, can go to Brpoklyn '
and see the , chair for thera
Courier Journal.
Tdey have turned over a fttw I
leaf in Chicago. Theloarna! 1
says "the fact that a manVeeps
a saloon is not the only fuali-l
fication necessary to represent'
the city of Chicago n the leg-1
islature." '
This brief chronicle was writ-,
ten by the editor of the Phila
delphia Ledger: ; 'Lowxll
Saturday. Two little boys and ,
a pistol. Now, only one little,
boy and a pistol.' ' , '
iei 'i i
Tun success of Josh Billing
is exceptional. There 'are'
thousands 01 yotfng men 'who
do not know howto tpe and'
yet they are not worth 1250,.
'000. ' f
Therk are now lour compete
itors lor, the title' of Nafthan
murderer. These parties should
be hung upon their own con-,
fession . and ive, others , a
chance. .
' An honest old farmer, oh be-'
ing informed the 'other day
that one of his heighbdrt tiwed
him a grudge, groWled ""at,'
"No matter; ' he never Jpays
anything." . '
"Workmen commenced taTteg
down the old Court House t
Ztnesrille last Tuesday. TWs
building was used as the 'Capi
tol of the State in ad
1812. : '. "
What small boy does'nbt'Wi.
vy t be nerve oi the pbrtly'itti'tt
who enters church, take Tttt
a big handkerchief, and derAn
eratery blows his nose tbtee
times before sitting downl
' Viikn a .young man ho
parts his hair in the niiidle
goes down on an orange tpeel
nobody seems to care Whether
he ever gets up again, or tot.
A Boston court has'dtJtided
that "if a woman lends 'money
to her husband she can trot get
it back. The decision Witt not
be new 'to many Wives. i t-.'.t
"'Comb down and esrt' grass
hopper soup with' os As, the
style in: which' Kansas editors
extend the hospitalities of the
season lo a brother ulll driver.
' 'A' Lady barbet has '-been
driven out bf Dubdue by the
married ' ladies of that place.
The latter thonght she scraped
acquaintances too eaisiiy. """ I
, i; : . ' ' - ! ra
Most ot . the shallows .that
cross odr talh through ilile are
caused by our staadmg !ln cmut
owh light !j .liiJKV.v.iinv'l
J.'.: I i, , . I Lii''I
. Preferred creditors aTdhose;
yhbo.io'tn'j ;, uqou-.
tas pound ' ct flesh aiihk
tough steaken'deir: -T
t .bl:'K'U

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