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The Fremont weekly journal. (Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio) 1867-1877, May 24, 1867, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038229/1867-05-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Fremont Journal
BT TVIIiCOX & GREENE
ejections to Advcrtiang and Job Work made Qaartri j.
TEEMS OF THE JOURNAL:
One rear, ia ad ranee, - - - $-'"Y
Six months, -
1,00
Three months, v
. .
50
!' -"
rVIRT VARIKTT OF
JOB IPRINTIlSrQ
NEATLY AND QUICKLY DONE.
Biislhess f Directory.
I. O.
G. T.
TRB HB9UI.AR Communications of the Lodge
if Good Templars ar. held ia their bsll la 8bo
M'i Bloek,.rery Tuesday .ran lag. Visiting Broth
ers ana Sister, ere InrHed. All who fart an interest
B the saass 9t Tampornuos and th. welfare of tbe
kaaaaity, ars requested to joia us. I SAtf.l
f DRT, COOPS.
nwctk - VUA
RS la Dry Goods, Dress dooda. Domes
tics, Whit, woods. Woolen Goods, Notions,,
MraorFroat aad State Streets,
FKSMONT, OHIO.
HKRMOJ,fllfirrH WIMO, )( :
T-atALERS (a DryOoode,8uevle fcCloaka, White
LI Good. Hosiery end Glores, Flannels, Blaakats,
Motto.-Front Street,
frkmont, omo.
EJSRIRICH 4c CO.,
DIALERS Id Dry Goods, Reedy-Mad. Clothing,
firowsriss, -. Front 8treet,
FBBMONT, OHIO.
VH( A. RICE, i
DIAIta'Dry voeflei Sroeerlee, Hat. Cape,
Boats aad Shoes, Meraeawt Tailoring, fceFront
Strecfr FBKMONT. OHIO.
CLOTHING. . r
DaTrws-4t Baa.
. . ... . u 1 .
ai.ero iaClothins-.
and Merchant Tailoring,
door aorta or inauonai nana,
FREMONT, OHIO.
frl HAftDWARg.fi v
ROBERTS SHEIiDON,
-v-tAi.r.Ra t- Rsrdnra. Naile. Btoewa. arrieal-
I I mil ImnleaMats. Ate- and manufaeturara of
Cooewr.Tiaoad Sheet-Ironware, Froat8treet, '
FREMONT, OHIO.
THOMPSON fc,CO.,
ARD Tia,pataad Shsat Iroa
wfTS "fremont, OHIO.
CROCKERY, &C.
MOORE, ,. ,;
TBALBKiaOfocriy,CMaaaalarirara, Brlt
II taala Warn, Looking Glasses. Lamas, ee, Front
Blreot, FREMONT,".! - K ,
HOTELS.
EXCHANGE HOTEli,
T)ELLItUE, O. Joha Ford, Proprietor.
Re-
I eeotly refitted and ruxnuueo.
CBOOHAN1 HOUSE; '
FRANK H.O0RKET, Yoprietoi'. Paannfran ear
Hod to aod from the Hoaoo froo of eharga. 81t-
(ta aoraar of 8tato and Front Streota,
FREMONT, OHIO. .
pTEBKaJa.')fT;(j( '!'. iWO
liESSLER'S HOVSE.
KI36jLSRaJSbDINO, PropWatort.' Paanngan
oaoaad Uand (ma tka Booca fret) oil abarga
Bitaata oornsr Front and BUta Btnata,
FREMONT, OHIO.
Young America Dining Saloon.
WARM MEALS SEftVEDAT ALU HOURS.
OYSTERS bytba Oaaaai faalf Caa eu alvay ba
obUkoadaaloa aa aa ba bought slsewnera.
Oomaancaav10r70Bro.il.-- i
I CLEVELAND MILLIOUS.
Froman,9as WM6-tf ? in'",-
DENTISTRY.
JI. M. SIfAW,"i
DX NTIST.lj breparod to do all vork In
tha Aantal Jvofajaioa vitk aromt--
aaaa and aatisfaetioa to all who may Dead
hli aarnosa. Heitarcparadteaetfnnsaiingiatootb
to formiac aom6to
to
acta for up par and lover jaws.
Taath taaartad on ptTO
t.
or gold, or surer plate.
pnoi Ia Baeklaod'inld Bloek. ap-ataira,
FREMONT, OHIO.
Jan 83
G. J. SAIiZDIAN,
DKNTIST.vill be ioJikr afia. at flydo,
the last tvo vests of pach """'"' fiftiji.
to perform all operations nTqairad in hisUxTT
profession. 8atisfaetioa gnaraataed in all earns.
KooauatAoaold stand. ueixi, eu 1
i . i i anLvnic ohioi " 7 '
DRUCCISTS.
DR. E. DILLON & SON,
"pR0GOl8T8 and dealers ia Paints,Oils, Dra-stafFs,
XJ Window ttlMS, ratent ateaielnes, rancy Am
elos, fca. Front Streets r - - " " i '
FREMOfiT, OHIO.r ,1 !f i
MEDICAL.
DR. C. VT, HIGGINS, i
PHYSICIAN AND- SUROEOff , No. 4 (seoond
oor) Fabing ft Helm's nev bloek, State street,
FREMONT, 0.
17 kt. BICfflKS trill attend to general prae-
tice in Medicine and Bnrgery, and will glra especial
atteatioa to Viaeanes M tut Kya. TTionzuy
jAsr.bJia'I'nR'ixTON, m. d.
TTONOtPATHIO PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
JtX OBea oror Betta' 8tora, eomer of Front and
Croghaa streets, , . . r
ananiuni, v. ......
Office Honrs- From I to 10 a. mn from 1 to 3 p.
na., and In tbs araoing. rtanwy
II. F. BAKER. M. D.,
TkHYSIOIAN. 8TTRGE0N AND ACCOUCHEUR
PrlraU Idiasaaea aarafaUy treated and promptly
cared. Office and residence on State Street, East side
of tha rirer, four doors east of the Brick Tarem.
U A ! ' l'.RSi0NT 0H10; lttf
J. M. COREY, M D.
TbHYSICI AN AND 8UR9EON. Omoa Up-sUirs,
t orar Leshar's Hat and Cap Store, aazt door to
haw's Denta 1 OIRoe,
FREMONT, OHIO.
oct20'66.
jr.
to. tSOODSOSi i4-l
TkHY8ICIAN
ICI AN AND BTTRGEON, baa changed his
L rmidenoa to the building one door south of the
Congregational Char:.
U. ! ;: SBLLEVUE
II. rrBOS WORTH, M. D.,
rHTSlCIAN AND SURGEON. Office, Shomo's
I giooa, orar roat unoa, s ront street,
FREMONT, OHIO. , 44yl
J. W. FAILING, M. D.,
HOMCKOPATHIO PHYSICIAN AND 8URGE0N.
Oft Aenrs From 1 to 8 r.a. Saturday a, from
10 a to I r. a. Partieolar attention paid toDis
aaw at tha Throat and Lungs. OFFICE, BucktMmfi
OU BUck, teeond aoor,
FREMONT, OHIO. AprillMd.
PHOTOCRAPHER.
A. D. WILES'
T10T0GRAPH GALLKRY, In St. Clair's Block,
I opposite tk. Post onie, - -
FREMONT, OHIO.
LECAL.
JOHN M. LE9IMON,
A TTORVEYIAT LA Wand NoUrr Psblie. Also
J aatborisod agent for ooUeetion of all kinds of
Miiitar,aoamty,ana renmsa maims, ya
CLYDE, OHIO.
C. W. PAGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW and Notary Public. Inenr
aaae, Baal EsUta aad General Collecting A gout
lor all k.ada ai war and ratent minima.
. . CLYDE, OHIO..
J. L. GREENE 4c SON,
a '
TTORNEYS ft COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
ill
V attend to Legal Business ia Sandusky and ad
ioininreonF.ties. Particular attention raid to the
collection of Clalma. Soldiers' Back Pay, Bonn-tr
end PeuioaleUlma promptly attended to. ui I iv
Front, eomer room.p-tair, Tyler Bloek,
FREMONT, OHIO.
f.a-.BOUD. AnXOST CHSJtCT
1IORD at CHANCE,
a TTORMYS AT LAW, OBIce in BaeklaBd'a Nev
Blook, FREMONT, oaiu. !iyi
J. R. BARTLETT,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.OBice
orar D. Garria ft Co.'s Store, corner Front and
Crogban streets,
,., FREMONT, OHIO.
II. W.WINSLOW,
AtTORNET AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW, vill
attend to Profeeaional Business in Saaduaky
and adjoining souatiaa. 8pecial attention giren to
prooarintseiawr's ray, voaaty.aaa renaions.
Omoa Seoond 8tory Tyler's Bloek.
FREMONT, OHIO.
Noramber.IT.lSa.
a. nun. jaa. rovtsa
EVERETT fc FOAVLER,
a TTORNEIES AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
V and Solicitors ia Chancery; vill attend to pro
fessional bnalneaa ia aanausky ana sdjoiningeoun
ties. Oafee, Seoond story Bueklagd's NEW Block.
rl4.-nes r li&iun i. umu.
STEWART,
T OCKSMITH ft CUTLER. Repairs Looks, Clocks,
iy $ewiog Maehiaoa, Trunks, Umbrellas, Ac. Ac
Griada Sure-son's lutramenta, Raaors, Knirea,
Shears, and all kinda of amall edge tools. All vork
.ttnud to nromntlT and aatiafaction ruaranterd.
8hop oa Croghaa Street, South side, rear of Perry
.oa.-.urr7, QmQ
JZUNDEL'S
o
WESTERN MUSICAL INSTITUTE
Will hold its
Annual Summer Scssioix.
IN SANDUSKY, O.,
COMMENCING JULY 10th, 1867
'Aad continue BIX WEEKS, ty For Circu
lar or farther information, adureea
JOHN ZC NDKL, Toledo, 0, or gaadusky, 0.
jujVt iw
,Wemn , pat.aHt. tK. m--l - -Jal ' ' ' "'V- : ii .' -j .
,"0
xne
Established 1829, Vol.
XXXVIII.
. FREMONT, SANDUSKY
COUNTY, OHIO ; FRIDAY, MAY 24 1867.
New Series, Vol. XV, No. 21.
Sewing Machines.
!'- , ; )''': -r' f
THE andersigned would respectfully aanoaaoa to
the people of Fremont, that he has re-taken
theageooyof tha
, - ... .. ' CELEBRATED . . - !
.'Flofrice Lock -Stitch ;
SEWING MACHINES!
And vill keep a supply of Maebinea oa band attba
8hoe Store of Hiachberger, la Faller's Block, State
Etreet.
ALL KINDS OF STITCHING NEATLY DONE.
I am also agent for
'ML0J)E0XS AND PIAF0S!
8tiiwat ft Soks, Haixkh Bbo'b,N. Y,
. WiLuam Kjtabs ft Co, Battiawra, Md.
- - JACKSOM.
Fremont, May M, 186. 19m3a
:y Tfee Howe Machine Co.'s : 1 '
SEWING IfMCHINES,
" 699 BROADWAY New York.
i-. M FAMILIES ;AKD MMCTDMJ .
; , THESE WOIUaD-ILBNOWNBD
SEWING MACHINES,
Were awarded the highest premium at the
World' Fair in London, and six first preeti
wm at the N. Y. Stale Fair of 1866, and
tt .! . i -. : : '
Are celebrated for doing the beat vork, using a mnch
smaller noedl. for tha name thread than nay oilier
machine, and by .the introduction of the moat ap-
C red machinery, are are sow able to supply therory
t machinea in the world.
These machinea are made at our aew aad
paciaasH Factory at Bridgeport, Co-no.,
ander the linmediat enper-vi.ton af the
Prealdenc afthe Company, KLIA8 HOWB,
Jr the original Inventor of the Sewing
Machine. '
.,,!; - . -! - .- -.
They are adapted to all kinds of Family Sewing,
and to the use of Seamstresses, Dress Makers, Tailors,
Manufacturers of Shirts, Collars, Skirts, Cloaks,
Mantillas, Clothing, Hats, Caps, Corsets, Boots,
Shoes, Harneaa, Saddles, Linen Goods, Umbrellas,
Parasols, eta.- They vork equally veil apon silk,
linen, woolen and cotton goods vith aillc cotton or
linen thread. They vill seam, quilt, gather, hem,
fell, cord, braid, bind, and perform erery species of
sewing, making a beautiful and perfect stitch, alike
on both sides of the articles sewed.
The SlUch invented by MR. HOWE, and
made on this Mactine, is the mott vovvdar and
.durable, and all Sewing Machines art subject
to (fie principal invented by him,
- This Bewins: Machine and samples of its vork may
be seen at the rooms of the Agent,
Hill ITIAGGIE GILMOKE,
IN ST. CLAIR BLOCK, FREMONT, O.
' ' QTHemmlog, Tucking, Dress and Cloak Making
pone in the beat style at the Agent'a rooms. . tm3
Send for Circular-
- - -- .
THE HOWE MACHINE COMPANY,
112 Superior St, Cleveland, O.
D. M. SOMVILLE, Gen. Agent
Branch Office 231 Summit St, Toledo.
;,' TAGBNTS WANTED.:;:
' March 22, rWnUyl. I - i j ' 'v
Sewing Machines. Insurance Companies.
MARIN E
INSURANCE I I !
- i
WESTERN INSURANCE COMYT,
i
i" ' OF BUFFALO, H. Y.
SECt HITY INSIBANCE COMPANY,
OF NEW YORK CITY.
I AM prepared to take Hull or Cargo risks oa Graia
or Lumber ia either of the abore prompt aad re
sponsible oompanieeat tbelovest going ratee; vill
make it to the adrantage of those desiring Maria.
Insurance to call and see me.
I I. K AMSDEN, Agent,
. March 26, l67-13m. ' 7 ' Fremont, Ohio.
.Home Insurance Co.,
OP NEW YORK. ,
29!i Stwi-AnKoaX Statemtnt,showHg the con-
daion of the Company on the 1st
t. , day of July, 1866..
Cash Capital, 3,000,000,00
Assets, . ., 3,596,922.0
Liabilities, 130,385,13
A rery large per seat of the assets of the Compa
ny coaslst in Bonds andMortgagesand UnitedStatoa
Stocks.
1 This Company by its efficient officers and men at
noma, and ita agents abroad, nas built up an organi
sation seMad to aoas in the Umilei Stmtet for ri
iwnor aad RassAaiLrrT.
All persons seeking Insurance should remember
He Home, 01 New ion.
CHARLES J. MABTIN.President,
, A. F. WILMAKTH.YiesPresideat.
- Job MoOb a, Secretary.
I. H. W asbbfrs, Asst. Sec'y.
H.. W. B. FIcL.EL.LAN, AVBk
Fremont, Aug. It. 1846.
Sewing Machines. Insurance Companies. Cleveland Advertisements,
CARPETS.
Sanford,
Stone and
Coffin,
AT THE : -r
NEW CARPET STORE!
. SIS SUPERIOR STREET,
HAVE a (ins assortment of Velret, Brussels, Ta
peetry, Three-ply, Ingrain, Cottage and Hemp
Carpeting. Also, Floor Oil Cloths, Cocoa Matting,
Windov Shades, Lace Curtains, Damask Curtains,
Table and Piano Corers, Door Mats, Bags, Ac,
at the;
LOWEST CASH PRICES.
SANFORD, STONE ft COFFIN,
Eagle Block,
215 Superior Street
ClerelandgOhio.
vlonlmopd.
pOLLEGE OCRIP !
j58 Cts.por Acre. J $94 for 160 A.
Each piece ofScrlp ill for 160 acres, and entitles the
holder to ISO acres ol lsnd in any State where there
ar. (l,.Yemmpnt Lands, subject to entry. We also
buy and sell Military Lasd Wahbasts. For full
particulars, send for the ARMY HERALD. Speci
men copies free. Win. K. PKKSTON,
No. 1 Lrmans Block, near the Court House.
Tl5nl3mi CLEVELAND,
LADIKS, DON'T OVERLOOK THIS.
The beatprepartion in the vorid for tbs complexion.
For 2o cents ve will send a receipt for the abore
preparation, so that erery lady can make her ovn
Cercassian Bulm " for one qaarter of vbat aha has
to oar the drngiriflt, and hss the satisfaetion of
r . . . ' : jt l . V
anoving tnai mere are nu puuuaaw unp in uie
mixture. Address UHnMcr jukdan,
mixture.
TloaWj
f 0 Drawer 21ft, Clmland, 0
Boots and Shoes.
!
O
Immense. Stock.
BOOTS & SHOES!
HOOT & MENC.
fV immenaa stock of Goods is bow ia stars,
J carefully selected in the , r .. , ..
GREAT EASTERN MARKETS!
Ml goat ,M.
Cbeaper than any Boot
Shoe House in Ohio.
Our Assortment is Complete !
Aad va Inrite-the Inspection of oar goods by all
paroaaasrs, eooaaeai i oar sonny u sun j.u,
both in goods and prloea.
Thankful for the Tory liberal patronage
which we hawe recalwed for the past
we years, we respectfully ask
a eentlnaaJtce of the aataao.
MANUFACTURING & REPAIRING
Dons oa short notice ia best styl. at eur old stand
BUCKLAND'S NEW BLOCK.
j . HOOT & DIESG.
Fremont, May M.186T.-S9T1. ' ' ,' ;
Auction and Bankrupt Sales
OUT DOME!
AT,
DORR & SON'S
H
ATING jaat returned from fitw York, where v.
bought atlov pnoaa,wacaa sow sell , t
Children's Shoes at 10 cents to Rl,21
Mlaaea' " SO
Boy's " '-.9
Ladiee' '-' 7S "
Liadlea' ood glorekid Bala.
liadiea' Ijiaitera,
Men's Calf Boota, at
Mens' s-eod French Calf Boors,
Caatommade. -
!t,50
i,t
4,30
6,50
Meaa' hrary Boota,
3,00
Mens' Brogans, .1,25 to 400
M hare made such arrangements for purchasing
vith tbe largest Boot aad Shoe Home in Nev York
that we can -
: . DEFT COMPETITION!,.
i. ......
Repairing don in Neatest Style;
Oar Custom Shop does tbe Snest vork at low
friosa SstisfaoHon guaranteed in erery ease.
" ' V DOKK St SON.
I Fremont, Mayl,'67 rUnZtf.
Come to Fremont
IF TOU WANTBAKGAINJIN-'1; ',1
BOOTS &L8HOESi
j GO TO
SHERMAN . & CO.'S
Cheap Boot and Shoe Store,' and save
25 per cent
If yoa vaat the beat custom mad. Boots and Shoes
r" , , SHERMAN & CO.'S.
If job wmnt th best sewed or pegged boots in San
tinskj County, go to
SHERMAN & CO.'S.
. If you wants nice fit, go to
i SHERMAN .& CO.'S. ,
If yoa want tha new styles for Winter and Spring,
0t SHERMAN & CO.'S.
If yoa want Excelsior Ladles' Boots, go to
SHERMAN cV CO.'S.
1 We giro nev pairs for all which prora dafectire af
ter reasonable vear. Satisfaction guaranteed ia erery
ease. Mending don. on short notice, leather and
ladings tor sals. '
SHERMAlf CO.
i ' No. 3 Fabiso Hai"s Block,
Btant Street, Fremont,
Fremont, February 22, 187. t16o.
GREAT EXHIBITION.
ADMITTANCE FREE.
Doors opea at all Hoars of the Day
THE "BIG SHOW OF SPRING
STYLES OF HATS AND CAPS
AT H. LESHERS IS A
FREE mSTTTUTION.
THE HOST PROMINENT AMONO THE
h
latest Agonies
ABE THE
JEROME, GERMAN, SARATOGA,
BROADWAY fe BOULEVARD,
Andtbey srs all beautlei.
Silk and Gassimere Hals,
Manufactured expressly for me, they are A No.
A full line of Soft Hats, in Far aad Wool, to suit
all in quality aad prices.
Dent tail to come iu and sea dm before yoa
your Hats.
No. 4
BUCKLAND S OLD BLOCK,
II. LESHE'tt,
Fremont, 0, April 24th 1867. U-w.
R ISLET'S Ill'CIItJ is the cdri for pais
veakness in the back and loins; and all those
complaints resulting from derangement of tha kid
neys and urinary organs. Sold in large bottler
the druggists.
H AURAL. RI9LK Y. ft Co..
holesale Druggists, 141 Chamber St, N.
Valuable City Lots for Sale.
INQUIRE OF
Fremont, Sept. T, IStS, 86tf.
R. DICKINSON,
Boots and Shoes. Hardware, Stoves and Tinware.
i
;
0.
,
;
,
1.
by
T.
The War is Over!
Gold has Gone Down!
AND
ROBERTS &SHELDON
- ; '
Have reduced thePrice
ON HARDWARE
TO COBHESPOND.
!IE ask the Farmers to call and ex-
f aming our stock 4.
Tools and Implements,
which consist in part of
Combination Steel Plow,
Curtis' Iron Beam,
Fostoria Cast Plow,;
i Corn Plows,
j Shovel Plows, double & single
I Cultivators,
! Road ScraDers.
Corn Shellers, iron and wood,
Straw Cutters, .
Horse Rakes,
Horse Forks,
Hoes and Forks,
Rakes and Scythes,
Grain Cradles,
Scythe Sticks and Stones,
Shovels and Spades, ;
Wheelbarrows, "
Churns, Tubs, Pails, Brooms,
Clothes' Wringers,
Spinning Wheels and Reels,
Sheep Shears & Wool Twine,
Land Plaster,
Water, Lime,
Stucco, &c, &c, &c. .
Together with a complete stock of
Nails, . ;
House and Barn Trimmings,
Builders' & Farmers' Hardware,
Tin" and Sheet Iron Ware, '
' All af vbieh v. oflbt at
Prices which defy Competition!
ALSO AGENTS FOK XHa
-CHAMPION
Slower anti Reaper
Cider Mills,. - '
Buckeye Wood Sawing Ma
chines,
Fairbanks Scales,
Our Tin Shop,
Is in order, and will fill your orders
with despatch.
! ROBERTS & 6HELD ON.-
THOMPSON & CO.
Now offer for sale a Large Stock of
H AR DWA R E
STOVES!
TIIST, copper,
AND
Sheet-Iron Ware!
low.
THOMPSON & CO.
rsMoirT, June i8S6, S9tf,
J
?
Boots and Shoes. Hardware, Stoves and Tinware. Drugs, Medicines and Notions.
FREMONT DRUG STORE.
DR. B. DILLON & SV,
ft IYK notice to thousands of their friendsand the
X nubile rsnarallr that la keeaina stes vith the
onvard marsh and rapid progress of thsir town and
country during the past Ire years, they bar. not
only doubled and trebled, bat treatly mora than
quadrupled the amount of their stock of
drugs ! medicines!
PAINTS, OILS,
' DYE-BTU iJ'i'B X
waU Paper!
Window Shades
STATlGNEBYpSCHOOL BOOKS
TRUSSES, SUPPORTERS, SHOUL-
j ttt, nn t nna lfTOnUTT A XT
Vat DisAULQ, JU.10VAUUAA1
EOUS INSTRUMENTS, .
AND A THOUSAND OTHER
ARTICLES UNDER THE HEAD OF
Druggists . Sundries
1 ; The besttuid most popaUr
HAIR RESTORATIVES & HAIR
DRESSINGS, PERFUMERY,
; SOAPS,! PATENT " AND ,
PROPRIETARY MED-
i ICINES, Ac; " '
with a liberal .oiler, a larsa Stock, and almost
unequalled rariety.ve feel Justified in saying
Druggists, Physicians, Merchants and tbe people
generally vill here find nearly erery adrantage possi
ble to bs offered ia any of the tovns or cities of
wrest west.. ... , , .,
, , ' E. DILLON k SON.
Fremont, Jsj.11,18I 38yl- ,j ,n ,
Boots and Shoes. Hardware, Stoves and Tinware. Drugs, Medicines and Notions. Commission Merchants.
LAIVDGRAF & ERNST,
On the Pike, West End of B ridge,
OBNERAL, '
.'J. ..:. .. i U I.- . .
HIOHE8T CASH FBICES PAID .FO.R -
BUTTER, EGGS, LARD, TALLOW,
'; HIDES, PELTS, DRIED ;',!'
; FRUIT, Ac, &c
, We have constantly on hand
A COMPLETE . STOCK OF
Family Groceries
Which we offer at the
Lowest New York Cash Prices,
ff Salt and Flour always on hand.
Highest prices for all sorts of FUR.
Don't pass by the Wild Cat Sign.
FRED. J. LANDSBAF,
n3jlrl5 . . JOHN 0. ERNST.
Joseph L. Rawsori &
BTORAGEr
Forwarding r.and; Commission
MERCHANTS.
-DEALERS IN '-
v
Coarse Salt,
Fine Salt,
Dairy Salt,
Land Plaster, .
Calcined Plaster,
Water
Baring purchased the entire property known
I the
I 'Tremont lOTarehoTise & Steam
Elevators"
At the head of narlsation on the Sandusky
I we are prepared to receir stort, ana snip .
GRAIN,
MOTHER,
fflERCIIANDISE, ;
AND OTHER PRODUCTS.
Jos urn L. Rawsoh is Managing
Office at the Ware House. .
' L. Q. RAWSON, )
JAMES MOORE, Fremont,
JOSEPH L. RAWSON, )
Fremont, March 18, 1887. rlSnlltf.
HOOD & DEAL
Hare opened an AUCTION and COMMISSION
on Front street. They will sell
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES,
CROCKERY, CLOTHING,
FARMING IMPLEMENTS
or anything els.; for anybody in this, or any
city, or la tbs country, oa commission.
If yoa want anything sold send it in. If
Boots and Shoes. Hardware, Stoves and Tinware. Drugs, Medicines and Notions. Commission Merchants. Poetry
DICKENS CRADLESONG OF THE
POOR.
!
Hash, I cannot bear to see thee
Stretch thy tiny hands in vain;
I hare got no bread to give thee
Nothing, child, to ease thy pain. ;
When God sent you first to bless me, .
, Frond and thankful, too, was I;
Now, my darling, I, thy mother, " C
Almoat loDgto see thee die. . '
Slee p, my darling thou art weary ;
God is good, but life is dreary.
I have seen thy beauty fading,
And thy strength sink day by day
Soon I know will want and fever ,. .f ,
Waste thy little life away. '
Famine makes thy mother reckless,
Hope and joy are gone from me; -I
could suffer all, my baby, . i
; Had I but a crust for thee.
Sleep, my darling thou art weary;
' God is good, but life is dreary.
I am wasted, dear with hunger,
And my brain is sore oppressed,
I have scarcely strength to press thee,
; Wan and feeble, to my breast. - - '
Patience, baby, God will help us,
Death will come to thee and me; ,
He will take us to his Heaven, ' '
Where no want or pain can be.
j - Bleep, my darling thou art weary;
i . God is good, but life is dreary.
Miscellaneous Selections.
WHO ARE THE GOSSIPS.
!
that
the
'
I.
!
,
Co.
Lime,
as
Birer,
Agent.
Ohio.
(tor
other
tf,
"Good morning, Mrs. Simpkins." -"Good
morning, Mrs; Browning."
"A beautiful morning, isn't it!" .
"Deliehlful I I could not content myself at
home, so I told Martha Jane I would just run
oyer here, and have a little chat witn you. i
maris nn mv mind if I ever saw yoa again
it would have to be here, unless I happened
to meet you somewhere, laughed Mrs. a. ,
How. Mrs. oimpKiD, aaia uie oiner,
reDrovinelr. "yoa know I eo to your house
oftener than anywhere else. I have not even
been ia to see my next door neighbor, Mrs.
Jewel, in nearly two weeks."
Indeed I then you nave not seen Jennie
since her return?" ' . '
"I have not, but I hear she is greatly un
proved."
. "Improved 1 Why, Mrs. Ui-owning, you
oupht to see her put on airs. It is perfectly
ludicrous-' - "
"Yoa have seen her. then i " .
"No. but Martha Jane has. It i really
amusing to hear her describe her. call there,
Martha Jane is rather witty, yon know, and
can set off anrtbinp: of that kind perfectly.
: "Decidedly so. uut did not oesnie treat
her well?"
O. well enough, as to that, but she was
just from the city, and though, I strppose, she
must bci nerscu up on mat account, alisbo
ridiculous in her. I presums Mr. Siropkins
is quite as well able to send his daughter to
a Clty uunruiug-suwi, niiu UlOOfl HVl vy
within an inch of her life, as Mr. Jewel is,
but Mr. Simpkins chooses to pay his debts
nrst, said airs, a., siguincanuy. . , , . .
"I have beard," said the eager,, but less
talkative Mrs. Browning, "that Mr. Jewel is
considerably in debt." - . i ,
"Lawsl 1 guess He is. .Between you and
me, Mrs. Browning, I think it would be
much more honorable in him to pay Mr.
Simpkins what he owes him, before he lavs
out quite so much for his daughter. How
ever, I always make it a point to say nothing
"Was that not Mrs. Butterfield that just
passed?" said Mrs. Browning, pushing aside
the curtain. , . ... ... .. .
"Yes, I believe it was, pretty, isn't she?.'
. "Very pretty, but she looks careworn.'' ,'
"WelL I don't wonder, if stories arc, true,"
said the sympathising Mrs. S. "I suppose
she has very little enjoyment. , ijihe has all
those children to take care of, and does ber
own house-work besides. . I should think,
with as large a salary as Elder Butterfield
gets, four hundred dollars, Be migni anora
tohiraaeirL" w "
; "I have heard," replied Mrs. B., "that she
prefers doing her own work, to being subject
to the annoyance of keeping a hired servant.
"That is what their church try to make out,
but, in my opinion, there are few ladies who
nrefer to do their own work when they can
ret help: tho' they may make a -virtue of
necessity. For my part, I pity . her, poor
soot, . They say ceis reauy unama to ur,
toot' It is such a pity that a man of Elder
Butter field's talent, and one that might do
so much good in his sacred calling, should
set such an exaniDle in hiB private life. How
ever, I know him only by reputation, and
what I hear may not be true. There are
some people. Ton know, that must talk. Dear
knows tcere are gossips enongn in mis town,
I don t pretend to believe one-nan l near,
Do you know, Mrs. Browning, they have
almost had Martha Jane married twoor three
mes. It is so provoking that a young lady
cannot receive a call from a gentleman but it
is construed into something portentous oy
the gossips." '!.!.!.. v: . , . i .. : V . I
Yes." replied Mrs. B.. "in these little
country Tillages there is any amount of gos
sip going orr. l am very anxious mat jnr.
browning should sea out ana return to ins
eity: ' There one need not know one's next
door neighbor." ' '
"Very true," said Mrs. S., rising to go.
but before she could take her leave, another
theme for her busy tongue presented itself.
There goes Miss Granger, " said she, pausing
on the step. "Poor girl, how I pity herl" -.
"Pity her, why!" " :
"Havn't you heard, Mrs. Browning? Tim
McFsrlain has' left her, and she is almost
Cissy. !.:..:.
"Is it possiblel I should not mistrust it
by her looks. - Besides, I have heard that it
was she who broke the engagement." a r :
"That is not so. I have heard all about it
from several reliable sources; and Martha
Jane was in there about the time ha left, and
Miss Granger was crying- herself almost to
death. It must have been about that. ; What
else could it have been? She is too proud to
let people know how she feels. But 1 guess
if she knew him as well as do, she would
thank her stars that she was fairly rid of him.
But. mercy I 1 mud go. -'Good, morning.
Mrs. a. disappears around tbe corner, and
Mrs. B. within the door. Thus endeth the
lesson. Who are the nostivs? All who have
reached the age of sixteen years can testify
to the fact that there is such a class in exist
ence, and yet a large majority of them would
be struck with amazement and indignation
to find their names upon the list. The dear,
innocent souls never dream that the interest
they take in tbe affairs of their neighbors
result from ought else than pure devotion to
the welfare of humanity. There is many
Mrs. Simpkins in the world, aye, and Mb
Simpkins. and Messrs. Simpkins Jr., who,
for wsntof something else to do, collect about
the aterai of shone and stores, comment open
the style of the ladies' dress, or the sine of
their feet, tf they happea to lilt their skltu
to cross a cutter, or avoid the pools of tobac
co juice with which these gentlemen of ease
adorn the sidewalks. They witness every
arrival in town, and every departure. They
know what ladies receive calls, and wnat
ODea do not. They know when Mrs. Jenkins
geta a new silk dress, Just how much it cost,
and if Mr. Jenkins is able to pay for it
They know, to a minute, tbe time Miss Mary
Jenkins expects to become Mrs. John Smith,
and all the paaticulars of the wedding, at least
a month before it takes place. After storing
their minds with aa much valuable lnlorma
tion as their soft craniums will contain, talk
ing it over among themselves, comparing
notes, and expressing their brilliant ideas,
they go home and retail it to their less for
tunate mowers, wives ana sisters ior mtuie
use.
Oh! ve irossips. Is there not work enough
in this suffering world for you all? . Aim
something- hieher than Catherine and spread
ing news. hinic ol the consequence oi your
idle life, think how it degrades your own
moral nature. think what you do when you
throw a shadow upon the character of tbe
helpless and innocent, think what you
. ' . e j r i: 1
When you aeperate irieca trum jneuu, ium ti
ding your unholy presence and poisonous
breath "where aneels dare not tread." The
same God who said "thou shajt do no mur
der," also said, "thou shalt love thy neigh
bor as thyself." Think you not you are
"treasuring up wrath T Guard well each
his own fireside, you know not what enemy
may be laying snares for you and yours.
"Mind your own business, is a homely
phrase, but it carries with it a valuable mean
ing. Carry out its instructions, and allow
others to do the same, and your hearts will
be lighter, your sleep sweeter, your con
science more at ease. There will be less
strife, less contention, less heart-bleeding,
less sighing in a world where there is sorrow
enough at best.
The Buffalo dapert report Cholera in
city.
Democracy and the Nigger.
The Shorter Catechism on Negro Equality.
Who said that all men are created equal ?
.Thomas Jefferson, tbe father of Democ
racy, .
Who gave to negroes the right of suffrage
in New York?
The Democratic party. '
Who presided over the convention which
gave this privilege to negroes?
. Marun van Jiuren, a Democrat.
"Who afterward elected Martin Van Buren
President of the United States?
The Democratic party.
Who married a negro wench, and by her
had mulatto children? s
Richard M. Johnson, a good Democrat.
Who elected Richard M. Johnson Vice
President of the United States?
The Democratic party.
JI President Vau Buren had died, and
Richard M. Johnson had become President,
who would have become the Democratic
mistress of the White House? -. ,
This same negro wench.
Who made the negro a citizen in the State
of Maine?
ah overwhelming Democratic majority.
Who enacted a similar law in Massachu
setts? .
An overwhelming Democratic majority.
Who gave the negro the right to vote in
New Hampshire.
, Tbe Democratic party.
' Who permitted every colored person own
ing two hundred and fifty - dollars, in New
York, to become citizens?
A General Assembly purely Democratic
W ho repealed the laws of Ohio, which re
quired the negroes to give bond and security
before settling in this stater
The Democratic party. '
Who passed a law by which, in Ohio, the
negro is placed on the witness stand along
side oi tbe white man!
' The Democratic Vrty.
r Who voted ior a bill in the Ohio Legisla
ture, repealing all laws making a distinction
on account ot color in this a later
George E. Pueh. ' '
-i Who afterward elected George E. Pugh to
the United States Senate? ,. .. . ' . ;
The Democratic party.
Who voted in the Constitutional Conven
tion of Ohio against a provision to prevent
negroes coming into this State T
: RufufrP. Ranney. '-.
Who voted in the same Convention to
permit negro children to go to the same
sciiools with white childredr
: 'Rufus P. Ranney. ---.
:Who supported Rufus P. Ranney for Gov
ernor of Ohio in 1859?
iThe Democratic party.
I Who decided iu the Supreme Court of Ohio
that mnlattocs had tbe right to voter
' I Ruben Wood, a good Democrat.
' I Who, after the decision, elected Ruben
Wood Governor of Ohio?
f i The Democratic party.
' Who refused, in the State Convention of
1850, to remedy the evil established by his
decision! , , , ,
l The Democratic party.
Who. with the above facts and many
others staring them in the face, are continu
ally yelping and hypocritically whining
about in ice
igger Suffrage and "Nigger Equal-
ity?"
I Tbe Democratic party
i All these things were done by the Demo
crats, aad yet they deny being in favor of
negro 'equality, and put it upon others.
JaoksojL stanaara. , .. - .
meat
pound
the
Mr.
this
I
ness
A
lately
came
see
I
did
let
girl
head,
veil
dress,
man
in
ed
er
tea
pain
bad
ing
Spring Fashions.
In the always interesting article of ¬
line there is a most gratifying change. The
"tilters" are acknowledged by their wearers
to be just what the newspapers called them
from the first, an abomination, ridiculous in
form and vulgar in idea. They are to be
followed by a much smaller hoop, gracelul,
becoming and eonvienent for both out and
in-door wear. ' ;
t The fashion for bonnets is still oscillating
and fails to indicate definitely the style that
is to prevail.' Those who venture to pur
chase have the mortification of seeing some
thing else entirely new the nrst time tbey
anneal' in their costly nothingness. One
thing, however, seems to be pretty certain,
tnd that is that there will be no such radical
change in regard to size aa has been antici
pated. The small bonnet is what the late
Arteraus would have called "a success."
Handsome women, and those who consider
themselves so, have no notion of again hiding
their beauty in bonnets of the old coalscut
tle style; and those not iucluded in these
two classes are' too insignificant in numbers
to influence the fashions materially. Seri
ously, we believe that for summer wear the
Small bonnet is the true idea; and we are glad
to see it perpetuated. ,
The gored dress, so long in fashion, will
be the prevailing style for the coming season.
It is made plain at the top-!-or with plaits
at the back, according to taste, r or the
house the skirt is very wide at the bottom,
with a long train. For reception this skirt
ie very suitable. In street dresses, there is
a decided and apparently popular change.
The short dresses, with petticoat to match,
are a great improvement upon the looped-up
dresses, with trainswhieh would sometimes
escape from the best of loopers to sweep the
streets. These short dresses require a sacque
or jacket to be worn with them, and are gen
erally made en suite. Shawls cannot be worn
with them; they have too neavy a iooz, ana
are not graceful with the new short dress.
The short dresses for the street arc made
main at the top. or with plaits at tbe back,
both of which are fashionable. The skirt is
usually cut with points around the bottom,
and ia worn over a plaited petticoat of the
same material but the petticoat is now ouen
made plain, and when trimmed with gradu
ated bands of velvet is very pretty, and many
prefer it to the plaited, h. very thing in the
way of dress is elaborately trimmed. .
,
ino-
in
nn
to
a
t
Sanitary.
a
The Health officer of Cleveland.has issued
the following circular which might be heed
ed with profit In Fremont :
As the summer months are close at hand,
and it is well known that cleanliness is one
of the first preventives of diease, we call the
attention of onr citizens to the following, re
commending them to comence the cleansing
process at once and not wait to be ordered by
we neaitn aumoruies:
Allow no swill or grabage to be thrown
around yards and alleys. Put your swill
and house offal in a vessel and place it in the
rear of your premise for the swill contractor.
Any neglect on this part to remove the Bwill
should be reponea to tnis oroce.
White-wash your bouses thoroughly, ea
rwwisllw. vnur cellars and sleeping apart
ment, and place a vessel of chloride of lime in
your cellars, renewing it ocasion ally during
tbe summer.
. TVnlnriza vonr vaulu frequently either
with lima rhnrnanl. aulnhate of iron fpro-
" .... ........ , ( . -
portion of about one pound to the pail of
water; or any oiner agenw.
Do-not throw any rubbish, wash water or
garbage of any kind into tne aueys; it is
contrary to the ordinance to do so. The
provisiousof thisordiance will be strictly
enforced.
The attention of physicians is called to
the ordinance requiring that all cases of
epidemic or contagious diseases be reported
in tKn health authorties.
It is desired that all nuisances, not dis
covered by the Health Officer be reported to
this office, where they will receive prompt
attention.
Rn the nrompt co-opertaion of the cit
izens, and strict attention to cleanliness, we
may hope to escape any epiueniic mm n
son.
By order of the Board.
Johk Dickinson, M. D.,Health Officer.
Kansas Fashions.
at
do
are
the
The following are the latest Leavenworth
fashions, as found in a recent issue of the
Commercial:
"Miss S . old Smith's daughter by his
wife's first husband, wore a short dress of
sorrel poplin, striped with brown hewgags,
with a tight-fitting baequine made out of her
ma's last winter's cloak. Sleeves of moire
antique to match her nighett underskirt, and
bonnet ol red oak bark, tied wim tuiyyj
elm strings. She was as beautiful as a
hntcher flr. She looked a little odd out
nmnzinfrlv nrettv."
"Miss H x, alleged to be the wealthiest
girl on Cheyenne etreet, wears a black-and-
tan Irish terrier popnn sun., iruuniru iiu
hins Mrfs of straw-colored bombazine, with
blue stitching, put around the Bkirts
with Snauldine's glue. Short sacfiue, tight
under the arms, and bonnet of buffalo chips,
trimmed with pieces of cable.
"Oh, Mary, my heart is breaking."
"Is it, indeed, Mr. Closefist? So mach
the better for you."
"Why, my idol?"
"Because, when it ia broken out and oat,
you may sell the pieces for gun flints!"
A Little Nonsense.
What is the difference between a pound of
and a drummer boy? One weighs a
and the other pounds away.
The following is said to be a copy of a let
ter sent by a member of the profession to a
person who was indebted to one of his cli
ents: B"Sir. I am desired to apply to you for
sum of twenty dollars, due to my client,
Jones. If you send me the money by
day a week, you will oblige me it not
shall oblige you."
Some people place their ideas of happi
upon one thing and some upon another.
lady made a call upon a friend who had
been married. 'When her husband
home to dinner, she said: "I been to
Mrs. ." "Well replied the husband,
suppose she is Terr happy. Happy? I
should think she ought to be; she has a
camel's hair shawl two-thirds border."
A great Methodist orator, in Dublin, once
attempted to preach from the text, "Rem
ember JUot s Wile," and made a lauure
Afterwards, remarking to Dr. Bond that he
not know the reason of his failure, the
venerable Doctor replied that "he had better
other peoples' wives alone."
"Mark Twein" says that to "see a lovely
of seventeen, with her saddle on her
and her muzzle on behind, and her
covering the end of her nose, come trip
ping along in her honplesa, red-bottomed
dress, like a churn on fire, is enough to set a
wild.
Rclcsfokthk ScHooL-Rooa. The' fol
lowing very good rules have been adopted
a scnooi-room in juaine;
No tobacco-chewing in the school room.'
No kissing the girls in the entry.
No snapping apple-seeds at the teacher.
No cutting benches with jack-knives.
No novels allowed to be brought to school.
Mr. Jones met Mr. Smith, as he was going
i i u;.:i:n..; -i
asked, "Which way. Smith, up or down ?' '
That depends npon circumstances," remark
the latter; "if I geta berth over the boil
I shall probably go tip, if in the cabin,
down." We have not heard form him
since.
"In short, ladies and gentlemen," said an
overpowered orator, "I can only say beg
re to add 1 desire to assure yoa, mat
wish I bad a window to my bosom, that you
might see the emotion of my heart."
Vulgar boy from the gallery: "Won't a
in the stomach do this time,"
Miss Mary "Now Harry, if you are a
doctor, prescribe for me. I've had a very
pain about my heart. nrnat can i
take?" '
Dr. Henry "(thinking this the best op
portunity he baa had) "I' ve no doubt as to
what is the Desi remeay to taae taae me.
A VaoETABLK Pokm. At a tableaux ex
hibition in Auburn, New York, the follow
vegetable poem was produced. .
"Onion garden bed reclining
Beets a youth his aching hesd;
Cauliflowers? Lo, weeds confront me!
Lettuce hence, he sadly said:
Carrots out the stoutest manhood, .
Peas my weary soul doth need; , ,
Bean 01 strive for me hereafter,
Else my heart will go to seed." - i
Foreign Gossip.
It is said that a homn?Dathic physician in
France cares rheumatism by placing a bee
the spot where the pain is severest and
exciting it until it slings.
The Prnsian Bessemer, who only a few
years since advanced his method of converts
mst iron into malleable steel, is already
enjoying from it an income of $500,000 per
annum. - -); ,;,
There ia now exhibiting at Kedcar, a
small village in England, a cork model of
Lincoln cathedral, made by a Lincolnshire
plowman, which contains the extraordinary
number of 1,800,000 old corks, and occu
pied ten and a half years in building;
The London Metropolitan underground
railway is about five miles long, and carried
1866 21,273,104 passengers without a fatal
accident. Its receipts per mile were con
siderably more than those of the ten princi
pal railways concentrating in London. Plans
are now in progress to increase we noes to
nearly thirty-six miles in the aggregate of
underground railways,
Cordinai Mazarin was dictating one day a
letter to his secretary. Tbe latter, overcome
with incessant work, fell asleep, and the
cardinal continued dictating, while pacing
nn and down his study. W hen he bad come
the conclusion, he turned toward the Sec
retary, saving "End as usual." He then
perceived that the first lines of the letter
only were written. The cardinal was very
-. . . ... . i . .-j t ,
nartial to that secretary ana treatea aim an
father. . To awake him he gave him a box
on the ear; the secretary in a fury, returned
the blow. The cardinal, without showing
the least emotion, said, eooly, "Now, sir, as
we are both wide awake, Jet us proceed
with our letter.
Tt is whispered abroad that the sudden ill
ness of the Empress iugene was caused oy
namnhlet sent to her. and into France, by
Gonzalez Bravo, the Spanish Minister of the
Interior. This pamphlet, it is said, was full
of aniteful revelations concerning the early
....... . T ' f C l.
lite ot the present Jimpresa oi uie c muui
and was sent out in retaliation for some
wicket pamphlets about Queen Isabella,
which have lately appeared in France.
Personal.
Rutratadt is going to Europe and his
splendid place on the Hudson, which is said
hiv rnxl him a hundred thousand dollars,
ia advertised for rent, furnished witn nis
horses, four carriages, and manifold appur
tenances.
The Noble County (Ohio) Republican gays
that old John Gray, the old revolutionary
veteran, who at the age of 103 was granted
a pension of $500 per annum by Congress,
hss received his first semi-annual instal
ment. This ia the first money he nas ever
received from the Government,
Paw J.m Belcher died a few days ago
at Blackwell's Island, in the Almshouse,
delirium tremens. Mr. Belcher, seven yeaia
ago was a pastor of the Baldwin place Bab
tiat Church. Boston, where he succeeded
nnrli men aa Dr. Baldwin. Rev. J.
Enowles and Rev. Dr. Stow.
HT-OovernorHawlev. of Connecticut, has
resumed the editorial chair and duties in the
new office of the .Hartford iVewand Courant,
of both of which' papers he ia now principal
nronrietor and responsible manager, ius
Courant is the morning paper, and is the larg-
est journal in New England and the oldest
in
America, lis nrst nuaauer uarwg y-
peared in 1764
James T. Fields, of the firm of Ticknor
Fields, returns an income for lbt of up
wards of $21,000, which shows that the At-
lantic and Our Young Folks are good prop
erty. Every Satuiday's health is a good
deal better than it was some months ago,
when ita circulation dropped low down
nmnno the one-figured thousands, but
cannot now nay a very considerable revenue.
The Atlantic is better man an ouwou,
even a mutual coal company. Its profits
cannot be less than $(0,00t per year.
Josh. Billings' Philosophy.
I want to bet three dollars that no man
matched himself sgin the devil
wh.f lip imt wat.
Aim hi. if von strike low. The man who
nniWtakps tn iump three hundred and sev
enty-five feet a head, he will certainly make
a iriwin xrv.
fs j . -,,
1 never gnu a mau wouukub wuivuo w
repent of his sins before he had committed
them, who didn't want the sharpest kind
watching.
I never bet anny stamps on the man who
is always telling what he would did if
bad been thare. I lave notised that
kind never get thare.
Faith don t appear to me to be annything
more than tip too good sense; and the faith
that is in this world now won't keep a roan
from falling into the bottom of a well it
lets go uv the curb to spit on his hands.
When I get to not havinganny gooa xucs,
it rloz seem to me that I kan have more of
than anny man I ever knew, and not
try; I suppose it seems, just so to you,
triend, don t ill
I kant think of enny talent now, that is
apt to descend from father to sou untarnish
ed, as the gift of exaggeration.
A man may have a perfek right to be
single, but I doubt whether he has a right
continue so.
An immense wild cat was killed in
Chicago lumber-yard, supposed to have
brought in tna hold ol soma veaoej
Josh. Billings' Philosophy. For the Little Folks.
SNOW WHITE AND ROSE RED.
[CONCLUDED FROM LANY WERK.]
I
.
,
of
Some time afterwards tho Mother sent the)
children into the wood to gather sticks; and
while doing so, they earn to a tree which
was lying across the path, on the trunk of,, .
which somebody kept bobbing ub and down
from the grass, and they could not imagine. ,
what it was. When they cams nearer they .
saw a Dwarf, with an old wrinkled bee and "
a snow-white beard. a yard long. . The end ,
of this beard was fixed in the split of the
tree, and the little man kept jumping about
like a dog tied to a chain, for he did not
!rnow how to free himself. He glared at tho
Maidens with his red fiery eyes, and ex
claimed,, "Why do you stand there? are yoa
going to pass without offering me any assist
ance?" "What have you done, littleman?"
asked Red-Rose. "You stupid gaping .
goose!" exclaimed he. ."I wanted to have
split the tree, in order to get a inue wooa
for my kitchen, for the little wood which wo
us is soon burnt up with great lagKots, not
like you rough greedy people devour! I
had driven tee wedge m properly, ana
everything was going on well, when the
smooth wood new upwards, and the tree
closed so suddenly together that I could not
draw my beautiful beard oat, and here it
g ticks and cannot get away. There, don't
laugh, yon milked-faced things! are yoa
dumb-founded?" . . ,
The children took all the pains they eouls
to pall the Dwarfs beard out; but without -success.
"I will ran and fetch some help,'
cried Rose-Red at length.
"Crackbrained sheep s-head that yon are! " -
snarled the Dwarf: "what are yoa going to .
call other people for? Yoa are two too
many now for me; can yoa think of nou-
ingelse?"
Don t be impatient, replied snow-
White; "I Lave thought of something;" and
palling her scissors out of her pocket she
eat off the end of the beard. And as soon
as the Dwarf found himself at liberty, ha
snatched up his sack, which laid between
the roots of the tree, : filled with gold, and
throwing it over his shoulder marched off,
grumbling and groaning and crying, "Stu
pid I to cut on a piece ot my beautiful beard.
Plague take you!" and away he went with
out once looking at the children..
Some time aiterwards Snow-White and
Rose-Red went avfishing, and as they n eared
the pond they saw something like a great lo
cust hopping sbont on the bank, aa if going
to jump into uw vHissr. - Aney ran up sou
recognised the Dwarf. "What are yon af
ter?" asked Rose-Red; "yoa will fall into the,
water." "I am not quite such a simpleton
as that," replied the Dwarf: "but do yoa not
see this fish will pull me In." The little
man had been sitting there angling, and uu-
man had been
fortunately the wind had entangled his beard
th the fishise line; and so, when a great
fish bit at the bait, the strength of the weak
little fellow was not able to draw it out, and
the fish had the best of the struggle. The
Dwan held on oy the reeds and rashes which ,
grew near; but to no purpose, for the fish
puiled him where he liked, and he mcsl
soon have been drawn into the pond. Luck
ily just than the two maidens arrived, and
tried to release the beard of the Dwarf from
the fishing line; but both were too closely
entangled for it to be done. So the Maiden '
pulled out her scissors again and cot off an-
Sther piece of the beard. When tha Dwarf
r this done he was in a great rage, and ex- '
claimed; "Yoa , donkey! that ia the way to
diafigute my face. Was it - not enough to
cut it once, but yoa must now take away the
best part of my fine beard? I dare not show
myself again now to my own people. I
wash you had run the soles off your boota
before you had came faerer : So. say tog, bo
took np a bag of pearls which laid among
the rushes, and without speaking another
word, slipped off and disappeared behind a
stone. : .
Not many days after" this adventure, it '
chanced that the Mother seat the two Maid- -
ens to the next town to buy thread, needles
and pins, laces " and ribbons. Their road
passed over a common, on which - here and
there great pieces of rock were lying about.
Just over their heads they saw a great bird
flying roundand roan and erery now and
then, dropping lower and lower, till at last it
flew down behind 'a rock. - Immediately
afterwards they heard a piercing shriek, and
t r.L 1
running up iney saw w iui aurini, nn vnio
had caught theirold acquaintance, the Dwarf, '
and was trying to carry him off. The com- .
passionate children thereupon laid hold of
the little man, and held him fst till ' tha ;
bird gave up the struggle snd flew off. A
soon then as the Dwarf had recovered from
his fright, bo- exclaimed in, hia sqaeakiog
voice, "Could yoa not hold me more gently? .
You have seized my fine brown coat in such
a manner that it is all torn- and full of holea, '
meddling and interfering rubbish that yoa
are!" With these words be shouldered a
bag filled with precious stones, aad slipped '
away to his home among the rocks. .
Tbe Maidens were now accustomed to his
ingratitude, and so they walked on to tha
town and transacted their business there. .
Coming home, they returned over the tamo
common, and unawares walked up to s cer- -
tain clean spot on which the Dwarf bad
shaken out his bag of precious stones, think
ing nobody was near, lae sua was sain
ing, and the bright stones glittered in ita t
beams and displayed such a variety of col
ours that the two . Maidens (topped, to ad
mire them.
Whatare yoa standing there gaping for?"
asked the Dwarf, while his face grew as red,
as copper with rage; he was continuing to
abuse the poor Maidens, when a loud roar
ing noise was heard, and presently a great
black Bear come rolling out of the forest.
The Dwarf jumped up terrified, ba the
could not gain his retreat before the Bear
overtook him. Thereupon he cried oat,
Spare me, my dear Lord Bear! I will give ,
yoa all my treasures. See these beautiful
precious stones which lie here; only give me
my life; for what have yon to fear from a
little weak fellow like me? yoa could not
touch me with your big teeth. There are'
two wicked, girls, take them; they would
make nice morsels, as fat aa young quails;
eat them for heaven's sake.''
The Bear, however, without troubling
himself to speak, gave the bad-hearted .
Dwarf a single blow with his paw, and ha
never stirred after. . ". ..
The Maidens were then going to run away
but the Bear called after them, "Snow- -
White and Rose-Red, fear not! wait a bit
and I will accompany you." They recog
nised his voice and stopped; and when tna
Bear came, his rough coat suddenly fell off,
and he stood up a tall man, dressed entirely
in gold. "1 am a king s son, ne aaia. --ana
was condemned by the wicked Dwarf, who
stole all my treasures, to wander about in
this forest, ia tbe form of a bear, till hia
death released me. Now he has received his
well-deserved punishment."
Then they went home, and Snow-Whito
was married to the prince, and Rose-Red to
his brother, with whom they shared the im
mense treasure which the Dwarflhad collect
ed. The old Mother also lived for many
years happily with her twochildren,and the
rose-trees wnicn naa stooa oeioro too cot
tage were planted before the palace, and
produced every year beautiful red and white
rosea.
Miscellaneous.
at
it
but
ny
he
this
ne
it
half
my
so
born
to
a,
been
God's Boi stt. The flowers do not implore
the sun to meet them. He looks down with
genial warmth, and draws them forth from
the dark ground to rejoice In his light. And
why should we implore God to grant us the
spiritual mercies wo desire, as if He were
cold and unwilling, when over ns He hangs,
I like the sun over the earth, rich in all boun
i ty, ana lunging va umu. i
Don't take your Bible and say, "I don't
want to read it, but I suppose- I must," nor
your hymn book, and say, "I don't want to
sing, but I guess I had better;" don't say,
I don't want to pray, but I will, and keep
praying until I do feel like it." I am in the
habit of likening the Savior in my thoughts
to some great and noble friend -don't yoa
suppose, if you went to the door of such a
friend snd said to him, "I did not want to
see you a bit to-day, but I was afraid you
would feel hurt if 1 did not come, and would
treat me accordingly," that he would say,.
"If yoa don't wan t to see me, I am sure I
don't want to see you;' ' and do you suppose
that God is less delicate in friendship than
an earthly friend? Beeeker.
Tbz Strugols Bsrwani Losot amo Short
Drkssis. A New York eorrespondent,nndeT
date of the 26th nlL, says: "The ladies, how
ever, adorn the streets with "spring styles.'
notwithstanding the cold. A great struggle
seems to be in progress in the fashionable
world, between the recently introduced short
dresses and the lull skirt for street wear.
The former can by no means be said to pre
vail as yet, although it is worn extensively by
young ladies and girls. Married and elderly
ladies still cling to the full skirt. I wish to
conect an erroneous impression which is pre
vailing in regard to tne manner in which tbe
waterfall is worn. Many seem to think that
the 'elevated' chignon is the mode, making it
appear as a patent windlass to pull the back
hair up by the roots. This is not so. Com
paratively, only a few would-be avant cour
ier of fashion have adopted this style. It
is mostly worn exactly on the back of the
head. When elevated a little higher, the
Chinese appearance ia relieved by. a braid
passed under."
Thomas Kast, who draws those remarka
ble allegorical and illustrative designs which
appear in Harper's Weekly, is only twenty
seven year of age. He ia a native of Bava
ria, but cams to this country when he was,
atx years ui sjjw.

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