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Daily union and American. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1865-1866, December 19, 1865, Image 1

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Voluntary eommnnieit'ions. contilninr interest-
int or important newt, solicited from .ny quarter.
, News letters from th Tsrioui counties of tbo
State especially desired.
All commnnlcationi should bo addressed to tbc
" Editors of tho U.niox jixd Americas."
MEDICAL.
P R P. "V Hr fi TT T? AT T
(Late BricaJc Suircon, S. A,)
OCUMST AX AUKIST,
Office 33 Cedar strccUictwecn Summer and Cherry,
KASHVILLK.
Office for treatment of all Diseases of tbe Eye
uid Ear, operation! for Bquintinc, Cataract, ect.
performed.
HOX 700, P. O.
decO 3ml.lp.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS.
IHSSOIXTIOW
fPlIE firm heretofore ciitinr under the name
JL firm an.l style of W. MATT BROWN k Cn
i. tlii. iliv ilirmlvifl liv mutual consent, Mr.
lirown retires from the business. Nr. Callcnder,
in connection with Thineas darretl, will co
tlnne the Ileal Kutatc bu'inen at tho old stand
W. Matt. Brown ic Co, M.TN,
TIIO.S. CAI.LKN'DElt.
r. OiEKfTT.
T. CSLMXDIK.
CALLENDER & GARRETT,
(Successors to W. i in. Brow.v k Co.,)
41 Clicrrj" fitrct,
WIIiTi five tbeir pminpt attention to Ihr selling
nnd rriitineuf every desferiutiun of Itcal Estate, i
(li lw.
DKSIKAKT.r: KESIDKNXTIS
Ituildiiig TmI Tur S:tlc,
X L1RGK
FARMS.
1st. A fine Rwidcnee, containing 12 rooms, in
frre territory. Also two vacant Lots adjoiuinir.
al. Tliat splendid Residence of the late James
.Tnlinson, on liroiul Rslreet, between Summer and
Hitch streets, containinc 8 rooms, besides servants
rooms ii ml other out nouses.
3d. Tliat splendid Residence of tbo late Hardin
P. Iliitliflr. mtitnliiinir uliout 10 rooms, out bouses.
etc. liood rWinir and sprinc bouse with
seres of land, immediately adjacent to thocity,
tho Charlotte Pike.
(111. Wl nerrs of cround of the Harrow property,
on the Cbarlntto Pike, which will be divided to
suit purchasers.
Sib. A very larce number of Lois in the Cily
niwl the ililltiroiit Additions to asevilie. JjOis
in Kdgeficid and llrowusvillc.
Oth. A very low number of tbe REST FARMS
In tins iuhI luu adjoining counties. jwij o
J. I., .t II. W. HROWN.
.Ieot-lm Mi Union itrect
KELSON I MUEPREE
ItKAI, 1JSTATI2 AGKXTS,
Cherry Mrt-rl, neiir i:iilon.
NASHVILLE. TENN..
""fAVEftsroaiiioiintof Real Estate to sell in
.1:1 this and lliundjouuiiirfclntoj.
THEY I1UY ANDSELL
Cniiitv :nul Klutc llond. on com
wellfiS every dceeription of (loveriiniciit in-curl-
TWO MAURY COUNTY FARMS
nrcioflercd at very reasonable prices. Also,
In Wjllium.on
A PLACE ON THE CUM1IERLAN1) RIVER,
of acres, in Jackson county, Tcnn., for talc.
Ni'i.r.Mii rrrv i'ikh'iiutv
FOR SALE.
30.
able'
1M!PT ... I1....1. nilhn.1l. ttn Tnv.
wpll llniisn anil Maimite reinttlcata renson-
nriee. Tliis is central, cho.cu property, and
Is more tbnu 1!00 fert deci.
4H rcrl. Improved, on Vine street, between
Church and Union, very choice locnlion, hut the
Improvements aro moderate. Tho prico is very
low.
02 IVrl. with larso brick dwidlinir, on Vine
stroit, between I'nion and Cnlar. bcinic nbout tbo
most dosirablo location for residences in lliocity.
aOO IVul on Mrfinvork street. West Nashville.
nn nlilcli is a neat llrick Ilwcllinc. o or i room'.
Jiteiien. stabl. otc:, and firpt-rate cistern. Price
only House and premises in sood onler.
1 no Fwf itn llrosd streeL West Nnlbvllle. with .
elccant new llrick House, containing 10 or Vl
rooms, kitchen, stable, two cisterns, shrubbery,
tc, etc;, at $l'i,(n. cry desirable. Knot sold
witliin ten days, this lureo and choice place will
! rented for tin remainder ot tins and llio whole
of next year.
BO I'oct on North Market street, corner of Ihi"
eust, on which i the toll known Pleasant Smith
Iiome. I'nce tl.su.
no I'wI on Snmeo street, with
larre, elecnnt
and new llrick Pwclline. containinc
in room.
bath rooms, kiteben, eitra sise. with eas, water.
and svory modem imiirovrinent.
lwt nn ISrk utrpct. with common im
provements, very low. This property runstbrouch
to futumcr.
40 JYol on Collcio street, being the lower por
tion of tho lot now occupied lv Department
Headquarters, belonging to Dr. Waters. Price,
ii) per foot.
A choice little lot on North College, just below
lie Public Squaro, at a sacriflcc.
SALOON AND RESTAURANT.
Wo oflcr for sale a Saloon and Restaurant, now
doinc a prbfitable business, in tbe very ccutro of
trnde, at a price perfectly satisfactory.
EDGEFIELD.
We Ikivo over feet of tround on the most
choice nnd desirable streets in Edgefield, for lease
for live yoars from 1st January next, at prices
which on cut to bo satisrjctor) to tWo dusirincto
iuiproi U'
Call di m:i.s.x a Jivuritr.r.
decS-lm
A13IRT V. D1I.UX.
w. nr.vcx Tiiovrsov.
DILLIti & THOMPSON,
Ki:AI. 1XTATH A XI)' H (Jft
C O Is T.U C T I.Yfl A J E X T S.
-1DR0MIPIN0 FAITHFI'L AND PROMPT
X. attention to all businees entrusted to our care,
we respect fully tender our service to the Public,
aslieneral Afents. for tbe Purehaso and Sale ol
Real Estate; Reiitinr and Leaunc of City or
Country Property; Collection of Notes; Accounts
and oueben; iutrttication of Titles, ctc etc
DILL1N THOMPSON.
Office, over Seonnd National Bank, Collece streL
dect tl
PL UAKKr.I.S ntAMIKltltI-.S,
J Just recciteil.
c .. . MEPARY ,V BI'RKE,
i i r South" comer liroad and Market its.
Rnf) NACKK llVCKWIirAT i roT?R.
OWU elrcant article ; Just ,re-ivr,I .i,d f,.r,alc
c . . MEDAKY .t BURKE,
0JKJ the best in the luaikcU
MLDARY .t 1HJRKE.
uthcast corner Broa4 and Market its.
SLKO,
NU31HER Of
VOLUME XXXIII.
groceries, liquors &&
JiEff ST OK 13.
Pandolfini & Eiva,
NO. 12 JCOUTJI CHEttltT STltEET.
.tir.AI.XKS IX
FANCY GROCERIES, i
WINES, LIQUORS,
CIGARS, ETC.
MOXG T11EIR STOCK MAY BE FOUND :
t
Jara.Ttioand Mocha Coffee :
Lruklicd, liwdcrcd, Uoflce, l'cTtl-Iuco, and every
rrmile nf Ilrnwn Outran:
Teas. Candies. KUirch ;
Castile, l'alin, Erajiro and Laundry Soaps;
Almunds. Filbert, Currants, I'runcs, ltasins;
IJutttr, Oysters, fancy and Almond Lrackcrs;
l'ine Apple, Gluuttcr and Domestic Cheese;
Mixed, Girkius, Cbow-eboir and Imperial Hot
Mushroom, Walnut, India, and Sir Robert Peel
Catsun :
Sultana, Royal, Table. IlccfStcaV, Roy al Osborne,
John Hull, bono, .Moul ami Murrey Bauces;
Esrcncc of Ancbories ; Lcnco of Shrimps;
Jlaille. Imperial and Durham Mustard:
.Mushrooms: Dutch Anchovies; Anchovy Paste;
Strasbourir Meats, Poltcd Tomrue, Polled Ham;
traits of every variety in cans anu Jars,
IS THFIK STOCK OP
lViiiCH it iid Brandies
ALL OF WHICH ARH
or.xuiSE asiumi-.obteb,
IAY BE FOUND
Pcinartin and Duff Gordon Sherries:
Old Choice and ReservcMadciras ;
London Dock and Burgundy Port;
Pcinartin, Blaniiuefuit and St, Julien Meloe
Claret:
Haut Santcrnc, Nicstciner, Hockbcimer and Ca
tawba Wines;
Hemcrcicr, Gold MciIalandHcidsick.Chainpaene;
Pinet Castillion, Otard, Dapny.k Co's Brandies;
Irish, Scotch, llourbon and Robertson County
hiskiei:
Hollsnd Gin;
Maraiehinn Absinthe; Vermoutbo and all As
sorted Liniinrs:
Baker's and Holland Bitters;
GENUINE HAVANA CIGARS,
Choice brands, together with every variety of Do
mestic CiEars,.Chcwiii(j and Smnkinir tobacco of
all brands; together with all other articles usual
ly fonnd in a
FIRST CLASS FANCY GROCERY STORE. '
It is the intention of PANDOLFINI & RIVA
to keep on hand at all times a complete assort
ment of everything in tbeir line, of tbo very best
quality to be purchased, which they are deter
mined to rcll ns low as any other establishment in
Jhis or any othercity.
They respectfully ask an examination of their
stock, feelini; assured that no one will co away
dissatisfied.)
IMXDOLFIM t RIVA,
I'nncy (Irocers,
iM) DEALF.ES IX
WIXES, LlfiUOIlS AND CIGA11S,
Xo. 12 Xorlh Clicrrj- Street,
dec Mm. NASHVILLE, TENN.
All. U l.Al'GIIMX. O. W. II. ni'TLKB. F. A. IRWIX.
Formerly of Evans, Keith k Co.
M'LAUGHLIN, "BUTLER & CO,,
(Sueessors to F. A. Irwin .t Co.)
WIIOTiKSAIiK GBOCEKS
Commission Merchants,
Corner of .Market and Clark streets,
NASHVILLE, TENN.
We have In store ami for sale a largo slock of
SUGARS, BROWN.
CRUSHED, AND POWDERED.
RIO COFFEE. FAMILY FLOUR.
SALT. MACKEREL. STAR CANDLES.
SOAP, TOBACCO. CHEESE. OYSTERS,
RAISONS, ASSORTED CANDY. LOBSTERS.
WIM'-O AXIS I.KllTOKS.
llourbon Whiky,
Robertson County do
French Brandy,
Apple do
Poach ' do
Cherry do
Baker's Bitters,
Holland Gin,
Jamaica Rum,
Sherry AVlne,
Port do
Champagne do
Claret do
Catawba do
And
complete assortment of other Groceries.
.Mclaughlin, butler .t co.
dec3 lm
FOSTER BROTHERS,
ii:ai.v.ils ix
FIXE FA3IIXY CJKOCEKIES,
PUHI2 WIXES,
ItKAXIUKS,
etc.,
etc., etc
NO. 33 . WIST SIDE PUBLIC
SQUARE,
Nnslivllle, ToiiinNoe
-o-
TV.- HAVE IN STORE AND 'FOR SALE
a large hock hi
BROWN SUGAR,
CRU HED do
POWDERED, do
RIO COFFEE.
FAMILY FLOUR,
SALT.
MACKEREL.
STAR1 CANDLES,
SOAP. ele
cta, eto.
OYSTERS. COVE AND SPICED,
C1IEKSH,
SAltDlNHS,
PICKLES.
RAISONS.
ALMONDS.
FILBERTS.
PEGANS.
ASSORTED CANDY.
LOBSTERS. ot
etc.
Wines and Liquors.
Burhon Whisky,
Robertson Oountv do.
Frcneh Bramly,
Apple Brandy,
Peach Brandy,
Cherry Brandy,
Baker's Bitter, cte., te.
Holland Gin, r
Jamaica Rum,
Shero- Vine,
Port Wine,
Charapacno Wine,
Claret Wine,
Catawba Wine, et&, cte.
Willow-Ware; .
Superior Citars;
Smoklnc Tobaccos :
Pickles;
French Mutard;
CaperCalsup; .
Java Coffee, eta.
roSTXR IIROTIIEIM. 3
deel-tf
J. 5ff. I,V3IS1)EX at CO.,
UAlVriCTCKlIS An MALItS
HIDES, OILS, LEATHER,
Findings & Currier's Tools,
arc. s totrrn mj.reet street.
5m4 KAHHT1I.I.E, Tavar
HARDWARE.
37
SAM. VANLEER, & CO.,
, i .. , t"L : ' '
(Two Doors below Publie Square,)
SIGN OF THE BIG PADLOCK
TTAVE ON HAND AND ARE RECEIVING
1 1 a large and complete stock of hncluh, (j
man, and American HARDWARE.
Which wo are sellinc at' reasonable prices". The
stock consists in part of
FINE IXL POCKET CUTLERY,
200 GROSS TABLE CUTLERY.
200 D0Z. KNOB LOCKS, assorted.
50 do HAND AND RIPPING SAWS.
300 d. ASSORTED AUGERS.
25 do FOOT ADZE,
2000 lbs. HOOKS AND HINGES, assorted. 12 t
4S inches.
1000 lbs. 1)0IL CHAIN.
1000 " BLACKSMITH'S HAMMERS, all kinds:
25 WRIGHT'S ANVILS.
100 CROSS-CUT SAWS. KM to VA feet,
CO MILL SAWS, to 5 feet; - Pf ?
axes; . ji y,
CHISELS.
FILES,
HATCHETS.
CHAINS.
LOOKING GLASSES.
- CANDLESTICKS'of all kinds.
KA7.0RS,
SCISSORS.
SHEARS.
TIN CUPS and PLATES.
-' TEA and TABLE SPOONS.
COFFEE MILLS.
SHOE NAILS.
TACKS.
A very larse stock of PLANES of every variety
Also,
ritEJM.CJI STEE1 I'lOWS.
Those wishing to purchase in our lino will d
well to give us a tall before buying.
r i ' .
SA3r.S-AXI.EKIt, & CO.
dec 4 lm.
1. 1. nRKAHT.
THO. D. CB11RIIKAD.
AETHUR A. BREAST .& CO.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS
IX
HARDWARE . , . j .
AND CUTLERY,
NO. 29 PUBLIC SQUARE, NASHVILLE,
WE HAVE NOW ON HAND, AND ARE
continually receiving, a largo and well se
lected stock of
iiAitnwAnEffAXD-cirixEnY,
in all its branches.
We invito Merchants and the Trade tenerally
to our stock :
TABLE AND POCKET CUTLERY;
AXES AND HATCHETS;
. CHAINES AND HOPES:
COTTON AND WOOL CARDS;
HORSE SHOES AND NAILS;
RIFLE AND BLASTING POWDER,
TANNER'S BELTING
AND PACKING;
FARMER'S AND MECHANICS TOOLS,
in everw variety, etc., cte.
Call and examine our Stock. We are prepared
to sell as cheap as any house west of tho Allcehc
nics.
A. A. BIIEAST A CO.
deel lm.
G. W. FALL & CO.,
I 3J 3? O It X 3D S,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS -i
'HARDWARE AXD CHTM2RY
NO. S4.PUBLIC SQUARE,
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE,
(Kirkman .t Ellis' old stand.)
We would respectfully invite the attention of
SPORTSMEN to our stock of
G-UN S
Which cannot bo equalled here. It comprises all
grades, from th
PliAIX DOURI.E BARREL
TO THE
CELEBRATED GUNS
07
irr.si.nT nicnAitns a gkku
also x raw
Krcacli XoatliiiK or Cnrtridffc
' snoT gtjxs.
AMUNITION
SPORTING
decl-lw
APPARATUS
jis. mViuohlix. a. w. n. ictlir. r. a. iewik.
Formerb' of Nevins, Keith & Co.
McLaughlin, Butler & Co.,
(Successor! to F. A. Irwin k CO
WHOLESALE GliOCEltS
Commission Merchants,
f
dc j. li as tx
p
KKANDir.H, WINES AXD EIQCORJi,
Corner Market and Clark stiU Nashville, Tenn.
iFatv A II E .
IP
VTe'pay (he bishest market prices for
DRIED FRUIT.
FEATHERS,
BEESWAX.
GINSENG.
And CHHlry Vxdne Cnersvlly.
McLAUGULlN, BUTLEK & CO.
WOT 'T
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, TUESDAY,
FAMILY GROCERIES &c.
FAMILY GROCEHY,
NO. DEADERICK STREET.
(old stand of Adams and Eves.)
ROBERT EYES & CO.,
-rrnvouu)
RESPECTFULLY ANNOUNCE
Tf TIU'Hl VUIENDS AND CUS.
tomcrs that they have opend a first class Family
Grocery Store at theou sianu, so lone occupicu oy
Adams k Eves, on Deaderick street. Tue Stock
tin. i...n civtil with care, and embraces a com
plete assortment of all the stapl and fancy arti
cles, losctacrwii:
OLD WINES,
CIGARS.
LIQUORS,
TOBACCO. ETC.,
ETC.
UTOODEN WARE. 20 nests Wash Tubs, 20
, ? doien Wash Boards, -J) doren Painted Buck
ets, 10 dozen Sifters, a large lot of Brooms, etc., in
store.
"TirniSKY 30 barrels puro Old Robertson
T V County Whisky for sale, by tho gallon or
barrel.
10VE OYSTERS, Sardines. Pickles, Mustard.
Brandy Fruits, Catsups, etc.
SCOTCH ALE 20 doicn Bottles of J. Walker k
Co.'s celebrated bottled Scotch Ale. Also a
large lot of Young k Co.'s Edinburg Ale, in bot
tles. "BANDIES, Soda and Butter Crackers. Crack-
J nell in
iiscuit, etc.
SUNDRIES Nails, Bed Cords, Rope, Wrapping
Paper, Demijons, Soaps, Candles, etc.
( 10FFEE, SUGAR, TEAS, etc. We desire cspe
J cially to call attention to our stock of Cotlcc.
Sugar, Teas. Also, White Fish, Pickled Herring,
flour by the barrel or sacK, tor inmiiy use.
TERR ASS BROTHERS
WHOLESALE GROCERS, COMMISSION AND
FORWARDING MERCHANTS,
SOUTH MARKET STREET.
NASHVILLE TENNESSEE.
SUNDRIES.
1 ff boxes Rosin Soap;
50 casks Soda:
05 boxes Indigo (best;)
a uo jiaaucr; .
Z kegs and half barrels Golden Syrup :
10 barrels Blacking;
100 boxes Grairand Ground Pepper;
25 do Spice;.
25 do Ginger;
200 reams Wrapping Paper;
, 20 cases Matches;
100 boxes Star Candles;
5 cases Sunny Side Tobacco;!
20 boxes Imperial Tea. For sale low by
TERRASS BROS,
deci im S3 South Market street.
CJUGARS. 60 hhds. common,
Drimo and choice
'Brown Suirar.
100 bbls. Crushed. Powdered and Granulated.
For sale by TERRASS BROS.
TOLASSES.
XVLMolasscs.
100 bbls. common and choice
For sale by TERRASS BROS.
T7L0UR 200 bbls. extra to choice brands.
For
JL sale low by
TERRASS BROS.
WHISKY
IT county;
.-50 bbls. F. N. k Co.'i Robertson
25 bbls. Tennessee AThite.
For sale low by
TERRASS BROS.
T ARD.-25 bbls. Country Lard
For salo bv
TERRASS BROS.
COFFEE. 100 bags prime CofTce. For sale by
TERRASS BROS.
dec3-lm.
O. W. ROWLAND, LAXDON BTOGXTOX,
JOHN V. SPHRRT, HKNRT HfKRRT,
Late of Nashville, Tcnn. Late of Nashville, Tenn.
ROWIaAXB, SPERRY & CO.
WHOLESALE
IGnOCEItS AN1 GEXERAE
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
FOR TIIR SALR Of
COTTON, TOBACCO AND PRODUCE GENER
ALLY. ASSParticulnr attention given to the purchaso
of all kinds of Western Produce. I
No. 48 WEST SECOND STREET.
deci lm
CINCINNATI OHIO.
TBEANOR & CO.,
WIIOIaESATaE grocers
And dealers in
Foreign & Domestic Liquors,
NO. 58 MARKET STREET.
deci
NASHVILLE, TENN.
SALE & LIVERY.
ix service a g a i jr.
TJI-Jl1VX-TJjP
L I VP R Ys
SALE,
EXCHANGE STABIE
DEADERICK STREET.
BETWEEX CHERRY AND SUMMER.
JT. F. PENTECOST, Proprietor.
rPHE UNDERSIGNED HAS JUST RETURN
X ed from the North, with the best stock to be
had in the country. BUGGIES AND CAR
RIAGES ALL NEW, and horses superior to any
in this c5ty.
My fscilities for BOARDFNG nORSES BY
THE DAY, WEEK OR MONTH, are unequalled
in the city. Th services of an experienced Host
ler nave been secured, who will give his exclusiv
attention to stock.
Constantly, en hand, a fine lot of HORSES
AND MULES for tale at th LOWEST MARKET
RATES.
Having had a long cxperieiKt in the businees, I
fl tatiifledlhatlcancivesatisfaction in all eases
deci-3m J. j PENTECOST.
TJM0N&AMEEI011T
Lamartine on the United
States and Mexico.
Ingenious Defence of the
French Mexican Policy.
The Secret Thought Which
Inspired the Mexican
Expedition.
"I am not afraid to say it boldly, notwith
standing the natural opposition which niay
exist between the diplomacy of the republic
and that of the empire ; against interests so
Prencli, so elevated, so European, as those
we defend in Mexico, there is no patriotic
opposition possible. The conception of the
policy in Mexico is a sublime conception, a
conception misunderstood. (I shall explain
further on why,) a conception as just as ne
cessity, as vast as tho ocean, as new as all
that which in apropos, a conception of a
statesman, fecund as the future, a conception
of safety for America and for the world.
Wo must here raise ourselves to a great
height in order to comprehend the full force
of this policy. The first empire, a purely
military empire, and which sold Louisiana
for a piece of bread to feed its armies, was
never capablcof a conception which equaled
this.
The idea of a bold and efficacious pbstiion
to be taken in Mexico against the usurpation
of the United States of America is a new
but just idea.
Jiurope has the nnht to talx this position .
France takes the initiative.
Let us examine the right from this elevated
point of view, from whence we distinguish
the legitimacy of things, and let us start
from this true but not radical position :
The Uiobe is the property of Man: the new
continent, America, is the property of Europe.
In starting from this principle, winch has
become at this moment a fact, that the
merican Continont has become the collect
ive property of mankind, and not the dis
rupted Union of a single race, without title
and without right, at least over bpanish
America, and over the Latin race, mother of
all civilization, the principle of the protec
tion of Europe, and of its independence, at
least of the seventeen Republican States of
couth America, belongs evidently to us and
all the Powers of the old world. AVe must
be prepared for events; we must protect the
Latin race; we must, in the first place, take
position at the point menaced by the United
States.
Vi'c must do this, or else we must declare
that the new continent the property of Eu
rope is to belong entirely in twenty-five
years, perhaps, to the armed pioneers who
recognize no other title for their usurpa
tion than their convenience, and who per
mit their citizens, like Walker, to raise in
dividually fleets and armies against Cuba,
while their Fedoral General enters in the
name of the Union into Mexico, and from
there into all tho civilized capitals of South
America !
"Why, therefore, should Europe or the
Old World recognize these rights of piracy
by sea and land for the United States, whilst,
in the Old World we recognize not only the
right of protecting such property as is use
ful to all, but further the right to expropri
ate with indemnity the right of all States
and individuals in things useful to all ?
This principle of the protection of interests
useful to all which applies to a commune,
does it apply with less right to a continent
entire? Evidently not. We do not say:
Expropriate the United States of Spanisli
America ; their proper organic anarchy will
expropriate them sufficiently ! But we say
Europe has the right, and we add, the obli
gation, of not giving over to them the Latin
race, bpanish America, the half which still
remains free and independent of that mag
nificent part of the globe, more than half of
the Jrleaven, the earth and the population of
the New World !
What are the collective, sacred posses
sions, the necessities ot mankind at large
that the policy of the Old World cannot and
ought not to be delivered up to the mercy of
the United btatcs ot Jinglish America t"
These things are the capital of the entire
world, used by a few, necessary to all, in our
state of civilization and in our system of ex
change, which renders to all moneyed gold,
as necessary as bread. The mines of gold
are there!
In the second place, the food of the Old
World the wheat, flour, corn, potatoes on
which nconle subsist, and of which the pri
vation in tne years of famine might produce
in Europe incalculable calamities and de
structions of populations.
In the third place, the industries which
have become in the last few vcars especially.
by the salaries they assure to at least forty
millions of workmflhin cotton, the veritable
and indispensable stipendium of wages and of
life.
In fine, commerce, which compels us to
maintain a navy and sailors, a floating
population, incalculable as a number of men
fed under sails, still more incalculable as a
element of our national power. To permit
the United States to renew the folly of the
first empire, to establish an anti-European
blockade, no longer on their ports alone, but
on the world, as they havo just proclaimed
it, is no longer a poltroonery, it is to accept
what New York offers us, it is to abdicate
navigation, commerce, cotton, free trade, the
marine of the Old W orld, it is not to live
but on the death of life.
Thus who docs not know that the grain df
America, of the valley of the Mississippi es
pecially, does not constitute tiie world's
granary in case of famine, as Sicily was the
granary ol the Homans I ho docs not
know that the monetary capital of the uni
iveree is in the immense mines of Mexico,
and Peru and Sonora, and tliat these mines,
given up to their natural productiveness by
a good system ot drainage, will place all the
capital in gold and silver of the universe in
the hands of the United States, masters of
the two Americas ho does not know
that the master of capital is the master of
interest, and that Europe, delivered up to
this country of monopolies, will be forever
subject to its despotism ? Who docs not
know that, masters of the price of gold and
silver they will be masters also of our most
vital industries, and that their coalition' al
ready organized against our industry in
silks, which rivals their industry in cotton,
will ruin Lyons, the capital of tissues, and
the second capital ol i? ranee
ho does not know that in depriving us
or in depriving themselves, by the extinc
tion of the bouth, of the clement of this in
dustry in Europe, coiton, they will continue
to starve, as they have already starved, eight
millions of workmen of France, more than
that in England, fivcmilliousin Austria, and
thus take Europe by famine at every caprice
of their arbitrary interests? Who does not
know, in fine, that owe commerce and navi
gation will be subject to the samedestruction
as our products 7
In all this wc discover, evidently, the se
cret thought which inspired the Mexican ex
pedition, an expedition winch bears the ap
pearance of a temerity without compensa
tion, and behind which I alone in 1 ranee
have seen the general utility.
r ranee has not comprehended this expe
dition. Why ? I will venture to reply : be
cause in the commencement it was neither
explained nor explainable. It -was because
this idea of taking a position in Mexico
against the United States was not to be ex
clusively French, but European; it -was ne
cessary to consult together, to organize, to
agree frankly on a common basis before act
ng, and this was not done. France, ac
cused of secret intentions, was suspected by
England and Spain. They Relieved that
she simply desired to draw her two allies in
to a war of intervention for purclv French
and monarchial interests, instead" of com
bining with London and Madrid on armed,
disinterested and European policy; and for
una reason tney suspected and at last aban
doned France. Imt one of two things
was true: either France was sincere and
wished to act in the common interest,
and in this case there ought to liave
been frank explanations in advance, and
no action but after a diplomatic and
military European agreement on an equal
footing of force, which would thus give no
motive for complaints of reticence or want
of frankness against the intervention; or
France acting aionc, ought to have acted
with a force -worthy of herself, and not com
mence by planting her protecting flag in
Mexico with a handful of heroic men aban
doned by their auxilairics and insufficientfor
AMERICAN.
DECEMBER 19, 1S65.
the accomplishment of the original concep
tion.
In these facts lie the vice of th6 enterprise
and Uie reasons why the people in trance
have not comprehended it, why Spain lias
had suspicions of it, and why England lias
abandoned it. France, when her loyalty in
the matter is better understood will bring
bade England and bpam to it, or she will
act alone with preponderating forces. Spanish-America
will thus "be protected, the
United States will be repressed, Spain and
iingland brought back, and this grand enter
prise will turn out tho honor of this'cchturv
in Europe and the honor of France in Span-
is ii-Amenca.
One can easily understand that this people
have vet scarcely any of the conditions of
an American literature, The Mexicans be-,
fore the conquest, the pretended savages of
.uoniczuma, uie j. eruvians wim ineir po
ems ot quippos, were in tliat respect much
more advanced. The gigantic monuments
of tho Aztecs have left on the earth traces
of intelligence and of force very much su
perior, thus far, to the cxclusivelvutilitari-
an edifices of the Americans' of the North,
The pioneers of the North Jo not build for
tune; the log-splitters only know how' to
cut down in order to split up the grand ar
istocratie trees of the forests which thevsee
fall with the joy of men envious of the su
periority of nature. Their eloquence is the
struggle of their legislative assemblies, into
which they carry the rudeness of their vio
lent manners, and where brutalities of ges
ture and of the closed fist take the place of
the beautiful moral violences winch tho
great modern or ancient .orators of Europe,
exercise by aid of persuasion, or logic, or
men of refinement assembled together for
the purpose of seeking in common after
the right and the justice of things.
Their journals, innumerable because thev
cost little or nothing, ore anly so many re
ceptacles of advertisements of the charlatan
isms recommended by the BarnUms of the
press receptacles of calumnies and invec
tives thrown out daily to tue various parties,
in order to lastcn upon them odious appela-
tions or trivial accusations so as to discredit
one another, and to tike away their sub
scribers. Their "saloons" arc held in ho
tels ; their circles of men, which are temper
ed neither hy good learning nor by polite
ness toward women, arc only so many clulis
of eager tradesmen, utilizing even their
hours of repose for their purses, proud to
Irnmitntiti (lint ivlv t .Tv VvinV0 tlinm n mnnni'
and entertaining each other only with real
or illusorv enterprises, bv which thev may
ccntriplejthcir fortune. Their lilicrty, alto
gether personal, has always something about
it hostile to some one; the absence of all
kindness of manner gives them in general
the air and the attitude of some one who is
in the expectation of being insulted, or who
seeks, by force ot pride, of manner, to pre
vent the insults that may be offered him
They have conscience themselves of the con
tinual disagrceauleness ot their manners.
One of their rare political orators, the
most eloquent and most honest among them,
whom the envy of his fellow-eitizcns has al
ways prevented from being elevated to the
Presidency of the Iiepuhlic, said to me one
day : Our liberty consists tn rfotn7 all thai
May be the most disatrreeaole to our neighbors.''
The art of being disagreeablo is their second
nature. lobe willing to please is a symp
tom of love, ihey love no one; no one
loves them. It is the expiation of egotists,
History presents no parallel of such a phy
siognomy; pride, coldness, correctness of
features, mechanism of gestures, munching
of tobacco in the mouth, spit-box under the
feet, legs perched against the chimney-jambs
or doubled up on themselves without regard
to the respect which man owes to man, an
accent bricfj monotonous, imperious, a dis
dainful air imprinted in every feature this
is the picture of one of these autocrats of
money.
With few exceptions which stand out and
which stiflcr by the general pressure in an
inferior atmosphere, exceptions so much the
more respectable inasmuch as they are more
numerous in the individual, and there is the
North American, there is the people to whom
Mr. Monroe, one of their flatterers, said, in
order to be applauded : "The time is come
when you ought no longer to suffer Europe
to mix in the aflairs of America, and from
which you ought to commence to exercise a
preponderance in the affairs of Europe."
ALABAMA.
Innunrnl Address or do v. I'ntton, on
Ills Induction into Ofllcc.
The following extracts from the Inaugural
Address of Gov. Fatton, gives a fair repre
sentation of his view of the political situa
tion, and duties of the people :
Of the wide waste and ruin which the war
has wrought upon our once happy country,
Alabama has suffered a full share. Of her
brave sens whontcred the army, it may bo
safelv stated that from thirtv-hvc to forty
thousand perished in the service. In mate
rial wealth, her loss in one species of prop
erty alone that of slaves is not less than
two hundred and hlty millions ol dollars ;
and the aggregate amount of loss in the va
rious other descriptions of property has been
equally as great. Hence we find that, in
this State alone we have sustained a loss, in
actual and substantial wealth, of at least five
hundred millions of dollars (5500,000,000.)
In this brief reference to the events of the
last four years, I do not wish to be under
stood as seeking to vindicate the correctness
of opinions which I entertained and express
ed at the mcipiency ol our late trouble, it
w true that disaster and ruin were predicted,
but heaven knows I take no pleasure in
painting tho fulfilment Those events are
now historic, and we should only recur to
tlicni in that calm and philosophic spirit,
with which we may appeal to any other
history, for profitable lessons to guide us in
our actions, while dealing with the momen
tous present, and preparing for the dubious
and even threatening future. For this pur
pose, I think we may all profit much by con
trasting the prosperity and happiness which
our country enjoyed at the beginning of the
recent war, with its present cnpjiled and al
most ruined condition. In doing this, we
should forget the contentious bickerings,
passions, excitements and dissensions thro'
which wc have passed; or, if wc cannot
forget, let us, at least, rise above them. Let
is be one man, and if we are unable to re
cover that which has been lost, it becomes
us to bend our united energies in saving and
improving that which remains to us.
Soon after the surrender of the Southern
armies, the President, by proclamation, and
the appointment of Provisional Governors,
announced his terms of amncsty-and the
policy bv which he proposed to restore har
monious relations to the recently discordant
States. Under all the circumstances associa
ted with the new condition of things, it must
1. mnfpsuod that the terms of amncstv were
as liberal as could have been reasonably ex
pected. To the great mass of our country
men a pardon was tendered, upon the sim
ple condition of taking an oath to support
the Constitutional laws of the United States,
and the union of the States thereunder, in
cluding a pledge of obedience to the Presi
dentiat proclamations in relation to slavery.
This condition was readily and cheerfully
complied with. The various classes who
were excepted from this liberal condition,
and vim nniilil nnlv obtain amncstv br
special action of the Executive, have presen
ted their applications in large numocrs; ana
the anxiety with which they seek for favor
able action on their respective cases, giyes
evidence of the sincerity with which our
whole people are endeavoring to conform to
the full requirements ot the laws.
The reconstruction, or restoration policy
of the President was duly submitted to the
people of Alabama, and has been unhesi
tatingly accepted by them. It may be safely
asserted that, as far as the work of recon
struction has progressed in this State, it has
been in strict cc irmity with what was un
derstood to be the policy of the General
Government. Without undue murmuring,
and in perfect good feith, our people have
. 11 r 1 . .11 .1 :
patriotically conformed to all the exigencies tuned by conscious rectitude, let them mfcin
of the "situation." They fully and fairly tain with calm and resolute dignity the po
aecept the results of the war, with all their sition they have taken, and await the re-
lnritimatc consequences.
Candor and sincerity are prominent trxiU
of Southern Character. Our people never
dissemble ; they always mean what they say
and do. Their high character in tins re
gard is so well established that all reasona
ble men, in all parts of the country, must
award full credit for their every action inoe
the termination of the war. Our soldiers
bore themselves with manliness when tliey
laid doim their Arms, and ha ye observed
thefr paroles with scrupulous good faith.
Returning home, they sank the toldier into
. . 1 f- 11 :.: :,i. .i...
imIIm-hs. therhaVe riven the whole weight of I
.1 :. . ;n , r i: .i. .t 1
their potent influence in forwarding the great
wotk of restoration. Patiently aad uncom-
plainingly obedient to all the requirements
of the Constitution, laws, and even military
orders of the United States since the war
closed, the people of Alabama have given
every possible evidence which human action
can furnish, of unfeigned integrity of pur
pose, and devoted loyalty to the Ueneral
Government. Wc may rightfully claim
therefore, that our State 13 fully entitled to
be placed in tliat position m the Union
where she will stand as the political equal
of any other btate under the r ederal Cxrasti
tutlon. In this faithful acquiescence in re
sults, and this sincere desire for the restora
tion of amicable and harmonious relations.
with the other States of the Union, there
are no partv divisions antong us. Thote
who favored, and those who opposed seces
sion, now stand hrmly and heartily together.
A sudden and radical change has been
brought in cur labor system. The extinc
tion of slavery is one of the inevitable rq
sults of the war. The relation heretofore
existing between the whites and black has
been totillv changed. The negroes arc now
free, and this stubborn fact is fully and im
equivocally recognized. I low far go vcrnmcn-
iai action may oc aoio 10 promote 111c conv
mon interest of the (wo races in their ul
denly changed conditions, is a great problem
winch tune alone can solve.
The normal vocation of the negro is that
of a cultivator of the soil. The soil and
climate of Alabama, arc peculiarly adapted
to the growth of cotton that great staple
which wields a most potent influence, in tho
commercial world. Land owners are de
pendant upon the negroes for the labor
which is necessary to produce cotton.
Hence the negroes have but to avail them
selves of the advantages which they may
possess a3 cultivator of cotton lands, to.
make for themselves an independent liv-;
ing. In their new condition, their future
happiness or misery depends entirely upon
themselves. They will find no disposition
on the part of the whites to opnreiS them.
or withhold from them any of those rights
to which thev are entitled as treedmen.
The recent Convention of the State,
adopted an ordinance imperatively requir
ing the Legislature, at its present session, to
provide full protection for the persons and
property of the colored population. Of
course, it is assumed that the Legislature
will take the required action in this regard.
In all this wc sec the evidence of a firm pur
pose to deal fairly and justly with the freed
men in his new condition. Wc will not
only extend to him all his legitimate right",
but will throw around him sucli effective
safe-guard as will secure him in their full
and complete enjoyment. More than this,
I am persuaded our Northern brethren can
not and will not a.sk of us. At the same
time, it must be understood, that politically
and socially, ours is a white man s goVOrn-
nient; in
1 the tuture, as lias been the case in
the past, the State aflairs of Alabama must
be guided and controlled by the superior in
telligence of the white man. The negro
must also be made to realize that freedom
docs not mean idleness or vagrancy. Eman
cipation has. but left him where lie cannot
live without work.
Let us hope that by a judicious policy on
the part of the State, and prudence on tlc
part of planters and others employing ne
groes, we may not experience tliat interrup
tion in the development of our industrial
resources which might, at first never havo
been apprehended from the sudden and
radical change, to which our labor system
lias been subjected. It may be, indeed, that
by additional energy, and bolder enterprises,
we may find ourselves, at no distant day, on
than we were likely to attain under the old
system,
Allow me to say gentlemen, in conclusion.
that since the close of the war, it has evident
ly been the studied purpose of our people to
move in full harmony 'with the avowed
policy of the National Administration. This
attests the high confidence which is retiosed
in the ability, integrity and patriotism of
'resident Johnson. 1 have no hesitation in
expressing the belief that the President is
doing everything in his power to advance
the best interests ot the whole country, tioth
North and South. In his high and responsi
ble position, he has given the most indubita
ble evidence of his purpose to administer
the aflairs of the Government in a spirit of
fairness, justice and conscrvat.vc nationali
ty. I consider it clearly our duty to give
him our cordial and earnest support in the
patriotic course he is pursuing.
jkoh;ia.
ILttrncta from the Innii;iirnl Address of
Gov. Jenkins Cnlin view, and ood
Advice.
In the brief survey, appropriate to this
occasion, of the held of operation upon
which we arecntering, we aro led to consid
er first our federal relations, and seeonilhj our
home interests. The Constitution of the
United States defines the former, and the
Constitution of tho State of Georgia indicates
our duty concerning the latter. In these
two great charters of liberty, there is no in
herent cause of conflict. As, 'according to
Kcpublican theory, all government is but
popular agency, so these instruments con
strued together present to the mind of the
inquirer, a clear, satisfactory division be
tween the governments they severally in
stitute, of all the powers necessary to tho
public exigencies, let we arc admonished
by history written in blood, that conflict
has arisen in the past, originating partly in
the too eager advocacy of abstract theories,
partly in the sectional jealousies add antag
onisms, and enlisting tne evil passions ot
humanity, it waxed tiercer arid uercer as it
progressed in a series of years, and culmi
nated in tho attempted separation of some of
tho American States from tho remainder.
Memories of common sufferings and com
mon triumphs, and anticipation of an ex
alted destiny within tho reach of a united,
but unattainable by a divided people, alike
lost their power over men's minds. The
desire for triumph in the strife thus engen
dered, on both Rides, speciously assumed tho
guise of patriotism, and inspired men using
a common Shibboleth with mutual aVersion.
Five vcars since Keason abandoned, and the
Sword assumed tho arbitrament. We open
not that record of violence would that we
could stamp it with the seal of oblivion !
Now the wager of Battle is over, and the
award is against us as parties to the issue,
our whole -people have risen, up, accepted it
as by the will of one man. What valor
failed to achieve, wisdom luu promptly re
nounced, and truth herself has set her signet
to the attestation of the deed.
In the recent remodeling of their Constitu
tion, the people of ucorgia have acknowl
edged the Constitution, constitutional laws,
and treaties of the United StateSj as their
supreme late. This means something more
than a yielding of a contest or an overture
for restoration. Itmcani fidelity to the su
preme law in all futuro legislative, executive
and judicial action, and in all future move
ments of the people 01 majj. It implies a
recognition of duty to, and interest in the
whole country, as well as to anil in the State
of Georgia. It is of course predicated upon
a reciprocal obligation upon thepartof thbc
to whom this pledge is rtncwtil. The insti
tution of slavery, the fruitful source of -discord
in the pat, 1103 been effectually eradi
cated from our social and political systems.
It can never again difturti the harmony of
our deliberations, without which the Federal
Union must be a curse instead of a blessing.
If the whole people, repressing all prompt
ings of sectional .feeling and interest, will
faithfully observe and obey the Federal
rVo?,iwn rvmilnfr OYfon t a TTt fi V lift tti. Vftil
which now covers recent demonstrations of
Providence, and disclose- b their rectified
vision, in striking contrast, ruin caused by
human folly, and renovation wrought by Di
vine Wiedom. After weeping that has fn
dured through a long night of civil strife.
joy may come in the morning of reunion.
Let not our people yield to discourage
ment In view ol the tardy progress of recon
struction, pr of the atwpuion and distrust so
nalnably manifested towards them. Sus-
: it" . r ,;....7- i .1
cweot over our land. The elements do not
subside into their normal quiet Instantan
eously with the lull ot tbc wind, the sleep
of the lightning atd the liush of the thunder.
The smoke of a hundred tattles docs not
vanish in a moment. But the atmosphere
will clear ere lone: those who cannot now
ree how men who fought with such desper
ation against the "United Ktates, can so soon
become IU real citizens, will thenjook. at m
through a rectified medium... It wjll oc
cur to them that V alor ana J.ruui arc
twin hslcpl corn ui uiaiiuuujuiity.
. ? . 1 , . r . ...nliailw. wliiyn
"womb Jiever did. nor era will con-
t ft
ceive treachery- They will then remember,
and appreciate the historical tact mat mc
i
NO. 13.
States now returning, never confederated
agaim-t the Cnitcd btatcs, until each for hcr
selfhad, in open day, anil in. hearing of all
mankind, declared herself separated from
that Power. And although they will still
hold tliat act, wrong jn principle, and void in
fact, they -srill find in it no taint of dunliri.
ty. They will loolcin vain through all the
sanguinary trcuxs of war, for the trail of the
serpent, in due time, consistency will com
mand ronfiuencc&uid sincerity, like the din.
mondofjlic first water, will" assuredly win
its own recognition. Then onr toft suspicious
udgea will- marvel less at our approved
fealty, than at their own tardineKS in discov
ering it.
Be the process of restoration long or
snon, wncu sonsnmmaieit, our attitude will
and must be that of strict fidelity to the
Union, of equality with our associaton, and
ot dignity sustained by an inner sense of
unviolated integrity.
Turning our attention to the subjects of
r-. . , . . . . ... -
oiaie administration, appertaining more di
rcctly to the service uion which we are en
tering-, the mind involuntarily, pauses upon
the changed relation between "the Caucasian
and African races inhabiting Georgia. How
to secure the latter in tho positive cnlovment
of the freedom with which they liave been
suddenly invested, with the least possible
detriment 10 com, is a promcm mil of per
plexity, taxing ait the energies of astute,
upright intellect. It is believed that the
war, bv whom the change has betfvwrought,
and who took the initiative of the process,
have realized in full force iti exteaive diffi
culties. Its solution has been already par
tially, and ere long will possibly lie "fullv,
devolved upon tbo States more imme
diately interoted. and better qualified
for the work, bv reason of their great
er familiarity with the characteristic traits
of the negro, and with the employ menti
in which he has been trained, and to which
his steady adherence should be encouraged.
The transition from slavery to freedom of a
large class is not a novel one in American
history, In several of the States it has been
effected without serious intervention, bv a
process w gradual, that no shook has been
felt in the labor system no plui'iizicd" im
pulse imparted to the liberated class. Uiwn
us it has come like tho sudden upheaving,
the terrific trembling and the distracted en-
gulphing of the earthquake, in volcanic lo
calities. But however cflected, and by what
ever embarrassments cncumlicred, the fact
is accomplished unalterably lixcd. The
realization that it is so is the firct sten to
wards the proper adjustment of a new Sys
tem, and that, 1 am persuaded, is, in its vast
magnitude, its tremendous consequences,
clearly impressed upon the Southern mind.
Any reference, in detail, to the action de
manded by the crisis would lie inappropriate
to this occasion, and is rendered unneceswirv
by tho prudent forecast of the convention
recently held, entrusting to five gentlemen
equally distinguished for ability, experience
and benV Vol Mice, the work of preparing and
digesting for your consideration. a svstom or
code of laws adapted to the exigencies of the
new situation. In it you may iuid valuable
aid. I commend it to your serious consid
eration. At this time I propose only a reference to
prominent points demanding attention, and
general principles which should govern our
action. And first, I present to you a well
merited plea in behalf of the emancipated
African. Hitherto the faithful bondsman of
the race from whose personal dominion he
has just been disenthralled, but upon whose
benignity and justice he still depends for
protection and advancement, he stands liefbrc
yon an object of peculiar interest. Happy
in the past bondage, which lightly taxed hfs
physical energies, abundantly supplied Jus
waujs, as well in infancy an in old age, as
in vigorous manhood as well in sickness as
in health and "which leaves him at its close
immeasurably elevated above tho cotcmpora
ry native of Africa, descended from the same
ancestry, he looks anxiously to Ids future,
and feels that it is still measurably in tho
hands of the proprietary race. It is undeni
ably true, thai during all the years of his
enslavement, lie has leen marvellously quiet,
profoundly content with his condition Anil
what shall Ihj said of his deportment during
the last half decade of sat: memories?
Whilst your strong men were in the tented
field, far away from unprotected wives and
children, he cultivated their lands, tended
their households, and rendered all servile
observances as when surrounded by the usual
controlling agencies. And since the fiat of
emancipation, which ho neither forced nor
implored, although sometimes unsettled in
his purposes, and inconsistent in his scrvico
by contract (the natural result of a transi
tion so midden and so thorough), I take
you all to witness that, in the main, his con
duct has been praiseworthy, beyond all ra
tional expectation. Tell me not of instances
pf ' insubordination as a slave, and of inde
corum as a frecdman, that liave transpired
in certain localities, or characterized jarticu
lar individuals. These are exceptional cases,
tho general rulo Icing quite otherwise. Do
our own race render unvarying obedience to
tlw mandates of law? Are our own off
spring, through the years of minority, al
ways fitibonlinato to parental authority?
Shall, then, the less cultivated African
be held to a stricter accountability, or
be judged by a higher standard of moral
rectitude? Tell me not the race is ungrate
ful. The assertion is against tho truth of
tradition and experience. I here declare
that, in my judgment, their fidelity in tho
past, and their decorum under tho distress
ing influences of the present, arc without
a parallel in history, and establish for them
a strong claim upon our favoring patronage.
As the governing class, individually and
collectively, wc owe them unbounded kind
ness, thorough protection, incentives, by
moral suasion, by appeals to their interest,
and by just legal restraint, to do right, that
they may do well. Their rights of person
anil property should lie made perfectly se
cure so secure that they may realize their
freedom and its benefits ; and of it tht-y
should lie encouraged ami stimulated to
make benefit. To this end the Courts must
he opened Jo them, aud they must lie allow
ed, in tho assertion and defence therein of
their rights in civil and criminal carci, tho
testimony of their own race. As essential
to their well being, they should be guarded,
on the otic hand, against tho crafty maelii
dations of the designing; and, on tho ether,
apainst the fatal delusion of social and poli
tical equality.
If t! lere ue any pseudo-philanthropists
who are inclined to infuse into their minds
this imfricndly delusion, or to preach to us
the duty of entering upon this leveling pro
cess, let them open their mhsion by taint
ing to examples. Assuredly, there pot
one to be found beneath the broad expanse
of our Constitution. The necessity of subor
dination and independence should be rivitcd
on their convictious. Such degree of legal
restraint as may be requisite to this end, is
enforced ujion us, by a sudden change of re
lation, originated neither by them nor by us:
and, happlv for all parties, it need not con
flict with the unvarying observance of the
law of kindnea-i, which felicitate intercourse
bctwecti cqual't and causes the inferior to
recognize in his superior a Ixncfactor. No
less able than formerly to till thor nccus-
tomed departments of labor, they (hould
be made to realize that this is not only
compatible with but an indospenMble
condition of their altered ttatai.
If won to the practice of honcntrsobnety.
and industry, they will "be for us the best la
boring clas, and wc to them the lxut em
ployers, the world can furnish, because of the
thorough acquaintance iietwccn the classes.
I eak with reference to the present, and the
near future. "Were it not divulged tliat, in
the changes to be evolved by time, they are
destined to attain snch advancement that, In
their daily intcrconrfc, they shall look in tho
face no superior, all philosophy, other than
Iltnnisn -rtMinl vail American nliilntwinh v.
as illustrated by practice would anticipate
for them an antecedent translation to other
climes. Were I so prcsumptnoun ai to pre
dict for them such a change. Iioth of condi
tion and local habitation, all Southern Amer
ican voices would write one loud acclaim
"So mote it bo!" But our duty is with the
present; and encompassed as it is with diffi
culties, I say to you, Caitrane, Senators and
.Representatives; resolutely and earnestly es
say to surmount them all, UOd u merciful !
God is mighty! God, in his abounding mer
cy, and in theplentitudcof his might, so dis
pose .our fortticfl and theirs tliat each cIosm
sliall be to the other a blessing, not a. curse 1
Jleauage of Gov. I'lcrpolnt.
Gov. Pierpont's message is quite lengthy,
giving a full account of the conditlbn of
the State. He concludes as follows:
IttXO.S'STHUCTIOX.WS
In ISCdtho Gdrcrmaeftt'oFScHUnitcd
States represented Uarty Hfilliota of people,
with more educated mind",, accustomed to
THE XASKVILI.K BAIXYTJXIOXASDI
'OfEc'e Uahm and AmcrieinBIoclr, rtr Cburoh
and Chrry itrcets, oppoiiU tb foil Off ee.)
J
Daily-
TIMS!
$i4 cr
- 5 00.
Weekly 1.
.it,
Proportionate rates for shorter pcriWJ
Subscriptions invariably in advance. '
amamm&mmwn 11
"' " . " ' " "
self-reliance and independence of thought i
and nation, than wcreerer, thrown together in l
one nation. Their prosperity was the won
der and envy of the .worlds Om-thini of r,
the States, embracing nearly one-half of the lu
territory of the nation, conibined'to over- f
throw he Government, and appealed to the d
Rwordns the arbiter. Some' eight hundred 2
thousand of the people perished in the con-
tlict. This "domestic violence" was "sup- v
prc$sed,'' and now that the din Of war has Jf
ceased, rxl to some extent the passion cn- k
gendered by the strife continue, and there- l
construction of the Government of these !r
States so as to place them in harmonious-ac- i
tion with the other States df the Union, is a
work of great magnitude: "In this you have f
a work to consummate which will" require 10
grca wisdom antl prudence. Upon the di.--porsionof
the Confederate army that per-
tion of the people of Virginia" who had J?
been engaged in resisting the authority of fc
the United States declared that they had I
ceased from all opposition to the Govern- r
ment, and acquiesced in the status m whir U
thu imno of the war Jiad placed them that
they had renewed their allegiance to tn
Govcrnmcntpf-thc lhiitctl 'States, and in
tended to keep Ihcir with. The Govin:
ment, in great kindness, .accepted the pro
fessions in good faith and acted acconlingiv.
The acceptance of this "status" was an
acceptance of thestnteof nflitirs -winch ex
isted under the Gpvcrrtmcnt of tho United
Mates, 'lhcelaves of the Southern Stat,
e d
had been liberated by the proclamation, of y
the President; a large national debt had
been created to defray the expenses incnrreil
in tho suppression of the rebellion ; laws
had been pas.ed for the confiscation of the
real and tHirsonal estate of all persons who
had resisted the Government. These laws
benitf under the control of the Presider t. lm
has suspended their execution. - Tho libera
tion of the slaves is. cordially acqutesred in
by the people. I think there ore only two
iiuestions now remaining that present diCi-
culties in the way of the fullest harmony and
fraternization between the sections oiic ti
tho paymimtof the national debt, and the
other a refusal bv the people of tho Stai .
...i...t r t 1.
i'iv "iiuit- i 4iubui wnieu was in rciKl-
lion, to pay what is called " tho Confederate
lebt," or debts made to aid the rebellion
What is now known as the " rebel " Legisla
ture of Virginia created a debt for which
lionds -were issued amounting to between
five and six millions of dollars. A miml r
of counties and corporations created debt fi r
.. ani imiij-v'.-i., ... wiv fmUtV 'U ) Jill HI, 11
which bonds wore issued to a large amount
The prohibition of the payment of these
debts is demanded upon the ground that the
were created for an unlawful purpobe. in nid
of the reliellion, to overthrow theGoviri
ment. The Constitution of the State pro
hibits the Legislature from making proT..-
ion for paying fitch bonds, and requires it
also to pass laws prohibiting each county
and cortMiration frum paving any debt c n
. 11 r.l r .1... .7fc.;ii:.rl. "r.. -
i.ilivia ill .nil vi till t im.'1111'll. J.l
therefore, the question of the. paymmt i f
thene debts by thu State, oc bv counties or
coriKir.it ions is settled.
It is of tho utmost importance that the
people of Virginia shall give a cheerful q -port
to the Federal Government in the r.av-'
ment'of all taxes .Trussed for the paying tlo
notional debt. I regard the repudiation of
the national debt as equivalent to the over
throw of the Government of the United
States. The Government might exist in
form or in name after Mich an act, but could
not exist in its vigor, honor and selfrespect.
and respect in, the eyes ot the civilized
world. Such an act would demoralize the
nation and paralizo all indn-itrial pursuit:.
Confidence both in thu Govcrnmen and in
individual honor will be destroyed, and the
nation would become a prey to taction nnd
to foreign Governments. Individual feeling
and prejudice should he discarded. Each
man should remember that it is hi duty to
act for the benufit of his children and" for
posterity that a good Government is ouiri f
the greatest blessings he can himself cnjiY,
or transmit to posterity.
I have Hindu every exertion to restore to
each man in the state all tbc rights of a cit
izen. I have done this under a high sense
of duty to my country. Tho jicople profess
ed subordination to the laws, and allegiance,
in good faith, to the Government, :tnd I lie
Iicve them to bo sincere in thuir professions.
I am satisfied that no stato can be governed
under a republican form of govrntnent
where three-fourth of the people, vmbrae
ing the largest tax-payers, aro disfranchised
and denied a voice in making or executing
the laws of the state. If I have ba-ntris-t.aken
as to the honesty and good faith of
these professions, thu fault is with them and
not with me. Protection nud loyalty aro
reciprocal obligations. The man who acti
in bad faith to the government under which
he lives is not entitled to its protection, or
to participate in the management of its af
fair; but no long'as he is faithful tho gov
ernment Is Wind to exert all its power to
vindicate his rights.
In this1 spirit I recommended to the last
Legislature, at the extra session in June last,
to remove the restrictions imposed by the
Constitution upon voting and eligibility to
office; to .a part of which recommendation
the Legislature consented, and submitted tho
residue to a voto of tho people to say wheth
er you should be clothed with 'conventional
jKiwers to remove tho rwtrictions upon hold
ing office. In this spirit the loyal people cf
the State v6ted to remove the restrictions.
and I hope that in a like spirit you will re
move the olistaclu in thu way of taking
their scats by those who have been elected to
the General Aw embly by the people with the
reasonable exjiectntion thut the restriction.!
would bo removed.
"Your action at the present semiou will
have much to do witli the futuro of Virginia.
If it shall be marked by broad, libera,!, en
lightened patriotism, looking to the building
dp of the great interest of our beloved
Commonwoalth, cultivating fculings of kind
ness aud fraternity, you will achieve a great
work. If, however, your deliberations shall
bo distnrlied by factious and party animtiHi
ticx, and your policy narrow nnd" illiberal,
you will throw a gloom over the future of
the State that will not disappear for a gen
eration. I ask your forbearance for tho length of
this communication. I assure yem there is
much yet to be said. I fervently implore tho
blowings of Divine Providence on your de
liberations, hoping that kindness and wh
ilom may distinguish all your action.
ituspoctfully, F.II. Piekpost.
nicilimiRO lii Iteprreiilntloii.
The Washington correspondent of the
St. LonU JiepuLtiean, in speaking of tho
protiosed change by the radictits in the Fed
eral Constitution, mi that representation in
the House of Itcprcscntativtx shall depend
iqion the number of voters, imtesd of tho
number of ieople, fays:
"This thing of representation in Congrc:!
will work beautifully in Maryland, fur in
stance. There, less than onc-fiflh of tho
jieoplo are voters their 'registry law' ex
clude tho. other four-fifths wh'ito in tho
State of Maj-uchucUs no such 'regktrv' ex
ists. Hence .Massaehusttts will retain her
representation in C'ongre, while Maij land
will lone font-fifth of hers, thu giving to
MartsachtueltH an undue preponderance .n
CongrcM and further aid hr in class legis
lation, for her exclusive bvnefit. Your own
State, if the Drake 'registry' law pAfef, will
probably wince your present 'nine' honor
ablcii to "three," or less; and your last elec
tion in St. Loiih would indicate her In nu
sense equal to Chicago, ami compel the
linking of tho Empire City of the West
with some ten or fifteen counties in the elec
tion of one member of Congress. The beau
tiful project Is so jiopular that several ieek
the honor of its paternity. Do you ask me
where are the conservative members while
all this is going on ? Iho anmrers, vheref
The onljr reason of this pot Kchemo is to
drive tho South into negro sufluragc, or eh
catlw theni to 1o-hj a large portion of their
Iteprcscntativcs in Congress. It U a miser-
abb: abolition dodge to effect a hateful
measure, tliat is worthy of general contempt.
It holds out a bribo to tho Statar to take
negroes, in one hand, antl in th other it
carries a roil to punish them, if they rcftwe.
The Hichmond Whig of yesterday says:
"A terrible disaster occurred cn tho
Eouthside railroad, near Lynchburg, on
Friday last. It iwoms ttiat the trcstln of a
Krtion of the bridge iii procew of cumtnic
tioit over the-James river gave-way, causing
the falling of twOjKpaiw of the ttructure, tho
.ruins crushing tho workmen- engaged nj oa
that part of tho work. Mr.T. C GarrifU,
road master,, and a -Sir. Horry were killed,
and twenty-three ticraon-i were more or less
bidlv wounded. Two peworu had each a.
leg broken. The others had flwb woupd.
Mr.Girrisorr was a citizen of Peter bar&
ind hi remains were taken to that place
for burial."
k".
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