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Nashville union and dispatch. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1866-1868, December 01, 1866, Image 4

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PUBLISHED BY.
C. XXJISTTI IS GTO N S CO
' Terms or Subscription. ,
Daily, per year...-....- S-?
Daily, per month l.0
Daily, per week...-. .-
Tri-Weekly, per year 7.00
Weekly, per .jear -.yx 3.00
Payment Invariably in advance, and the paper
discontinued when the time paid b;
Voluntary communications, eontal
alnlng inter-
esting.importantnews.solicited from any quarter
Newt letters from the various counties of the
State especially desired.
SATVnDAY, DECEMBER , 1SCC.
Os the insidoi"pageSHof'tliis morning's
TTvtnv ivn Dispatpii will ha fnnnd kavb-
, g-
ltral 'interesting articles Proceedings
Proceedtncs'of
the Bresbyterian General Assembly at
Iemphis, National Finances, the Fenians
in Ireland, Oration of Wendell Phillip;,
his objections to impartial suEfrage, etc
"PENALTIES AND GUARANTEES. .
.-iJjCDho New York Tribune construes the
.general tenor of the comment of Southern
papers upon tho questions of amnesty
and suffrage as manifestations of an in
corrigible spirit of rebellion, and argues
that the SoallfGrn pcorlfe'havo not yet
been subdued into a duo appreciation of.
tho condition in which the surrender of
jtbeir armies left them. Their rejection.
iiof the constitutional amendment,- together
with their ' assertion of the paramount
- ngni oi tne otaies to aetermine suuraso
qualifications, and their repugnance to
Federal dictation in that matter, is cited
as proof that they Tiavo not abandoned
their cherished theories of government
-, lnna tno political uleas which have become
apart of their being. Upon these premisps
Jtys argued that tho Southern people
Kave fiJrgotterl'tnatlhere are penalties fpr
rebellion, and urgeuV that. ifhe " loyal"'
I North shall baring them vback to a recol
lection of their duties, by the exaction, of
guarantees an tho imposing of condi
tions which will prevent future rebellions.
4Th,eTnbU'no says '''the Southern people
claim that the South lost nothing by the
robellion but tho object of the rebellion'
UfPhis i; denies, and, in effect, asserts that
rw!)She Southern people lost everything
i'jtheij: rights as States and their rights' as
' individuals; that they arc a conquered
. neonlo. divested of every attribute of free
ftmenfSn'iIyjng passive and helplesst the
mercy of tho General Government. It
Droolaims the result of the war as con
queitfn'the full sense df the term, leav
ing penalties indefinite in character and
degree to the conquered, and rights with.
' out limit to the conquerors.
TI .NowArc dertythat the States' lately in
revolt lost nnjthinjj but "tho object pf
tho rebellion, as tho Inbune styles it
4pQhe sgyoranee.ofr th.o federal Uniopiand
the ostablishmcnt of aeeparat, enationali
ty was the object They lost that in an
appeal to arms, and nothing else directly.
As.an incident of the .war, the destruc
tion oi donfestib' 'slavery' occurred, aid
the seal of its destruction was, after tjsc
close of the war, ratified by a civil pro
coss f pointed ouv by the Constitution!
(A Saving fhe'direct object and this grand
incident, the Southern States justly Idst
nothing or the.re.qual rights and dignity
as members of the Union, and tho people
lostnojotor-titlcof their right to repre
sentation, their right to. free thought, free
speech and free voting upon cverjr subject
which concerns tho general welfare.
fjTho Government in defeating tho resist
. anco to its authority accomplished all it
. originally proposedt and all it bad' tho
. right to do. War being fiagrantf it had
"'.belligerent powers. Peace being resumed,
the conquering party representing the
. f Government, and the conquered party
y -Twhioh had made resistance to its authori
iirlV,. ipso facie, passed under tho rule of th
1wwConstitution. In that instrument are
,t provided means for amending it, and the
mode of determining the punishment for
" ' treason, but nothing that can bo coh
.' strued to mean that the amending of
thr Constitution shall be made a mode,
of inflicting penalties for beason. There
' is nothing in it that authorizes ihe'pqlit:
caliparty in possession of the Government
tTjiO'domand amendments in tho nature pf
Jt-fi"1-??111008 aJ?iinst treason or rebellion, j
? "If treason and rebellion have bctin com
. mitted, tho Constitution and the, authdr
l Jitios of tho Government can determine
jjj and inflict the penalties. There is no
power given by tho supreme law, nor ac
.rquired as a result of tho wnr to amend
theCenstitutioninto a system of enhanced
bonc'fits for the victorious party, and pun
itive measures for tho defeated. It is the
,' attompl of tho Radicals to force such
views that isjjrevcnting the restoration of
tho Union and tho return of peace.
i Therefore -when tho Tribuno says that
" the host intelligence of the Southern
TjopplQ must b.o fully aware by this, time
iSat 'penalties attach to rebellion which
can only'bc aVbrTdfl' tj guarantees tliat
-thati Shall 'not 4be renewed" it is in
-gross crror and states a proposition that
firo "lntolligcrico"' of every fair minded
man who pretends to understand Ameri-
can'institutwns instantly rejeets.
Tlic peal(ies whiohjattach to rebellion
can oi ly be determined by judicial con-
ujr ..... uj '
nnu-pr f flip finvprnmnnt lodired eiclu -
l. . . . . . !
AiieJT in the Lhief iixecutive. ah uie
link ( ' -rvtt(iV i
rtmentofl' thdovernmencoml
bined, and all the men and women in it
guiltless of rebellion,
cannot av rt thfc (
penalties ola criule by. tho. exaction X)fi
v . . .,, , i
, , ... , ' , i '
and they liave no right to demand j:uararr-
tees with that or any other view, "which
loottd th'oSrirrihgement or tho' inherenit
rights of millions of people, and involve
radical alterations in the structure of ihe
political body. The attempt to secede
was a giantic revolution, participated in
by millions of citizens disputing for con--trol
of ha.f ho territory of the nation, ahfl
not a rebellion simply. To hold every
such participant as criminal, bound to ex
piate his 6flense and purchase his con
demnation by the forfeiture of a portion
of his essenttal rights as a freeman, and
this, too, without - the privilege of a trial
bj" jury, is' a wild radical error both in
law ana, Buucsmaasnip. ji. is inuecu
mode of inflicting penalties the most
swecninc, crievous and enormous ever
projected. Its enormity, too, is increased
when it is imposed at the Instigation of 'p.
party in numerical minority, but tempo
rarily in possession of the nuthority of
government
The articleof flic Tribune proceeds.
say that if the Government, controlled'by
the "loyal" clement in the Northerji
States, should require less than the sub
stance of the constitutional nmpitdmcnts,
or omit to demnnd the extension of the
franchise to tho blacks of the South, .it
will "send the war for the Union iiuo
history as a silly and unnecessary cru
sade." To which it may be replied that
if, at tho. instance and in the interest of
tho .Radical party in the North, the. power
of tho Government is perverted to any
such purpose, history will record that tho
late war was not and was never intended
as " a war for the Union," nor meant as
" a silly and unnecessary crusade." it
will stamp it as diabolical in its concep
tion, and as tho deliberate overthrow pf
Republican institutions) and the most
damning outrago everpcrpstratcd against
human liberty.
"8CFFKAGE AND AMNESTY."
Some ten days ago, meeting with an ar
ticle in the Now York Evening Post ap.
parcntly favoring a settlement of tho
pending differences between tho North
and the South, on the basis of universal
amnesty and universal or impartial suf
frage, we propounded to that paper the
following questions i
"I. What do you mean by the terms 'univcrfal
euffrage and 'impartial suffraee?' And in what
respcer, ii any, ao mey uiacr;
"2. What do you mean by the term 'general
amnesty?' Simply an exemption from arresfand
trial for the 'crime of rebellion?" Dn-fc it -nn-
tcmplato a removal of the restrictions at present
imposed upon a targe proportion t ineBonthern
Ecople by the 'test oaths' now on the statute
ooksT Or, is it designed that theso restrictions
and limitations shall continue?"
To which it evasively replies :
"Wo can only say that plan, as it is now
before the public, appears only in the
rough. Some of those who look with favor
upon it seem to mean partial suffrage; some
even appear to favor unequal suffrage that
is to say, legislation which would let all the
whites and only a few of the blacks vote.
For ourselves, it is known that we favor
general or universal suffrage, and that
without regard to any plan of settlement.
Now that the election is over, the
constitutional amendment, which was the
issue In. the canvass, seems to get the go-by
from! many of those who then most strenu
ously insisted upon it as the one and only
plan of reconstruction. Yet this amend
ment will, if it is adopted, make it the in
terests of all the States, Southern and
Northern alike," to grant impartial and
universal suffrage. Senator Wilson has
said that ifwOuld bring about this policy
in five years, in every Southern State. It
has been repeatedly asserted by its most
zealous friends, during the summer and
fall, that it was sure to be adopted in the
end, as the number of States increases. We
suppose, as this amendment was proposed
and "urged by Congress, that body will
adhere to it."
We regret the want of direct frank
ness in the above. If tho question pro
posed is one material to a final and har
monious understanding between the
parties to the latcciviljconflict it js de
serving of different treatment Tho Post
Bays that tho originators of the proposi
tion should n'nswcEfitr and'w6 suppose
we must be content
The last paragraph exhibits a phase of
Northern political dealing not calculated
to impress the country favorably as to
tho sincerity of any proposal that may bo
offered as a means of restoration.
The people of this vicinity arc as re
ligious as any community of the same
size in any country, but wc did not see or
hear of much observance of tho day be
foro yesterday as an occasion of "thanks
giving, gratitude and prayer." God is
good, nnd each man's life should give daily
evidence of gratitude for His mercies and
blessings; but man is vile and the devil is
busy, nnd between them they have got
things into such a state that peoplo don't
take readily to .these special secular oc
casions for thanksgiving. They don't see
much religion in tho high places of the
land whence these reverential edicts ema
nate, nnd while there is so little to Tjo
thankful for, the practice is bocoming a
form and sham'that had as well be aban
doned; - ' '
TheCindSmiatirCumbcrlfflid Gap an
, . UL. L&. . fL'Jk
(Juarleston Kailroad, proiectea several
. . - , . i
ivcarb a;o, is devoting its means and en
J - - .connections .with
f . ' ' I
... , !
rcer. the President He is nowbu'idms
man
i tuQ road frpui. ilqrrstown. to Paint KocM
on the North Carolina line, wherciheovill
be met bythe. .WeeteriT North ;.Cj?rlfhii
lines,. and carried toAshcville.andSauli
bury, and be thus placed in immediate
connectioniiwith thf "jentire;..Ey8tera.tof
iMorth Carolina and,.throngh. a, link in
process of construction between Asheville
and SparJen)UXfi;-wltlth)iti jalsp jqf jquth
Carolina,, concentrating at Columbia,
Kingsvillc and Branchville. As to thj;
progres of the work on the Carolina side,
w,c;take; pleasure inlaying; .'the follow-ihg
letter before our readers: !
Westeek Nokth Carolina SaileoaiJ,
President's Office, .Morganton, 17th. Nov;.
1866. & E. .Carriger, Esq., President
Cincinnati. Cumberland Gap and Charles
ton Kailroad.T Dear Sir.': Your favor ojT
the 3d is before trie. Absence in New York
is the-caue of ,delayt in, answering.. I re
joice ia common, with- our. peopli,at thp
sure prospect of an early connection with
the WeUern Road by way of the French
Broad Valley, and am especially gratified
to know thatryour work is .so far advanced
and 'under s6ch favorable auspicei ibToii
may give any assurance to your Legisla
ture they require as to the earnestness
with which we labor to meet you, and the
certainty of it. The road is now complete
to within a short distance of the station at
Morganton.. ha .remainder of, ,tle track
to mat poim win do uown oy winouiias. i
That completes" eighty miles. The grading
from Morganton to " Western Patul Swaii
anoe Tunnel" (16 miles east of Asheville!).
is in a forward state j Work will be re
sumed' and vigorously prosecuted upon it
at an early dey. It is comtemplated tolk
the balance of the work to Paint Rock" as
60on as the contractors are ready.. We hav)e
SOOibOtffrdm the State of North Carolina,'
which, with the county and. individual sub
scriptions will be, ample to complete' the
whole. The only cause of hesitation has
,been the low price of our bonds, but the di.
rectors have aecidea to co aneaa." i
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
bamtjel idou. Tate, President.
THE liAST RADICAL AGGRESSION.
The Radicals in Tennessee are carry.
ing proscription so far in their efforts to
have the whole political and civil nuv
chincry of the State under their control.
asj (6 cause reflecting Radicals" in the
North "to Shudder Tor the safety of clyil
liberty. The other, day a bill was passed
into a law providinjthat in any criminal
or even civil trial, in any of our courts '
it shall bo jgood ground for challpnging
tho comnotcnev of a iuror that such ner
A W
son is not qualified to vote in this State
Of 'course he'franchisc'law is to deter
mine whether a citizen of the State, who
is required to pay taxes and assist in
keeping up , tho, public roadand to do
military duty when called upon, is quali
fied to vote, and this law reduces tho
number in many df the counties in Middle
and West Tennessee so low as to make; it
almost impossible to secure a iury an
very-mariy" cases that' may- occur."
will certairily,-if ' rigidly'cnforced, great
ly delay the course of iustice. But this
is not the most objectionable feature' Lf.
ll-l l !- t" T.
r
It ii
4
mis last agression oi itaaicansin,
tno euort oi a poutioai party to piaco
courts of the State under tho control of
its leaders. "How long will the courso f
justice remain uncorruptcd if the courts
bo made a part of the machinery of a
political party ? Certainly this is the
deadliest blow at civil liberty that has
yet been delivered by the party in power.
Tho Chicago Journal, a Radical organ,
must take this view of the matter, for in
its issuo of the 26th of November, it says
in reference to the passage of this "bill :
"The creat charter of constitutional
liberty settled the jurorquestion. Nothing
can be added to or taken away from that
bill of rights touching trial by jury with
out endangering public liberty. The!
'Charter of Liberties' protects every free-'
man from loss of life, liberty or property,
except by the judgement of bis peers or
die law of the land. This is entire, want
ing nothing, ancL it is to be hoped,, will
ii6t be impaired by uncalled-for innova
tions." " ;
Thi3 must be the opinion of every" mdn
who takes an unprejudiced view of the
action of the majority in tho Legislature.
Only a few steps more need be taken to
establish a complete despotism.
AraaorRiAxroxs for the Correct
Year. The following items of appropria
tions for theyear ending June 30,1867, have
just been officially pompiled from the acts
passed to the late session of Congress: Pen
sions, 17,940,000; deficiency for sundry
civil 'expenses, $4,904,514 '46 ;' naval ser
vice, $18,904,667 50; postoffice depar
ment, S19,679,500; military academy,
$301,457; fortifications and other work of
defence, $1,540,000 ; completion of public
works, $3,698,047 91; army, $38,004,
241 83 ; legislative, executive and judicial
expense, $25,430,449 89; consular and
diplomatic expenses, $1,405,494 ; Indian
department, $3,778,535 45; sundry civil
zpensea, $7,074126. 76 ; . deficiencies for
the year, $515,100 76 ; miscellaneous, $12,
705,635 60 total, $155,881,781 16.
The Albany Journal objecta to the im
peachment of President Johnson because
it would be "the arraignment' of a party
vKir-h acceDts the President as (a ernrv.
nentj" and "defends uoon constitutional I
grounds the very acta which are relied upon
to justify the process of impeacHmeni." 1 I
In the Senate, Mr. Trimble introduced
a bill providing that all persons twenty-
one years ot age, residents six months n
Biccountv aBwelvom6tbsir?tn,,e StaTe
or who shall declare the intention tolJe?
come citizens, shall have a right to vote
in air1 elections; antf'providing furthe
that no person shall -be allowed to vote
after July 4th. 1876, who cannot read ana
wrifc.' TWjVhI is" A' compretiensiv
term, and'may' Co' construed" to iti'cldde
adults of all colors and sexes. Whatever
may'Ge'tlfoicaninSf thlsfteTnJ tnfendeoj
by the author, his scheme looks to a very
1 1 1 - V i ' trr.X 1 At c i
cuiiisiuvrnuie c&icnsiuii ui mc iraucuis
privilege. oi : -r i hv ..iaiv trr
The proceedings of theJIousewere unj
important, .Thjo.r.eportvof1a f pecmljconi j
mittce on the subject exonerated. Gov!
Urownlow from censure in compromising
with tho officers of the Athcps Branch b
the Bank of Tennessee. " ' f
A resolution 'was1 -passed stopping sup
plies to the metropolitan police 'at Mem
ghisand Cliattanopga. . .
The Senate bill offering tho Hermitage
to the Federal Govefnmoai as'a site for a
branch of tho West JPcint Academy, was
passed on its third reading The provi
sions'of the measure-will; be- found in'anl
nthnr column. Thp. wfttnrwnrlcs hill, nni
t&cjizirig' th'eT'issuaJJbyJ&iei .teorpbratjdS )
Nashville of bonds to tho amount of fivd
hundred thousand- dollars for the con
struction of new works, was assed-on, it
third reading,
A bill prohibiting the introduction ot
new business alter to day was Jpostj-
THE GEOLOGY OF TEXXESSEE-r
raoF,.sAF,Fqni'.s re pout, i
During his services as State Geologist,
Prot .SafFord abcnmufated.atfas.tXqndJof
information in relation to the geological
and mineral resources of this State, o
yeryTgreat. interest and,., practical j-alu,
whichl ia va alconditiori1 tolbc iplcoUv.ar:-
ranged for the press. Prior to the war,
he submitted-totheLegislature a'prelimi
nary report, which was ordered to be
printed, and was ipartiajly distributee!,
but the publication of tho entire work was
postponed., Thpvcnts ,ofthe past few
years have rendered the facts contained
in it of greater .interest jmd valujo
to the State than ever before.' Tho
'mineral, w.ealthi of . our ate is deB
tined soon to employ an immense share
of capital antPlabbr in its "development,
and the publication, of this report would
accelerate that? period by giving tho care
ful and unbiassed investigations of Prof.
SaffdrcL' We" 'trust tho Legislature 'will
not adjourn without ordering the printing
and distribution of the report believing
that the money required will be .well
spent, and will advance the general inte
rests of tho States !'-'k ! i
TnE National- 'Intelligence irulysays
that tho future of-the South is in the
m Mi
hands of its young men. How many pf
mem arc quamying tncmseivcs to manage
a tsj factories: controbita railroads, mine its
ore, work its machine 8hcfps,-arid cultivate
its plantations? Professional men it has
in abundance ablo lawyers accbraplisn-
edrnhvsicians. olonucnt sneakers. These
have their uses,'bnt tho growth of a State
depends less on them than on the charac
ter of the men who manage its industrial
enterprises. What is most needed in the
South, to-day isifthat .the young1,' blood
which fought for it so gallantly should
work it as determinedly, On -the .plan-
tation, in tne suop, in uie lactory, tncre
. . .1 Am .
the South is to effect its true restoration.
The young men who dug.tren'chos'. dnd'tfjd
on hominy and pork, who went clad in
homespun gray and, slept, jn cold pr rain
or shino under tho canopy of the heavens
to further the fortunes, as they believed,
turning its lathes, guiding its spindles,
handling its locomotives. But there is
want of capital No matter. They have
youth, health, hope," anJbitibn and -good
abilities. Theyhavo evaryincentive for
which to work. Begin with a will, arid
success will crown their efforts.
It was" claimed
that States could not
withdraw from the Union.
If they could
not, and they did not,, they could not
ccaso to be States-of tho Union." And yet
Thad. Stevens is belaboring his brains with
the drafting of an act " enabling" States
tovbccomq States, f iVirginirf " tho Mother
of States " is to be'c&fne an infant State,
and put in swaddling-clothes, with, Stc-
Tons, .Butler andfothor "vixenish hagsiand
UU10U3.
We are pleased to remark an agreeable
change in the tone of the more influential
of the Canadian journals in relation tb'the
condemned .Fenian?. .There is. no longer
any clamoring for the blood of these men
i . r i 'ii .r-. i :zv: '
dui irequent appeals lor me exercise oi
mercy and magnanimity, coupled with ex
pressions of approval of the statement re
cently made by a Minister of tho Crown,
that royal clemency will save from the gal
lows all of the men who hare beens sen
tenced to death.
The Fenians, from the latest accounts,
arc .going tplpok fgr Ireland's freedom
and independence thq. , right place
that is wnerc she lost if: ' If thdy succeed
in finding it welf and good.
ewi
York Journal of Commerce is
reiterating
the, call-uiKiniPersons who
parlors, ChufBHes, .Ihere. thines that,'
were stolen from the South, during the war)
lO.Seiid; thehi IbJfckJ oThafcMbersatF: .nt
"An old friend of ours, a Union man in
the South throughtalUhe war, told us that?
jno uuuacuHj were in a certain nouse in,
Massachusetts, his piano in anothcrand,
various unily treasures inrothers: H&had.
traced them to their positions. We- have
heard of a Southern lady sittinsr down at a
Northern table-rand recognizing -silver en,
that table asJieroWn. Wo have heard off
a lady receiving from an- oflicer-a:pTesen
of jewelry, which she recognized' fa thej
jewelry of a Southern lady who -had been;
her old school mate .'and friend." Public!
sentiment need to tJCaroosed to this sub
ject, and the holders of such goods should!
be compelled, by the. indignation of theirj
nonesc tieiiow-citizens, '"to send them
back,"
The news from Europe indicates that his
Holiness, the Pope, will be compelled td
leave Rome and seek an asylum elsewhere.
As soon as the French troops are recalled,
ho will probably depart from the Holyj
City forever. There are no indications
pointing to his removal to this onnntrv.
and, indeed, we do not think such an idea"
was ever entertained by the Pope him self.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
TU OBEDIENCE TO. TUB DECREE OF TUB
x.
Chanoery- Court in the case of Boyd-McNairy
and others ts.
do
he;
Anna Mcnairy and others, notice
is hereby given that the
nes npon the lots
ovemocr 13th. of
gold by mo at Public Sale on November 13th. of
mam
the JlcNairy
nrouertv. on Summpr street. .r
opened, and will remain open until 12 o'clock on
Wednesday, November 28, I860
. The bid on Lots Nos. -1 and 5-will bo-sbirtod at
$335.50 per foot: on Lot No Sat $?J5 per foot and
on Lot No. 1! at $305 per foot.
The highest bidderlat the expiration of tho time
above named will be reported to tho Court as the
purcnaser.
, noSidtd.. JJOETONJQ. HOWULL. and CM,
The timc.fQUn.ikiair ,the bids abovo specified
is contidtfa W SaTUKD A l , December 1, at 12
ociocg. t,
-ER031 10 TO 25 PER CEXT. SATED
r EcriNC rova goods at tub
EW YORK S
no. ia mm street!
f
mnR.PIflPT.K OV NAPHVIIiT.E AND THE
J. nrronnding country will pleaie bear In mind,
ing a new and Tcry attractire stock of
Staple and Fancy Di:ygood$,
A'UTIONS, hTC, ETC.,
Wbich has been bought for Cash In the Yerybett
Eastern m&rtetf, and will bo off-red at th very
lowest retail prices.
The stock comiits In part of
Black Silks, all prices ;
Colored Silks, all shades and prices ;
Moire Antique, all colors ;
Best English and German Poplins;. j
English and French Merinos ;
Empress Cloths, all colors ;
ladies' Badcing Cloths
Fine Whito and Black Alpacas ,
Lustres, aU colors ;
f i" " ""1 Wool PUIds, all'colbrs ;
AH Wool Flannels, all colors; 1
Bearers, Broadcloths, and Cassimerrs;
Doeskins, Tweeds, and Jeans ;
fi
,j.oguia ana American rnna , i jf . , j
lirown and Bleached Domestics ;
5-4j-C-4r7-4, 8-4', 0-4; and 10A Sheeting;
Table Linens, Towels, and Napkins
l; -1 , jAll grades Irish Linens; f rj l '
' ' A fu'l assortment 'ofHVhlte GoodsJ;
Ladien nnd Children's Uoilerj and Glares ,
Common and Frecch-'EmbroIdered Corsets;
DupJex.ElliFjc Hoop Skirts ;
Ladies' Shawls, Cloaks, and Sontags ;
i Hlbbons, Trimmings, Fancy jGoods;
And many other Goods too numerous to mentfon.
Bemember theiplace NEW YORK STOKE, No.
15 Union Street, (Levy & Co.'s old stand.)
oct21-3m E. FRANKLIN.
GREAT EXCITEMENT
NO. 65 NORTH COLLEGE STREET,'
iXD XT
SG SOUTH 3XARKET STKEET.
$50,000 WORTH OF GOODS,
CLOTHING', BOOTSSHOES
HATS, and NOTIONS,
To be sold at a great sacrifice. Corns and jniie pr
ourselr. The best qualities Frencn Jlcrlno at
1.23 per yard X fine Ladles' Shoes, SI JO per pair
and erery thing else in proportion.
Remember the places No. Co North College, and
20 Sonth Market street. : t
oct21-2m I. M. SOBEI..
Grand Lodge of Tennessee,
Y. and A. M.
f .- i i ;
THE ADJOURNED ANNUAL COMMUNI
cation of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee,
tree and Accented Masons, will commence at
the Masonic Temple in tho city of "Naihrille. on
MONDAY, December 3, 1SS5. Delegates are re
quested to be prompt in their attendance. The
t .. ANNUAL, ADDRESS
Will be delivered before the Grand Lodeo on
Monday night. (Dec. 3.1 by the Urand Orator.
Bro. P. G. STIVER PERKINS. P. G. H.P..in
the Concert Room of the Masonic Temple.
Members of city lodges, and ail transient
brethren in good standing, are requested to be
present.
ftB Citizens generally, and ladies particu
larly, are respectfully invited.-' ' tr '
I'UAtUiJbS A. tVbbhU,
H0T27-6t Grand SecreUry.
E. H. THOMPSON1
FASHIONABLE
HATS "A'ND- C'A'PsVl
MEN'S
FTJENISHTNG GOODS,
Trunks, Yalises, Bags, Efc,
28 Cherry Street.
naJShirta made to 'order Jnd warrantdtot
ct7-tf sp.
.at .Viv.ftiii.iunuii tj
DRUGS
STEPHENS & WATMS, .
VVIIOXiESALE, & ltETAIX. DRUGGISTS,
(The 0)d&k.Sta4.
iii
AFTER. HAVING REFITTHD,
RfamisHfea the entire establishment,
nnd having maS large atlditions thjfefb
wa aro. agaiu xeady to j offer to the jPublifl
every artioIe,ti3nalIyJotind, iii a- Druggist's
Stook. i . . -
3Ve have in sfoanMtensive stoct:6f
Pure' and Fresh phS Jiledtojnes,. Dye
Stuffs, etc., which -'w'qTHtjr andrimrity
aire unsurpassed hyanyotker attBilar estab
lishment ia the couritrr; ' ''
The great variety of European and Ame
rican Fancy Good Fine Soaps,' Toilet
Fovders, Pomades, Brushes, Extracts? ete.
comprising invQioof'goods froSw &
rSpn, London; Coudray; Society Hygmuflrte,
and Lubinj of Paris;.' UtEzin imA otiftr repu
table Americftn ' manufBcturrs will bo
found "most complete and for beauty, ele
gance, and util$ye e&mqt fail to suit the
taster of the most disariaun&ting.
Our assortment of CCsmetics, Tqrtoise
Shell and Ivory bombs, 'Puffs arfd Boxes,
Mirrors, and dthor articles of, that class,
being of the latest styles aad.of the most
recent importation, will compfef with that
of any hotise in the S(juth. . ' ;
Great- attention is paid to tha selection
and importation of Pure and Fresh Drugs,
and none other are allowed to j?e out of tho
Establishment
A. splendid selection of Imported and
Domestic Cigars, all fine brands of Chewing
and Smoking Tobaccos, Garrett's Scotch
and.Maccoboy.Snufls,juid jtery article, in
that One, constantly in store.
A most extensive and' varied assortment
of . v ,
JFisldiiig J Taokle;
oonsisting of Hooks, from the most". cele
brated manufactories of Limerick, Ireland,
and Silk, Grass,. Japanese,' and Cable-laid
Lines. Also, Heels, Bamboo and Japanese
Hods; together with every thing usually
found in a first-class establishment
A lart?e lottof ilie celebrated adltis ultra
Black 'and Plantation Imperial anSother
fino TEAS just received. f- - t
3r Prescriptions compounded with ac
curacy by competent and experienced Phar
macists; and Physicians and others can
'depend on-thty most entire reliability injtho
execution OT Orders, all goods being war
ranted as represented.
J 4 'u
NASHVILLE
COMMERCIAL BSURMCE CO.
:
UQce Iii 'tlie Buliaing or the Bank
of the Union.
C ITI'a U, iVjI i ir JTf.
nnis cjompAnt, BSTXumrfnBDiN'nsM-
L Insures Suildines. Vessels. ,in.,port, Merchan,
dUf, Hpnsbeld Furniture, and other property, on
the. mot t liberal terms. Fire, Marine, and Inland
rfeks taken at lowest rate. ' "
Bv Losses libeTaUy.adjBSted and promptly paid bj
this Company.
ciiiiBoronst -! -
It,C. MoNaibt,
Jxo. KikxWax,
U. . illLLMAS,
Vf. H, Kvsns,
Ilceir MTrci,
Jaa. UEwis :.
Jls. P. Kiffefis.
Si HI 3IXCXT,
r,.CL KeNAiBT,resdent.
E. D. IIICKB-Se
fUry. sep9-6nup
WHOLES
,E AND RETAIL
FjKOY , .GEqQEEaSa;OEE,
No. 13 Norm -Cherry Street,
- "-,
ASIIVILLK - TEXKESSEE.
PAKDOtFINI fc KIVA,
KEEP CONSTANTLY OH HAND' A LABGH
. end eumplete 4aortment of eTerrtnioa In
their line ot tlie' . " ,
vebv nEsrQnAiirT,,;,. j
Importer- of Piuo . and Qennise
Uertnuii,
SpajiUh,
Italinn and"
French
AXD I.ltiUOUS,
Ixff 9100:3. Al. od liand, tho best
rtntWljJa TOBACO. JjlMy
Lumber I lumber I
ra nnn rEET eobgia yellow
UUvUU Pine Dressed Flooring.
50,000 Georgia Tellow Via EKIngte.lS Inches
Ion;, Jnst reoeiTed and far sale by
nOT21.1m Mo. 73 Nor th College street.
FOR BEST,
THE TWO FINE STOKE HOUSBS. OS.
41 and 42 Public- Square, now oecopied by
North.' Ferris and M. Marbers. Inquire o
Turoer SToaterNo. 33 Pnblie Square,-,
j OR KENT,
THE " BUILDCJO KSQWN . AS JUE DI3-
PAI0U Pnnt0fflenerrBank and
Apply to'Jno. walIarfe7at'thls-Uffiiet.ort
J. B. Lindsley. 52 N. Cherry street.3 ' -"
n0T24-tf
r.

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