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The times dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1903-1914, April 17, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038615/1912-04-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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Dead, 1,302; Saved, 868--Enormity of Titanic SeaTragedy
? Grows, and Hope of Reassuring News Becomes More Faint
TOLL OF SHIP'S DEAD
IS FELT WORLD OVER
To Thousands of Homes Sinking of White
Star Liner Titanic Has Brought Bur?
den of Sorrow and Immeasur?
able Dread.
PASSENGERS PERISH MISERABLY IN
ICY WASTE THAT BETRAYED THEM
No Reassuring News Comes to Lessen Tragic Story,
and No Doubt Remains That All on Board Were
Lost Except Those Who Are Now on Carpathia.
Rule of the Sea Holds True, and Women and
Children Are Put in Lifeboats, While Men Are
Left to Meet Death of Heroes.
New York, April 16.?Nothing that came through the air from
tho sea to-day mitigated in any degree the pity and the horror
of the Titanic tragedy except as individual distress was abated
by the gradual addition of names to the list of the known survivors.
There are no known survivor.-; that are not on the Carpathia. The
Virginian was too late, and found none, and no other ship has re?
ported rinding any. In the icy. fog-sniothcrcd seas where the Ti?
tanic sank, exposure must soon have destroyed those who were left
to life belts or wreckage when all the boats were gone and no help
had come an dthe great steamship foundered. The receding Oympic,
whose powerful wireless began on Tuesday morning to recite the
names of the living, conducted the work of relaying the Carpathia's
dispatches, and the successive bulletins posted at the Wliite Star
office kept many an anxious man or woman waiting all day, and
sent others away thanking God.
Nearly All Men Went Down.
It is practically a certainty now that nearly all of the men of vthe
Titanic's company went down with the ship when.she plunged two
miles toward the ocean floor or that they perished miserably while
clinging to wreckage or life preservers in the icy waste that be?
trayed them. They gave up life within sight of the little, rocking
boats that held their women and children.
It cannot lie doubted now that among these were Colonel John
Jacob Astor, Isidor Straus. .Major Archibald \V. Butt, aide to
President Taft; George 1). Widmcr, of Philadelphia) Karl H. Behr,
the tennis champion j Jacques Futrcllc, the writer; William T.
.Stead, the London editor; Francis D. Millet, the American artist,
and many, many more who were known on both sides of the At?
lantic.
The loll of the Titanic's dead will be felt the world over. The
names of ihc survivors sent by wireless include a small number of
men, who were able t< rind place with the women and children in
(he all too few boats. Such goodness as there is places among the
living Henry Steeper Harper, of the publishing firm of Harper &
Co., and Mrs. Harper; Dr. and Mrs. Mary Fraucnthal and Mr. and
Mrs. T. G. Fraucnthal. Mrs. Jolij, Jacob Astor, with her maid, is
on the Carpathia, which is hurrying the survivors to this port, and
which should arrive here Thursday night. Among the others res?
cued arc: J. Bruce !smay the managing Director of the White Star
Line; Mrs. George D. VYidencr, of Philadelphia: George Gordon
and Lady Cosmo Duff, Mrs. Jacques Futrcllc, Mrs. Charles M.
Hays, whose husband is president of the Grand Trunk Railway ;
'Mrs. Henry B. Harris and Mrs. Washington Dodge, of San Fran?
cisco.
No Distinctions Made in Rule of the Sea.
The list of survivors includes women and children from first
cabin, the second cabin and steerage. No distinctions were made
when the rule of the sea sent women and children to the boats and
left the men to their fate.
The first message from the Oympic that filtered through
stormy airs early this morning, that there, were 86S survivors on
the Carpathia, was modified to-day "'to about 800," but whether one
message allowed for the boat's crews and others did not was not
made clear.
There is no absolute certainty here as to how manv souls were
on the Titanic when she hurled herself against an iceberg. The first
(Continued on Elgrhth Fa**-T ~* ._
THE TITANIC AMD HER CAPTAIN, E. J. SMITH.
LIST OF TITANICS PASSENGERS
BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN LOST
Of Ihr I3S first i'lam puMD^cre who perished when the Tltnnlc Trent down, 24 were women and 114 men;
tue IK) second clnss paasengcrs who lost their Ursa, 21 were women and 139 men. The list which follows hits
ed compiled by striking from ih- orlsrtiisl paantiiKtr list the names of lho?: wJiu are reported to hare tuen
red.
Isidor Straus, wife, manservant
and innld.
Frederick Sutton.
G. Thome and wife.
Mr. Cruchurtu.
WyckofT Vanderhoef.
W. Anderson Walker,
r. M. Harren.
J. Weir.
George U. Widener.
M. J. White.
Perclvel W. White.
Richard V. White, yrtfe, maid and
manservant. '':
Cearec D. Wick nnd wife,
i.nircr Wright.
FIRST-CLASS PASSENGEHS.
John Jacob Aator.
II. J. Allison, wire daughter, son,
maid and nurae.
Thomas Andrews.
Harmonil Ar-tagn-Vey-tlo.
Major Butt.
J. Baumann.
Qulgg Baiter.
T. Ileattle.
I. III? Bonuell.
II. BJornstrom.
Stephen Weaurt Blackwell,
Ueno' Blank.
J. J. Borebank.
John B. Bradf.
E. Braudels.
Dr. Arthur Jackson Brew.
Frank Carlson.
F. M. Carran.
J. P. Carran.
T. W. Cavendish.
Herbert F. Chaffee.
Hobert Chlabolm.
Walter M. Clark.
George Qulne-y Clifford.
E. P. Colley.
Mm. A. T. Compton.
-Allan S. \\ . Comptnn.
A. T. Compton, Jr.
John B. Crafton.
Kdward G. Crosby.
John Bradley Cununlngs.
P. P. Dal}.
Thornton Da>ldson.
Mr. Douglas.
Mlas Caroline Endreo.
Mlas E. Adama.
Mra. A. F. I,. Eganheliu.
B. L. Foreman.
Mark Fortune.
T. P. Franklin.
J. Futrelle,
Arthur Gee.
E. Lb GoldenherB.
George B. Goldeschmidt.
Victor Glglio.
Henry B. Harris,
W. H. Harrlaon.
H. Hoven.
Charles 31. Rari.
Christopher Head.
W. F. Heat.
Herbert H. Milliard.
W. E. Hopkins.
A. O. Holvcraon and wife.
3Ilss A. E. Icham.
Birnbaum Jakob.
C. C. Jones.
II. F. Julian.
Edward A. Kent.
F. It. Kenyon.
Herman Klnber.
William S. Lambert.
E. G. l.ewy.
Milton C. Long.
J. H. luring.
J. E. Magrulre.
Pierre Marochal.
D. W. Marvin.
T. McCaffrr.
Timothy J. McCarthy.
J. IC McGough.
A. Melody.
Edgar J. Meyer and wife.
Dr. W. E. M In a hon.
II. Mnrkland Molaotn.
Clarence Moore and manservant,
Mr. .Morgan, wife and maid.
Cbarlca Natseh.
A. W. .Newell.
A. S. M elm I Ron.
S. Orira.
M. H. W. parr.
Austin Partner.
V. Payne.
Thomas Pears and wife,
Victor Pcnaaco, wife and maid.
Walter 'C. Porter.
Jonkheer Renchllng.
George Rheims.
W. A. R?chling II.
Hugh Rood.
J. Hugo Hose.
M. Rothschild.
. Alfred R?wo.
W. T. Stead.
Mr, Schabert.
Frederick Seward.
William lt. Stirer,
.lohn M. Smart,
j. Clinch Smith.
R. W. Smith;
W. A. Spenaer.
Max Frollcher Stehll and wife,
A. A. Stewart.
SECOND-CLASS PASSENGERS.
John Aahhy.
Samson Abclson.
Hannah Abelson.
Edgar Andrew.
Lillian Bentham.
Robert J. Hut?-mau.
Lawrence Beesley.
Reginald Butler.
B. J. Beauchamp.
Jose De Brlto.
Her. Thomna It. D. Bylea.
Mr. Hanihridge.
Solomon Bowrntir.
Mildred Brown.
Perch Bally.
W. Hull Botaford.
William Bcrreman.
Carl Bryhl.
Frederick J. BanOeld.
It. C. Coleridge.
Harvey Col Iyer.
Irene C. Corbett.
Mra. C. P. Corey.
John H. Chapmen.
Elizabeth Chapman.
Rer. Eraeat E. Carter.
Lillian Carter.
Charles V. Clark*.
F.rlk Collander.
Stuart Collett.
Charles Chsptuan.
William Carbines.
Harry Cotterlll.
Sebaatlanl Dr Carlo.
Herbert Denbury.
James V. Drew.
Marshall Drew.
Percy Deacon.
Charles Darlcs.
. William Dlbden.
William J. Denton.
Lena N. Def.
Stanley Fos.
ArueJ Fnblstrom.
Harry Faunthorpe.
Charlea Fillbrook.
Annie FJunk.
Joseph Fynney.
Alfred Gaskell.
William Glllesple.
William Gilbert.
Hnrn Gale.
Approximate Statement
of Titanic Disaster
First cabin paanengera, 325.
Second cabin passengers, 2SS.
Third cabin passengers, 710.
Total number of posacngera, 1,320.
Members of the crew, 8?0.
Total passengers and crew. 2,1 SO.
Number of known survivors. SWS.
Number wlio probably pcrlahed,
1,803.
Total tinmher of named ourrlv
oro, 32S.
Approximately twenty lifeboats
manned by seven members of the
erew each, I40.
Estimated saved ateeroge passen?
gers, 400.
Total. SRS.
NAMED SVRVTVORS?
Flrat cahtn pnsacngersi
Women, 141.
Men, A3.
Children. 6.
Totnl, 210.
Second cabin passengersi
Women, 02.
Men. Id.
Children, 10.
Total, 118.
S. Gale.
John Gill.
Itslph Giles.
Hansek Glvard.
Samuel Grcenbers;.
Fred Giles.
Edgar Giles.
Lawrence Gnrey.
Walter itnrrl?.
Samuel Herman.
Stepben Hold.
George Hunt.
Leonard Hlckman.
Stanley Hickman.
Ambrose Hood.
Benjamin Howard.
Ellen T. Howard.
Benjamin Hart.
John HnrpCT.
Mr. Hoffman and two children.
Ororge Hocking.
Henry P. Hodgea.
Martha HUtuner.
Bertha llett.
Clifford Jeffert.
Erneat Jeffrey.
Sidney S. Jncohsohu.
Stephen Jenkins.
Dr. J. C. Jeuklna.
John D. Jarrls.
S. Kantor nnd wife.
llnulel Keane.
Itcv. Churlea Klrkland.
P. Karnes.
Johu Henrik K villner.
Ilcnc Learnot.
Jnhn I.lnjnn.
Hobert W. N. Leraon,
Joseph Laroche.
J. J. Lamb.
Charles Louch.
R. F. Levy.
William LnhtJgen.
Emlllo Maaglaraoohf.
Mr. Marshall.
Erneat Mornweek.
Noel Malachnrd.
James McCrle. c
Joseph Mantrlln,
Frank IL Mnyberry.
Thomas F. Miles.
Mary Mack.
Thorium Mundil.
.Henry Mitchell.
A. Mallett.
\V. J. Matthews.
Peter McKane.
August Meyer.
Jacob Milling.
Joseph Nlcbolls.
Hobert D. Norman.
Nicholas Naaser.
L. Xesson.
Richard Otter.
Hobert Phillips.
Or. Alfred Paine.
Frederick Pengeliy.
Clifford Parker.
Martin Ponezll.
Crank Pnlsauni.
Peter H. Rebouf.
Harry Heuern.
Emlle Richard.
Darld Fteevea.
Miss E. Remolds.
Georae Sweet.
Krnrst A. SJostedt.
Augustus Smith.
Illchnrd .1. Slomer.
Ilayden Sobey.
Philip J. Stokes.
II. M. Slayter.
F. W. SeHgwtck.
Perrlval Suhnrp.
Anno SInkkonen.
S. Ward Stnnton.
OeorKe Swnne.
L. .Mnnltu Shelter.
SI. E. I. Strunt.
William J. Turpln.
Ellen Toonejr.
Moses A. Tr imp Inn sky.
Mrs. A. T. Terran.
James Veole,
Mrs. George Wilkinson. ?
' A du in C. Wilkinson.
William J, Ware.
Leopold Welsr..
Edward Wneadon.
John James Ware.
Florence I?. Wore.
Charles Wilhelm.
E, Arthur Weat.
Edwin Wheeler.
Mian H. Vndla.
There were also 740 third-class
passengers on board. ?
CARPATHIA BEARS
ALL THAT ARE ALIVE
It Now Is Definitely Known That No Other
Vessels Reach Scene of Accident in
Time to Pick Up Any of Pas?
sengers or Crew.
FIGURES TELL STORY OF HEROISM
OF MEN ABOARD THE SINKING LINER
Masters of Many Millions Bravely Stand Aside While
Boats Are Filled With Women and Children.
Great Secret of Ship's Death in Collision With
Iceberg Not Yet Told, and Every Wireless Ear Is
Waiting to Catch Story Which Carpathia Has to
Tell--Mysteries of the Sea's Horror May Be
Cleared Up To-Day.
That the final roll of the rescued from the Titanic disaster had
practically been made up was the .'mpression that grew almost into
conviction last night aji the hours vore on without the revision of
lists adding measurably to the total of known survivors.
Of the definite news of the disaster the night added title. Down
I the Atlantic coast, fog-enveloped in many places, as he report show?
! ed, crept the Cunarder Carpathia, bearing on her the 8t>S lives that
! had been snatched from the waters when the Titnic's boats, laden
I to their limit, one by one made their way from the giant liner as it
became known that she was soon to take her fatal plunge.
But although the rescue ship was reported within wireless range
of the Sable Island station at a comparatively early hour and every
wirelcss ear was waiting to catch the snap of a receiver which might
mean that the great secret of the liner's death was about to be given
up, midnight came and went and the night began to grow old?and
still the word had not been spoken.
Figures Tell Story of Heroism.
Carefully compiling the available lists, the record of the named
survivors of the disaster stands significantly thus:
Men?79.
Women?223.
Children?16.
Total?328.
Of the remaining 540 known survivors it is estimated that not
more than too were seamen required to man the boats. This would
leave approximately 440, and in the ordinary proportions of women
and children in the steerage, where the passengers in the Titariic's
care numbered 710, it seems prohahle that the greater part of these
440 were women and their little ones.
Nothing could show more plainly the heroism of ihe crew and
the men passengers who stood by the doomed ship, facing practi?
cally inevitable death, and sent th women and children away in
the lifeboats. Some would have to be left: that was a certainty.
Hundreds, in fact, were left. But to all appearances, the men who
were left stayed behind deliebrately .calmly stepping aside to lot the
! weaker ones., those to whom they owed protection, take their way
to safety.
"Sinking by the head. Have cleared boats and filled them with
women and children."
This was the final message these brave men sent the wolrd. for
it was directly afterward that their wireless signals sputtered and
then stopped altogether.
The picture that inevitably presents itself, in view of what is
known, is of men like John Jacob Astor. master of scores of mil?
lions: Benjamin Guggenheim, of the famous family of bankers: !si?
.lor Straus, a merchant prince; William T. Stead, veteran journalist';
Major Archibald But?, soldier; Washington R?chling, noted engi?
neer?of any or all of these men stepping aside and bravely, gal?
lantly, remaining to die, that the place he otherwise might have
i filled could, perhaps, be taken by some sabot-shod, shawl-enshroud!
jed, illiterate and pennilscs peasant woman of Europe.
Of the survivors, what: Their story of peri! and suffering,
with the revelation they will furnish of just what happened on board
the stricken ocean giant?pictures which will leave the,imagination
nothing to draw upon?still remains to be told. I tow quickly they
will be able to tell it and clear up all the mysterie.- of identity which
the limited carrying capacity of the Carpathian wireless has loft
(Continued On "Ninth* Pace.) ' *

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