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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, July 02, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1913-07-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE WEATHER
FAiR AND WARMER
SWINGING THE
ME FOR FAT
Heads of 6.0. P. Postmasters
Falling In Violation of
Civil Service
So States
Young of the Second
Dakota District
Cites Case at Valley City
and Refers to Burleson's
Order No. 117
Washington, July 1.—Representa­
tive Young of North Dakota declared
today that to enrich their campaign
fund, the democrats are violating the
principles of the civil service law and
removing republican postmasters to
replace them by democrats.
He believes it is being done in
large oflices, as well as smaller ones,
and that. Order No. 117, recently is­
sued by Postmaster General liarle
son, was framed for this purpose.
Too Much Power to Inspectors.
"Postmaster General Burleson ha
issued Order No. 117, under which
posloflicn Inspectors have gone about
the country, and by .neans of trivial
iind technical faults in postofliees
have resulted in the removal of re­
publican incumbents," said Mr.
Young today.
"1 have not seen this order, but
have been given the substance of
it,
and I know that "it gives the inspect­
ors the greatest latitude in making
their inspections, and they have tiled
reports of technical violations of
the
regulations on which recommenda­
tions for the removal of republican
postmasters were based.
Cite* Valley City Case.
"The most glaring instance of the
vjQlatioiu.ofLthe^ spirit .of the -clv'.l
service principled announced by Pres­
ident \Vilson has. been at Valley
City. f,
"Postmaster W. H. Pride is serving
tinder a commission that does not ex­
pire until 191.r», and yet I am informed
that his removal has been recom­
mended by an inspector. There was
not.a single objection to Mr. Prion's
(Continued on Page
SERBS CAPTURE
778 BULGARIANS
Belgrade, July 1—The latest ad­
vices report the1 Servian troops ad­
vancing in the direction of Istep and
Kobene.
A' cabinet meeting was held at the
foreign office tonight at the conclu­
sion of which it was announced that
hostilities were proceedng energetic­
ally all along the whole line.
Newtpaper reports say the Ser­
vians captured 20 Bulgarian offiecrs,
r.8
non-commissioned oflicers and 700
alien during the lighting Monday.
A sensational ttory was published
that the Bulgarians at Guevgheli
treacherously killed the Servian Ma­
jor Vasitch, on the morning after he
had been their guest in camp to cele­
brate the supposed acceptance of ar­
bitration by both governments
ARKANSAS REPUBLICAN CON
VENTION.
Little Rock, Ark., July 1.—Arkan­
sas republicans met in state conven­
tion here today to nominate a candi­
date for governor to succeed Gover­
nor Joseph T. Robinson, who resign­
ed to hccept election to the United
States senatorship. The gubernator­
ial election will be held July 23.
OBSERVANCE OF DOMINION DAY
Ottawa, Ont., July 1.—Dominion
Day, the forty-sixth aniversary of the
Confederation, was observed in the
customary manner throughout Cana­
da today. In the capital all the Gov­
ernment offices and a majority of the
places of business were closed and
Ihe day was celebrated as a general
holiday. Athletic and sporting con­
tests formed a leading feature of the
celebrations in nearly all the cities.
ELEMENTS KILL 13
AT PITTSBURG
Pittsburgh, July 1.—Six are
dead from the heat, a drown
ed while seeking relief in the
rivers, and scores of prostra- •.
tions "marked the heat wave
today. At least four were kill
ed in an electric storm this af
«8» ternoon.
"BOARDWALK SUFFRAGIST" PLANS
VOICELESS KilLLEH CHAIN PARADE
RY ATLANTIC CITY'S
and Confederate Sol
diers Address the Old
War Veterans
"Rebel Yell" Given After
Governor Tenor Con­
cludes Speech
Heat Reaches the Hundred
Mark and Fifth Death
is Reported
Gettysburg Pa., July 1.—In tiie
glare of a pitiless sun that sent tlie
mercury over the hundred mark, the
armies of the North and South began
the formal exercises set to marke the
semi-centennial of the battle of Get­
tysburg. The veteians to the num­
ber of fifteen tthousand, army oflicers
estimated, filed into the big tents set
apart lor the exercises anil s:at in the
haze of the heat, ior two hours and
shook the camp with cheers when I in*
speakers made reference to a reunit­
ed nation.
livery seat under the can van was
taken long before Secretary of War
Garrison and Governor Tener, the ora­
tors of the day, came chugging up in
automobiles. Although men in gray
were far outnumbered by those in
blue. There were probably a thous­
and Southerners in the amphitheatre,
an what thoy lacked in numbers
they made up in lung power.
When Gov. Tener finished his
speech. General Young, Commander
in-chief of the United Conledernte
Veterans, arose slowly and bowing to
him said:
"I will give you something :io one
else can give you. We will give you
the rebel yell."
Nine famous Confederate oflicers
an a thousand soldiers of the south
gave it so loud that it was heard far
back in the crowds towards Gettys­
burg.
When General Young stepped for­
ward to deliver his address he was
greeted with wild enthusiasm by
Union veteraris, led by Commander-in
Chief Beers, giving him three lusty
cheers and a "Tiger".
Young's speech captured the audi­
ence and he was overwhelmed by
handshakes. Among the two hun­
dred guests on the platform were
Governors ji,oerhart of Miire^ota,
Mann of Virginia, McCreary of Ken­
tucky, and several Confederate gen­
erals.
All through last nighf the veterans
(Continued from Page 3)
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UNCLE SAM BAS
A BIG WAD LEFT
WhSbiiigtfm. July 1.—-uncle Sam
closed the fiscal year of ,1913 with a
surplus of over $40,000,000, represent­
ing the excess of receipts over expen­
ditures, exclusive of. the Panama Ca­
nal and ^public debt transactions .made.
This -exceeds last year's surplus by
$750,000. The Panama Canal expen­
ditures and the public debt transac­
tions, however, wiped out the .surplus
of ordinary receipts over ordinary ex­
penditures and created deficit for the
year or over $2,II'HI,0("I0. The total
receipts tor the fiscal year amounted
to 'over $72S,00''),000, while the ordi­
nary disbursements were over $683,
000,-000.
GOING TO UNDERWOOD.
Miss Minnie Evingson of Kindred,'
D., was a visitor in Mismarck, and
will go to Underwood this morning/
wheie she will he the guest of friends
for several days.
RUINS OF
it
The' totiil death toll of the fire holo­
caust at the Husted Milling and Ele­
vator company's plant, Buffalo, X. Y.,
was fcrtpected to reach 50. An explo­
sion of dust hurled many instantly
into eternity and maimed 60 others,
aome of whom have since died. About
a scotffe" of bodies were recovered the
Bismarck Srtbtmi.
THIRTY-THIRD YEAR No. 16B. (NEWS OF THE WORLD) BISMAltCK, NORTH PAKQTA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 2, 1913. (BY ASSOCIATED PRESS)
MUTUAL LIFE
INGS TO
BE EXEMPTED
Reached After Long
Debate by the Senate
Democrats
Restrictive Tax
Proposed
on
Tobacco Production to
Prevent
Monopoly
Tariff Dill Now Almost Ready
lor the Committee of
tbe Whole
Washington, Jtily l.~
The Senate
Democrats approached ihe linal agree­
ment oil, the Uinl 'rw(io(i-Sinuuoii:i
tariff bill in caucus !au- iod.iy when
they made the following decisions
important co'ntotjffcil .points.
The Mutual I.t'e 'Insurance com­
panies are exempted
ed
!#efo
Irani
of an income tax oil
payment
premiums
return­
t'o policy holdt'i's in the taim of
dividends.
The stamp tax of cue te-.ilh of one
cent per pound was agreed to for all
trading on cotton •futun-s, tin- tax in
be refunded when the c.tton is
niatl.\ delivered.
An agreement was readied to vote
tomorrow on the Hitchcock amend­
ment proposing a restrictive rax on
tobacco production prevent, monop­
oly.
The finance committee members
held another meeting tonight, to de­
cide the questions'referred back from
the caucus. Tho caucus will resume
work tomorrow and it is believed the
final paragraphs will he readied be
fore night.
I The decision /to exempt the earn
ings which mutual lii'e insurance com
panies later distilfoupe to policy hold.
sirs eame^ifter.a lOT^Sebitie."
Senator -Hitchcock^ fight to secure
the adoption of the tobacco amend
I went was carried over until adjourn­
ment tonight. The members of the
finance committee decided against
the amendment.
AIRSHIP CROSSES
LAKE MICHIGAN
Chicago, July 1. -Logan A. Vilas,
an amateur aviator of Chicago, made
the first aeroplane flight, across hake
Michigan. The trip was made in a
hydroaeroplane from St. Joseph. .Mich,
to Chicago, and consumed an hour
and thirty minute.- about half an
hour more ilian tin- aviator estimated
it would take. The course wae
about. 5S miles.
I
FIRE HOLOCAUST It!
ifcwi I'lKi'l' I ll'lHi11«HUiH'n
day after the accident but the smol-.
dering tire and the mass of twisted
girders and broken concrete kept the
firemen and wreckers from recover-]
ing the other bodies^at ouce. This1
picture shows firemen pouring tons of
water into the ruin3 from the rail-'
road tracks. (A Top of one of the!
MRS. CLARENCE H. MACKAY SEES HER
LAWYER AFTER DER HUSBAND AND
CHILDREN SLIP OFF TO EUROPE
I, H'fJ
"it5
MANY NATIONS WILL
PUT BAN ON OPIUM
The ltaginj, ,luiy Representa­
tives.,of ^4 nations gathered
_ti,ej'e -for
the'YesfihfptloVr o'ifHtrd" sordllff^Mrefctifa*
tional opium conference, which was
opened by Foreign Minister of Neth­
erlands Jonkher Reneke Demarses
Vanswineren, wlio accepted the holl­
oa rary presidency. Tho lTutch dele­
gate was ejected permanent president.
Among the delegates are lour from
the United States. The conference,
will exi/niine into the possibility of
enforcing the the ratification of
those powers which signed a genera!
convention drawn in 1S02. and the
.president appealed for tho co-opera­
tion of till states in stemming the tide
of tho increasing use of drugs.
DENVER SELECTED
Washington. July 1.--Denver was
selected as the meeting place for the
next. Triennial Convention in I'JIf! ot
the Brotherhood of hocomotive Fire­
men an.l .Onginemen. W. F, Carter
of I'eoria, 111., was elected president.
BUFFALO PLANT, N
WHERE DEATH TOLL MAY REACH FIFTY
elevators which did not collapse.
(B) Heart of the ruins, where many
were lost and where search for bodies
was not, begun until after the ruins
cooled. The wreckage was piled 60
feet high at this point. (C) One of
the freight cars from which firemen
fought the blaze.
MACKAY. WIFE AND CHILPREftl
SMILE AWBILE
Energy Must be Left at
Rome After Reaching the
Port of Energy
Energy Will Hold
qna That Will be Chuck
Full of Energy
Energy Das Arranged a Pro
grain That Has Touches
of Energy
Energy, N. D„ July 1.—'The second
annual assembly of the linergy Chau­
tauqua lias secured onr of the best
and liveliest programs to be found
at any Chautauqua in the state. There
is not a dull day in the entire ses­
sion and while the Chautauqua is one
of the youngest in the state, it will
be attended by thousands of people
from Mcl.oan county and the Missouri
Slope.
Among its lecturers will be found
the greatest men of the. northwest,
nen who have accomplished some­
thing and are willing to tell their
neighbors about it. Among these are
found l'errv G. Holden the Corn King,
Hugh .1. Hughes, Champion of Co-op­
eration, Governor Hanna, A. 15. Bow
en, Senator McDowell, Herbert C.
l'ish and many others.
The entertainers include the Impe­
rial Quartet, the finest quartet of the
'twin Cities, Jubilee Singers, Carter,
the Cartoonist, and other musical or­
ganizations. The Washburn and Un­
derwood bands will render music on
diherent days. Old Settlers' Day,
ipourth of July and, in fact,, every
day are special days. A class in
domestic science, another in current
topics r.nd both a boys' and giris'
club will furnish profitable pastime
for, all.
The Chautauqua park, which is one
of the piettiest in the state, has been
fixed up this year as never before,
and everything points to a large en­
campment.
Press day, on which the editors of
McLean county and the Missouri
Slope will gather, will be observed on
Saturday, July 12tli. On this day
Governor Hanna will speak.
Chautauqua Program Complete.
That the Energy Chautauqua will
be among the best in the state is
shown by the completed program.
The park was never prettier and a
force of men are busy putting it in
shape for the big meeting. Manager
•Stanley is busy putting on the finish-
(Contined on Page 3)
THIS EDITION 8 PAuES
FIVE OENT8
BEADED FOR
iMany fining to Testify io
Latest Developments
la Probing Cases
Inquiry to be Made Into tbe
Paid Press Bureaus
of Corporations
Former President if the
Maaofadurers' Associa­
tion Subpoenaed
Washington, July 1.—With witness­
es headed for Washington from many
directions to testify on the newest
developments in the senate's lobby
Investigation, Chairman Overman to­
night gave a hint of further sensa­
tions of the committee's activities.
I Inquiry has been under way for
some time, it is understood, into the
operations of the paid press bureaus
conducted by large corporations and
"the interests." The committee ex
I pects to determine to what extent
the paid publicity agents have been
employed to attempt to influence pub­
lic opinion or to direct federal legisla­
tion.
The charges of Martin M. Mulhall,
a former representative of the Manu­
facturers' association, regarding his
lobbying operations, will not be for­
mally opened until Tuesday.
Tomorrow's hearing will be dvot
od primarily to the testimony of Wall
street men who are believed to have
information regarding the lobbying
activities in New York, in which the
names of congressmen have been
freely used. Developments indicated
that oflicers of the senate and mem­
bers of the lobby committee have
been secretly busy for several days
procuring new, information, the na­
ture of which has be^n'^eoacekled.
Kirby Make* Denial.
San Francisco, Cal^ Julj% 1.—
"Brought-on Brandenburg was never
in the employ of the National Asso­
ciation of Manufacturers."
This was the reply of John Kirby,
(Confined on Page 3)
MANY NAVAL
Washington, July 1.—'Fourteen na­
val oflicers were selected by the
"plucking board," including several
of the best known men in the navy,
today, and placed on the retired list
along with ten others who voluntar­
ily asked for retirement. Those forc­
ed off the list included Captain Temp
lin M. Pottes, commanding the Battle
fliip ..ouisiana. Captain Washington
I. Chambers, on duty at Washington
in cnarge of the navy aviation corps
Captain John G. Quimby, command*
ing the naval training station at Nor
folk, Va., Capt. John M. Elliott, com­
manding the armored cruiser Mary­
land of the Pacific station Capt.
Chester M. Knepper of the naval war
college at Newport, U. I., Captain
Potts, who heads the list, was the
center of a storm early in the pres­
ent administration when it was an­
nounced his pro motion to be Rear Ad­
miral be held up until he had had
more extended sea service. Undar
the preceding administration lie had
been serving as a secret aid for the
personnel of the fleet. He was re­
tired in his present grade. All will
receive three quarters pay.
MOTHERS' PENSIONS IN JERSEY.
Trenton, X. J., July 1.—County
clerks throughout New Jersey report
numerous applications for widows'
pensions under the new state law,
which became operative today. Un
d?r the provisions of the law a pen­
sion of ?9 a month is to be paid to
widows with one child under the age
of 16 years. Fourteen dollars a month
will be allowed for two children un­
der 16, with $4 a month for each addi­
tional child under that age.
INDIAN WEDDING.
Father Eeede arrived in the city
Tuesday afternoon, from Cannonball,
being on his way to Berthold, where
he will today unite an Indian couple
in wedlock, according to the rites of
the Episcopal church.
THE WEATHER.
North Dakota—Fair Wed*
nesday warmer east portion
Thursday fair.
South Dakota Generally
fair Wednesday and .Thursday.
Minnesota Fair Wednes
day warmer northwest cool
er northeast Thursday fair
moderate winds.

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