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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, July 03, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1913-07-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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I
THE WEATHER
l.OCM SHOWERS TODAY
IS CALLED TO
Story Without Parallel io
the History of Probing
by Corgress
Man Wbo Assumed Many Roles
Admits All the facts
ID
the Case
Asseots to Correctness of
Certain Accusations Made
Against Him
Washington, July 2.—A story of
misrepresentation, impersonation of
ijmblic men, and organised effort to
iniluence Wall Street financiers is
piobably without a parallel in the his­
tory congressional investigation, at.
unfolded before (he senate loboy com­
mittee today. A prosperous looking
seli^po.isessed individual calling him­
self David Lamar of New York, de­
scribed himself as an "operator in
stocks' and admittedly was the bear­
er of several assumed name.?. He
was the piincipal witness in the re­
markable session. With entire
noandon he aroused the committee
to laughter at times by his naive ad­
missions as he told of his impersona­
tions, his participation iu tne attempts
to influence Wall olivet operations,
and his association with Edward Lau­
terbach of New York, a lawyer, in the
efforts to have Lauterbach retained by
til.- Morgan firm, the Union Pacific,
and other great "interests" to head
oi congressional activity in Washing­
ton.
Lamar telephoned financial men
and lawyers in the names of Rep­
resentatives Pal.ner an.l Riordan. He
assumed the yuisc of Chairman Mc
(Jombs of the Democratic National
Committee and Lewis Cass Ledyard
of New York, counsel, for the Morgan
lam, one of the attempted victims.
LedyUrd came to the witness stand
armed with almost verbatim account
of the conversations Id with Lamar
•who represented himself as Congress­
man Palmer. As he read the record
of the conversation., between them­
selves in an uiiumal tone. Lamar, sil­
ting nearby, laughed and nodded, say­
ing: "that's right," and slapping
hands with apparent ei'ioynient.
The purpose oi his impersonations,
I.aniar contended, was to obtain rein­
statement for his friend Lauterbach,
in the good graces of the .Morgan
firm.
The members of the committee to
(Continued on Page Five.)
»j» »j» »jt
THE WEATHER
North Dakota: Local show­
ers Thursday, execpt. fair
sowthwest portion Friday
lair.
South Dakota: Local show­
ers Thursday cooler central
east Friday fair.
Minnesota: Local thunder
showers Thursday Friday
probably fair, moderate vari
ble winds.
A A A A A A A A A A A
MORE MYSTERY
Wjashburn, N. D., July 2—The sud­
den disappear SJice of Fred Hammond,
who conducted the O. K. Cat'e here
on Maia street, is causing inquiry
among many of the citizens and busi­
ness men of Washburn. Hammond
locked his pla.ee of business on Sun­
day night and up to date lias not been
seen since. Financial troubles are
claimed by some to account for his
«lif.appeara ice though it was consid­
ered he was enjoying a profitable pat
Toi:age.
FROM FARGO.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Lund of Fargo are
in the city, the guests of the Grand
Pacific.,
row mum
St. Louis, July 2—Four per
sons, all members of the same
family, one of the wealthiest
and most prominent socially
in the city, were killed and
two seriously- injured in an ati
tomobile accident.
DAVID LAMAR NOW
CHIEF FIGURE IN
PHONE LOBBY PLOT
Washington, July 2.—David Lamar.
the Wall street slocl operator, who
was brought into the Union Pajilie
holdup lobby plot by Kdwanl Lanier-1
bach, the New York hiwy ir, agreed
to testify before the senate co nmil
lee investigating the "insidious lob­
by." Lamar, after a long conference
with Lauterbach agreed lo apear with­
out being subpoenaed. The '.ouijy
luinlets thought Lamar would be able
to shed light upon the identity of
tlie mysterious man who impersonal-'
ed Repres"iitalive Itiordan o: New!
York and Representative Palmer ot
Pennsylvania in telephone conversa-j
i.ons with Robert S. Lovett and Lew-1
iss Cass Ledyard regarding the re-J
mining of Mr. Lauterbach as special
counsel for the Union Pacilio in (lie
dissolution aialtcr. Lamar lias many!
enemies in Wall street, who are out­
spoken in their attacks upon liini.
OLD BISMARCK
BHD TO THE
WATER'S EllGF
Pioneer Steamboat Destroyed
by Fire While in Duck
atRee
Navigated the Muddy
Crest of the Missouri for
Many Years
Washburn, N. D., uiy c.—Tho Mis­
souri river steamboat "Bismarck,"
one of the pioneer boats of the Len
ton Packet company, which has been
plying the watfirs of the Bi^ .Muddy
tor a long term of years, has been
destroyed, It was consumed by
lire after it docked at ltee.
On the day it was consumed it had
taken a load of Indians up the river,
and while the Indians were leaving
the boat, a fire started in the engine
room, and with a high wind prevailing
the old boat burnaci rapidly. All the
passengers had plenty of time to land,
but some of the men in the crew were
compelled to run off deck to escape
the llames.
The men of the crow lost all of
their clothing and bedding on board
and some of them lost their savings,
which to some amounted to a snug
siim.
The Bismarck boat was piloted
nearly all the time she plied the Mis­
souri by Catpain Belk, whose home is
at Bismarck. He was tlia first pilot to
take this boat up the river and he has
steered the boat through the -Muddy
river for years. This spring, how­
ever, the rn'fcr captains have exchang­
ed boats a number of timus, and on
the trip the Bismarck burned it was
in charge of Captain Marsh. The
accident and fatal ending to the old
boat was unavoidable, a fid though no
blame can be attaciicii to anyone, tne
old liver captains feel the untimely
loss of the pioneer boat keenly.
2,
IN
»j»
Alt Alflt ACCIDENT
Belgrade, July 2 Army
headquarters report that the
Servians, after capturhig Istip,
pursued the enemy, capturing
over 100 officers ,and 1,000
men. Press dispatches say
that sanguinary fighting occur
red ft Ovtchepalye, where
CT.e Bulgarian losses were
enormous, and 4,000 Bulgar
ians surrendered. In this en­
's" gagement 2,000 Servians were
killed and wounded.
& $ $
IN FIGHT AT
iOld Veteran's Anger Aroused
Over Abuse Heaped Upon
Abraham Lincoln
iTerrific Rainstorm
the Whale Cainp and Re­
freshes the Air
Two Vets in Blue and Gray
Bury a ileal Hatchet at
Bloody Angle
(lottytbitrg, July 2.- Seven men
were stah^-ii, tonight in a light in a
dining 100114 of a (icily:-bin. hotel as
1 he result of an. argument which
stalled whti'.i several men aroused tile
anger of an ol.l wteran in Blue by
abusing Liac(.-:i. Several of the
wounded men are in a serious condi­
tion at the Pennsylvania state* hospi­
tal. The stale .•oiutabulary are
making efforts to find th men who
did the slabbing.
A roaring sior.n swept down over
the plateau of Gettysburg, bringing
much needed relief to ihe Ih uisand:
of veteran-, in lllne and Cray, who
have swelleiod for four days in an at­
mosphere dangerous in a city of 5(1.
noo old men.
For over half an hour the rain
came pouring down on the sun
cracked and sand swept encampment
i,rounds. Tho ihci.nometer drop­
ped and the lightning cleared the air
of its humidity. in the vangard of
the storm the wind ed iied dust clouds
and blinded the veterans who scur
nod for the tents to 1 ash them down.
They showed that they hadn't forgot­
ten the old days, for not, a lent was
blown over an.l not a veteran hurt.
Tonight Ihe veterans are really
able to enjoy tliemsolve for the (irsl
(Continued oil Pago Five.)
As iO.'OOO veternns' of the north and
south gathered at Gettysburg to cele­
brate" the fiftieth anniversary of the
civil war's greatest battle they saw an'
immense tented city spread out up­
on hundreds of acres of land adjoin­
v..
THIRTY-THIRD YEAR No. 156. (NEWS OF THE WORLD) BISMAMCK, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY MORNING, JULY is, 1913.. (BY ASSOCIATED PRESS)
M'NAB, THE MAN
WHO ATTACHED THE
ATTORNEY GENERAL
f.
LMfNAB)
Washington. July 2.—John L. McNab
whose resignation as, 1'iriied Stales
district attorncv of Salt I'laneisvo was
recently accepted by President Wil­
son after McNab had' attacked attor­
ney General McReyimlds. will likely
be a witness before confess in .'ase
the matter results in an investigation.
It was not thought liki !y. however,
that congress would go so far as (hat
after Mr. MyReynulds li.nl plac.-d be­
fore ihe liotu'e all the (••'i're.-.ionileiu-e
in the Digiit.-Ca.niuci! white slave
case and the Western I'm 1 company's
ccmpiracy case. ,.VIr. McN'ab's accu­
sations against the head of the depart­
ment of justice, combined with other
ciiticisnts of the attorney general, led
to 'a renewal of the report that Mr.
McKeynokls might resign from the
cabinet.
NORTH DAKOTA POSTMASTERS
Washington, 1). July 2.—The
president seiu to the senate today
the following Supinations for post­
masters in North Dakota: J$hu W.
Sshitlonboig, Bisbee Frank J. Calla­
han, McClnsky W. i: •I-O.vdeu, Mc
1 lenrv.
SCENES AT GETTYSBURG DURING FIFTIETH
CELEBRATION OF CIVIL WAR'S BIG BATTLE
1
rm*
4
5
I
TEKTCP CITV AT
ing the great field of conflict. Here
they camped, several men in each of
the 5,000 tents, and were cared for
by United States regulars. Many in­
teresting scenes were witnessed when
old comrades met. Some of them
'•-.'V
'""Vi
®ribttnc.
VALLEY CITY
CHAUTAUQUA
A LIVE AFFAIR
Most Unusual Features
Introduced lo Make it
a
Prominent North Da
kola Men on the Board
of Directors
By Bessie Doran
Chautauqua Grounds. Valley City,
N. 1)., July 2 The Third Annual as­
sembly of Ihe Valley City Chautau
|ua Association bids ,air to be the
greatest affair of its kind ever held in
the stale of Nortii Dakota. Some
most unusual features have been in
tioduced and tne manager, Alex K'arr,
»li has faithfully labored during
the past year to make this an assured
success slates he is confident that
there is no better Chautauqua pro­
gram.to be lia.l in the entire North­
west.
Mr. Karr, went on to state that the
desire of the management was to
make this institution an essentially
democratic one. where the people
iroin homes would be given a better
chance for rural education. Willi
this aim for agricultural uplift in
view a splendid program for the
farm boy and girl litis been inaugu­
ral ed.
The board of directors are as fol­
lows: G. W. Hanna, President F. K.
(Conlintieil on Page Five.1
PHOTOS Vt AMERICAN PRES3 ASSOCIATION
had not seen each other since the
I blcody days of '6u. The picture
showing the two old vets is charac­
teristic of "the war is over" spirit
which prevailed when northerners
and southerners shook hands. A
tegular army man stood by when
those two met. One of the oldest
vets, General Wtogner, and one of the
most .prominent vets. Colonel Beath.
are also shown as they were snapped
on the field. Colonel Beath is often
tqken for Andrew Carnegie.
FEELING OVER THE RESULT OF THE RECENT
MURDER TRIAL IN WASHBURN IS STILL VERY
MANY OF THE LOCAL PEOPLE
FROM MEETING
Nebraska Seoator Refuses
to be Bouad by Rules of
the Caucus
Will Lead Figlil in Senate on
a Tobacco Tax Amendment
of His Own
Washington. July 1,—When Senator
Hitchcock of Nebraska withdrew
from the democratic tariff caucus to
day because that body voted down
his amendment that put a graduated
income tax on lonacco production, he
precipitated the liveliest time the
senate' democrats have had since they
began the consideration of the tarilf
measure. Senator Hitchcock's re­
volt, which later he declared didn't
mean that he had withdrawn from
the parly or that he would not sup­
port the party measure, served to de­
termine that there will be a binding
resolution passed by the caucus for
senators to support the bill as rati
lied, and refrain from introducing
any amendments not proposed by the
finance committee majority, and not
io support any amendments offered
from Ihe republican side. It was be­
cause he anticipated such a resolu­
tion, Hitchcock announced, that he
did not remain in the caucus, as he
intended to introduce a tobacco tax
amendment in the senate and lead
the tight for its adoption.
•Tlitchcock left the room amid grCat
excitement, after several senators
had pleaded with him to stay. The
vote on the amendment was 230 to
!».
Tonight the caucus adjourned until
tomorrow, when it will have before
it the matter of extending the date
for the sugar tariff to become effect­
ive.
The majority of the finance commit­
tee meet this morning to consider
the child labor question and the time
for making effective the wool sched­
ule, and odds and ends.
Chairman Simons says the complet­
ed bill will lie reported to the senate
Monday or Tuesday. The caucus will
complete consideration of the meas­
ure by Fridav or Saturday.
CLUB WILL SHOOT
FOURTH OF JULY
The members of the Bismarck Gun
Club will hold their club practice
shoot on the morning of the 4th of
July. An interesting program has
been arranged for and no doubt this
will be incentive enough to bring out
a good attendance. The program will
consist of six events, making a total
of 1)0 ta'rgets to be shot at and the
Dupont trophy will be contested tor
in one of the events. The members
are requested to be on hand at 9:30
prompt, for the shooting will com
ence at that hour, so as to finish
the program by noon.
FRAN KKtENAN HERE.
Frank Keenan came up from Fort
Vat.es Tuesday and was hanging
'round yesterday visiting with the
boys—and girls—for a day. Frank
was on his way to .viankato, where he
will spend the glorious Fourth. Hff
will return immediately after, and
proceed to the reservation, where he
will continue in his labors looking af­
ter poor Lo for his dear Uncle Sam.
WILL BE WEDDED
IN WHITE HOUSE
Washington, Julv 2.— Presi
dent and Mrs. Wilson an
uounced tonight the engage
ment. of their second daughter
Jessie Woodrow Wjilson, to
Francis E'owrs Say re of Lan
caster. Pa. The wedding is
expected to take place next
November at the White House.
Sayre is an attorney in the of
fice of District Attorney Whit
man of New York. He is 2S
years old and a graduate of
Williams college and Harvard
law school.
THIS EDITION 8 PAGES
FIVE CENTS
Ugly Rumors Afloat as to
Why Certain Witnesses
Were Left Out
One nf the Testifiers is Now
In Jail Under a Charge
of Perjury
Fahlgren May Bring Suit
Against Bangs fur Defam­
atory Remarks
By George Weatherhead.
Washburn, N. IX, June 3.-—Feeling
over the result of thp recent murder
triiil held here, when Wall'red Ander­
son was declared, not guilty of the
murder of Banker Funk, is still ex­
ceedingly intense, and criticism over
the manner in which the prosecutioa
of the case was conducted is now
more profuse than it was right after
the trial ended.
So intense is the feeling that the
matter of calling the grand jury is
now being agitated. It is rumored
that the reason why so many import­
ant matters were left out of the case
in the way of offering" testimony ot
what was thought important witness­
es was that it might involve many
matters that, had better be left un­
touched. Therefore, the idea of hav­
ing a grand jury summoned will bti
to thoroughly investigate local con
anrofi5--mwr wora-rarEWe o«t tna:tr
there is at present no small amount
of corruption in public affairs at.
Washburn that has caused a blot on
the name of what has been in past
history one of the best towns of tfte
Slope, and the citizens are hopeful
that a grand jury investigation would
return to Washburn once more the
good name to which it is really enti­
tled.
Ludwig Peterson, the pool hall pro­
prietor, who is now confined in tho
county jail with a charge of perjury
lodged against him, is still without
bonds, and so far all efforts to se­
cure sufficient sureties have failed,
(hough there have been some ener­
getic efforts made in his behalf. It.
is said that Walfred Anderson made
an offer to put up a cash bond in tho
sum of $.",000 to secure Peterson's
immediate release from the county
jail, but Peterson is said to havo
spurned this offer, as he feels that Att
derson is in no way under obligations
lo him, and he also claims to have
I old the truth when he testified in An­
derson's behalf during the trial.
Attorney J. E. S'elson, who was one
of the attorneys for the defense, up
to last evening had exerted every ef­
fort. at his command, and at one time
had a sufficient number of signers
for Peterson's bond, but at the last
minute two of them withdrew their
names, and it seems now that if Pe­
terson is in a hurry to leave the
county jail his only chance to secure
a bond will be to accept the cash fl­
ier made him by his friend, Walfred
Anderson-
Not only has Peterson been arrest­
ed for perjury, but there are rumors
that more witnesses may yet be ar­
rested for offering false testimony,
and then, too, there are more rumors
that the attorneys for the defense
may cause some arrests because of
false testimony.
Together with these rumors, comes
the report that Carl Fahlgren, the wit­
ness for the state who testified that
on the Saturday before Funk's death
he was in the bank and heard Ander­
son pass some defamatory remarks,
will bring suit against Attorney Tra­
cy Eangs in the sum of $5,000. Dur­
ing the course of his argument at the
close of the trial Mr. Bangs referred
to Fahlgren as a "damnable perjur­
er," and said further that his testi­
mony had been 'bought" and that he
could almost point to the man who
"bought him." In his argument, Mr.
Bangs also said that Fahlgren had
come into court and as soon as he had.
"spit out his vile venom" he "ran
out of town."
Fahlgren is a farmer, living some
10 miles from Washburn, and his
friends, here say that his veracity has
never been questioned, and in view
of the fact that the defense made no
effort to impeach his testimony at the
time he offered it in court, his friends
are urging him to hasten his action
against Mr. Bangs.
Feeling over the outcome of the
(Continued on page .5.)

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