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Bismarck daily tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, July 04, 1913, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042242/1913-07-04/ed-1/seq-8/

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ISMARC|f
THEATRE!!
Special 4tn of July Program
"The Pride of
the South"
A wondertul three-parl production. Thrilling Scenes
displaying all the terrible machinery of war and the
fierce passions of victory and defeat. A living, breath­
ing prototrophic review of a treat battle
Hughes Bros. Bakery
A TREASURE SWEET
Bismarck Infirmary of Osteopathy
DRS. BOLTON A BOLTON. PHYSICIANS IN CHARGE
Dr. M. Evangeline P.olton specializes in women'o and children's
diseases and obstetrics.
All curable acute ami chronic diseases successfully treated with­
out drugs.
EPPINGER BLOCK, BISMARCK, N.D. Phone 240.
'1•|':• i'
./05
1
Mi W'^\
!!!!{!•"••:).• :Mr$)'.. '-Ii!, ...
Your Collars
Are an important item in hot
weather. We realize this and
have installed special m.icliin-
I e.ry, which does away with all
saw edf. es, our lies never
I slick in collars tha come from
our laundry, because each col­
lar is inspected befoio being re­
turned to you.
Bismarck Steam Laundry Co.
Phone 54
TONIGHT
THE LOCKET
A Comedy, With JOHN
BUNNY and MISS
FLORA FINCH
Risen Soul of Jim
Grant
It's An Edison,
Full of Action from Start
to Finish
SPECIAL FOURTH OF JULY PROGRAM
ORPHEUM
VAUDEVILLE
LEE'S HAWAIIAN HULA TRIO
Hawaiian Musical Artists, Native Songs, Transparent Art, Featuring
The Hawaiian Hula Dance !sm0p^ed„rrsdPrEciA^sciVERYt
MR. KENNETH
McFARLAND
IN
THE LATEST SONGS
DON'T FAIL TO
HEAR OUR
CLASSY 4-PIECE
ORCHESTRA
Kansas City
Indianapolis
Toledo
AND PRECIOUS
is what all good judges pro­
nounce our chocolate layer
t:ake. The tnrne praise can just­
ly he Riven to any of our bak­
ings ot the various kinds of
cakes and pastry, for we exer­
cise the greatest. care in tiie
r( paration of our products.
Fresh, pure ingredients, careful
baking and above all thorough
sanitary surroundings.
Phone 546
Fifth St.
Philadelphia
Cleveland
Washington
I Chicago ...
J.'osum
Detroit,
Ht. Louis
New York
With The Big Leagues
ASSOCIATION
STANDING OF CLUBS
I (Mnrt
tViltlliltHIS
Milwaukee
Louj.-.villi! ..
.Minneapolis
'.St. Paul ...
•to
2x
l!!i
Milwaukee and Kansas City not
scheduled.
It. II. H.
'Indianapolis ... 001 100—L' 10 2
Louisville 110 |or, 01*—
it 1 1
Batteries—Works and Casey To
'nnv and Sevoroid.
I
i| It. II. K.
St. PriTTl' ... 000 ('00 Oil 01— 'A
I Minneapolis 00n (too 020 00—2 11 2
Batteries—WalKer and James
Comstock and Smith.
It. H. Ii.
Columbus 001 100 000—2 7 0
Toledo 40H 010 00*—3 1
Batteries—Cole arid Smith James
and Kruegcr.
NATIONALS
STANDING OF CLUBS
Club—
ew York ..
hiladcl phia
iek!y.i
jicago ....
ittsburgh
ostoii ....
t. Louis ..
inc nnati
Won.
42
38
Lost.
23
21
2X
Pet.
.OK
.013
.."ill
.52!)
.403
.4ol
.412
.382
31
28
28
20
30
37
40
42
New York .. 001 00.) 100 02—4 10 1
Pliiladelph.a t0 2no nOO (Hi 2 S I
Batteries-Ue.naree and .Meyers
Alexander and Kiilifcr.
11. II.
Boston 040 121 144-17 20 0
Brooklyn 00O 040 OH)-- 4 4
Batteries Dickson and Itaridan
Stack and Miller.
R. H. E.
Cincinnati .... 000 000 010—I ii 2
Chicago 020 021 0()x—5 8 0
Batteries-Suggs and Clafke Lav­
ender and Aicher.
It.
Sr. Louis 000 000 000--0 10 0
Pittsburg 300 Odd I Ox—4 0
Hattlriest— I larnion and Win
go
Hendrix and Sfinon.
Iimpiros—Quigloy and Rmslie.
AMERICANS
STANDING OF CLUBS
Won.
Club
It. II. I'l.
Washington .. ooO 000 000 000 ool
I !i 0
Boston 000 0000 000 1)00 000—0 l.- 1
It. II. Ii.
Detroit iiJ0 000 Old—I 3 2
Cleveland OOu t»20 01*—3 1 1 0
Batteries—Dansh, McKee Kahler
and ONeiil.
R. H. E.
Chicago P)0 002 000 1—4 10 1
TOMORROW
AFALSEFRIEND
A Drama of Life by the
Lubin Co. It Thrills
the Heart
A Battle of Musk
When It's an Essanay
Comedy It's Sure to Be
Good. This Is One
listnartk laih Srlbmt?
•###»«.
v". St. Louis ... 110 100 000 0—3 8 1
Batteries—Scott and Easterly
Mitchell and Agnew.
I'ltiladolphia
Xcw Vorlc
Won. I.'i.st. I'd.
•in
•17
..V.I.I
,.'i20
.."ILLO
AW,
.4S7
.:.»4
,:JS2
It. II. K.
212 nun 102—f 12 2
lino 200 002—4 2
STANDING OF CLUBS
Club— Won. Lost.
Winona 11 22
Superior !t 211
liuluth 40 25
Minneapolis 39 28
Winnipeg
Pet.
,(i(i7
.U29
.«IG
.582
.."07
.44!)
33!
.238
:,r)
34
Grand Forks 31 38
St. Paul 31 42
Virginia 2". 48
DIAMOND DUST.
Shortstop Lavans, understudy of
Cobby Wallace of the Browns, is a
former member of the Michigan Uni­
versity nine.
Fred Snodgrass, of the Giants, has
boosted his batting average one hun­
dred points during the past three
weeks.
Eddie Collins, one of the Athletics,
has passed Joe Jackson and is now
the leading run "etter in the Ameri­
can league.
The best talent of the defunct Mink
league has been signed up by the Ne­
braska State and Kansas Slate
leagues.
The Waterloo club, of the Central
association, has released Pitcher Ed.
Jokerst. Ed. might try changing his
name and taking a J'resli start.
The Chillicothe and Lexington
teams are traveling neck and neck
and putting up a great battle for the
Ohio State league flag.
Captain Hill Sweeney, of the Bos­
ton Braves, has been disabled many
times this season and only his grit
has kept hi.n in the game.
Since he, became a regular in the
i-irates' ranks Jimmy Viox has clout­
ed his way to the top of the National
league's list of heavy batsmen.
.Manager "Wild Bill" Donovan is
right on the job this season, keeping
his Providence Grays well up in the
race for the International league pen­
nant.
Clyde Milan, of the Washington
team, has stolen twice as many bases
as has "Hi" Myers of the Braves,
who leads the Pilferers in the Nation­
al league-
The champion Red Sox have not
been able to land a good substitute
for Charley Wagner at short. When
Captain Heinle is out of the game the
Sox curl up and wilher.
Several major league clubs are af­
ter Pitcher Cantwell, of the Oshkosh
club in the Wisconsin-Illinois league.
It is said that O&hkosh has refused
..•{,(11)1) for the youngster.
Among the players recently added
by Manager Kelley to his tribe of
Indianapolis Indians are Catcher Ira
Payne, formerly of the White Sox
Tom Downey, the former Cub, and
"Red" Nelson, the former spitball
flinger of the Browns.
Southpaw Pata, of the Texarkana
Texas-Oklahoma league team, was
presented with a diamond pennant.
fob recently in recognition of his ex­
cellent work in shutting out the Sher­
man team in an IS-inning game.
Ancient dope shows that Yale did
not. make an intercollegiate record by
winning 17 straight games. The
The Princeton nine of 1S!)7 won 17
straight and the Harvard varsity nine
of 'S."i put over 1!) straight victories.
Rumor has it that charges may be
filed against the Decatur club for vio­
lation of the Three-1 league salary
rule. If Decatur is over lite salary
limit the players should be pinched
for copping money under false pre­
tenses.
In the seventeen years that Honus
Wagner has been in the game Larry
Cheney, of the Cubs, is the only
pitcher ever heard to declare that
Honus has a weakness at, the plate.
Larry claims that Honus can be
crossed when there are two strikes
oil him.
The second annual grain palace
festival of Ray will be held Thursday
and Friday.
BISMARCK'S ROLL OF HONOR.
P/Ien Who AreMaking History In The
Capital City.
There is nothing slow about our
business men when they get started.
Just show Uieni a good thing and
you may salfely leave the result to
their sound business instinct and in­
itiative.
Since last publishing the list ot
those who have signed contracts to
assist in the Third Industrial Exposi­
tion, to be held in Bismarck October
7 to lit, many new names have been
added and the list today stands as
follows:
*if A. W. Lucas Company.
First National Bank. $
Bismarck Bank.
Marshall Oil Company.
Fox Land Company.
Goodridge-Call Lumber Co.
Copelin Candy Company.
French & Welch Hdw're Co.
Capital ity Bottling Work^
Medina Mill Company.
O. H. Will & Company.
"Jim Jam Jem«."
A. L. Truax Furniture Co.
Bismarck Hardware Co.
Bismarck Grocery Co.
Hughes Electric Cti.
Webb Bros.
F. L. Conklin.
Bismarck Steam Laundry Co.
E. B. V/oodward.
Joseph Breslow.
Mrs. A. B. Welch.
W. F. 'Erlenmeyer.
Murray & McLean.
Dakota Live Stock A Casu
alty Co.
Union Central Life Ins. Co.
Chas. A. Laudenberger, Agt.
4 6 9
PRISON DOORS WILL
CLOSE ON QUINLAN
Trenton, N. J.. July 3.—
Patrick Quinia.i, the leader
connected wiili the industrial
Workers of the Woild, was
sentenced to slate prison for
two to sewn vears and lined
$51)0. The jury in the case
of Elizabeth urley Flynn, un­
der .ndictnient accused with
inciting the .silk mill workers
to riot .announced that after
28 hours the ywere unable to
agree. Quintan will not bo
taken to prison before Mon­
day. His counsel will seek a
writ of habeas corpus. He
was unable to find bondsmen
and went to jail for the ii.ght.
City News
VISITING RELATIVES HERE.
Rev. Fr. Dan. Slatterv of Salt Lake
City, Utah, a nephew of M. P. Slat
tery, has arrived in Bismarck for a
visit with relatives here.
MISS DIETRICK" RETURNED
Miss .Mabel Dietijck re\urnqd
Thursday afternoon from a several
months' absence to St. Paul. She
will remain about a month.
HEAVY TRAFFIC
The railroads are enjoying their
share of the Fourth of July rush in
business, every train being loaded to
thes limit witli,»asscrigers land express.
GOING TO FARGO
Deputy Secretary of State John
Andrews left Thursday for Fargo,
where he will be .net by his family,
and they w.ll spend the fourth.
A TWO WEEKS' VACATION
"Hank'' Halvorson, the genial and
popular clerk at the Grand Pacific,
left Thursday evening o:i No. 2 for
Mendovi, Wis., his old home for a
twi. weeks vacation, cavorting with
the boys—an 1 girls.
CHARLES MERRICK HERE
Charles Merr ck, for many years a
Bismarcker, but now a resident of
.Minneapolis, arrived in the city yes­
terday and wiii remain for a "few days
lookiug after hi sbusiness interests,
and to play a 1 Ltle "golf" as a side
line at the Country club.
jv/.
-D. AUSTIN RETURNED
W. D. Austin deputy insurance com
misbioftfcr, has returned from Colum­
bus, Ohio, where lie had been in at­
tendance at the supreme, coun -il
meeting of the United Commercial
Travelers, of which he is a member.
He reports a very busy session, and
a very good session, though the heat
was almost !.-• on.1 endura.ice. He
says Han rancj seo representatives
were on hand with $10,00) in cash a3
a bonus lor the meeting 'in 1915.
UTAH SHEEP 00 120
DAYS WITHOUT WATER
Washington, Julv 3.—Sheep on the
Mcbo national forest, Utah, go four
and a half months without, water ex­
cept for such moisture as they get
from the dew and the juices of for­
age plants.
Graziag sheep on a range entirely
destitute of water is a recent innova­
tion due to the increasing demand for
forage and the efforts of the foresv
officers to find a place on the forest
ranges for all the stock that can safe­
ly be admitted. lie area on the
Xebo which has now proved usable
by sheep is high and rocky, a portion
of it being above timber line, and
has neither spring nor streams of
sufficient size or accessibility to be
used for stock" wateiingiiiffrpoes. The
grazing season lasts from' June 15 to
October 31, and during this period of
four and a hall months the animals do
not get a drink.
Undts' t»ich conditions, Hovievrtt.
the sheep have done extremely well,
and iats year's lambs from this range
had an average weight at the close
of the season of ti8 pounds on the
Chicago market, which was rather
above the normal wo.'ght from that
vicinity.
In one area on the Targhee forest
in Idaho sheep get water only twice
during the four-months summer graz­
ing season. There is no water on the
range, but the sheep are driven to a
nearby stream lower down the moun­
tain side. Lambs from this range
weighed 65 pounds on the Chicago
market.
WIN SPECIALS
Harry Flannagan, a former Mandan
boy, raised in this city, but who left
the city tor Seattle, Wash., where he
has since made his home for the past
six or seven years, arrived in the
city to spend several days visiting
with his grandparents, with whom he
made his home for so many years.
Harry has numerous friends in Man­
dan, who are very glad to chat with
this genial chap. Since leaving Man­
dan he has graduated from one of the
leading military oclleges of Washing­
ton.
The Golden West laundry received
a car load of machinery the last of
this week, which they will immedi­
ately install in their laundry. The
company has raised the laundry to a
first-class laundry in every reaped
and has a large business. Mr. B. G.
Eidinger is an able manager and is
deserving of every support that can
be tendered him. On July 1st they
will install a French dry cleaning
plant that will be operated by an ex-
pert and they guarantee the best of
tan ^faction.
The county commissioners have
given every attention possible as to
the betteirnent of the roads in Mor­
ton county during the past month*
Several new road drags have been
purchased and distributed among the
various districts, having received
I hem (lie early part of last week.
The oilier day a car load of culverts
were received and the commissioners
have been busy having them taken to
the destinations to which they have
been assigned. Upon the completion
of the work now laid out to be done
on the country roads, Morton county
will have roads second to none.
Mrs. G. A. Rendon was hostess to
a large gathering of her friends, who
were most royally entertained Wed­
nesday afternoon at cards. Those
present report having a most enjov
able afternoon.
Auditor of Agencies W. C. Taylor
has been in the city the last two days
making the transfer between C. D.
Sterling, who for many years was
agent at the terminal of the Northern
Pacific, and ('has. Van Soelen, who
will succeed Mr. Sterling. Mr. Van
Soelen has been cashier in the freignt
office for many years and is fully
competent to fill the posil on tender­
ed him, though he may only nolci the
position tempo arily. whiMi un­
derstood is left optional with liim.
The cashier^hip will b? given to Art.
Kaiebier, "or manv yj.tri connected
with the freight, odire here. 'ii..l will
no doubt do jusM.-e to his promotion.
Yesterday morning the lightning
struck the hone of Mr. Olias. Edquist
and gav?. Mri. Kdquist a very severe
shock, knocking her down. The light­
ning did considerable damage to the
house, but there were several nearby
and quick action prevented any fire
from starting. John Winehandle,
who was also (dose to the house when
the lightning struck was stunned.
Intense excitement prevailed a short
line after the accident happened, but
.Mrs. Edquist is no worse off for her
experience. I
A very pretty wen., ng was solem-l
nized at the Catholic church Tuesday'
morning, when Miss Pauline Cooper 1
became the bride of Joseph Sagmiller,
both of this citv. The bride was at
tended by Miss Katherine Haider and
Miss Katherine Kulstnen and Johm
Sagmiller, a brother of the groom,'
and Ralph Fries/, acted as best. men.
There was a large number of friends
at the church to witness the popular
young couple joined in the holy bonds
of matrimony. After the services at
the church, which occurred at !):00
a. m., they were taken to the home
of Mrs. J. F. Sagmiller, where an ele­
gant wedding breakfast awaited them.
Upon his return from viewing the
new road project near Ft. Rice, Com-j
missioner John Ellison met with a^
painful accident that resulted in the,
fracturing of his right leg. It seems
that he was walKing rapidly towards)
one of Gwyther's popular places of:
business when he was called by some
one he turned rapidly around and
fell in such a manner as to sustain,
the aforesaid injuries. Dr. Bunting!
was i.ivmeuiatoly summoned and lie
came at once to Fort. Rice He per-!
formed such medical operations as j'
was necessary and the patient, wasi
taken to Mandan and put in the hos­
pital. At this writing Mr. Ellison is
recovering as rapidly as could be ex­
pected.
UNCLE TOM HERE
Burk's Rig "Uncle Tom's Cabin
Co.", the largest organization of its
khid in America, will exhibit at Bis­
marck, Saturday, July 5. On this
occasion the famous old play will be
presented in as new and elaborate a
lonn as modern thought and tsage in­
vention will permit, and doubtless the
Big Pavilion Theatre will be filled to
its utmost capacity during their per­
formance here. The 'principal char­
acters in this grand old play will be
interpieted by a very competent cast
of Lady and Gentlemen Artists that
that have been selected especially
for their ability to give a correct in­
terpretation of Uncle Tom, Topsy,
Oiphelia, Marks, Legree, Eliza, St.
Claire and L'ttle Eva the balance of
the cast are exceptionally good, a con­
tingent of vaudevfile artists consist­
ing of jubilee singers, buck and wing
dancers, wire walkers, lioop rollers,
etc,, are introduced throughout the
play, maU'ng it the strongest produc­
tion of this popular drama ever pre­
sented to the public. A pack of Si­
berian blood hunds, horses ponies,
donkeys, and an unusually gorgeous
transformation scene are also among
the many features of this grand spec­
tacular production.
COL SAM CLARK
SAYS NOT GUILTY
The following item which i/pear
ed in the Minneapolis Tribune re­
cently is attracting the attention ot"
L'ismarck friends. Jt contained but
two lines and read:
"Mr. and Mrs. Sam H. Clark, 4203
Fifth street northeast, twins."
•Col. Sam Jim Jam Junior of this
city was interwieved regarding the
item and said: "Again I plead not
guilty, though I find that it does not
seem to make much difference, and
I arn surprised at nothing since things
have starled wrong."
Inasmuch as Mr. Clark's friends
are true blue tliey will attach no sig
if a to it in as a it
FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1913
PLANS FOR THE
Many People Will Go Over
to Mandan to Help Cele­
brate Natal Day
Bismarck Band and
Team Will Go Tbere to
Join in the Events
The Fourth of July as far as Bis­
marck is concerned was dampened
by a rain that fell in the early hours
of the morning, but as there had been
commemoration of the day provided
for it did not spoil any arrangements
as far as this local community is con­
cerned. except that if it continues it
may spoil a few picnics that have
been arranged for the day.
The farmers will appreciate the
rain in spite of the natal day or any
arrangements they might have had in
view looking towards an annual holi­
day dming the summer period of the
agricultural toil, a^ the lields of crop
ali through the state will stand all
the precipitation that he elementte
have at their disposal.
.Mandan has provided a celebration
that is full of events for the day, and
many l.'ismarck. people have planned
on going to the neighbor town across
the* river today and join in the fun
'thai the neighbors propose to supply.
1
The band and ball team from Bis­
marck are going and will help greatly
to enliven the town over the river.
TI.ere will be two ball games there
this aj'ternoon, and before the trains
go west today the rain will probably
be cleared up and there may be no
inteiYcrenee as Var as the elements
are concerned.
The lirst ball game will be between
the Hismarci and Flasher teams and
the game will be a 'purse of $100. the
winner to lake all. The winning team
of this game will play the second
game against the Mnadan team for a
side bet of $50.
The firs tgame will start at 2:SO,
Mandan time, and all Bismarck pla
ers, and those who wish to see both
games, are requested to leave here cn
No. 3, as No 7 may be late.
The following will be about, (hn
Bismarck linoi'p: Thinnes (Baldy),
Larson, Rockford, ss Nixon, lb:
Batter 2b Quirk, 3b Kaiser, If Quil­
ling, cf Edwards, rf Mockler and
Fuller.
BiSMARllAY
AT CHAUTAUQUA
Tuesday, Jul" 8, will be Bismarck
Day at the Mhndan Chautauqua. The
Commercial club is arranging for a
•special train to It Bismarck at S
o'clock, and to return immediately af­
ter the program is finished on the
Chautauqua grounds.
There will be 110 misunderstanding
about the return of the special. The
Bismarck band will accompany the
train. A short concert will be given
at the corner of Fourth and Main
streets before the train starts and an­
other on the grounds in Mandan be­
fore the regular program starts.
Ali who went last year were highly
pleased with the program given, and
the program this year promises to be
much better than the one at that
time.
FIRE MARSHALS LOCATED.
Fire Marshals Uunge and Ileade
have finally entered their new quar­
ters in the capitol, being located in
the southeast corner apartments, for­
merly oecimied by the board of con­
trol. They liave nice new furniture
and fixtures, and are now ready to
carry on the office as it should be.
until the present time these gentle­
men have temporarily had their office
on the second floor of the city hall.
In a tew days they will start on sev­
eral trips over the state, where there
are matters for their attention. The
office is proving a popular one and
the marshals are making it so.
Let us be optimistic. If it were
not for the hot weather we should
never kno\V how delightful it is to
hear ice clinking in the pitcher.
Use of the Left Hand.
Of just how much value, daily value,
is your left hand to you aside froui it
being a natural appendage of your left
wrist? It is estimated that hardly one
person out of ten uses his left hand 5
per cent of the 100 per cent of its usa
bleness from getting up iu tb#morn
lng until going to bed at nij*I. In
this respect the left handed person,
although often made the butt of the
"lefty' stigma, is far superior to his
right hand neighbor. There is hardly
a left handed man or woman who can­
not use the right hand much more
freely and with stronger grip than the
right handed man or woman can use
the left. So weak is the left hand of
many men and women that, although
not crippled in any way and perfect
as to shape and size, nevertheless it is
held back and guarded and restricted
as though it were an injured member.
In lifting weights or grasping objects
with the firmness necessary for mov­
ing or shifting the right banded per­
son makes the right hand do three
fourths of the work.—New York Sun.
1
1B the first offense charged in that
line.
An Oregon editor reports a straw­
berry "as large as an a^ple." How
large was the apple?

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