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Cleveland daily leader. ([Cleveland, Ohio]) 1865-1873, October 11, 1865, MORNING EDITION., Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042437/1865-10-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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c CLEVELAND LEADEH,
FvlLWiKD SI TUB
fLETELA.VD LEADER COMPAXY.
DAILY, TRI-WEEKLY & WEEKLY.
Twa Edition Xarain- a ad E.enlng.
OFFICE i 141 81 FKEIOR STREET.
MoItll or -uig, by mail, per yr.10
" " 3 sao.
'' " i l
6
Arents and Newa-IWalers. iwr UK) - S
Sbei fi cenu per w-k.
wrnrerea vy varrter, (Morning or Even-
i i
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
L I. BALDWIN & TO.
offer this day,
6 CASES FRENCH MERINOS,
Contracted for in July, at 15 jer tent.
Delow present prices, - -
E. I. BALDWIN $ CO.
Offer this day, .
100 PIECES TOIL DE VENICE,
At 10 Shillings,
Present value by the package, $1,35.
E. I. BALDWIN $ CO.
Offer this day,
1200 PAIRS WOOL BLANKETS,
Common to superfine, at very low prices.
E. I. BALDWIN CO.
Offer this day,
CLOAKING AND BASQ VE VEL VETS.
Real Lyons Good a in extra fine qualities.
iT. . BALD WIX $ CO.
Offer fh'w rff?v.
MOTJRXISG DRESS GOODS.
Extra Fine Black Anna Clothx
do do Satin Intjterial,
do do Biariiz,
do do Tampise,
do do Empress Cloths,
do do Poplins,
do do Epinrjies,
do do Wool DeLnines.
English and French Bontbazines,
' Mourning Melanges.
English Worsted Crapes,
English Canton Clotha,
4-4. 6-4, 8-4 Black AljHieas, -hiaek
Turin Cloths,
Black Worsted Barathea,
With fall line Fancy Mournina Dress
Goods, comprising the largest variety we
ever offered.
E. I. BALD WIN $ CO.
Offer this day,
100 WOOL SHAWLS,
In great asxsortment.
E. I. BALDWIN $ CO.
Offer this day.
BLACK VELVET CLOAKS,
BLACK JOSCOir CLOAKS,
SPANGLED BEAVER CLOAKS,
FANCV VELOL'R BASQUES,
BLACK BEA VER BASQUES,
OPERA CLOAKS,
And a full stock of
RICH WINTER CL OA KINGS.
E. I. BALD WIN Jf CO.
Offer this day,
IRISH POPLINS,
FRENCH POPLINS.
FRENCH EPINGLES,
EMPRESS CLOTHS,
PARIS VELOURS.
HUDDERSFIELDS,
PLAID POPLINS,
OR A V POPLINS,
GRAY MELANGES,
And other Elegant Styles Wojrsted Dress
Goods.
E. I. BALDWIN CO.
Offer this day,
CRANKET GINGHAMS.
The first importation for three years of I
these desirable Uoods.
E. I. BALDWIN
CO.
Offer this day,
WOOL FLANNELS,
White, Colored and Fancy, in all qualities.
E. I. BALD WIN 4-
CO.
Offer this day,
250 COUNTERPANES,
Honey-Comb, Quilterf, Marseilles, and oth
ers, in White and Colored.
E. I. BALD WIN i CO.
Will offer this day,
EXTRA FINE TARLTON AND
SWISSES,
For Evening Dresses.
E. I. BALDWIN 4 CO.
Offer this day,
REAL THREAD VEILS.
Punher Veils, French Thread Veils, Shet
land Veils. Also, Real and Imitation Lace
Barbes.
E. I. BALDWIN i
CO.
Offer this day,
CARRIAGE ROBES,
Elegant Coach and Traveling Rugs, at very
line prices.
E. I. BALD WIN $ CO.
Off er this day,
WRAPPERS AXD DRAWERS.
Ladies' Merino Vests and Pants,
Misses' Merino Vests and Pants,
Boys' Merino Vests and Pants,
Gentlemen's Merino Vest and Pants.
Also, Shetland, Lambs Wool, Silk and
others, comprising a very complete assort
ment. E. I. BALDWIN i
CO.
Will offer on
THURSDA Y, OCTOBER 12,
At Wholesale,
600 WINTER CLOAKS.
A full variety of styles and fiaith, at
prices below any competition.
E. I. BALDWIN $ CO.
Offer this day, full line
BREAKFAST SHA WL
NUBIAS, HOODS,
SONTAGS, COMFORTERS,
SCARFS, CAPS,'
JACKETS, ALEXANDRES,
BOOTEES, MITTENS,
SLEEVES, GAITERS,
Hand and Machine-knit, in full variety,
AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
E. I. BALDWIN CO.
Offer this day,
FANCY CASSIMERES.
Alio, BL KiCOLD OVERCOATINGS.
E. I. BALDWIN $
CO.
Offer this day,
.Silccia Damask.
Double Linen Damasks,
Linen Damask Cloths,
Damask Napkins and Doylies,
Linen Sheetings and Casings,
Linen Diapers ami Hltcks,
And other Linen Goods of Richardson,
Hons $ Owden.
E. I. BALDWIN i CO.
Offer this day,
M 2000 BALMORAL SKIRTS,
At Wholesale and Retail.
E. I. BALDWIN 4- CO.
Offer this day. at Wholesale,
1 Rn PACKAGES DeLAINES.
Choicest styles of the season, below New
York prices- Aiso, juu, lines
r NEW PRINTS.
octll
,.::. 'i
i i
f
-1. i
00 I
50
no
00
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 18G5.
VOL. XIX-K0. 242.
3 rirMi.''
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
FOR LAKE SrPERIOR.
fTAnE staunch and reliable.
X steamer LADY FRANK LIS,
f'apt. Fred. 8. Miller, will leave1!;,.!?-
onr dork for btiiienor City ihIwWms r
intermediate port, on FRIDAY. k-t.,lw.r im. .
lo'clork F. M. '
For Freight or Paraaer apply o
JiALONK, PETTIT k CO.,
ortl 1:25.1 127 and fca Hirer street.
DRT LIMBER TOR SAIE. 100,000
feet Clear SftoikIh ti l Bey Lnmla-r. -oU:2M
IIKKVKY, BOUSF1J.LD CO.
FOR LAKE Sl I'CUIOK.
rjHE magnificent steamer
A LAC LA HKI.LE, Oapt. Jno. ZTTT
SpaMinc, will leave oar d..ek for 132-4 1,
Lake Superior Port on TIH RS-jawMsn
DA Y, or-tolter 12th, at 8 o'clock P. At.
for freight or pasftajre apply to
U. 11AXNA CO., Agent,
lt'Q and 171 River street.
CJHEEI ZIXC
FOB SALE. 12 Casks
KJ Sheet Zinc, No
, M inch.
HF.KYEY, BOrSFIEI.D CO
A BMISISTRATOK'8 SALE OF LAXD
Xiln nnrannnre of in oriler of tho Prolmtf Pnnrt
of Lnynlioea County, to direct.. I hU ufffr
for fait- At the duot of tho Court Hove. in the rilv
of li TManl, in said Onnty, on th 11th dar of
nuuiiMT, in.., ruitiiiH imni: at o cUxS r. ..
tlHf following nremisrs: Hitimtod iu HAtt city. an.l
Ixiiiir the urtliw. sl. rlY unrt of nih-ltt hu. UK iu
.Mm Brr'fl milMlivihi-m of orii:iiinl lot Nun. 1 and
a, mud in -2t iVet front on KiiumaQ truet mud l.'Mi
T rum of Sale One-third Uowo. mad halaitc (
ai itnymmi, inn llitcrrr't.
Appraised at flM. L. rflENTISS,
Adm'r of J. Frnii'lfoot.
OrtoW 11, IfifiS. ocll:iiti2
WHITE-WOOD MMBF.K WASTED.
U '.'' feet of White-W.knI Lumhir nt.fl
for liii h the hie hent itri-e lie paid in rnh.
oll:iM HKUVKV, BOVSKitLO & CO.
Blankets!
j VTE are j"st receiving, in connection
1 f with oar Taried and well-a.,.rted stork of
PUT tilHiPS, a laree line of BLANKETS, in 8-4.
0-4, I'M, 11-4 and 12-4, both W hite and Colored,
ill of our own importation, and VfcRY CHEAP.
ocU:H.r.2:;tltw RAYMOND. LtlWEiCO.
! J 1ST RECEIVED.
2 Cases Sondstlal Silvia,
1 English "
SOO' Pes. Fancy ('assimere.
a Cases 4X Lower Valleys,
Wlu'fh will be bold at lowest market price., at
Ol'R STOCK OF READY-MADE CLOTH
INU is thelanrerit and Taried. Ut Pit tern .
and most l ardiioiutble Styles in the city.
it K. MANN.
COBB, AjVBREWS & CO.,
BOOKS
STATIONERY,
241 SUPERIOR STREET.
DIARIES
FOR
1306.
WHOLESALE AXD RETAIL.
BL.AIVK BOOKS.
A larirc assortment on band and for sale at the
lowest ratefl.
ENVELOPES.
White, Buff, Amber, bold, Canary and
w ran cp.
Will lie gold at a low figure.
XOTE, CAP AXD LETTER.
EXTRA QTALITIES juat received.
PHOTOCRAPH ALBUMS.
New Style for the Wholeaale Trade, at
COBB, ANDREWS CO.'S.
The Mason & Hamlin
CABINETORGANS
CoNGRATTLATE Ton upon th i tit rod net. on of
a new Mniral Instrument long wanted, and
mire to hurt itn way into every hoiitw-tiolrt of
taste and refinement. L. M. Oottm halk.
8 compared with Melodeon, Harmoniums, Ac,
ttlie lalmiet Organ is certaiuly Hiipenor Hi
iiualitv aud volume of time, while ittt power of
expression can hardly be too highly raied-
WlLLIAM MAHOK.
BKST of their clans of which we have. any knowl
edge. MORE THAN 2UU . MINK ST OBOAXIfiTP.
IN every renpect far unperior to everythinr of
the kind I hare seen, whether in Knrope or
America. (aBo. washburne Mokuak.
NEXT to a chnrch orean, and that a pood sized
one, the la iiintrulumit with whkh we are
acquainted to a oomp-uiy church ng.
New Vobk Mi mical Kevifw.
EXCEEPS, in my estimation, every other in
strument of this general cUimm.
Thomas Hasting.
THE favorable testimony of nearly every organ
ist or piauiHt of note in this country, together
with that of certain distinguished fitreign ma
thorities, has forestalled our appreciative corn
men tt upon the excellence and valae of these
cmrefnlly-uuuht intrumeatH.
NkwYobk World.
ONCE hearing them will satisfy the most skep
tical that they arejut what the church has
been waiting for. New York Owkbvei.
REALLY very effective and beautiful instru
ments. Lowell Mason.
GR AXD accompaniment when the conyregatioB
Slug. lRKNjKVt.
AYETtY'eAlcient church organ, brought within
a small compass ; uot easy to get out of order,
and sold at a low price.
New York Examiner.
VTEVER saw anything of the kind that interest
d me so much. . - Ueo. F. Boot.
rRPASSES everything In this line I have seen,
whether French or American.
John ZrNPELL.
PRICES FROM tno TO
S. BliAINAKD A SON, 8ole Aeentfl,
ocll 2U Suierior street, Clevelaud.
CLEVELAND
Electrical Manufacturing Co.
Fen it & Kramer,
MAM FACT! ItEES OF
Dr, Young's Electro-Thermal Bath,
AND
ELECTRICAL APPARATUS
Or EVERT DESCRIPTION.
W Modeli and Small Machinery of all kindi
marie to order. "
latf" Bra.. Fininhinc, Repairing and Jobbing done
with care aud disatch.
"K0. 64 CEXTRK STREET,
Over Dennis Holt's Machine Shop.
Je9:R4:ltp CLEVELAND, OHIO.
ELECTROTHERMAL
BATH CURE,
34 AND 3G PROSPECT STREET,
CLEVELAKD, 0010.
MBS. J. YOUNG : PROPRIETRESS
BATHS ONE DOLLAR EACH.
D. T. KRAMER, M. D., rhjBiclan,
Office Hoara, 9 A. M. to 12 M. and 2 to 6 P. M.
ffeT'Patienta can be accommodated with Board
at the Cnriv jel lU lntp
"DIKE APPLE CIDER. Dr. Talbot's
i Pine Apple Cuter is for sale br
CHURCHILL i BROTHER, ,
auglg U Ontario itret.
DAILY LEADER.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1865.
The Victory in Ohio.
We record this morninc, with joy and
pride, the renewed verdict of the freemen
of Ohio in favor of the Union and against
the fynipathizers with rehelUon, who,
cloaking their nefarious design under
specious pretences, have sought to obtain
control of our State Government. The
Yallandigham Democracy have, liecn
routed, horse, foot and dragoons. General
Cox and the entire State ticket are elected
by a majority of about 20,000. There will
be a decisive Union majority in both
branches of the State Legislature, and
there is no possible-chance that' the con
victed traitor, Yallandigham, will be sent
to represent Ohio in the Senate of the
United States. This is the glorious record
of our victory in Ohio !
ifte majority lant fall for Linaoln ou
the home vote was 28,197. Cox's utajority
. nw large, owing to a heavy falling
ott in the vote. This is especiaOjULe
case in the strongly Union counties, while
all the closely contested sections the
Union gain is marked.
The Union men of the Reserve m ay join
in the rejoicings over Ijiis glorious con
quest, but not as those who have aidad it.
They have not done their duty. Wthile
the Democrats have polled their full vote, we
have suffered ten thousand Union voters to
stav awav from the polls. The rest of the
State has, on the average, held its own.
We regret that tho Reserve has not done
its duty better, but our regret is lost in thve
general joy at the grand triumph of Union
principles over Coppcrheadism and Seces
sion.
The Keystone State.
Pennsylvania wheels steadily and irre
sistibly into line beside Ohio in the grand
Union phalanx. The majority in the old
Keystone State is fully ten thousand. The
gallant Major General Hartranft, tho hero
of Fort Stedman, is endorsed by a sweep
ing majority, bnd Pennsylvania has given
us a renewed pledge of her unwavering
devotion to the Union banner.
Montana Mines.
A correspondent of the St. Louis Dem
ocrat writing from Virginia City, Monta
na Territory, Sept. 10th, speaks favorably
of the agricultural prospects and mining
generally, and says of the new places
found :
One hundred miles of placer mines have
been discovered, much of it of exceeding
rtenness. inese discoveries are in the
counties of Deer Lodtrft, Beaver Head.
Jefferson, Edgerton and Gallatin to the
North of this place, and are on either side
of the Missouri, but are mostly on tho west
eme oi me river.
The Westliche Post, the Kadical Ger
man ortran of St. Louis is authorised to
say that President Johnson did not say to
uovcrnor r ictclier, ot Jlisouri, in a l
cent conversation as has been alletred.
This is a white man's conntrv. and bv
God, while I am President it shall be a
white nun's Government." The report is
incorrect, and it was not Governor Fletch
er who authorized the papers to publish it.
as iar as tjovernor Jleteher remembers,
President Johnson used about the follow
ing words "I am in favor of the white
man; or, "1 belong to the white man's
party.
The leader of the En slish tories. Lord
Deroy, and the English premier, Lord
ralmerston, are both prostrated bv the
gout. In the event of the permanent in
capacity of these statesmen for public
Dusiness, Ljora tiranvnie or Liora Claren
don will probably succeed Viscount Pal-
merston, and the iarl of Malmsbnrv,
though not a very brilliant person, will be
the most available successor of the Earl of
Derby as spokesman ef the conservative
party of the bouse of lords.
t'alklna, Clrilfln at Co." Union Biul-
nett College, at Olwrlin, Ohio, is meeting with sur.
prising sncce.li, beyond the expectations of its many
sanguine friends. In no other Institution of the
kind do students receive as much personal atten
tion, and make. In consequence, such thorough
stndents, aa at that point, if wa may judge by the
testimony of students.
One-half the usual expense of taking a Commer.
cial Course is saved by those who attend at Ober-
lin, while a thorough preparation for business is
guaranteed. ocIO
All the School Books used in the City
may be had at Holilen, Clarke 1 Wilson's, 1118 Pub
lic Square. ocll:254eodWedFriMon
Homes1! Freednian'a Seller AsHoel-
atiou. This Society wilt meet this waek on Thurs
day, at the honse of Sir. Nrce, on Kinsman street,
next door to the Fruit House. A general atten
dance of all the members ia very much desired.
There is much to be done, and all willing hands
can find abundant employment. 'IIelp the needy."
Mrs. H. M. LITTLE, Pres't.
Maat T. CoRKta, Sec'y. ocll:25.1
Buek wheat Flour A good article in sacks.
jn.t from the mill. W. MELHINCH,
ocll:2T2 72 Merwin street.
All the Late Publication may he had
at Holden, Clarke Wilson's, 1118 Public Sunare.
ocU.254:eodWedKrl.Mon
Domeatle Hewing Sfachlnesi Call and
see theia, at Ko. 121 Superior street.
ocll:2r4 O. W. CROWELL A CO.
Shell oyatera and Clams-Just received
at Russell's New York Lunch, corner of Michigan
and Ontario street, under the Auction Stores.
o7:254
For einle. A good, assorted stock of Groceries
and Lease of Store, with a good ratabliHhed trade,
for aula at a bargain. Inquire at ll!l Petrol
street. West Side. ocl0:254
dent's FnrnlahintT ttoodia. Mott
Haight, have Just opened a splendid assortment of
Gent's Furnishing Goods for the fall and winter
trade, at No. 141 Superior street, under the Wed-dell
House. oct7:R8
A New Book More has Just been opened at
Ve) Public Fquare, near the Post-office, by Holden,
Clarke a Wilson. ocl0:254
Meaam. Mott Halffhi Have removed
their Gents1 Furnishing Emporium from 1.1C Bank
street to 141 Superior street, ander the Weddell
House, and will open an Saturday, Oct 7th, with
an entire new stock of good, with all the novelties
of the season. oct7:262
Bnhrer'a eentian Bitten. To all those
who want a good Tonic, we would recommend the
use of Buhrer'a Gentian Bitter. They are pro
nounced by Physicians to be equal to any ever of
fered to the public. Try them. To be had at all
the Drug Stores. oct6:252
Winter Frail for Male.-o'io barrels of
choice varieties of winter for sale.
octOiW S. COTTRELL.
old Co lipoma. September, November and
January Gold Coupons and U. 8. 6 per cent. Com
pound Interest Notes of 18G4, bonght at highest
market rate, by E. J. FARMER Co., Bankers,
No. 145 Superior afreet, under Weddell House.
eepl4:245
To Printer. We have for sale In quantities
te suit, Bingham's Celebrated Roller Composition ;
also. Palmer's Patent Composition, the best and
most durable extant. All orders by mail promptly
attended to. Address LEADER CO., Cleveland,
Ohio, aug7
THE ELECTION.
OHIO TRUE TO THE UNION.
She Gives Cox 20,000 Majority
THE LEGISLATURE ALL RIGHT.
Union Majorities in Both Branches.
PENNSYLVANIA ERECT.
UNION MAJORITY 10,000.
VICTORY! VICTORY! VICTORY!
OHIO.
OHIO. The City.
We publish below a table, made tip from
our returns, showing the vote for Cox and
Morgan in nine wards of the city, as com
pared with the vote in November lu.-t for
President. It will be seen that they ex
hibit a LTnion majority of 505, against a
Tjnion mjority last year of 1,049:
lfif' iin-.. Union rr m
Union, licm. Lin'lu. McfTn. tiain. Gain
1st Ward S57 :to 57 :iHti fi.t
2d " 535 2:16 fills 2:18 :U
3d " 205 2S2 319 2S7 41)
4th " II5 2S 706 295 811
fith " BOO 546 696 594 48
7th " 175 1S9 209 183 40
8th " 131 274 14a 249 39
10th " 279 212 315 216 34
11th " 229 4S9 241 4il 50
Total 3,376 2,871 3.956 2,9119 544
Union majority, 1805, 505; Union ma
jority, 18ti4, 1,04! ; Democratic gain 544.
Total vote. lSUS, W- total vote,
1864,6,805; fulling off 618.
The Fifth and NinthjAVards, which are
yet to be heard from, gave last year a vote
of 682 for Lincoln, and 807 for McClel-
Jan. a Democratic majoritiy of 215.
Should the Democratic gain be as great,
proportionally, in these Wards as in those
heard from, the Union majority in the
city will be about 150.
The County.
"We returns from only six out of
wnetccn towns in tho county, showing a
Union majority of 55!), and a Democratic
gain of 407. Here is the table :
18f,-,
Tnion. Pern.
Betlfnrff 70 tuaj.
Brookly n 44ti :ar,
Chaitriu Jails 8 1
Newnurgii :V17 11
Parma 78 117
olon....-. 7i niaj.
1SV.4
L'n. Mc'n.
!4
5S8
24S
nrl
111
I.W
Peni. gain '24
ai " 129
t.2
1M " 1H7
11H " .04
' 32
Total Law
!,.' f.14 4o7
Tnion niaj. 18'h'i, 6.V.I
Democratic gain 3o7.
rniou niaj. 18(4, 90ii;
Ill the Uiirteen towns which remain to
be heard from the Union ticket last fall
received 2,654 and the Democratic 1,11)9
votes, a Union majority of 1,455. Pre
suming that the Democratic gain in these
towns will be in the same ratio as those
heard from, we estimate the Union major
ity in the county, including the city of
Cleveland, at 1,000.
The County Ticket.
"We give below the vote in detail for
county officers and candidates for the Leg
islature r
FIRST WARD.
Senator AVilliamson 553; Rice 361.
Representatives Dangler 472 ; Lock-
wood 556 ; Gallup 55:t : Marshall 372 ;
Inglehart ST ; Knight 360.
treasurer lurney 5ju ; illiston 3j9.
Prosecuting Attorney Castle 543 ;
Lvnde 362.
Commissioner Crawford 552 ; Green
360.
Coroner Schenck 555 ; Conlan 360.
SECOND WARD.
Senator 638 ; 235.
Representatives D:ingler 4!)2 ; Lock-
wood 538; Gallup 538; Brewster 18;
Marshall 238; Inglehart 225 ; Knight 232.
Treasurer Turney 534 ; Williston 235.
Prosecuting Attorney Castle 518 ;
Lvnde 245.
Commissioner Crawford 536; Green
233.
Coroner Schenck 528 ; Conlan 244.
THIRD WARD.
269; 278.
Representatives Dangler 2G3 ; Lock-
wood 269: Gallup 270; Marshall 272 ;
Inglehart 275 ; Knight 277.
lreasurer lurney 26i; Williston 2i9.
Prosecuting Attorney Castle 281;
Lvnde 263.
Commissioner Crawford 286 ; Green
261.
Coroner Schenck 208 Conlan 279.
FOURTH WARD.
Senator Williamson 615 ; Rice 283.
Representatives Dangler 635: Lock-
wood 616; Gallup 615; Brewster 25;
Marshall 285 ; Inelehart 220 ; Kniirht 279.
Treasurer Turney 604 ; Williston 290.
Prosecuting Attorney Castle 602 ;
Lynde 281.
Commissioner Lrawtord 613 : Green
280.
Coroner Schenck 611; Conlan 291.
SIXTH WARD.
Senator Williamson 598 ; Rice 549.
Representatives Dangler 629 ; Lock-
wood 603; Gallup 603; Brewster 12;
Marshall 541 ; Inglehart 496; Knight 544.
Treasurer Turney a94 ; w tiltston 5a3.
Piosocuting Attorney Castle 589 ;
Lvnde 545.
Commissioner Crawford 602 ; Green
544.
Coroner Schenck 602 ; Conlan 545.
SEVENTH WARD.
Senator Williamson 177; Rice 187.
Representatives Dangler 177 ; Lock-
wood 177; Gallup 177; Marshall 191;
Inglehart 178; Knight 186.
Treasurer Turney 170; W illiston 193.
Prosecuting Attorney Castle 176;
Lynde 186.
Commissioner Urawtord ltT; urcen
187.
Coroner Schenck 178; Conlan 186.
EIGHTH WARD.
Senator AVilliamson 130; Rice 2 76.
Representatives Dangler 141 ; Lofik-
wood 130; Gallup 131; Marshall 264 :
Inglehart 275; Knight 274.
Treasurer Turney 127; w unston 28.
Prosecuting Attorney- Castle 128;
Lynde 274.
(Jommissioner Urawlnrd 130 ; Ureen
274.
Coroner Schenck 131; Conlan 274.
TENTH WARD.
Senator Williamson 282 ; Rice 212.
Representatives Dangler 288 ; Lock-
wood 282 ; Gallup 282 ; Ingersoll 1 ;
Brewster 1 ; Marshall 206 ; Inglehart 209;
Knight 212.
Treasurer Turney 281; Williston 213
Prosecuting Attorney Castlo 276;
Lynde 216.
Commissioner Urawtord 282 ; ureen
211.
Coroner Schenck 282; Conlan 212.
ELEVENTH WARD.
Senator Williamson 220; Rice 491.
Representatives Dangler 218; Lock-
wood 227; Gallup 230; Brewster 6; Mar
shal 496; Inglehart 498 ; Knight 4S9.
Treasurer Turney 209 ; W illiston 508.
Prosecuting Attorney Castle 215;
Lynde 491.
Commissioner Crawford 230; Green
488.
Coroner Schenck 231 v Conlan 487.
BROOKLYN.
Senator Williamson 440; Rice 324.
Representatives Dangler 428; Lock-
wood 448; Gallup 448; Marshall 328
Indehart 324: Knip-ht 324.
treasurer Turney 449; Williston 332.
Attorney Castle
429
Lynde 331.
"Commissioner
324. -Crawford 443; Green
Coroner Schenck453 ; Conlan 318,
Prosecuting
PARMA.
Senator Williamson 78; Rice 117.
Representatives Dangler 86; Lock-
wood 78; Gallup 78; Marshall 107; Ingle
hart 108: Jvnignt lit.
Treasurer Turney 74; ATilliston 120.
Prosecuting Attorney Castle 79
Lvnde 1 15.
Commissioner Crawford 78; Green
117.
Coroner Schenck 78; Conlan 117.
Mr. Dangler received 3,315 votes, 61
less than Cox, in tho nine wards rf this
city heard from. The vote for Mr. Brew
ster in this city amounts to less than one
hundred. Mr. Dangler will not run more
than a hundred votes behind his ticket in
the whole countv.
From Columbus.
[Special Dispatches to the Cleveland LEADER.]
FIRST DISPATCH.
Coliimbvs, October lo.-rJKeturns from
seven wards in Columbus give a Union
majority of 93.
The two wards to hear from will make
The opposition will have the county by
1,901) a gain to them of 1,000 on the vote
for Secretary of State last year.
But few returns from the State at large
have been received.
Greene will give Cox 1,700. Loss of
200.
Erie is for us by 600.
Sandusky city gives tho Democrats 434
majority.
Camp Chase gives Cox 4 J ; Morgan, 1.
t nited States Arsenal, Cox 49 ; Mor
gan, 2.
The soldiers,at thepoll opened in Wash
ington, it. C, cast 319 Union to 120 op
position.
SECOND DISPATCH.
Cox gain in Tiffin and two township on
the home vote for Lincoln, 1864, 103 votes.
Xorwalk gives a Union majority of 219,
a loss of 10 on tho Presidential election.
The Democrats carry Sandusky county
by 150, a loss to them of 104.
Hamilton county goes Union by 3,500.
The I.ji'iJature is considered safe.
Cox's majority is estimated at about
18,000.
Cox has. a majority of 284 in Mt. Ver
non, a Union gain in Morgan's own town
of 60.
Butler alamt 1,200 Democrat, a gain to
the opposition of 300.
THIRD DISPATCH.
In half of Seneca county Cox gains 174
votes on Lincoln in 1804. We elected the
liu-inliiT of the Legislature.
Hardin county goes Union by 300,-a
large gain.
In Darke county we have about 100
majority, which secures the member of
tho House and the Senator from that dis
trict.
Dayton gives 400 and Montgomery
about 100 Union majority.
A dispatch from Cincinnati states that
there fifteen wards and three townships
how over 200 Union gain.
Columbus goes Copperhead by 1,042
votes; Iranklin county not less than
1,000.
The Unionists have carried Harrison
county by C00, a loss of 4.
Butler count gives Morgan 1,600 ma
jority.
a
in
FOURTH DESPATCH.
Starks elects the Union ticket by 300,
gain of 500.
Lancaster gives a Union gain of 43.
Cox's majority is 12.
In six townships heard from in Fairfield
it is 191. The county will give Morgan
only 1000 majority.
Zanesville went for Morgan by 21 a
democratic gain of 62. The county is
probably democratic.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Elyria 281 Union majority. Democratic
gain of 28. .
Portage township, including Akron
City, 475 Union majority.
w arre.v, tjctober iu. 2111 l nion ma
jority. Union gain of 4.
Fremont 50 lTnion majority. Dem
ocratic gain of 40 on last years home vote-
Sandusky 43 Democratic majority.
Canton," October 10. 51 Union major
ity. Gain of 50. The county w certain
for Cox.
ty
The State.
Cincinnati, Oct, 10. 11. P.
election in this state, as far as known has
passed off quietly. The returns thus far
indicate a reduced vote and consiueraoie
gains for the Democratic ticket.
Cincinnati and Hamilton counties give
Cox, Union, for Governor, about 3,500
majority. Democratic gain about 2,500.
ClNC'lKNATI, Oct. 11, 12.30. A. M.
Cox has carried Ohio by about 25,000 ma
jority, Vermillion Democratic majority 79;
gain 29.
New London Union majority 152.
Huron Union majority 71.
194th Ohio, Washington, D. C. Union
25'2; Democratic 120.
Elvria Union majority 282; Union
loss 22.
Woodvillo, Sandusky Co. Democratic
majority 164.
Greenwich, Huron Co. Union majority
105; Union gain 11. "
Bellair Union gain over 1864, 40.
Granville, Licking Co. Cox majority
270; Union gain 47.
Zanesv'illo Morgan 869; Cox 849;
Democratic gain 70.
Lancaster lTnion majority 9; Union
gain 60.
Erie Co. Union majority 700.
Oberlin Union majority 488.
Ravenna Union majority 166; gain 27.
Columbus, First WardCox majority
50 ; loss of 28. Second Ward Cox major
it v 1 76 ; loss 48. Third Ward Cox ma
jority 144 ; gain 24.
Clinton .Morgan majority 12a ; demo
cratic gain 45.
Columbus, Eighth Word Morgan ma
jority 99; Democratic gain 101.
m... r,. m.'nrlttr At - Mor
gan 1 vote.
Columbus Arsenal Cox 59.
Perry, Stark county Cox majority 85.
Portage township, including Akron
Union majority 475.
Monroeville Union majority 206.
Solon Union majority 76 ; majority
Hist year 108.
York Union majority 170.
Wakeman Union majority 27.
New London Union majority 152.
Huron Union majority 71.
Sandusky township- Union majori
ty 46.
Willoughby Union majority 197.
Conneaut Union majority 329; loss 20.
Warren Union majority 291 ; gain 6.
Yellow Creek Cox majority 190.
Alliance Cox majority 207.
Hudson Cox majority 100.
Kingsyille Cox 221 ; Morgan 54.
Wellington Cox majority 212.
Huntington Cox Tnajority 94.
Tiffin 2d ward, Democratic majority
69; Democratic loss 31.
.
Scipio, Seneca countv Union gain 50.
oanausky Democratic majority 150;
gain 164; Colonal Parks (Representative)
Toledo, 1st ward Cox majority 243;
vote light. 1
Sandusky countv Morgan's estimated
majority 175; Union loss 100.
Grafton Cox majority 40.
Lagrange Cox majority 42.
Summit county Cox's majority 1,200;
loss 600 to 800.
Springfield Cox's majority 384 ; Union
loss 38.
Madison Cox's majority 179.
Houston Cox 84.
Zanesvillo Morgan 869; Cox 849.
Democratic gain 7o.
Lancaster Union majority 9; Union
gain 40.
Vermillion township Cox's majority
270; Union gain 47.
Perry township, Stark co. Cox's major
ity 85.
Scott township, Ross co, (including
Chilocothe) Democratic majority 175.
Madison township, Clark co. Cox's
majority 179; small Union loss.
Tuscarawas co, Neal township Cox's
majority 209 out of 303; Morgan 96.
uxioru townsnip .Morgan 29 niaj.
Frazerburg Cox's maj. 7.
Cadiz Cox's majority 190: estimated
majority in the countv 700.
loledo, 4th Ward Democratic maj 70.
Columbus 7 wards and 4 townshins
Morgan's maj. 530.
Ciiacrin Falls Uniform Union vote
202, except for Cox 201, Dangler ion, Tur
ney 199, Castlo and Crawford 201. Uni
form Democratic vote 22. Brewster 29.
Lewisburgh C8x's majority 131.
Leesvillc, Crawford County Morgan's
majority 112.
Jackson, Crawford County Morgan's
majority 244.
Hamilton Countv Cox's maioritv 3.500.
Perry, Columbiana County Cox 430
majority.
Ashtabula Township Cox 300: Mor
gan 176; Democratic gain 130.
i"ainevilic Cox 500; Jlorgan 180.
Crestline Township Morgan's majori
ty 144; Democratic gain 144.
Marion Township Cox 69; gain 36.
Mansfield Cox's majority 44; Union
ss 25.
Richland Countv In four townships
the Union gain is 29 over last year's vote.
uueyrus, c rawiord county .Morgan
maioritv; Union eain 71. Three
townships heard from give Cox a majority
of 193.
Logan Countv, Washington township
Morgan's majority 91.
ibtark County I nion maioritv. Pike
178 Cox; Canton Cox 7; Berry
Cox 85; Sandv Cox 130; Marlljorotisrh
Cox 71 ; train in four townships 416.
Van AVert county eives 30 maioritv for
Cox, a gain of 200.
Allen county goes for Morgan by 400
majority.
Pennsylvania.
Philadelphia, October 10. The elec
tion progresses quietly. Tho indications
are that a moderate vote will be polled.
The contest for SJavor is exciting the
most interest, together with the Senator
from the 2d District, there being two can
didates for tlic latter office on tho Union
ticket.
In making up the election returns to
night the gains or losses will bo sent as
compared with tho votoof 1862, when Mr.
Slunkcr, Democratic candidate, was elect
ed by 3,524 majority. The election
passed off quietly.
Chester County 1 he north and south
precincts of A est Cheater and . East
Goshen show Union gains of 123 over the
vote of 1862.
Pittsburgh, October 10. Allegheny
county returns come in slowly. Only 16
districts have been heard from. There is
great falling off in the vote from la.-t
year, but a decided gain on the Union vote
1862. Tho Union majority in the coun
ty will be about 5,01)0. Partial returns
from the adjoining counties indicate a
mall vote, but a corresponding falling off
the Democratic vote, and the Unionists
are confident that they have carried the
State.
Meadvii.i.f, October 10. Five dis
tricts, including Meadville, give a Union
Majority of 3i2, a gain of 76 over the
1860.
Crawfonl county is likely to give from
500 to 1,700 Union majority.
Crawford Countv Union majority
probably 1,500 to l,7oi).
Philahklphia, October 10. rour-
teenth ward, Union majority 785; X'nion
loss 19; Fourth ward, Fox, Democrat,
,396; Union loss 286.
The citv returns indicate the election
McMichael by a reduced majority iu
comparison with 1802, when Henry was
elected by 5,080 majority.
Alleghany Countv r.Uziibeth town
ship and borough 106 Union majority;
Somerset gives 68 Union majority.
lork County lork borough 227 Dem
ocratic majority; opnng Garden 204
Democratic majority ; loss of 7.
Dauphin County Harnsburg is a com
plete tie; Union gain 59.
fhiluilelpnia iwenty-two wards give
Union majority of 650; Union loss 80.
Lancaster County Democratic majo ri-
Lancaster 22 ; v nion gain.
f.ontgomerv County jxorristown the
Union majority 46; Union gain 46.
Burks County scattering returns show
Union gain of 258.
Allegheny countv Fifteen districts and
wards show a Democratic gain of 121.
Bucks countv tour townships show a
Union gain of 21.
Danphin county L nion maj. 1200.
Huntington county Thirteen districts,
Union gain 236.
Berks countv Keading shows a u ni on
loss of 115 over 1864.
Philadelphia countv 3d AVard ; for
Mayor, Fox (Dem.) 281 ; AVagner gain
1": Cth AVard, Fox 424.
Susquehanna county Union maj. 99 ;
Lincoln's majority 1864, 11 ; Union ma
jority for Representative 117.
Twelfth ward l.to Hem. mnjonty. Un
ion loss 12j; 9th ward, .Mcjlichael 210
majority. Union loss 131. Sixth ward,
Fox 291 maj. Union loss 201. tilth ward,
Fox 416 maj. Union loss 216. Tenth ward,
McMichael 10C9 maj. Union gain. Thir
teenth ward, McMichael 478 maj. Union
gain 267. Lancaster county gives about
400 Union maj. Philadelphia, sixteenth
ward, McMichael 12 maj, Union gain 170.
Eleventh ward Fox 267 maj. Union loss
Fifteenth ward, McMichael 1001 maj.
Union gain 285. Seventh ward, McMich
ael 805 maj. Union gain.
Philadelphia county 1 7th Ward Fox
848 majority; Union loss 148. 26th
Ward Now McMichael 812 majority.
25th Ward Fox 475 majority; Union
loss 168.
Berks county Reading gives 101 Dem
ocratic majority. Four townships give a
Union gain of 119. The Democratic ma
jority will not exceed 5,000. Union gain
900.
Lehigh county Five townships give a
Union gain of 382. Further returns from
Lehigh and Carbon counties show Union
gains.
Philadelphia 18th Ward gives Mc
Michael 1,002 majority. Union gain 276.
1st AVard gives McMichael 642 major
ity. Union loss 99.
19th AVard gives McMichael 274 major
ity. Union gain 42.
121st AVard gives McMichael 391 ma
jority. Union gain 291.
Six Wards remain to be heard from.
McMichael's majority thus far is 3,740,
and it will probably jeach 7,000.
Bucks County Democratic majority
will not exceed 500.
Northampton County Democratic ma
jority about 3000.
Mifflin County Union majority of 40.
Union loss 58.
Perry County 8 districts show a Union
gain of 142.
Philadelphia County 2d Ward Fox
167 majority. Union loss 192. 22d Ward
corrected McMichael 746 majority.
Tnion gain 11.
Chester countv, Union majority, 1,900,
los 300 to 400.
Philadelphia connty,,25th ward, Mc
Jiicnacl J4i majonty, gam 69. 3d. ward,
correct-ed, Fox 424." 5th ward corrected,
Fox, 416.
Returns for Auditor General from all
the wards ef the city but two give Gen,
Hartrauft, Union, 6,637 majority.
McMichael's majority is 4,437, with the
8th and 24th Wards vet to come in.
The 8th AVard gives McMichael 391
maioritv. Loss 13.
24th Ward gives McMichael 207 major
ity, train 80. This completes the city
making McMichael 5,073 majority.
There is little doubt but that the State
has gono Union by a handsome majority.
The complete city vote gives Hartranft
7,421 majority, showing a gain in the city
alone of 4,620.
Latest News
BY TELEGRAPH.
LAST NIGHT'S DISPATCHES.
Speech by the President.
HIS SPEECH TO THE NEGROES.
THIS IS THEIR COUNTRY.
THEIR FREEDOM ASSURED.
THEIR DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES.
THE EPISCOPAL CONVENTION.
Debate Over Bishop WIlmer.
"What They Will do with Him."
Discovery of a New Planet.
More About the California Earthquake
Banks Nominated for Congress.
Gold last night closed 145 1-8.
Associated Press Report.
Washington News.
Washington, October 10. This is a
holiday with a majority of the colored
ncoplo of AVashimrton. who in large
crowds have followed the First District of
Columbia regiment as they marched
through the street, having recently return
ed from the bomb. The regiment pro
ceeded to the Executive Mansion and were
addressed by the President, who thanked
them for the services which they had ren
dered, mis, ne said, is the country ot all
within its limits, without reference to color.
He gave them some wholesome advice, in
culcating the importance ot honesty, in
dustry and virtue, and the necessity of
showing by their conduct that they are
worthy of trecdom.
ANOTHER ACCOUNT.
The first District of Columbia colored
regiment marched from their quarters in
Campbell Hospital to the Executive Man
sion where they were received by the
President who addressed them as follows
My Friends: My object in presenting
myself before you on this occasion, is sim
ply to thank you, as members of ono of
the colored regiments which have been in
the service of the country, to sustain and
carry its banner and its laws triumphant
ly in their part of this broad land. I re
peat that I appear before you on the pres
ent occasion merely to tender you my
thanks lor the compliment you have paid
me on your return home again, to again be
associated with your triends and relations.
I repeat I have, but little to say It being
unusual in this Government and in most
governments to have colored troops en
gaged in their service, you have gone
forth, as events have shown, and served
with patience and endurance in the cause
of your country. 'This is your country
as well as anybody elses country. Cheers.
This country in which you expect to live
in, and in which you should expect to do
somathing in civil life, as you have
in the field, this country is founded upon
principles of equality, and acts sometimes
stand out by which persons are to be esti
mated, according to their merit and thou
worth, and you have observed no doubt
that for him who does his duty faithfully
and honestly, there is always a just public
judgment Unit will appreciate and meas
ure out to him his just reward. I know
there is much well calculated in this gov
ernment, and since the late rebellion com
menced to excite the white man against
the black, and black man against
white. There are things fyou should all
understandand at some future time pre
pare yourself for what is before you
upon the return of peace and the sur
render of the enemies of the country. It
should be the duty of every patriot and
everyone who calls himself .1 Christian to
remember that with tho termination of
the war his presentments should cease, that
angry feelings should subside, and every
man should become tranquil and be pre
pared for what is before him. 1 his is an
other part of your mission. You have
been engaged in the effort to sustain your
country in tbe past, but the tuture is more
important to you than the period in which
you have just been engaged.' One great
question has been settled in this Govern
ment, that question is the question of sla
very. The institution of slavery made war
against the United States, and the country
has lifted its strong arm in vindication of
the Government, andot tree Government
in lifting that arm and appealing to the
God of battles, it has been decided that
the institution of slavery must go down.
(Cheers.) - This has been done, and the
Gixldess of Liberty, in bearing witness
over many of our battle-fields, sees strug
gles commence, has made her loftiest
Slight and proclaimed, that liberty has
been established upon a more permanent
and enduring basis than heretofore. (Ap
plause.) But this is not all, and, as you
have paid me the compliment to call upon
me, I shall take tho privilege of saying
one or two words. As I am before you I
repeat that that is not all, now when your
arms are recovered, and the olive branch
of peace is extended as I remarked before,
the sentiment of revenge should subside.
Then what is to follow? you do understand
no doubt, and if you do not you cannot
understand too soon that simple liberty
does not mean tho privilege of going in
to tbe battle-field or into service ot the
country as a soldier. It means things as
well, and now when you have laid down
arms there are other objects pf equal im
portance before you. Now that the Gov
ernment has triumphantly passed through
this mightly rebellion, after the most gig
antic battles the world ever saw, the pro
blem is before you and it is best that
you should understand it, and therefore I
speak simply and plainly, will you now
when you have returned from the army
of the United States and take the position
of citizens, when you have returned to
the associations of peace, " will you give
evidence to the world that yon are capa
bla and competent to govern yourselves?
That is what you will have to do.
Liberty is not a mere idea, a rude va
gary. It is a reality; and when you como
to examine the question of liberty, you
will not be mistaken in a mere idea for a
reality. It does not consist in idlenesss;
it does not consist in being worthless; it
does not consist in doing all things we
please, and there can be no liberty without
law. In a government of freedom and of
liberty, there must be law, and there must
be obedience and submission to law with
out regard to color. (Cheers.)
Liberty and may I not eall you my
countrymen? liberty consists of the glo
re-assembled
of
of
of
of
rious privilege of work, of pursuing the
ordinary avocations of peace, with indus
try and economy, and that being done, all
who have been industrious are permitted
to a; propriate, the fruit of thcirown labor.
(Cheers.) This one of the great bleasings
of freedom, and hence we might ask the
question, and answer it by stating that
liberty means freedom to work and enjoy
the products ot our own labor.
You will be soon mustered out, and it
is for you to establish the great fact
that you are fit to be free. Hence freedom is
not a mere idea bnt is something that ex
ists. In fact freedom is not simply a privi
lige to live in idleness. Liberty "does not
mean simply to resort to saloons and oth-
erpiaces oiaisrepiaDiecnaracter. Freedom
and liberty do not mean that people
ought to live in licentiousness. Liberty
means simply to be industrious, virtuous.
upright in all our dealings and relations
with men, and those now before me, mem
bers of the 1st regiment of colored volun
teers from the District of Columbia and
Capitol of the United States, I have to
say that a great deal deDends nnon
yourselves.
1 on must give evidence that von are eom-
oeium tor rignis mat tne uovernment has
guaranteed to you. Henceforth each and
all of you must be measured according to
your merit. If one man is more merito
rious than another, they cannot be equak,
and he is the most exalted that is the most
mentonous; without regard to color, and
the idea of having a law passed in the
rnorriinp- thnt will m.yq f vhilo roan n
mi.-, mail ueiuru Ulirill- ana a niHCIr nmn
a white man before day, is absurd. That
is not the standard. It is your own con
duct. It is your own merit. Tt is tb
development of your own talents, and of
VOUr own lntellio'en Ann mn..l nn.lin.
rt wis, tnen, De your course. . Adopt a
ivstem or morality. Abstain from all
licentiousness, and let me say one thine,
for I am going to talk plain. I have
lived in a Southern State all my life, and
know what has too often been the case.
There is one thing you should esteem
higher and more supreme than almost all
else ; and that is tbe solemn contract, with
all penalties, in the association of married
life. Men and women should abstain from
these qualities and habits that too fre
quently follow a war. Inculcate among
your ennoren, ana among your associates,
notwithstanding you are just back from
l, ..fit. Tv . .:. .. j . t .
tne (biiuj tuo ijuieu oiuies, uiai virtue,
that merit, that intelligence, are the stand
ards to be observed, and those which vou
are determined to maintain during your
future lives. This is the way to make
wnite men biacn and black men white.
(Cheers.)
he that is most meritorious and virtuous
and intellectual, and well informed must
stand highest without regard to color.
Each individual takes his degree in
sublimer and more exalted regions in pro
portion to his merit and his virtue. Then
I shall say to you on this occasion, that in
returning to your homes and firesides, after
feeling conscious and proud of having
faithfully discharged your duty, re
turn with the determination that you
Will perform your duty in the future as
you have in the past, and abstain from all
those bickerings and jealousies and re
vengeful feelings which too often spring
up between different r.ces.
There is a great problem before ns, and
I may as well allude to it here in this con
nection. It is whether this race can be
incoporated and mixed with the people of
the United States, to be made a harmoni
ous s,nd permanent ingredient in the pop
ulation. This is a problem not yet settled,
but we aro in the right way to do so. j
Slavery raised its head against the Gov
ernment and the Government raised its
strong arm and struck it to the ground,
no part of the problem is settled. The in
stitution of slavery is overthrown, but
anotner remains to be solved, and that is:
Can four millions of people raised as they
have been, with all privileges of whites,
can they take their places in community
and be made to work harmoniously anil
eongruously in our system. This is a pro
blem to be considered. Are the digesta
tive powers our own Government suffi
cient to reoeive this element in a new
shape, and digest and make it work health
fully upon the system that has incorpora
ted it; this is the question to be determin
ed. Let us make an experiment, and
make it in good faith. If that cannot be
done there is another problem that is be
fore as.
If we have to become a separate and
distinct people, although I trust that sys
tem can be made to work harmoniously,
and the great problem settled without go
ing and further ; if it should be so that
the two races cannot agree and live in
peace and propperitv,and the laws of Prov
idence require that it should be so; in that
eventlooking to the far distant future and
trusting it may never come; if it shoul d
come, Providence that works mysteriously
but unerringly will point out the way, and
the mode and the manner by which these
people are to be separated, and they are to
be taken to their lands of inheritance, and
the promise for such a one is before them,
hence we are making experiments.
Hence let me impress upon you the im
portance of controlling your passions, de
veloping your intellect and of applying
your physical powers to the industrial in
terest of the country, and that is the tTue
process by which this question can be set
tled. Be patient, persevering and for
bearing and you. will help to solve the
problem and make for yourselves a repu
tation in this cause as you have won for
yourselves a reputation in the cause in
which you have been engaged, In speak
ing to members of this regiment 1 want
them to understand, so far as I am con
cerned, I do not assume or pretend that
am stronger than tho laws or tho course of
nature, or that I am wiserthan providence.
It is our duty to try and discover what
these great laws are which are at the
foundation of all things, and having
discovered what they are, conform our
actions and our conduct to them
and to the will of God who rules
all things. He holds the destinies of na
tions in the palm of His hand, and He will
solve the question and rescue these people
mm tlw dimcuItiT-n mat nave xi long
surrounded them. Then let us be patient,
industrious and persevering. Let us de
velope our intellectual and moral worth.
I trust that what I have said may be
understood and appreciated. Go to your
homes and lead peaceful, prosperous and
happy lives, in peace with all men. Give
utteranco to no word that would cause
dissension, but do that which will be cred
itable to yourselves and to your country.
To the officers who have so nobly led
and commanded you in the field, I also
return my sincere thanks for the compli
ment conferred npon me.
The troops then returned to Campbell
Hosnital. where thev partook of the abun
dant hospitalities of their colored fellow
citizens. is
a
The Episcopal Convention.
Philadelphia, October 10. The gen
eral Convention of the Episcopal Church
at 10 o clock this morning.
Rev. Dr. Burgess, of Maine, from the
Committee on the Consecration of Bishops,
reported a resolution favoring the transfer
Bishop Talbot to the Assistant Bishopric
Indiana, and from being a missionary
the torthwest. After discussion, the
Convention adopted the resolution by a
large majority.
the same committee then reported an
acceptance, by tho House of Bishops, of
Rev. R. H.Wilmer as Bishop of the Diocese
Alabama.
During the discussion Mr. Brunst, of
Pa, made a speech denouncing the spirit
which he said had crept into the Churc I
that nothing mast be said against suck
evils as slavery, intemperance, etc, becauso
some serioa feeling may be caused by if
A Southern delegate attempted to atop
the speech by calls of order, but Dr. Brunst
was sustained by the chair. A motion to
lay the whole subject on the table was then
lost.
The Convention will hot be in ses n
the day having been appoin d
to the consecration of SeTCr. ';'' ,71.
on
VV EJ DEP.?
a liiiii suxii comaxKras ui thi I
rnanENT HEW'S, MISCELLANEOUS Ttt.. I
Axllf f r i-'i.N Li
JOB THB I-A3IILY,
prSLIgHEB BY TRK
(LETEIAXD LEADER C0MPAxT.
O.'FK'Ei no. ill st FERioa stbeEtJ
TERMS OF TUB WEEKLT: (
On. year (52 issne). m i
To the getter np of a Clnbflf ten, we will ml . t
eeny of tlie W r.tRLT Leadk., gratis ; of twenty a
...... ttu. Tri-W..l.i- . . . .. , r r v u.t ., V -
n - - . j , v. . - j rHwu. a
copy of the Daily. '
AJtiresa
CLEVELAND LEADER COMPAXT.
Quintard, Bishop elect of the Diocese of
Tennessee.
Dr. Vinton, of Penn,'said it was a pain
ful duty to him to oppose the consecration
of Dr. AA'ilmer to the Bishopric of Ala
bama, knowing him as hdid, having par
taken of his hospitalities. He then read
certain resolutions which had been offered
bv him at the last Convention, aud which
had been laid on the table, as follows:
Resolved, That the House of Bishops,
concurring with this General Convention
of the PrJtestant Episcopal Church in the
United States of Amerlcn. pronounce tho
action of the Bi.-hops of Virginia, Georgia
and South Carolina, in their consecration
of Richard AVilmer. D. D of the Episco
pal See of Alabama, to bo irregular, un
canonical and schisniatical, and that his
jurisdiction'in the Diocese ot Alabama is
void anu ot no
Resolved, That this preamble and reso
lution be referred to a joint Committee of
iii;. Ifoiise. with instructions to consider
and report what further action, if any, this
Convention shall take to assert the dignity
and enforce the rights of the Protestant
Episcopal Church ot tne u nnea otaies in
the premises.
tDr. Vinton then read the oath required
of a Bishop, which requires of him to swear
allegiance to the United States. Ha then
asked : Shall there be a ISishop acfenowl
ed"ed as a Bishop of the church, who has
not conformed to tne oath required oi nun
by our canons ? H:id we better not wait
until tbe church in Alabama expressed.
their willingness to comply with our re-
qul reiiients?
Key. IT. Ciarkson announced that a
letter addressed to Bishop' Hopkins and
others, bearing on this very subject, had
been received.
The reading of the letter was called for.
The Dr. here stated that the rapers, he
supposed, to be read, were a letter from
Bishop umer to the clergy, the
order of the commandant thereupon,
the request of Bishop AA'ilmer for an ex
planation of the action of the commandant
thereon, and the reply of the commandant.
The letter from Bishop AVilmer to the
House of Bishops was not in the envelope.
Dr. AV. D. Harlow stated that if the
telegraph had done its work with ordinary
speed, Bishop AVilmer had heard of the
action of this Convention, and that he had
expressed a willingnes to conform to tbe
requirements ot the cnnrcn.
The iTcsident in ruling- upon uie call
for the reading the documents received
from Bishop AVilmer, said as they ap
peared to be mutilated they could uot be
received.
Dr. Ciarkson then explained that he
had stated that the letter from Bishop
Wilmer to the House of Bishops had been
received with the other documents. Thesa
papers fiad been handed to him, but wera
subsequently withdrawn.
ilon. &. a. Ku"gles, of JNcw lork, then
made an address, but owing to the noise
and confusion at the doors, none of it was
heard
General News.
A New Planet.
Observatory, Ann Harbor, Mich,'!
October 9 1 1 p. M. f
I have the pleasure to announce that I
discovered a new planet at about half-past
ten o'clock this evening. It shines like a
star of the 9th magnitude, and is situated
in the nsrh ascension 14 45". and in decli
J. C. WATSON.
Damage by the Earthquake in California.
ifornia.
Sax Francisco, October 9. The dam
age by the earthquake yesterday amounts
to considerable in the aggregate, many
houses needing new plastering andrepair-
ng of broken windows. The Merchant's
Exchange building and Custom House
will probably require rebuilding. No
really substantial, well constructed build
ings were seriously damaged.
(Santa Cruz felt the shock more severely
than any other town in the State. Sev
eral brick houses were so badly damaged
that partial reconstruction is necessary.
A despatch from there says there was a
general tumble down of chimneys, and
those left standing are turned partly
around. The motion was apparently
from east to west. The ground along the
river opened in fissures and spouted water
like so many geysers. Tho people are
unable to use some wells, which are either
dry or filled with sand. The chimney of
the powder mill wius thrown down and
other injury done to the works. Portions
of the wall of the new hotel were thrown
down, but the foundation is all right.
The tide rose very high at tbe time of
the shock, but fell very low immediately
after.
There were eleven distinct shocks felt
since the first shock up to five o'clock this
morning, ab-o a number of smaller visita
tion". The losses are estimated at about
jplO.ooo, but may exceed this amount.
Dates from Honolulu are received up to
September 16. The war steamer Saranao
arrived there on the 6th. Nothing heard
from the Shenandoah.
Note from the Mexican Consul General
New York, October 10. The Mexican
Consul General, Senor Navara, has sent
the following note to the Associated '
Press :
NEW YORK, October, 1865.
To the Agent of. the Associated Press :
Dear Sir: Permit me through your
efficient and reliable agency to aain con
tradict the report that President Juarez
has left the territory of the Mexican Re
public. The statement to that effect of a
correspondent of the Philadelphia Press,
published in the papers here this morning,
an unmitigated falsehood, and only adds
another proof to the many we already
have of the unscrupulous character of the
agents of Maximilian, and of the means
they employ to support their unholy
caase.
I am in possession of official dates
from El Paso to the 8th of September, five
days later than the date of the letter o
the correspondent of the Philadelphia
Press and I can aver that not only has
President Juarez never had the slightest
intention of leaxiug the territory of the
Republic, but there is no occasion for his
doing so.
I am sure'so respectable and iufluential
journal as the Philadelphia Press can
not be aware of the interested and utterly
unreliable character of these reports or it
would not have given place to a corres
pondent at once so untrustworthy and
for an American so unpatriotic.
I am, sir, very respectfully,
Your obedient serva'nt,
J. N. NAVARA.
Mexican Consul General.
Race.
race for three year olds, for the St. Leger
stakes, to-day, was won by Revenue Col
lector. Baltimore Julia was" second, and
Alcada a good third. Time 4:15.
The race of one mile heats was woa bv
Areola in two straight heats. Time 1:47
Gen. Banks Nominated for Congress.
Bostor, October 10. The Sixth District
Union Convention, held in Reading to
day, nominated General N. P. Banks for
Richmond Papers.
RlCITMOND, Va.. October 10. The Com.
mercial Bulletin establishment was re
stored to the proprietors to-day, and tha
punucauon oi the paper will be resumed
Tuesday. But, for the present, AVcd
deburn will not be allowed to resume edi
torial control. The publication of the
Enquirer will be resumed next week. Th9
Examiner will soon be re-opened by
Harry Rives Pollard, late editor of tha
Times.
Foe yesterday after nun s report see 4th page.
The Boston Transcript, commenting
upon the Connecticut election, says: " K'
learn that A. H, Stephens, now confined in
Fort'. Warren, is in favor of the impartial
suffrage which Connecticut repudiated,
Mai is he is in favor of allowiny negroes,
qualified by an educational test, to vote.
This, on the'Connecticut deflnation, makes

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