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Cleveland daily leader. ([Cleveland, Ohio]) 1865-1873, August 31, 1866, Morning Edition., Image 2

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JACOB FRANK,
issfastsjrer, .Tsiibeali sat iMmil Peeiar t
HOOP SKIETS!
COnGESTS!
fiRperlor BU, aader tbe Anericaa.
u P.rtfrolar Mtotioa wholesale trade.
"jT-.K t New Tor ..-
DAILY LEADER.
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' DRfl-T. TM-WEEKLf MB WEEULT,
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OFFICIAL PAPER OP TEE CITY.
Tor .Horning Idltloi Hewi w
irfr For Irevlag tdltiwi Rewi
FEIDAY, AUGUST 31. 1866.
The Soldiers' Response.
The vHdierj of Michigan have published
a response to Steedman & Go's call for the
Cleveland Soldiers' Convention, which we
mint below, and believe it riTes utter
ance to the aentimenta of the soldiers all
over the country with the exception of the
few who are hungering lor civil office.
The response if addressed to the "Union
soldier and tailors of Michigan'' and it
as follows:.
"Believing that vou still hold dear tha
principle for which you fought in the
field, and that Toil repudiate with scorn
the invitation of a few officers looking for
promotion, to desert jour loyal friends
for the purpose of joining your disloyal
- ennmias, we, a portion of the Michigan
boys in blue, respectfully request you to
meet as in Detroit at Firemen s Hall on
Thursday evening, August 30, 1866, for
the purpose of giving expression to oar
sentiments upon the great issues of the
day. and of organizing the society of the
"Michigan Boys in Blue."
"W call upon all to join us who be
lieve In justice to oar friends before mag'
nanimity to our foes all who would en
courage the Union men of the South be
fore unrepentant rebels. We believe that
it will be time enough to forgive trai
tors, -who fought, against the old Sag,
when they fcrgive patriots who fought for
it. It will be time enough to embrace
rebels as brethren when they cease the
mobbing of loyal citizens and the lynch
ing of Union soldiers now eoine on- "It
will time enough to proclaim peace when
a Uaion soldier can visit the graves of his
comrades, and the fields of his victories,
wearing the Union blue, and carrying the
old flag, secure from public violence and
private assassination, and without a pad
lock on his lips or a cover over his loyal
heart. .
"We protest against rebels, whom we
have whipped in the field being consti
tuted, by immediate restoration to politi
cal power our superiors at the ballot box.
In reconstructing the Union, we demand
that a Sooth Carolina rebel soldier's vote
shall not count twice as much as the vote
of a Union Michigan soldier. We de
mand, also, that traitors who deserted the
army, or violated official oaths, to join the
rebellion, shall be prohibited from being
elected President or Governor to rule over
loyal men, or Legislators or Congressmen,
to make laws to govern Union soldiers.
"And we invite all who are still true to
tbe eld flag, the old cause, and to old
friends, to rally with us once more in the
ranks f Right, Justice, and true Union,
shouting tbe same grand battle-cry of
FREEDOM which has so often cheered
ns on to victory and glory."
This noble address is signed by about a
hundred Michigan soldiers, from privates
up to Major Generals, and the list em
braces the names of many officers who
served with distinction in Custer's Cavalry
Brigade.
A Significant Prediction.
Considering that the Louisville Jour
nal is a great foe of universal suffrage, the
following prediction is significant, to say
the least. We quote:
Tbe shouts for Jeff. Davis, Lee, etc.
which have been beard at many a gather
ing in Kentucky during the late canvass
which were heard at tbe Coart House in
Louisville on Friday night last, and again
boisterously for Lee and Johnson at Feet
Hall on Saturday night, and on the streets
of Louisville, after the Duval triumph oa
Monday, following the Memphis and the
late riot in New Orleans, will in all hu
man probability lead to a train of events
that wiTl establish negro suffrage through
out the whale Southern States within two
years and a half or three years at tbe far
thest."
The Democratic Doctrine.
E. D- M- the able contributor to the
Cincinnati Craxette, compactly . states the
Copper-Johnson rebel doctrine of restor
ation, in the following ter.iis :
"Any State (Ohio for example") may
walk out of Congress, stay out as many
years as she pleases, smash up all the lawi.
of the nation in her territory, adopt a new
Has. elect her own President, send her own
ambassadors to foreign nations, and vet
retain Ker political rights in the nation she
has abjured.
Jas-G. Robinson, Esq., Postmaster at
Bucyrus, Crawford county, Ohio, is about
to be removed, the papers having been
made out for Dr. C. Fulton. Mr. Robin
son is the editor of the Journal, one of
the staunchest Union sheets in Ohio, and
a consistent Union man, who supported
Andrew Johnson in 1864. Dr. Fulton is
a bitter, violent Copperhead a Crawford
county Copperhead whs opposed John
son in '64 and in whose store ' in 1863,
Uwjafurloughed veterans of the 49th O.
V. L were shot down, because they were
Uaion soldiers. Johnson knows his friends
and it rewarding them.
Henry Ward Beecher has been invited
to act as Chaplain for the Johnson Sol
diers' Convention at Cleveland, and it is
to be hoped will consider each a courtesy
an insult. Chaplain Moody, about whom
the torr is told that during tbe siege of
Kashviile he prayed and Mr. Johnson
swore for its deliverance, is to be tbe
Chaplain of the Pittsburgh Union Soldiers'
Coaventioo, and Mr." Beecher may profit
by his example. Mr. Moody still prays
as loyally as ever, bat vw he kneels to
the President to implore him to stand up
like a man-
There is already a split in the " Happy
Fsni.. The Johnson Union men of
Michigan have called a convention to
meet a day in advaaoa of the Democratic
Convention, whereat the Free Prtm is
wrathy, and gives its allies to understand
that the Democratic party will be " dicta
ted to by no party."
BasQ C Brown, a hitherto nnheard-of
member of the Brown family, whose
"conservatism'' is certified to by the Plain
Deuier, has been appointed Assessor of tbe
14th Ohio District, is place of a Union
man. Another illustration of my policy.
The arrangements for the Soldiers' Con
vention at Pittsburg? re being rapidly per
fected, and among the orators selected for
t'ao occasion are Generals Logan, Howard,
Geary, Butler, and Thomas.
JUDGE SPALDING.
He will Return this Week and Address
His Constituents.
We have seen a letter from Hon. B. P.
Spalding, dated, "Windsor, Conn., Au;.
27th. 1866," addressed to A. J. Marvin,
Esq., Secretary of tho Cuyahoga Republi
can Cocvention, acknowledging the re
ceipt of a copy of tha resolutions of tbe
county Convention, in which he says :
t shall return to Cleveland the last
part of this week, and will speedily take
occasion toftddrees my constituents in the
18th District, with a large majority of
whom I am happy to know that I am in
harmonious sentiment respecting all po
litical issues."
POLITICAL.
OHIO.
The Union Executive Committee have
appointed a meeting for Urbana, on Septem
ber 12, to be addressed by Gov. Cox, Hon. A.
F. Perry and Wm. Lawrence.
A. G. Clark has been appointed Post
master for Toledo.
The Elyria Democrat makes the following
correction: The Cleveland Lkxdab, in
speaking of Mr. Mussey's appointment as
Collector of this District says :
"Mr. Museey has formerly been a re
spectable Republican. We infer from his
appointment that he has made up his mind
to desert his party and his principles."
Mr. Mussey has never been a member of
the Republican party. He joined the Un
ion party as a war Democrat, and voted
with it nntil 1864, when he voted with the
Democrats for McClellan, and has not since
been identified with the Union party.
MICHIGAN.
3. F. Ferry and J. F. Driggs, on Tuesday,
were renominated by the Kepublieaa Con
ventions of the Fourth and Sixth Congres
sional Districts of Michigan.
MISSOURI.
An invitation has been extended to Pres
ident Johnson to visit 6l Louis during his
western trip, and the Copperhead City
Council have tendered him the hospitalities
oflheeity.. -i
The Conservatives of the Second Con
gressional District of Missouri have nomi
nated Colonel Broadhead for Congress.
IOWA.
Gov. Haha, of Loaisiana, made a very
able speech at Des Moines, Iowa, Monday
night, in which he arraigned the President
for the murder of Dr. Dostie, Rev. Mr. or
ton and the other 'Sew Orleans martyrs.
PENNSYLVANIA.
. Han. J. M. Broomall was renominated for
Congress by the Republican Convention at
Westchester, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday.
All the nominations for county officers were
soldiers.
Ancona, the present member of Congress
from the Berks District, Pennsylvsnia, was
a candidate for renomination before the
Democratic county convention, but was de
feated. J. Lawrence Gees received the
nomination by a majority of twelve.
THE SOUTH.
A number of delegates to the September
Convention have arrived in Washington
from the South. They all report that the
eourse of the President in regard to the New
Orleans butchery has made the position of
Union men more perilous than it was at any
time under the Confederate Government.
In many parts of the South where it was
contemplated to hold meetings sxd appoint
delegates, public opinion has suddenly be
come so bitter toward all Unionists as to
render it certain death to take part in any
meeting to further the objects of the Loyal
ists' Convention.
The South Carolina Legislature meets in
extra session, next month, to devise some
relief lor debtors and make some changes
in the negro code.
The Tribune, tbe organ of tbe col-red peo
ple of New Orleans, which auspenped pub
lication a short time ago, has been revived.
WASHINGTON.
By a curious mistake, several thousands
of Judge Kelley's address on suffrage ware
sent from the office of the Public Printer to
the Bread-and-Butter club rooms, Instead
of a batch of iroaifHre's, al ww, eoni tint
to the Copperheads of Pennsylvania under
the frank of Senator Cowan.
A correspondent connected with the
Western Republican Press Association was
informed, Tuesday, by a high official in the
Postoffice Department, that it was not the
intention to furnish any information con
earning the business of tha Government to
those papers which do not support the
President ; and the list of appointments
made for the day was in consequence re
fused to that Association.
The following appointments of postmast
ers were made day before yesterday : A. G
Clark, Toledo, Ohio; W. R. Loskwood,
Quiney, 111.; E. B. Aller, Tern Haute, Ind.
P. A. Starr, Milwaukee, Wis; Henry
Barns, Detroit, Mich. ; C H. Taylor, Grand
Rapids, Mich.
General Tillson, who, it is said, is to suc
ceed General Howard in the Freedmen's
Bureau, ha arrived in Washington.
Who Denounce Congress.
The following caustic catalogue of the
opponents of Congress and the Congres
sional policy is mvde by that out and
out Unionist, Colonel Sam. McKee, who
represents the Ninth Kentucky district in
Congress :
WHO IS DENOUNCING CONGRESS?
How do we find ourselves divided into
parties ? One of the parties furiously de
nounce tne nation s representatives, de
nounces the action of tbe Federal Con
gress, denounces that body which is tbe
representative of the loyal people who
nave sacrincea so mucn of blood and
treasure to vindicate the honor and maies-
ty and the dignitv of the cation- We
(ind to-day the national Congress and I
hazard nothing in saying it is a body of
men nose patriotism nas never been sur
passed ; a body of men who will vie in in
telligence and in wisdom with anv assem
bly of men that has ever met since our
Government has been formed; a body of
men wnose wnoie action, wnose every
thought, whose every measure has had
but one object and end, and that the pres
ervation of oar country, and the liberties
iifoar people, the security and tranquility
of our whole land cheers but we find
to-dav the national Coneress and all its
acts denounced in the most harsh and se
vere terms.
JSow, my fellow citizens, I want to call
your attention to tne class of people who
are aocustomea to aenounce tnis (Jongress,
and after having done that to discuss in a
manner the measures that are so de
nounced.
WHO IS DENOUNCING CONGRESS? 1ST-REBELS GENFRALLY DENOUNCE
CONGRESS.
Look over the land and gather them
up in your mind, all those who are most
bitterly denouncing the acts of the nation
al Congress. First comes up that class
of men, who, since 1860, when Mr. Lin
coln was elected President of the United
States, began at once their foal slanders
against that great and good man and all
those with whom be was associated; met
who went astray from their allegiance,
and violated their sworn oaths to support
the Constitution of the United States and
ail the laws of the nation, and plunced
the country into a gigantic war against
the liberties of the people; men who, for
four long years have sought by every
means within their power to pull down
this trreat fabric set up by the wisdom of
our fathers.
These men are the leaders in this movement
of denouncing the members of Con-
2d-THE SECEDING CONGRESSMEN ESPECIALLY
DENOUNCE CONGRESS.
Ton find all those men who left the na
tional Congress in I860, and went into tha
rebellion denouncing tbe course of Con
gress, beginning with the great head and
chief of the conspiracy, Jefferson Davis,
with Alex. Stephens, Howell Cobb, Rob
ert Toombs, and all that class of men, who,
through the war, formed the administra
tivt department of the rebel Government.
DENOUNCE CONGRESS. 3D-THE REBEL GENERALS DENOUNCE
CONGRESS
Again, you find Congress denounced
by those men who led tbe rebel armies to
battle by Robert E. Lee, by Beauregard,
and Johnson, . and Hood, and Breckin
ridge, and Simon Bolivar Buckner, and
that pirate Semmes, and their confederates.
CONGRESS 4TH-REBELS IN CANADA DENOUNCE
CONGRESS.
Again, you find not a few men who
have beea watching Congross from across
the border, who are too mean to have re
turned even to Southern soil, and are
waiting until that party made up of a
congregation of all the disloyal elements
known to the country, gain power enough
to assure them that there is no danger ;
such fellows as Blackburn, who infected
clothing with yeilow fever and small pox,
and tried to inoculntj all our cities with
those pestilences he and his coadjutors,
still in Canada, are denouncing the United
States Congress. Cheers.
CONGRESS. 5TH-KENTUCKY GUERRILLAS DENOUNCE
CONGRESS.
Tou find again, whea you cross that
beautiful river in my btate, every follower
of John Morgan, every guerrilla who rode
over those mountains and hills, murdering
Union people in their homes, insulting
their wives and driving them and their
children across the river into your own
State to find safety these are the men
who to-day are denouncing tbe United
Suites Congress in Kentucky.
CONGRESS. 6TH-COPPERHEADS DENOUNCE CONGRESS.
When you come North you find such
brave patriots, such unsullied and honored
Salesmen as Vallandigbam and Fernando
Wood, laughter. They never voted a
man nor a dollar to carry on the war
they to-day, too, unite in denouncing the
nation's Congress. -
CONGRESS. 6TH-COPPERHEADS DENOUNCE CONGRESS. 7TH-PETTY OFFICE SEEKERS DENOUNCE
CONGRESS.
And then, worse than all of them yes
worse, if possible, because they are more
unprincipled and meaner you find a set
of men who throughout the war adhered
to the great Union party, that great pha
lanx which crushed out treason, but when
the victory is over, for the sake of a petty
office, have deserted the party they ara
engaged in denouncing the United States
Ccogress. Great cheers.
Ail those, then, who opposed the war
from the beginning, tbe very same men
who denounced it in 1860, the very same
who were bitter and fiorce against us in
1862, the same class of characters who
were ready and willing to wage war in
1863, the very same party who, in 1864,
just in the full tide of our success, when
the grand armies of the Union were gath
ering their strength, and hurling their
power against tbe rbel Confederacy, and
choking the very life out of it, met in
grand convocation in the city of Chieaga,
and resolved that tbe war was a failure
they to-day are denouncing the United
Stales Congress ; they to-day are denounc
ing the representatives o.r that people who
never faltered ia their devotion to the
cause of our country. Great cheers.
NAPOLEON II.
Interesting Details of the Melancholy
Life of Napoleon's Son.
[Paris Correspondence of the New York Times.
Xittle is generally known in America
of the last years of .Napoleon IL, and the
present moment seems opportune to give
a sketch of bis brief and melancholy
career.
Joseph Charles Francis Kapoleon, King
of Rome, Duke of Keichstadt, wns born at
Paris on the 20th of March, 1811. All
the good fairies seemed to have assembled
around his cradle, and all appeared to
predict for him honors, riches, and power ;
not one intimated a doubt of his future
grandeur and lustre I Yet, despite the
happy presages which accompanied his
birth, scarcely throe years after he came
into the world as the heir of Hapoleon.
tbe young Prince left France on the 2d of
May, 1814, never to return during life.
On arriving in the dominions of his grand
father, the mperor of Austria, his title
was suppressed, the name he bore was
proscribed, every fact in history which
recalled the glory of his father and the
humiliation of his enemies was carefully
concealed from th child's knowledge, and
at seven years of age the son of Napoleon
became the Duke of Keichstadt.
An Imperial decree, promulgated July
22, 1818, (the 22d of Julv was also the
date of his death,) conferred upoa him the
tiUe of an Austrian Duke, fixed his rank
at tbe Court of Vienna, the arms he was
to bear, the honors to which he was to be
entitled, and the position he was to occupy
as a member of the Imperial family of
Austria. No trace of Napoleon was"left,
and the name itself was formnllv ann.
pressed by the decree.
Alterwaru, as he grew up and learned
what hero his father bad been, he sud
denly awoke as from a long slumber.
When he read in secret the story of Na
poleon's immortal campaigns, and com
prehended the glory and power to which
the genius of his father had attained, it
seemed to him that he had all at once en
tered another world, iiluminated by the
history of gigantic exploits. Then, des
pite the incessant watch kept over him,
ne determined to know all. He obtained
and eagerly devoured every work in which
Napoleon's name was mentioned, and
finally, when he realized how great his
father had been, what humiliations had
been heaped upon him. how he had died a
tortured prisoner, the young Prince was
tilled with an immense hatred of those
who had accomplished the banished sol
diers long martvrdom. His indignation
was also escited against tbe decree which
dprived him of the name which he justly
regarded as 'the most glorious of those he
oore, ana be immediatelv and resolutelv
signified his intention to be called Napo
leon. Like his father, he was fond of the
profession of arms, but his tall, thin bodv
could not withstand the arduous exercises
to which be attempted to school himself.
Appointed Colonel of the Gustavus Vasa
Regiment, he assumed the active com
mand, took part in every fatiguing cere
mony, in all weather, and no matter how
ill ne was, or how much hus physician ro-
monstratea. jtim or cum a were of glory
He studied the art of war in the number
less descriptions of his father s battles.
either reading them or inducing others to
recount them to him, with the map of
Europe before his eyes.
He would never consentto lie down, ex
cept when his feebleness forced him to do
o. lie well knew that he must soon die.
but be had only one regret in leaving the
world, and that was to have done so little
worthy to bear the nameof Napoleon.
I remember having often seen, in Ameri
ca, an eneraving representing him grasp
; i. f . k. , 1 i , . i
iug uu iui;i b bwuim auu lamenting nis
poweriessness to wieia tne weapon which
bad so long "made all Kurope tremble."
The phrase attributed to him mar be
spoclryphal, as regards the strict letter of
tne expression, but tout such were in real
ity his feelings cannot be doubted for an
instant.
His mother, a woman whose heart seem
ed insensible to anv ennoblio? emotion.
and who had not the dignity to remain the
wiaowor .napoleon nis mother wept at
his bedside, when tbe fatal moment drew
near.
" Mother 1 mother !" he whisDered. " I
am dying I" -
fit was the 22d of Julv, 1832. and Lhasa
wt.ro tug tab wor 01 v apoieon it., ex
piring in a murmur upon his lips, with his
last breath. Thus died the son of the
Great Captain, at the age of twenty-one
years, brx days after his death, on the
the 28th, a jott mortem examination of the
remains was made at Schonbrnnn. The
following is an extract of the medical re
port:
'The bjJy eompletelv emaciated: thn
chest, in proportion to the body, long and
narrow; tne sternum natteneu; the neck
wasted."
He was interred at Schonbrunn with
princely honors, and visitors to his tomb,
at the present day, wili ee upon a Latin
inscription, of which the followine is a
translation :
To tbeeterast m-'niorr
Of JosEra Cbaklis Faascis, Puke of RUehetadt:
Bon of ftAPOLBos, ampere of tbv r reach,
4 ad of Habia Lol l -A. Arch-Dneheaa of Au-Ula ;
.- Bora at Carle, the attk of Mai eh lull.
Died at Scao&brnns, July 22, 1&32.
He had himself written an epitaph.
which he wish placed upon his tomb, but
which was rejected. It was brief and to
the purpose:
H-r tiea ihe Sod of tbv Great Xal-OLEOX I
He was bora King of Rome.
He oioo. a Aval rian CoLmkI !
-of
l-ittt
as
A Paris letter says: The toilettes of
the ladies at the sea side and watering
places are now more than grotesque.
.very lady, it appears, adopts Uit stvie of
dress most suited to her fancy, so much so
that the sanda at Dieppe give one the
idea of a bal masque, minus the masks
bTJPniclAt' h'?h bU' sm"li DHt '
cocked on the top of the head. iIhv of
"rouge and poudre de riz, and a long walk
ing stick. This is the custom of the pres
ent century.
y
"MY POLICY."
Interpretation Written In Blood.
NEW ORLEANS MASSACRE.
Testimony of Gen. Sheridan.
LET NO MAN LONGER DOUBT.
The following quotations from official
dispatches from General Philip H. Sheridan,
to the President and General Grant,
need no comment:
NEW ORLEANS, August 1, 1866.
-
TaV.S. Grant:
'In the meantime official duties culled
me to Texas, and tbe Mayor of the city
during my absenje, suppressed the Con
vention by the use of the police force, and
in so doing, ATTACKED THE MEM
BERS OF THE CONVENTION AN D
A PARTY OF TWO HUNDRED NK
GROES, "WITH FIREARMS, CLUBS
ANB KNIVES. IN A MANNER nO
UNNECESSARY AND ATROCIOUS
AS TO COMPEL ME TO SAY THAT
IT "WASMURDER. About forty whites
and blacks were thus killed, and about one
hundred and sixty wounded. Evervtliir:
is now quiet, but I deem it best to main
tain military supremacy in the city for a
few days until the affair is fully investi
gated. I believe the sentiment of the
general community is great regret at this
unnecessary crueltv, AND THAT TU K
POLICE COULD'HAVE MADE ANY
ARRESTS THEY SAW FIT WITH
OUT SACRIFICING LIVES.
P. H. SHERIDAN.
i - Major General Commanding.
NEW ORLEANS, August 2, 1866.
THE MORE INFORMATION I OB
TAIN OF THE AFFAIR OF THE 30tb,
IN THIS CITY.THE MORE REVOLT
ING IT BECOMES. IT WAS NO
RIOT; IT "WAS AN ABSOLUTE
MASSACRE BY THE POLICE,
WHICH WAS NOT EXCELLED IN
MURDEROUS CRUELTY BY THAT
OF FORT PILLOW. IT WAS A
MURDER WHICH THE MAYOR
AND POLICE OF THE CITY PEIU'E
THAT ED WITHOUT THE SHADOW
OF A NECESSITY. FURTHER MOKE,
1 BELIEVE 11 WAS .rKE Jl fcDl l.t
TED, AND EVERY INDICATION
POINTS TO THIS. I recommend the
removing of this bad man. I believe it
would be bailed with the sincerest gratifi
cation by two-thirds of the popu:ation of
tne city, lnere has been a leeling ot in
security on tne part ot tne people here on
account ot this man, which is now so
much increased that the safety of life and
property does not rest with the civil au
thority, but tne military.
P. H. SHERIDAN.
Major General Commanding.
P. H. SHERIDAN. NEW ORLEANS, August 3, 1866.
1o V. S. Grant : "
Unless good judgmentis exercised there
will be an EXODUS OF NORTHERN
CAPITAL AND UNION MEN which
will be injurious to the city and the whole
country. I will remove the Military Gov
ernor in a day or two. I .igain strongly
advise that some disposition be made to
change the present Mayor, its I believe it
would co more to restore confidence than
anything that could be done. If the pres
ent Governor could be changed aiso it
P. H. SHERIDAN.
m Major General Commanding.
New Orleans, Aug. 3, 1806.
To Aiidreta Johnson, President of the V. ,S'-
e a a
Tha remote cause was the bitter and an
tagonistic feeling which has been growing
in this community since the advent of the
present Mayor, who, in the organization
his police force, selected MANY DES-
rtKili JnEJN, andsomeot them known
murderers. People of clear views wore
overawed by want of confidence in the
Mayor and fear of the '-Thugs," many of
whom he had selected for his police force.
It is useless to attempt to disguise the
hostility that exists on the part of a grnt
many here towards NORTHERN MEN,
and thiB unfortunate affair has so precipi
tated matters that there is now a test of
what shall bo tbe status of Northern men ;
WUBTfl ERTHEY CAN LIVE HERE
WITHOUT BEING IN CONSTANT
DREAD OR NOT. WHETHER THEY
CAN BE PROTECTED IN LIFE AND
PROPERTY, AND HAVE JUSTICE
IN THE COURTS.
From the testimony of wounded men
and others who wore inside the building,
the policemen opened an INDISCRIM-
isali. i'litE LfON THE AUDI
ENCE until they had emptied their re
volvers, when thoy retired and those in
side barricaded the doors. The door whs
broken in and the firing again commenced,
when many of the colored and white
people either escaped through the door or
were passed out by tne policemen inside,
BUT AS THEY CAME OUT THE PO
LICEMEN WHO FORMED THE
CIRCLE NEARESTTHE BUILDING
FIRED UPON THEM, AND THEY
WERE AGAIN FIFED UPON BY
THE CITIZENS THAT FORMED
THE OUTER CIRCLE. '
Many of those wounded and taken
prisoners, and others who were prisoners
and not wounded, were fired upon by their
eapto-s and by citizens. THE WOUND
ED WERE STABBED WHILE LY
ING ON THEGKOUND, AND THEIR
HEADS BEATEN WITH BRICK
BATS. In the yard of the building,
whither some of the colored men had es
caped and partially concealed themselves,
tbey were fired upon and killed or wound
ed by policemen. SOME MEN WERE
KILLED AND WOUNDED SEV
ERAL SQUARES FROM THE SCENE,
MEMBERS OF THK CONVENTION
WERE WOUNDED BY THE PO
LICEMEN WHILE IN THEIR
HANDS AS PRISONERS, SOME OF
lllX.it JnUlt 1 Alili X .
NO STEPS HAVE AS YET BEEN
TAKEN BY THE CIVIL AUTHORI
TIES TO ARREST CITIZENS WHO
WERE ENGAGED IN THIS MASSA
CRE OR PUBLIC MEN WHO PER
PETRATED SUCH CRUELTY.
As to whether the civil authorities can
mete out ample justice to tbe guilty par-
nua on oota eiaes, i must say it is my
opinion unequivocally that thev cannot.
Judes Able, whoso course I have closely
watched for nearly a year. I now consider
one ot the most dangerons men that we
nave here to tne and of the
P. H. SHERIDAN.
JUajor treneral Commanding.
GENERAL NEWS.
Mrs. Jenkins complained in the even
ing that the turkey she had eaten did not
set well. "Probably," said Jenkins, "it
was not a hen turkey.
Professor Newton, of Yale College, fore
tells a prodigious flight of meteors on the
or 1 Itn ot next JNovember. It will
probably be the last of the century. Only
thirteen of these met-oric showers are re
corded between the years 903 and 1833.
The coffin of a colored woman, who had
apparently died of cholera at Cairo, Illi
nois, the other day, during her husbaod s
absence, was opened by the latter on. his
return, and signs of life were observed in
the supposed corpse. The woman was re
moved from the coffin, and is now as well
ever.
Two ignorant French peasants were dis
cussing the continental war, v-hen one
attempted to explain to the other the na
ture of the telegraph. After repeatedly
failing, he was struck with a brilliant no
tion and exclaimed: '-Imagine that the
telegraph is an immense long dog so
long that its head is at Vienna and its
tail at Paris. WelL tread on its ti.il.
which is at Paris, and it will bark l
Vienna. Do you understand now. stunid.
what the telegraph is like?" "Oh. VfiS !
replied the other, "I have an idea now
what a telegraph must be."
1
The rebel General Wrii'hL whn u- a
delegate to Philadelphia, has been writ
ing a letter to tho Augusta Cht-miele, ot
which he is now editor. In thecoi.rseof
one of them he says : "The Federal Cav
alry General Custer is here. I have m.-t
him several times to-day, but he seems not
raogf'i" me as the Confederate
ffhn
licked him out of his boots.' on one o. fu
sion in Virginia, and who has now his fine
war Vharger plowing cotton on the broad
fields of the South."
no
"
The Romance of Croquet
[From Pouch]
You tv!d me," said my romantic young
f : I.T.-.t to mo, "that I should have lots of
opportunities of saying sweet things to
to Uor. ' I pointed out to him that he
Lad hid numberless opportunities at 'cro
quet. He bad not seen it, I gave him
aonie hints, and he owned himself per
iViily astonished at the facilities afforded
for serious flirtation by this admirable
-sine. ' Give ine," he exclaimed, "a cro
iiu.'t party, :ind the object of my affec
tioiie, aid niy success is certain."
For tho Knefit of fluttering flirters I
carei'ul'y observed the game, and press
the following account, dramatically ren
oered, to tho notice of young ladies and
gentlemen, in order that they may know
tho di!fiVultie8 to be encuntered in the
pursuit of the interesting science of out-oi-door
flirting-in-croquet company.
Ktrg-lie Vroguet Player (who gets up
the game, and who means "the game, the
h -is 5:11110, and nothing but the game").
Nowth.-u! Sides! Here Poty!
To Romantic Young Man, who being
ir.i'lincl to corpulence, was when a
boy, called "Potty" at school.
Romantic Youth (thinks te himself.) I
wih to goodness he wouldn't call me
l'otlv (looks furtively to see if Miss Ger
trude l.i iuit noticed it; is satisfied that
Mi'- dida't, and answors briskly,) Yes!
E'lenjeiic Player. You'll take 3Jiss
Dowdy for a partner.
.Miss Dowdy, a maiden lady, age un
certain. li . mantic Youth (thinking it's just like
his lu- k l'axmes suddenly glum.) Oh I
Very Well.
Miss Lmnit (with n sweet smile.)
Wboesideam 1 en?
Enrryetic Player. Oh ! You're my
p-irtTH;r.
Romantic Youth sees an opportunity lost;
be Diight have said something with
deep meaning about u being partners."
He puts his mallet under his arm like
an umbrella, and regards Miss Gertrude
with melancholy.
iJLisDvmly (with such a look.) We're
partners, Mr. Prinkie.
The Romantic Youth's name. He bows,
and wishes 3liss Gertrude would look
nt him, a ad see how wretched he is.
Energetic Player ( to two others. ) You'U
play, won't you? and we'll have tbreo a
side.-
The two new ones are a chatty pleasing
looking Young Ladv, and a Comic
Man with a reputation in his part of
the country.
Young Lady (Miss W'ilson.l With
pleasure. But I'm afraid you'll find mo
rather wnat .air. itummal ho .runny
Man) would call "a muff."
This leads to a little laughing and talking."!
Romantic Youth (who has managed to
sidle up about as quick ly and mysteriously
as the Ghost in tho - Corscian Brothers "
to Miss Linnit's side). I wish we (finds
that his voice has almost disappeared)
Attcm ! (Clears nis tnro&t, but still finds
that his undertone, in which he intends to
say his sweet things, it uncommonly
gruff.) I wish that we were ( struggles
with his throat) purtners. This last word
sinks altogether.
MUsLinnit (looking straight at him
with "tho- eyes," and speaking, he thinks,
unnecessarily loud). What? .
Romantic Youth (feeling that he'd bet
ter not be too precipitate, and trying to
adopt a tone somewhat below hers, and
alxve his former ore) I said, I wish
that (suddenly changes the entire
phrase) that we were playing together.
Hiss Linnit (a little disappointed, per
haps, but not showing it) Oh Yes,I wish
we wero. Laughs apd looks toward the
other players.
Romantic Youth, experiencing some
difficulty in selecting tbe best things out
of the lot he's got to say, is silent. Ho
has just hit upon a commencement
when
Energetic Player Now, then, Potty !
You begin.
Funny Man (much amused) Potty!
Who's Potty ?
Energetic Player loudly explains while
Romantic Youth, missing his first hoop,
and feeling that he is not showing to
advantage, becomes depressed.
Hiss Linnit. My turn? (Discovers
dainty ankle, pretty little croquet shoe
and stocking.) Ani I to go here ? (Funny
man instructs her. Romantic Youth
thinks him oihsious.) May I bold it like
this ? (Energetic player explains to her
the best mode of grasping tho mallet.)
Romantic Youth would have liked to have
interfered, but has nothing to say on the
subject.) I hope I shall have bettor for
tune than Mr. Prinkie. (Looks coquet
isbly towards Romantic One, who smiles
grimly as if the world and its pleasures
were naught to him now. She plays and
makes hor first hoop triumphantly.)
There!
Funny Man. Potty's potted, eh ?
General laugh, in which Romantic Youth
is obliged to joii., and wishes that the
Red Sea, or something, would sweep all
funny men off the face of the earth.
Romantic Youth (as the game pro
gresses he sees Miss Linnit standing
apart by her ball, and gradually gets up
to her side in tho "Corsican Brothers"
ghost style as before) You've been
croqued out here?
He tries to remember what the dickens it
was he had arranged to say.
Miss Linnit (looking staaight at him,
and understanding all about it at once).
"Yes. Very unkind, wasn't it?" '
Romantic Youth (absently). "Yes."
Doesn't see that her remark leads to any
thing, and thinks he's wasting time.
Miss Linnit thinks so, too.
Energetic Player (interrupting some
stroke in the middle of the ground). "I
say, wnen two balls aro kissing.you know,
vou can't "
Explains what you can't, &c
Juintaniic iouth (hazily seeing an op
portunity, says in an undertone,) "I didn't
know that" (feels his throat getting hot,
but continue "there was kissing allowed
at tois game
Looks at her tenderly. As there's a pow
erful sun, he finds that a couple of sec
onds of ftx.l gazing makes his eyes wa
ter. He averts them, and is conscious
of blinking unromantically.
jlissjjinmt (who wont follow suit,
says carelessly.) man t you i
Romantic Yovth ( feels inclined to say
angrily, " No, I didn't," but substitutes.in
a plaintive tone.) I'vo been longing to see
you ior
Is going to add, " tbe last three days,"
wnen
Energetic Player (unconsciously.) Now
then, Twe Blue (that is, Miss Linnit) it's
your turn.
Miss Linnit ('not approving of too pow-
ertul a demonstration in public). Ob, 1
beg your pardon, 1 m sure.
At once hits her ball sharply, and walks
alter it.
Romantic Youth (looks after her bitter
ly, and wishes he hadut wasted his time
m talking about croquet instead of saying
something to the point. Sighs.) Ah !
Funny Man. Now then, Potty, show us
what you can do. (Komantic Youth
wishes he might snow him what be could
do, and then misses an easy stroke.) Oh,
butter-nngors :
General laugh. Romantic One thinks
whata conceited 'ass that fellow is.
Chatty Young Lady. I'm afraid I can't
do this stroke without spooning. May I
spoon I
Funny Man (loudly). lou mayn't
spoon alone.
A titter. He laughs heartily at his own
wit. Komantic 1 outb sees a real
portunity gone, and hates Funny Man. -
Energetic Player, (at tne winning end
of the grounai. jnow, i m a rover!
Miss JJoudv, (with the slyness of anun
certain age, to Komantic iouth). Im
alraid that's the character of many gentl
men.
Romantic Youth, (wocdering what right
she bas to talk like tbis). vtnat! A
rover? (Determines not to give her any
encouragement). un,yes.
("Looks with envy towards Miss Linnit,
wno is making most successiui nits un
der the personal superintendence of the
I unny Man J.
Jws Dowdy (sentimentally). Croquet's
very life-like.
Romantic Iouth (feeling uncommonly
matter-of-fact). Is it?
Miss Dowdy. Ah ! l ou ve no poetry,
m atraia. uon i you recollect mose
beautiful lines
Funny Man (shouting). Now, Potty,
" spooning : mu must come ana
play your stroke.
Miss JJoway (simpering i. spooning!
How absurd, to be sure.
fM Linnit enjoys the joke. Everybody
does. Atimauui: lymuuarea vtwikiuv
for the rest of the game.
From which it may be seen that your
party must be carefully chosen, if the
opportunities " are to made satisfactor
ily available-
J
DRY GOODS.
DRY GOODS
Wholesale!
mHE ATTENTION OF MER-
L ;H&NT3 is .nitM to our nDusuftJIy large
lock of merchaatilM aitbl for tii
FALL TRADE !
50 Cases Anierkan Prints,
20 Cases V. BeLalrjfS,
20 Cast s assorted Flannels, -10
Cases Pacific Merinos,
5 Cases French Merinos,
10 Cases Yo0ln Blankets,
10 rases Balmoral Skirts,
100 Bales Sheeting,
200 Bales Baiting,
25 Bales Wadding,
25 Bales Ticks and Stripes,
10 Bales Denims.
ALSO,
Ladles' Dress Goods,
Broadcloins,
Cassimeres and Eatlnetts,
Tailors' Trimmings,
fankee Sotlons,
Hosiery, Glovrs, vc, Ic.
Onr goods ara now dailv arriving, and will ba
offered at the I aw tat market rntci.
MORCAN, ROOT & CO.,
SO. SSS SI PERIOB SI-BEET,
Corner of 3neca street.
auKST:70-DTrtW
OPEMJG FALL. GOODS.
P. SHERWOOD IS NOW OPEX-
I
. ins: a lara- atock of Faehionable Goods. De
invitee attention to his aloe 0
French and English Xcrlnoes, Color,
ed and Blatk Alpaca, Mohair
Mixtures, wool, plaid and
figured, and plain im
press Cloths.
A La his stock of Opert rianaela. Black and
White Plaid Flannels, Whiteend Ued flannels
In all qualities. AIo a lrce lot of Long
HK and fr-joare plaid baw!a.
OPENED THIS DAY !
A larg iiiTo.ce of
COLORED SILK VELVETS,
i
GRKXS, BL0I,
bTKEL, BKOWfC.
UABNET, PCBPLI.ao.
BLACK SILK VELVETS,
All widths and qualities.
WOOL BEKETZ, (In colon ud black mw svnd
elejfc'jt ttjle of Dress; Gixxit.
ang29 B. I LDWIX & CO.
ENGLISH fJUAPE!
Just receiTsd at
Ford & Wagner's,
257 Superior Street.
Crape Veils !
From $2.50 to $11.00 eacH.
Best quality
ENGLISH CRAPE
Worth from $8 to $12 per lard.
New lot oi
JOSEPH KIDS
it $1.00 per Fair.
CRAPE COLLARS !
CRAPE SETS !
HAT CRAPE
Corsets in all Sizes
Kew lot
Belt Ribbon!
All Silk, extra quality.
CALL ASD TAKI A LOOK AT ODE
ENGLISH crapi:
FORD & WAGNER.
nn(r25 .
FRLS.l ARRIVAL OF
Fall Dress Goods!
H0WER & HIGBEE
Have J tut opened larjp assortment of
DRESS GOODS
Oomprislng many qualities of
Floured French Poplins,
Black Vrench Poplins,
btrlpt) Poplins,
Black and Mripe Mohairs,
Baratheas,
Enstlhh Bombazines,
. Wlnseya.
Baxopr Plaids,
. Poll-dc-l hevres
french Prints.
Alao m Terl-rtj of SILK A PATKST V' TTS,
WHO BomeiainK nnw in
SK1BTIN09, at
snir24
23 SFPEBIOR NTKZET.
J. M. H0WER & CO.,
I'll Ontario street,
Open thia dsy New Styles
Fall Dress Goods !
Plain, Figured and White
ALPACAS !
PLAIN IRISH POPLINS !
Plain, ritfnnd end Plaid
FRENCH POPLINS
French Merinos,
Sew Styles Delaines,
Sew Styles Prints !
auEB 124 O VTA BIO STREET.
RUCK SILKS. I hare J
I rec elved
a uleti'Ud aaaortment or tne
t oaalitia of
mamLeaBt. lrwi biiki imm . odi were onr-
cnura tu to tow t point or w ee90, vtr.en
eab,ra m to Mil item ai vary' prtot. Per
tou wis hi up to pnrcbaa food cbaap Black
Silka, will aaT money by callinc -t
B. Hllati s (-neap U'f Ooodl store,
r store will ba ovenvd avai-v alrd --
from H-dowa till 10 o'clock.
tnne? ft H
PROFESSIONAL.
CULTIVATION OF TH K VOICE, PIANO
ASD OBaAS INSTKUOTIOJI. Hits. .
SHEPHKB.D, (UTFaisof Plynoatb l1i-rcfa,)S12
3?.itfs--tfV pemr Trinity Chm-ch. JqpU B17
DENTISTRY..
BrTLSR at GBGESriKLD hare re
moved their Dental Booms to House So. U82
Superior street, opposite Oa BnildiBav '
b. o. s. airruft. ' nu izjwzmfcs.
mayl:B15
CKAS. W. at CUNWAI W. SOB Lit,
Attorneys & Conasellors at Law
A-XBI0A9 BrjILDIKOS,
' ' Ol-aTa, Own.
DRY GOODS.
OPEMVti OF FILL TRADE
500 Bos. Ken's Skirt Drawers,
300 Ooi. ladles Fnder Garments,
TheaboTe ara AUCTION GOODS, ud will be fold
at a great redaction.
I. P. 8HIBWO0D,
ngS
U2 and 244 Bnperior street.
J. H. DE WITT & CO
Otter great Bargains hi
SUMMER CLOTHINC!
tin n Salts, White Hack TeMs and
Pants, Children's Llnea and Light
Cloth Salts, Silk Mantillas
Light Cloth Cloaks and
Dress Goods.
the above goods wilt be so'd cheap to make
room ior
FALL AXD mm STOCK
Nov being sflaaufectnred.
Clothing Hade to Order In the Tcry
Best Style.
J. H. DeWITT a
anglT N om. 7 and 11 PnbHc 4q gjye.
NEW FIRM !
New Stock of Aatnci Goods
Beecher & King
50. 16 PUBLIC SQUARE,
(Cobb's Hw Block,)
Will open to-daT an entire new stock of Seasonable
uooos, comprising m par.
Dress Goods,
Shawls,
Sheetings,
Tickings,
Stripes.
Checks.
atC.i etc , etC
Table Linens,
Casilmeres,
Shirting,
opera Tlanels,
White Goods,
Embroideries,
Hoskrj and Gloves,
NO 16 PUBLIC SQUARE
ang2!:K!8
JUST RECEIVED
AT
Selbj, Brown & Pearson'
L0 OntarioIStreet,
AlUrga'aaaortment o(
Kid Gloves
At Use Dollar par Pair.
HOOP SKIRTS & CORSETS
PAKASOLSS
At reduced price m,tZ
Selby, Brown & Pearson's
KAUFMAN & BRO.
AnrrAOTuUBS or
HOOP SKIRTS & CORSETS
Ladies' Under Garments,
wbolbuls a utTarL,
Made to order at greatly red need prices at
KAUFMAN BBO.,
818 Snperlo-tt.. next 'o 2d Prea. Chnrch.
Crumb,BasIington& Kendall
DRESS GOODS!
TTe hell offer on Moc day, A ngnst 20th, Tery flae
aaeoruuent 01
FRENCH MERINOS,
FRENCH POPLINS.
With foil lhes of seasonable
DRESS GOODS!
aoglfl -
Look out for Poisoned Seeks.
THE ONLY ENAMELLED PAPER
COLLAR mean factored free from any pota
orjortt preparation, aa pronounced by tbe higbeat
medical antnomy ot tne eountry, u
Goldsmith' PrrHplratlon Proof E-
a are! 14 Collars.
All other mannfactarera of Knemelled CoUart nee
acompwition made Irora white Lead a deadly
poteen. . .. uLt.ua '.u.,
147 Wer-t.
Afmnt- for Clereland for GoMitcitt- Patent
Glace Collar. J yl
B
KST BARGAINS Of TBS 8KAS01
rerr faihionebte for dreeeea. at only AOeenua
rard. Thie ia abent one-n Uf the sfncral price of
ttmllar Foods. Also, rood one' j ttrocaat) atpme-
m, only 60 cents a yard, with a eplend.dtock of
bamnwr Ureas Ooods, wn.cn 1 poeitif el nnoance
witl be eold at tower prices than can be '-rchasod
at any other hnse in tbe city. 8. nt N.
jnnn- f ornerenperior-st. ami . ou qare.
E. R. GRISWOID & CO.
217 Superior Street,
Open this nrornfng
NEW STYLES
Fall Delaines !
new styles:
Fall Prints !
ALS
BAMSLEY DAMASKS !
E.B.6riswold&Co
j-wfliry,
englT
217 CPEBIOB RTlEAi.'
PATENT MOP WRINGER.
R. H I N E S '
MOP TOMER
P. M. W.
Durable, econoatlcal and ornamental
E. P. . W.
Small investments and large profits.
E. P. II. W.
The sum aavoont of work oas be dan is nas half
the time
E. P. Tkt. W.
Bol iuf hoi water may ba need.
E. P. He W.
f the water la hard strong lye-wet sr can be need.
E. P. M. W.
A lady can mop her floor or carpet If neceeaary
after haring dressed for an evening party
or in bridal array.
E. P. H. W.
Very family bays It becanee tbey oant afford to
do without it. It costs hot a trill le, UkU er
years, and live from three to ten time
its price every year,
B. P. He W.
People bey rifthts beoaaee thir judgment telta
them It will be received with Joy in every
household.
E. P. M. W.
Agents are making from S10 to fS pr day.
E. P. M. W.
There Is no sense In whistling the tnne " I've
noming to oo;" no excuse for lone faces and
rargt - pante for want of paying baMneas.
Bur a Right. Cuyahoga county wtU
be furnished by towns. Cleveland
city j wards. Ho other counties to be retailed
e. p. m. w.
To actlre, energetic baslnen men I win pay sala
nnoi irom aou to atuu per montn
and expenses.
E. P. M. W.
I think I oan satisfy an eua who will call and
aee me that thia ia tbe " bigg t little thing" to
make mener oat of that has hees discovered In
Sfteen years.
For Bights ia Ohio apply at the American Honee
or aaoreea u. a. m AVliSW,
Cleveland, O.,
Agent for Bhinea' Patent Mop Wringer.
InneT W-DAIR
CLOTHINC.
A FACT
Mix & Fairchild
Are offering great bnains in
Men's, Youths' & ChildreD's
FINI AKD MEDIUM
CLOTHING
AND '
FURMSIiLVG GOODS !
rUK STOCK WILL ALWAYS BE
V found the moat delrshle of any In tbis city,
aa the MAKE, MATERIAL and FIT of oar
Clothing will equal the beet custom made, aid onr
rnrniHhing Goods tha UOBBlKd of the hOB-
.Summer Clothing: !
At s small advance from cost. Give na a call.
MIX. at PAIKTHII.il,
10 HOFFMAN BLOCK,
East Bide Public Square, Cleveland. Ohio.
aug22
JUST RECEIVED 1
300,000 of Goldsmith's Poison Proof
- Enamel Paper Collars !
At a west Hew York Wholesale Prices
S . MANN'S,
ng!3 Bole Agent, Cleveland.
Qso. A. Davis,
M. L. M.
Flixorro.
if as Fork.
ESTABLISHED
A. Dm lHit,
Davis. Peixotto & Co.,
etannuc vera and Jobbers of all qualities Jnd
ijfea oi
READY MADE CLOTHIAG.
Corner of Superior A Water sU,
CLEVELAND, On
Offer for the Spring and innmor Season a large and
w en hwiwi aloe oi a en ana 00 i
SLOTHING.
These Goods are made expressly fur on? Trade and
inatye. -ltuanand workmanship are
Eqsal to the Best Custom Work
A choice selection of
CESTS' FCKSISIinG G00US,
Such as Cnder Garments,
CaMlmcre and Flannel Shirts,
Paper Collars, Ac- Ac
Posaesein. the benefit of as Staters ooi inectioa.
we are enabled to offer superior indoceatenta to
purchasers of Read? Hade Clotbins;.
Nearly twenty yearn' experience la Wester,
trade, gives ns nnusual qnaltflcatioaa to snpntv
the wanta of Country Merchante.
Onr old friend and purchasers senerally are
eordiellr Invited te.ill.
DAVIS, FECI OTTO A. CO-
Oor. Water and Superior sta., and lo. I Water at.
mar'o
SAFES AND SCALES.
ROCHESTER SCALE WORKS.
WTABLUBS 1141.)'
FORSYTH'S
U. S.
Standard
SCALES
WARRAHTTTCrt
i.rv.jc, acraniie mma Dnrsoie.
6rJ Trletle nd sisee, adapted to every nee.
m-m amvrn sioo"i tne ceet OT ZOyearaMI
Ale Foravth's Track. Btee Barrow, lion.
Ing Prreaes and Soger Mills. Send for circular.
rufiflxxnt V SST-AKB, Gen. Agents.
87 Weterat., Cleveland, Oh!o.
r Scales riytred. jy28
"TABTIX'S ' f ATKXT 8ArES-(iIum
XtX and dry nlaster llin. Do rt tkir
tire proof qnaHties by age. Always reliable.
Have stood every test trinmohaatlv. nr. Damn
u uuiim rrwt. eniy-eeven sites of tsasioees
Safes. Also elaieent llonsa fmlem for nlat s-rl
in allies or rnrnitnre. me Beet tecnrt-
iy in me worio. lenl forcircqiar.
wisi'LAKC Geo Agents.
87 Water-st., Cleveland, Ohio.
eT Safes Repaired. jya
FAIRBANKS'
STAHDABD
SCALES
1 OfsUI Kimds,
Fairba&lis. Morse & Co..
82 SUPERIOR RTRBET,
' r OLITBt AKD, OHIO.
' We aleo man a fact a re and deal In '
rttr nnd Warehatise Trnrka-Rnsnrmc
bv w.m pr-M iri-". swag nt
ejoneam rresses, w eisym-sn nm tej ri
Beanus aad Kntmea, Liter e
nlfent lreaaea- etc-, e.
a9BasrsP
PL
PL
H. Be oaJwfhi to boy only the canine.
jy7:r , '
(
of
or
ef
site
BITTERS.
GREENBACKS
ARE GOOD!
Birr
El
OBACK'S STOMACH STTTTBS,
rears of asperieace and trial, haveprorea
to he tbe feet remedy eitsat fur all com
laints where a tools and elm iniaat are
required. Tbey eater fail to stnogUea
the weak. Impart vigor to tbe strong, aud
art vigor to tbe strong, and-p-v
veto snattere d and broken If
tloaa. No retaedy bas beea I X
aa araca favor l I I
m I, - f rht4
io all respects meter.
Sown innsillnllnas
received with
aaca'a Stomach Brrraaa, la CaJeego
0
YtK 90,00 bottles were sold by ee
drf-beaee fas the past year. It Is ad
amted by onr ssost learned phveftdaua
taat Dr. EC-BACK'S STOMACH BIT-
TJLES ooaafa-M Um preperUse ef a geatie
I -ra
th- r-t stomschlo kaova to the world. EO I
BACK'S biTTKl-S sbonld be aaed by roe- I
valceceata to strengthen the prostration I
which always frilows aeate diseass. In ihe--
BILIOC8 districts of tha West and Booth
there has, for a tons; tine, baeo mo'a
asxdd an article of bTOMAOH BITT-ltS,
which, if taken la proper e.aaatiea, aed
at, tho proper tinse, are a tore preveotivo
of BHtoos f-rer, fever and Agae, Livery w
Complaint, Drip pate. Indigestion, Jaaa-f I
ilea, Kidney CoapUJat, and all dliim I
ef similar Baton ; and are better as a pre- I
festive tor bilious derangenseni, rsfolating
A
HD streofthlng the yetea., and gtvisg
tenetot-a digestive organs, lean any otbsjv
known remedy. How taat the war ie over,
tbere will be tho asanas seeking bosses ia
the South. Ko person who values his 11m
ahonld go there Ttttont haviog eciDjtMlty arv-
at hand the B1TTKBS. as a safogsard" I
aain. spidastte aa4 aialadias engalered I
by miasma and Kllated water. Tnva4re I
nd all reeideuts of the raob river-bottoa. ;
aOCNTIRI of tbe Weet and South, aoA
I th valley or the Mtestaeippl ud its tritm
tarlm. she old Drovtd tbeesaalvae with t
1 J BITTKIU. Tbere to probably no ene du
' aese with which Mankind ara afflt-l
wblrh Is the soaroe of so many at In
as dTHpepeie, er ee It to more eomeKtaiy
c!.r4 Hoar fjtos-ech, and there to ne aeere
ort . a remedy than Kobeck't Btosaarh I 1 i
Biltara. Tbey are m known te -ML
K1MO OHO L KB A has si ways bean moon
dreaded by tae pnbiio, and people havo
rtwnrted to all ainnn of mr jtaae te
errM tha progrsee, bat with little socease.
A tore oare and preventive to to be fonnd
la the nee of Dr. BOBAOK'S SCANDIN
AVIAN R EMIil I EA. Kae the bowels
open with tbe Pilla, and Invigorate the
system by tree oes of tbe tomas h Bitters,
or, if the blood to thia nee the Partner.
SUCH n
In ever
Tor
Do not
TJCH aa Invaluable remedy shoaid be kept
every tatniiy. neap tne system in foil
and aotaing is to be namd from dts-
caotera. Tan out uklia-LS
Do not be deceived by porehansg any of
the Toaek nostra ma onder thevartoaa names
s
ef Hitters, rnrchaaa eon ether but Dr.
BOBACK'S STOMACH B1TTLR8, which
are compounded of the purest drugs, and
in WQicn we amtctea can my.
ABB
BETTER !
PRINCE, WALTON V CO.
' (Sneeeaaors to Dr. C. W. Koaaoa.)
SOLI PROPRIETORS, C
Jrc. , S, 60 eueaT 69 East TMrd BL,
'l!n-15ATI, OHIO.
sjsasanaBBBaaasaKBassseawaajsmaasaajBesaaBasejaBaa
CITY NOTICES.
N0TICK TO Cii.MB.iae8. Pro
posals will be receive- at tha City Ci.il Eotei
neer's Office ontil .o'clock P. M., Mtmdny, rVp
t saber 9d, for griuliug and improvtag hupei ir
treet, from Brieitr et to tbe line of the ten cre
lots
Plans and specififatfnns may be sen nt said
Engioeer'a office. Too Bord 'f City Improve
menta invite the submirision of bid-, reserv
ing the riht to reject ny or all of the same.
By order of the Board.
JOHN WBlTVliAW,
an. 30 31? City Civil Kaxineer.
NOTICE TU CONTBACTOttS Pro
posals will be received at the City Civil Ko
gioeer'sf fBce BDtil 2 o'clock P. At. Nuoday. Sep
tember loth. 18ti, fof radin, pavins? and 1m
proviog Bank street, between apttiur and Lake
streets; pavement to be wood.
Plana and specification may In ruit tod mon
particular in:ortm;iiOibTaiuelat a:d kuneers
office. Tbe Bourdof City luiproTnn-i invite
the snbmis ion of bids rt-erv:ng the r ght to re
ject any or all of the same.
Jfy oroer of tne 0 oaro.
JOHN WH ITELAW,
ang30:343 city Civil Engineer.
VfOTICK To irvoIt"my ton
Xl cfrn. At a rcalar iaretin of the City
tTonnciiof th City of Cleveland, he'd An gnat 'ISlh,
18, tbe following reeolatioo was wlopled :
fi'sof-eW, That m the opinion of this Coonrit it
Is dWmed neeersary te grade, pave and improve
Detroit atrett between the anatherly 1iu-j ot the
Cuyahoga bueat fc'arnace od tuo center hue of
PflstTet. and t gra-ie end imptov Burton
street bewen Lorain street eari ibe M.'aworth
Uud; a-'ao t ttiwl aot imrove UeaNii sirewt
between Lorato an 1 stunn-v stieta. Ail peroua
claiming da mas by rrtteon of tha grading, pav -ing
and impioving said etriit street, or by
reaeoa, of graaling aud impioving of either of a -id
Bnrtot and Mx-bantcs str- ets. are hereby r
qnlrtd to file their c'aims in writing with the City
Clerk, witbia Are eks from the first pnbltcAtion
of th . resilation, or he forever barren from flftng
any clums or raceivig any durmg'w ther-f)r.
- . . WH KATUN,
Assistant City CHt.
Cleveland, Annt 29, 18' rt. angrj aft
N
6TICK TO C0XTK4Cr0K!t The
posals fir gradinff aud pavinic tbe aidewelks m
front of the Cite Cemeterv. West side. Also the
aidewalka in front of to. 10 Koine Hodw, and in
front or eitr procertv oorn-r n' Pearl .n4 Ursta-
attoets, nntii it o'clock on Monday, tho 3dint.
The Board reservim the tight to acceptor rwjrct
any or ail b d.
E arder of tne B nnL
-..Ma. VATTIB30, Olrh.
Cleve'and. Angnat 27tn, 18 . ai9:iJA
BlILUKas. e'ed proposal
1 wil
ill here rived at tbe City Clerk's office na-
tiieotorday, Strtember 1st, 18, et 13 o'clock
M.. for tbe cofifttrnctioo o. a nevilioo at Wood
land Cemetery. P'ans end speitlcations may ba
-en at the City Clerk's office. The Committee on
Parks and Publio Grounds solisit bids for tbe
same. raeerrinK the r eh to accept or reject anv
proposals al tbeir option.
y oroer 01 the Cliy tonrcfl.
JuiiN HTMT NGTOK, Cbairman.
rieveland, Angast 2d. 1806.
(fit raid and Pialn L-ealer ropy.) aog-T34
LEGAL.
XOTICBa
Rose K are nag h, Plaintiff, ) Oonrt of Onmmon
vs. j Plena lor Coyahtjga
retries &arDcn, id-i
Crontv. Ohio.
Cleveland A Maboaing f
KnTlr1 Cowtiaoy, at.d j
Petition tr money
and to sell iacda.
usury uatus, uei cs. j
PH E DFEN D ANT, PATRICK
L Kavennxh, a a ia-r,idrjnt of ih-. btaie of
Obio, and wfco Is supposed t j be a rtwirfest of tbe
State of lilluoia, will take notice tht ibe ptftiat:ff.
isoee n.vena(0, niea ner p ttttoa in tneofflseof
theCterhof sahl Court, ne-n tte l;ih day of An-
gnat, lia, against eud Patrick Itavenagh and the
otber defendajjle above nemed. settlaa forth that
st the May ttrm of said Coart, for th- year l(yX,
see rerovorea a decree or di.oroe fr .m said Keve
nat;b, and also ibe inn of on thousand dollars
for her reasonable alimony, and he costs ia tbe
twocfues in which satd decree wa- rrnlerrd. taxed
as follows : 01 igoal at 993.38. and increaaed coeie
as H 06. That her said alimony was aatle a
m-'P -pon 1 do premises aeacrioea as follows, to
wit: situate ia tbe city of lvelend, in the conn
ty of Cnyahope and SUte of Ohio, described aa fol
lows, to wit : lleiatr. the who'e of anb-lot eishtv-
aix and part of tab let ehcttty-Ave of tbe ub
division of part of orleinal lots nnmber forty
eiK 't and forty-bine, matle by Blisba Taylor and
Minti a, noji, im reooroen in cn omce or tbe
Becorder of said County of nyahos;, O., in book
or,beroit i,f mapa aud snb-dlvlaions, pate
avfereace f r narticulars as to sine and boons-ariea
of said land being had to sid raoo-ded snb-oivls-hn
said part of said sub-lot No. 60, is bounded aa
fbliows, to wit; Commencine at a point in the
Westerly line thereof, wbieh ie 100 feet sooth of
Ibe south lioe of Lorain street, sseaanring on tbe
westerly line of said lot; tbe ore easUrly parallel
with Loram street to the westerly line of Tavlor
street, thence enntherly on said line or Savior
treat to The rontb-eest corner of said lot; thence
westerly on tbe south line of said lot to the south- .
west corn r ; and thence northerly on tbe wester
ly -tine t th- p sc off becinntnr; and alee a nart
of sub lot (No. 86) eighty-flvo, of the sob-division
made by Elriha Taylor and James M. Hovt of
part of crigioal lots numb-re forty-eiebt and
urty-aiiht, rerxrrded as above, and to which ref
Vence la hereby made, bounded as follows, to wit:
Bortherly, weeteily and easterly bv the linee of
aid aob-lo nnmber eighty -ft ve, and eoniberly by
a line running from the w-eterty line of aaid sub
let t Ty lor street, parallel with the southerly
line of Lorain street, andone busdnd feet dttant
Syptberly therefrom That said defendant, ave
rJjvr. bas no personal nrooeiTv. or otber Un.i. in
th rearh rf an execution of thia Court, and that tbe .
oore aeacrita lands are 00 eocumtxred tbat tbey
t.n not be sold upoo an execntton. That the other
al-ovs na.mvddefslantshaveorcbi-i te hare lienai
cpon tb a hove deecribed pr Deny, and praying
Judgment for her alimony the sum o' one tbou
sand dollars and her costs ef suit in said two suits
the sum of ninety-eeven and 4.MCU dollars with
Id Ureal from the 14th ay of May, 184, on both
said sums, and ft or and 6-liJO dollars increased
costs, and ibat un'eas ta;d jo-'greeat be paid with
in a reasonable Mm", to be Axed by the Court, said
lauds above described will be sold, subject to tne
mortgage of Ha ry Hains (not yet due) and also
anbject to nl: the marital rights. Including the
dower interest of the Plaintiif, aod the proceeds
such sale h- applied te pay tbe Plaintiffs said
claim, and the oth r li'tts uiw Mid premises, in
their . rder, and ior other proper reii-f. The said
Kavenagh is reqnired to anawer or dmnr to said
prtitlou on or before the 17th dav eYOctohrr. 18ox
the same will be taken aa conivseed.
J. ft.GRftSiUB,
Plain till s Attorney.
A afreet IT. IHf-a anelT-.tiwlta-t P
DYEING.
redk ana? Iancy Steam Dye Work and Oleaninf
Kila.s.istiintt. oelVidsHre aerm. a.at tlfVcUuv.
98 80 oec a street.
Orrici liH B-neca street, Cleveland, O.
I mean t- make this the BUST DVCHirsiCT
THA W K3T. and thai 1 -pare ne etfort to gtvs eail s
Cart.oo.
I call the ep Ariel attrntlon ot Oentrenesi to tha
IMPrtOTKD rAltK' R r-TVU
ft-auf n " or Ke-'lv! n nf m A.n 0r-sr,
WE HAVB IT Pure Oonoese Silver
Jewelrv eoaethiBK aO-ifcf J .r . , i
ieei. Gail aad aee, at
r" t(-o. las A cva.
- J . - -7.'. V V-

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