OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles daily herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, November 05, 1888, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042460/1888-11-05/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

2
ANSCHLAG'S CONFESSION.
The History of His Life Told
By Himself.
WHY HE KILLED THREE PEOPLE.
He Tells How He Killed Fuge and
Mr. and Mrs. Hitchcock.
Other Small Crimfs.
It will be remembered that a few days
ago an account was published of the
murder of one Julius Fuge, near Oroville,
by Anschlag, and of the finding of the
body. The confession of this murder
was obtained from Anschlag by Prof. U.
8. Glick, who has translated Anschlag's
confession exactly as it was given by
him. The obtaining of the confession
was no light undertaking and Prof. Glick
deserves great credit for the manner in
which he performed so distasteful a
duty. Rev. John Berger, pastor of the
German Evangelical Church, has been
acting as Anschlag's spiritual adviser,
and Prof. Glick has been his most able
assistant. Prof. Glick labored three
days in translating the history of An
schlag, as told by himself, from German
into English. The history is as follows:
Los Angeles, Cal.. Oct. 26, '88.
A short history of my life:
I, Fritz Anschlag, was born in the city
of Kcenigsburg, East Prussia, on Septem
ber 9th, 1864. When I was two years old
I lost my mother and was taken care of
by a governess. When I was five years
old I started to school and attended three
different schools between that age and
sixteen. At the latter age I was con
firmed in the Catholic Church of Kcenigs
burg, and at this age father took me out
of school and bound me as an apprentice
to a merchant. One year prior to this
my father married his second wife.
Clerking I liked very well, but my em
ployer thought me not strong enough, and
when he told me this 1 quit working for
him and went home. After this my father
took me to a wholesale flax house to learn
the business, but I did not stay long aa I
was unable to speak English. After this
I hired to the proprietor of a wall paper
store for three years to learn the business,
but after nine months service I fell from
a ladder twenty feet to the ground, break
ing my left arm and hurting my head
very badly. After this I was in bed for*
long time, during which Dr. Schneider
treated me. I was unconscious a great
deal of the time. When I became well I
did something wrong most every day,
such as eating scup with my knife and
fork instead of using a spoon.
I was hardly ever in my
right mind. If I was sent
for anything I almost always forgot it.
Dr. Schneider gave me three months'
treatment for this mind trouble, on ac
count of which I lost the above position.
This same year, 1881,1 lost my beloved
father.
TAKEN TO A FARM.
Thinking that I was all right, my
uncle took me to his farm to learn farm
ing, which I liked very much, as I
wished to be out of doors. During my
illness I thought a great deal about com
ing to America. After staying with my
uncle one year I bad another misfortune.
I had a coal stove in my room, and 1
closed the door and damper. Then I
laid down on the bed with my clothes on
to wait for a veterinary surgeon to come
and attend to some horses. The next
morning the servant girl found me in an
unconscious condition from inhaling the
coal gas which had escaped. I was in
this condition for seven days and nights.
When my head became clear again I
went to work, and I staid with my uncle
one year longer. During this time I was
a great loss to my uncle, on account of
making so many mistakes. At times I
could not keep my mind for a minute,
and could not even count the measure
ment of the wheat, so that my uncle
would have to send another man to at
tend to it. Uncle did not want to keep
me any longer, saying that I was doing
him much damage. So I went to a farm
near the Polish boundary, as a farmer
under & superintendent. There I had to
endure a great deal, and the superin
tendent told his wife that this fellow for
gets to do his work right. I
had been there some time before
this as the superintendent was some re
lation to my uncle, and he prevailed on
him to keep me. After the superintend
ent had to leave the firm by reason of his
son's taking his place. I only staid two
or three months longer, when I had to
go home and look after other work.
During that time it happened I went
into a jewelry store to buy a watch, as
the one father gave me would not keep
time. During the time that I was look
ing at the watch, I stole one from a stand
on which several gold watches were
hanging and put it in my pocket. I then
selected one and paid for it and left the
■tore. But on account of stealing the
watch I had no rest. I thought often of
taking it back, but was afraid. I tried
to sell the watch and in doing so was
arrested, because the jeweler had sus
pected that I had it. Through my step
mother's influence I was relieved, and
they kept it a secret.
Shortly after this I found a position as i
superintendent of a farm in South Russia, |
and staid there three weeks. As I could
not get along with my employer we could
not agree. He told me I should not
give different orders from his. He
wanted to discharge me but did not. I
then received word from the court at
Kcenigsburg to come and answer to the
charge agoinst me for stealing the watch,
for which I got
pouk months' imprisonment.
I consequently lost my position. I
made my employer believe that 1 had to
serve my time in the military service.
By the first and second examinations in
1884 and 1886 I was found unfit for such
service. But in 1886 they found me
fit for first-class service. This my
relations would not have, because in case
of war it might change me to active ser
vice, when I would have served three
years. This was because I did not have
a 1-year certificate. They were also
afraid that I might do some more foolish
acts. They wished me to emigrate and
I was willing to do it. I left home with
my brother on the 11th of November,
1886, for New York, by way of Berlin
and London. There my brother left me
and I took the steamer from Tower Hill
for the New World.
It took us fourteen days to get to New
York. I stayed there three days and
then took the train for San Francisco
with some other men with whom I had
become acquainted on board the ship.
After I got there I looked for a family
whose address I had got in New York,
bat I failed to find them and on my way
from Oakland to San Francisco I lost my
friend on the boat and I have never
heard from him since.
I first tried to get work as a famer. I
advertised in the newspapers but I could' <
THE LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 5. 1888.
not find any work, so I did not do any
thing for a time.
After I received the first large money
order from home and I was becoming
more acquainted with the way of things,
I made up my mind to buy a farm, with
the understanding that I would live on
it one or two months so that I could tell
if I would like it. After looking around
quite a while I went to Bangor, and then
to the colony Conßtadt, where I met Mr.
Bader. Here I expected to find what I
wanted. We soon came to an agreement
for the ranch belonging to Bader. I had
not been there very long when
HE STEALS GROCERIES.
I went to the city to buy some seed.
While there, passing a store, T saw some
fence wire. I stopped and put three or
four reels of it in the wagon. Then
drove on and saw some sacks of coffee.
I jumped off and put three or four of
them in the wagon and drove on again.
In passing another store I saw some
packages already put up for some one. I
jumped off and put them in the wagon
also. There was also a large can filled
with something, but the wagon was so
full that I could not get it in. I went
home with this load and forgot all about
the seed I went after. I must say here
that it was very cold that day and I
drank heavy on the way home. Two
days afterwards a gentleman, the owner
of the wire, came to the colony and
found out who stole those things, and
demanded that I should bring them back
the same day. But I did not do it till
the day after. A Sheriff came and ar
rested me and took me to the city, be
fore a Justice of the Peace. I was found
fuilty and imprisoned sixty days. After
was free I went back to the farm again
with Mr. Bader, and in a short time
after I returned I planned to kill my
neighbor, Julius Fuge, believing I could
gain possession of the property, Fuge be
ing in the habit of procuring milk of me.
He was a bachelor. He came to my
place on the morning of September 1,
1887, asking if he could get some milk
again. He was on his way to the post
office at Bangor and asked permission to
cross my field, as it would shorten the
distance, to which I consented. By this
time Bader came to the house and we
stood conversing on general topics for a
short time. Then Bader and Fuge start
ed for the Bangor postoffice and I
joined them with my gun, pretending
to hunt for hares, as was prearranged.
After crossing the field for a short dis
tance together, Fuge to my left and
Bader on the right, I carrying the gun
on my shoulder, Bader said, "a haro;"
giving the signal to shoot. I drew the
gun from my shoulder and, pointing it at
Fuge, pulled the trigger, the gun dis
charging its contents into Fiige's neck,
KILLING HIM INSTANTLY.
We stood for a moment looking at
each other; then we looked around to
see if anyone had observed us, and see
ing no one, we concluded to bury him
there. We then made a solemn vow not
to divulge the crime to any living person.
Then I went to the house and procured a
pick and shovel and, returning to the
spot where Fuge was lying dead, Bader
and I dug a hole about twenty feet from
the spot and buried him. After the kill
ing oi Fuge I stayed with Bader on the
land for some time, but fearing that the
crime would be discovered I left the
land, stating that I was not satisfied with
it. At this time I received a part of my
money from home. I also had money in
San Luis Obispo. When I left the farm
I went to San Luis Obispo by rail and
from there I took ship to San Pedro for
Los Angeles. Three days after I went to
Santa Ana and spent some days looking
for lands. I then went to Pasadena with
my baggage and upon arriving there
found that I had left it at the
depot in Los Angeles, so 1
started to walk back to Los Angeles fo*
it, While walking back, it became dark,
but I kept on and upon reaching Los
Angeles found my package. Then I sat
upon my pack wishing a train would
come going to Pasadena, but I was
obliged to remain in the depot all night,
going to Pasadena next morning. I
stayed in Pasadena two weeks looking
for lands but found it too expensive, so I
returned to Los Angeles where I learned
of two or three farms near Pasadena. I
then went back to Pasadena, but con
cluded not to buy and again returned to
Los Angeles. From there I went to
Santa Ana, and upon my arrival left my
bundle at a German hotel. I rode
around for two days with a real-estate
agent looking for land until we found a
place in Garden Grove, which I liked,
and upon which I paid him some money.
Next day I went to Anaheim and re
mained there two days, but, not liking it,
I went to Pasadena where 1 stayed three
days. I then returned to Santa Ana and
looked at lands, finally concluding to buy
the Hitchcock place. I made the first
payment according to agreement with the
agent. Before that we went to the city
to record deed and I promised him
the rest of the money in a short time.
Now I want to make it short. I then
stayed on the farm. I told the man I
hired in Anaheim that I would call for
him some time during the week.
THE HITCHCOCK MURDER.
On the day Mr. Hitchcock went to
Long Beach I commenced work, lie
came back at night, and his horses be
ing too warm to water, he put them in
the stable, giving them some hay. He
intended to water them after they had
cooled off. After eating supper together
we sat reading for a short time. Then
we started for the barn to water and feed
the horses. I had been drinking some
wine in the evening to gain courage to
commit the deed which I premeditated.
During the day I had placed the hatchet
near the door so that I could get at it
easily, and while Mr. Hitchcock was
finding the horses I placed myself in
such a position that I could easily kill
him. As he stooped to pick up the lan
tern I struck him on the head. I then
gave him two more cuts on the head, and
believing him to be dead I went to the
house to kill Mrs. Hitchcock. Finding
her standing in the kitchen I entered
the door with the hatchet in my hand.
She looked at ma as I came in and then
turned to work again. Approaching her
from behind I struck her on the head,
but did not kill her. I then struck her
again, knocking her over, after which I
dragged her out doors near the wood
pile. I then got the axe and cut her
several times, and after making sure she
was dead I started to Mr. Hitchcock
with the axe in i,iy hand,
and gave* him several more
blows. I then got the wagon
and putting some straw in it I laid Mr.
Hitchcock in first and then carried Mrs.
Hitchcock, and placing her in with Mr.
Hitchcock, covered them up. After this
[ hitched the horses to the wagon and
drove to an obscure place about two or
three miles from the house. Upon reach
ing this spot I found that I had forgotten
the spade, so I placed the two bodies on
the ground and covered them up. Next
I drove back to the house, where I got a
clean suit of clothes, and after clearing
up things around the house so that no
trace was left I returned with the spade
bo the bodies, and digging a hole, placed
them both in and covered them up very
jarefully. Taking off tho suit I had on
[ put on the clean one and threw the
lirty one into the brush, and getting
into the wagon, drove to Anaheim for
the man I had engaged to work for me
and then returned to the ranch and
worked till I was arrested and brought
to this jail. This I did thinking that no
one would find it out and that I would
get possession of the property, as the
deed was already executed in my name.
This short history is a true statement
of my life, made this 26th day of Octo
ber, 1888, hoping and trusting that God
will forgive me all these awful crimes I
have committed.
Johann Heinrich Fritz Anschlag.
Witnesses: U. S. Grant Glick, James
0. Kays.
A SLUR RESENTED.
What the 8. P. Men Think at a
"Times" Editorial.
"There is a rumor current that em
ployees of the Southern Pacific Company
have been registered here and in other
places along the line, and will attempt
to vote twice or more. Now, there may
be something in this, or there may not.
Such practices are, we believe, not alto
gether unknown in the history of the
Southern Pacific Company of Kentucky,
especially where, as in the present in
stance, one of their own employees is a
candidate for a responsible position. The
regulars are probably all right and as
honest as any other set of men, but
there is always a floating class in the
employ of large corporations, many oi
whom are purchasable. In any case, it
will be well for election officers along
the line to be on the alert for voters who
are not recognized as citizens."
The above article, which appeared in
yesterday's issue of the limes, has
aroused a storm of indignation among
the officials of the Southern Pacific's es
tablishment here. Republicans and
Democrats alike resent the slur cast upon
them by such an accusation, and the feel
ing of disgust it has aroused againßt the
Republican campaign organ is evident by
the comments that were made yesterday.
"Every employe of the Southern Pacific
is indignant at theauthorof that article,"
said a prominent official (Republican) of
the company, "and we think that no man
with an idea at all of political probity and
honor would be guilty of such an allega
tion. We all deny such a slur cast upon
the integrity and honesty of every man
who draws a salary from this company
and we consider the article a low, con
temptible trick on the part of a man who
claims to be a mouth-piece of Republi
can sentiment."
Several other railroad men, among
whom were noted a ticket agent, a pas
senger representative and a freight
official, were in the room at the time the
above remarks were made and all en
dorsed them thoroughly. Such a state
ment as that made by the Times does
much to injure the Republican cause
even among the adherents of that party.
A Prohibit* View*.
Editors Herald—ln the Times this
morning appears an address to the Re
publican voters, purporting to be from
the Chairman of the County Central
Committee of the Republican party, in
which voters are warned that about
noon on the day of election there will be
telegrams and telephones sent out from
San Pedro to Pasadena and other places
to the effect that Republicans are trad
ing Aguirre for Banbury and from San
Pedro to Pasadena that Aguirre's friends
are slaughtering Banbury, but that it
will all be a lie. Now, I wish to say to
the voters of this county that it will not
be a lie, but that this is really the plan
adopted by many Republicans, especially
the money kings, and knowing that it
will be found out by noon tliey send out
the denial beforehand, as the Democrats
would not have told them that they were
going to send out these telegrams. They
are going so far as to trade Harrison
with the Prohibitionists for Banbury. I
have positive proof that some of these
things are so, aria when I said I would
write it up I was told that I would
be denounced as a liar, but such dis
crimination, no matter where from, will
not affect me in this community, where
1 am known for thirty-six years. If
there is anything that I hate with a per
feet hatred, it is a liar, and if anything I
admire, it is fair play. I have nothing
to say against Colonel Banbury. I be
lieve him to be an honorable gentleman,
but I know Colonel E. E, Hewitt is a
man who stands above reproach, both as
to honesty and truthfulness. I have
known him for twenty-seven years and
never knew him to do an uncourteous or
ungentlemanly act to anyone, rich or
poor. Colonel Hewitt has had a large
experience in dealing with workingmen,
and so far as I know there has never
been a complaint of an unkind act by
any of them against him and these are
the men to size up a man's principals
and honesty. Twenty-five years ago I
knew of a case where Mr. Hewett took all
the money he had saved up from his
drawer, several hundred dollars, and gave
it to a man to pay an outlawed debt, he
having failed in business in the early
days of California, as was common in
those days of uncertain speculation, the
man whom he owed being a rich man at
the time, but fiat broke when Colonel
Hewitt gave him the money to pay a
debt that the law and public sentiment
said he did not owe. The public funds
of the county of Los Angeles will be safe
in the hands of such a man, and although
the Times or any other paper or person
may accuse Mr. Hewitt of acting in bad
faith in his letter designating the dis
posal he intends to make pf the public
money in case he is elected, those that
know him will not be influenced by any
such insinuations, for they know him lo
be absolutely honest and truthful. His
position might have made him rich if he
was open to corruption, but in place of
that he is a poor man but has a good
name, which the wise man Solomon says
is more to be desired than much gold.
J. W. Potts.
SLIGHT WASHOUTS.
Heavy Rain on the Deserts-The
S. P.'a Precaution!.
The rainstorm which passed over this
city on Saturday extended down south
to the deserts this side of Yuma, and, as
is usually the case, washed out a piece of
the S. P.'s track. The damage was done
between Dos Palmos and Friuk's, and
delayed No. 19, the east-bound train, a
few hours. It was all fixed up, how
ever, by the time No. 20 came along,
and reports last night stated that all
trains were running on time.
The Southern Pacific is making strenu
ous efforts to avoid delay t3 traffic by
washouts, and on Saturday a pile-driver
was put to work strengthening the bridge
over the Los Angeles river, just above
the city, as the stream flows with con
siderable swiftness during,the wet sea
son. The company is also fixing up the
roadbed on the Southern divisions, sev
eral thousands of ties having been re
ceived for that purpose at San Pedro
during the past month.
n,?£j.Y ate £ nte «nee for ladies to the Vienna
tmfltet, on Beqnena stroet.
•tree? 18 *' FOy * laa " JeM 217LoaAngeles
■BMGIL.
DR. STEINH ART'S
Essence of Life!
Sold in Europe for 17 years and years on
the Pacific Coast
CHJ-Thia great strengthening remedy and
nerve tonic cures without fail Nervous and Phys
ical Debility, Exhausted Vitality, involuntary
Weakening Drains upon the System no matter
in what manner they may occur; Weakness,
Lost Manhood in all its complications, and all
the evil effects of youthful lollie<i and ex
cesses. Also Impure conditions of the blood,
pimples and eruptions.
Price—s2.so per bottle. In liquid or pills, or 5
for SlO.
DR. STEIN HART,
100 !*. W. Cor. Flrat and Spring .s.,
Boom 13, opposite Nadeau House.
Ornci Hours—o a.m. to 3 r h.; 6to 7:3 i _,
Sunday—lo to 1 o'clock.
N. B.—For the convenience of patients, and in
order to insure perfect secrecy, I have adopted
n private address, under which all packages are
forwarded.
DR. STEINH ART'S
Great Vegetable
KIDNEi, BLADDER
AND
LIVER RLiMEDY
A positive cure and relief for all forms of
Kidney, Bladder and Liver diseases: Diabetes,
Gravel, etc,; Acute inflammation of the Kid
neys, from cold or injury, pain or heaviness In
the Back or Loins; Irritation at the Neck of the
Bladder, causing a freqneDt desire to pass
water; Smarting or Burning after micturatton;
Incontinence of Urine; Calculi: Lack of Force
or Power to evacuate the Bladder; Stoppage,
etc.
FOR THE LIVER
This remedy Is a purely vegetable compound,
free from mineral substances, and prepared
with gre<t care; this remedy is the best ever
put up to relieve immediate sufferings such as
constipated Bowels, Sick Headache, pains in
the right side running through the shoulder
blades, sickness of the stomach, Giddiness,
Double Vision, Bad Taste in the Mouth, Foul
Breath, Sour Stomach, Water Brash, Heartburn,
and all the horrible diseases implied in the
word
DYSPEPSIA.
Price, $1 per bottle. Sold at mv office. 109
West First street, and by Druggists. 027-tf
THE KNIFE »l I S X GO!
UK. A. W. BRINKERHOrr.
Diseases of Women a Specialty
CHBONIC DISEASES A SPECIALTY.
RECTAL ULCERATION, CATABBHAL CON
ditionsof the RECTUM and INTESTINAL
TRACT poison the blood, Interfere with diges
tion and assimilation, producing so-called
CONSUMPTION. By removing the cause we
continue tn cure this when all others fatL
PILES, FISTULA, FISSURE, RECTAL UL
cers, cured without Cutting, L'gatlng, Burn
ing or Swallowing Medicine, by DB. A. W.
BRINKERHOFF'S Sure and Painless System of
operating. No chloroform or ether used.
AWMore than 150,000 operations and not
one death.
the old, painful carbolic treat
ment—it Is dangeious.
C. EDGAR MfITII, M. D.
RACHEL S. PACKSON, M.D. Assistant.
Office—Hotel Hollenbeck, cor. Spring and Sec
ond sts., Los Angeles. Rooms 12 and 13.
030-3 m
Do You Dream.
YOUNG MAN! Are you suffering from any of
the errors or indiscretions of youth, causing
lame back, tired feeling about the legs, coated
tongue, bad tat to in the mouth, wind on stom
ach, or sour stomach, amorous dreams, vertigo
(dizziness), forgetfulness, loss of energy and
pain in the side? These are some of the nu
merous sj mptoms of Sptrmatorrhiea. Let not a
sense of false modesty prevent you from seek
ing relief at once. This trouble will lead to loss
of Manhood, Insanity or death. The under
signed has treated many hundred cases such as
yours with never a failure.
Have you contracted any Private Disease
which tou do; not wish your friends or family
physician to suspect? If so. DR. BLAKE3LEE
will treat you privately and successfully, and
guarantee a cure In the shortest time possible.
Many cases can be cured in twenty-four hours
if taken in time.
Syphilis (blood taint) whether of recent 01
lcng duration can bs entire'y eradicated from
the system by the use of my vegetable remedies
without mercury in any form. There Is no
necessity of going to the Springs when you can
be cured as quickly and permanently at home.
Are you troubled with Strictuer, or any other
ailment peculiar to the male sex? If so, relief Is
at hand The Doctor, by his studies and practice
in this country and abroad, has made himself
familiar with all such cases.
CONSULATION FHEE,
Drs. D. & B. sre a firm of physicians, one
specialist of which has charge of each depa't
ment. The above department is under the su
pervision of Dr. Blakeslee.
Hours: 10 a. m. to 6 p. m., and 7 to 8 p. v.
»RS. ». Ai It.
Phillips Block, N. Spring st.. Los
Angeles, Cal.
Ladies Parlors, Nos 37 and 38; Gentlemen's
Parlors. Nos. 39 and 40.
the elevator at the First office floor.
018 ly
Phrenologists anf Physicians
Who Cure Without Medicine.
' I?
Office—No. 243 North Main St.
DR. BOSK ADAMS PATTY, C. 8.,
Office-No. 109 South Main St. 012-lm»
COCKLE'S
ANTI-BILIOUS
PILLS
The Great English Remedy.
FOB LIVER, BILE, INDIGESTION. ETC.
Free from mercury, contains only pure
Vegetable Ingredients. Agents, LANGLEY <s
MICHAELS. San Francisco. sAwV'vly
O. R HEII^ZEMAN,
Druggist and Chemist,
No. 188 N. Main St., Los Angeles,Cal.
REMUVED TO 25 TEMPLE ST.
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded at Dsy
or Night o24tf
POLITICAL CAM DN.
Superior Judge.
H. K. S. O'MELVENY,
Of Los Angeles, Is the regular Democratic nom
inee for Superior Judge, long term.
Assemblyman, seventy-Sixth ~~
District.
S. A. WALDRON,
Of Santa Monica, is the regular Democratic
nominee for Assemblyman for the Seventy-Sixth
District.
Senator, Thirty-Ninth District.
VICTOR MONTGOMERY,
Of Santa Ana, Democratic nomf nee for Senator,
Thirty-Ninth District.
District Attorney.
HON. J. R. DUPUY
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Democratic nom
inee for District Attorney.
County Clerk.
H. S. PARCELS,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Democratic nom
inee for County Clerk.
Sheriff.
T. E. ROWAN,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Democratic com
lnte for Sheriff.
County Treasurer.
GEN. E. E. HEWITT,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Democratic nom
inee for County Treasurer.
County Auditor.
C. E. J. WHITE,
Is the regular Democratic nominee for County
Auditor.
County Recorder.
GEO. HERRMANN,
Of Pasadena, is the regular Democratic nom
inee for County Becorder.
County Tax Collector.
OMRI BULLIS,
Of Compton, is the regular Democratic nom
inee for County Tax Collector.
County Surveyor.
S. H. FINLEY,
Of Santa Ana, Is the regular Democratic nom
inee for County Surveyor,
Public Administrator.
S. LEVY,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Democratic nom
inee for Public Administrator.
Coroner
JOHN L. MeCOY,
Of Lob Angeles, is the regnlar Democratic nom
inee for Coroner.
. Supervisor, Second District.
A. OSTHOFF
Is the regular Democratic nominee for Super
visor, Second District.
City Justice.
O. H. VIOLET,
Of Los Angeles, Is the regular Democratic nom
inee for City Justice.
Sheriff.
MARTIN AGUIRRE,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Republican nom
iueee for Sheriff.
County Clerk.
CHARLES H. DTJNSMOOR,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Republican nom
inee for County Clerk.
County Recorder.
J. W. FRANCIS,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Republican nom
inee for County Recorder.
County Tax Collector.
ROBERT S. PL ATT,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Republican nom
inee for Tax Collector
Assemblyman—seventy-seventh
District.
J. M. DAMRON,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Bepublican nom
inee for Assembly man, Seventy seventh District
Township Justice.
THEODORE SAVAGE,
01 Los Angeles, is the Bepnblican nominee for
Township Justice.
Public Administrator.
D. W. FIELD,
Of Los Angeles, is the regular Bepublican nom
inee for Public Administrator.
City Justice.
H. C. AUSTIN,
Of Los Angeles, Is the regular Republican nom
inee f.>r City Justli c.
City Justice.
W. C. LOCKWOOD,
Of Los ADgeles, is the regular Bepublican nom
inee for City Justice. au4td
Township Justice.
WM. CRAWFORD
Is the Democratic nominee for Justice of the
Peace, Los Angeles Township.
Constable.
H. S. CLEMENT,
Is tho regular Bepublican nominee for Con
stable.
Constable.
FRED. C. SMITH,
Is the regular Republican nominee' for Con*
* stable
storage and Commission.
B. G. Wetsr, Proprietor.
GRAIN, WOOL
—AND—
General Merchandise Warehouse.
Btobags, Commission and Insurance.
Agents for all kinds of Agricultural Imple
ments. Wholesale and retail dealers In Im
ported and Domestic Wines, Brandies and
Whiskies. 634 to 666 Alameda street,
olltf
California Warehouse,
COR. SEVENTH AND ALAMEDA.
GRAIN, WOOL
AND
General Merchandise Warehouse
Storage, Commission and Insurance.
n5 3m
0. B. FULLER & CO.,
Successors to McLain & Lehman.)
PIONEER
Track and Transfer Co.
No. 3. Market St.
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
SAFE AND PIANO MOVING,
ALL KINDB OF TRUCK WORK,
Telephone 137.
01-2 m
"LAZARUS & MEiLZER,
111 N. BPBING STREET, next to City of Parti.
Complete Assortment of
STATIONERY, BOOKS
AND PRINTERS' SUPPLIES.
Tt i loading PAPER HOUSE In Southern
California. 0 17 tf
GEO. W. COOKEIk C 0.,"
Book : Binders,
BLANK BOOKS A SPECIALTY
110 Los Angeles st., Los Angeles, CaL
03-tl
CARRIAGES, WAGONS, ETC.
RICHARDSON-KIMBALL C 0.7
FINE CARRIAGES/
BTJGGIRB,
spring and Farm Vaiom
—AND—
—AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS,—
48 AND 50 N. Los ANeKLES ST.,
Los Angeles. Cal. nl-H
FOR FINE BUGGIES
—AND—
CARRIAGES
—co to—
H. GIEBE,
The Farm Implement Dbalsb,
44 to 48 N. Los Angeles it, Los Angeles.
Furniture and Carpets.
DEALER in
FURNITURE
AND
CARPETS.
38 and 34 South Spring St.
WALTOMWACHTEL,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In
FURNITURE
OF ALL KINDB,
At Lowest Possible Kates.
814, 816 and 818 South Spring St.,
06-tf Bet. Third and Fourth Sts."
Restaurants.
IXjIaIOH'S
Restaurant and Oyster Parlors,
41 and 43 Nortb Alain street.
Cm~ PRIVATE ROOMS upstairs for ladles
and families, where meals will be served In the
best style.
ol6tf JERRY lIXICH, Proprietor.
Clothing and Furnishing Goods.
FIRST INSTALIImeI^tF
—OF—
FALL CLOTHING.
NOBBY BDITB,
gj L.IGHT-WEIGHT OVEBCOATB,
SATCHELS, CLUB BAG?,
Everything for All
At IB South Spring- Street.
ABERNETHY & TAFT. *
Wood and Lumber Yards.
Wagon Material, Hardwood,
Iron, Steel,
Blacksmiths' Coal and Tools,.
Cabinet Woods, etc.
JOHN WIGMORE & 00.
13 and 14 Bouth Los Angeles Street.
nl tf
WILLAMETTE STEAM MILLS
Lumber and Manufacturing
COMPANY,
Formerly the Oregon Lumber Company,
Oregon Pine and California Redwood Lumber
of every description at their new yard on
Date, Chavez and Mission streets. We have •
fine stock of Laths. Pickets, Shingles and Fin
ishing Lumber of a superior quality. We ore
also prepared to fill orders on short notice for
building materials of every description.
Particular attention paid to orders for un
usual lengths and dimensions.
Orders solicited.
nl-M J. A. BU3B. Agent.
SCHALLERT-GANAHL
LVMBEB COMPANY.
MAIN OFFICE AND YARD—
Corner First and Alameda streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
BRANCH YARDS—
East Los Angeles Lumber Yard, cor. Hoff and
Water streets.
Washington-street Lumber Yard, cor. Washing
ton street and Grand avenue.
Garvanza Lumber Yard. Garvanza. o23tf
J. A. Henderson President
i, R -| M^ EB Vioe-Pres. and Tress.
Wm. F. Marshall Secretary.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
LUMBER JtfMPANY.
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIAL.
Office and yard, 180 East First St., Los Angeles,
' ol9tf
J. M GRIFFITH COMPANY,
LUMBER DEALERS.
Manufacturers of
Doors, Windows, Blinds, Stairs,
STAIR-RAILS, BALLUSTEBS,
Newell Posts and mill work of every descrip
tion, and dealers in Lime, etc
538 N. Alameda St., Eos Angeles.
___ nl-tf
KEBCKHOFF-GCKHIIB
Mill and Lumber Company.
Wholesale and Betall Dealers In
LUM BERI
b Q u ft^B•urb^k? Vla • AlnSa - Qlendo "- Li "- d "
,^ nlnK UiUa ,l An «>le«. Pomona, Mon
r<ma - 025-tf
CO OPERATIVE LDMBER COMPANY
875 N. Main St., Eos Angeles.
ties, piles, shingles, laths, etc.
Bubscriptlons for stock, which will be taken
wived by " COBT PWCI1 *
A. C. FISH, 875 If. Main St.
W. A. VANDEBCOOK. 275 N. Main.
J. C. MKRRILL, 113 W. First.
O. A SUMHEB & CO., 54 N. Main.
POMEBOY & GATES, IB Courts".
C. B. BIPLEY. Pasadena.
ELLIS <fe SIMPSON. Pasadena. o2otf
Western Lnmber Co.
yard;
Cor. Ninth and San Peure Streets.
LUBBER of all classman be had attlusysrd,
D. B. ROZBLL, . ' T
rozell bros!. /
—DEALERS IN— J
Lumber and Building- Material
relepSSe Effigy ™ An&W
PERRY, MOTT & COtS
Lumber Yards \
„ PLANING MILLS, \
No. 76 Commercial Street alitj

xml | txt