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Los Angeles daily herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, November 06, 1888, Image 1

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LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD.
VOL. XXXI -NO g&
AITIISEitIENTS.
/TkandT opeka IJoulkT''"
VJf H. C. Wyatt, Lessee and Manager.
One Week—Commencing Monday, November 5,
The Funniest Play on the American Stage!
"I wouldn't miss it for nine dollars."
The Popular Artists—
HAL LEU AND HART,
Assisted by their own guaranteed company,
under the management of
MR. HARRY HINE,
In their new musical farce-comedy,
LATER
A superior register of noted artists, introducing
sparkling operatic gems, medleys, topical
songs.beautlful marches and original
musical novelties.
J. W. Owens Business Manager.
031
CALIFORNIA DIME MUSEUM & THE ATER
/ North Main street, near First.
Doyle & Isaacs, Proprietors.
WKKK BATTIRDAY, OCTOBER 27_
ANOTHER AVALANCHE OF NOVELTIES!
MUSEUM DEPARTMENT.
A troupe of Bedouin Arabs; Caddie Young,
Albino Girl; Nellie Greene, Long-Haired Lady;
Capt. Smith Cook, Kentucky Giant; Henrietta
Moritz, German Midget; iloa, Circassian Beauty;
Prof. Greiner, Glass Blower; Punch and Judy,
etc.
THEATRE
Putnam Twin Sisters, accomplished Duettists,
Dancers, etc ; Paul La Drew, Female Imperson
ator; Walter Goldie, Eccentric Comedian; Sam
Gilder, Lone Star Minstrel; etc.
Doors open from 10 a. m. to 10 p. m.
Admission, 10c. Reserved seats 10c. extra.
qkoont7street PARK.
NEW ATTRACTIONS.
NEW BOARDB. NEW SWINGS.
SEAILION.
EVERYTHING NEW.
COIsCERT EVERY SUNDAY.
Admission to Park and Menagerie, 10 cents.
o9tf
JIALLOWEEN.
The Caledonian Club will give an entertain
ment on Friday evening, November 9th in
Good Templars' Hall, 108 North Main St., oppo
site Temple Block. n4 Ot
hITgRANDE3T SIGHT IN LOS ANGELES
is the BIEGE OF PARIS! Main and Third
sts. Open dally (including Sundays) from 9a.
k. to 10 p. M. Admission—2sc. 07-lm
WANTS, PERSONALS, AND OTHER AD
vertisements under the following heads
inserted at the rate of 5 cents per line for each
insertion.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
TAILOR, DYER, SCOURER
and repairer, 226 W. Becond St., Los An
geles. 08-lm
XCELBIOR STEAM LAUNDRY—MAIN
office permanently located at No. 15 West
Second st Laundry 184 Wall St. All orders
promptly attended to. Telephone 367. o2stf
NOTICE TO" BUILDERS—ANY KIND OF
building to build on easy terms, plans and
specifications furnished gratis, by J. FRIED
LANDER, architect, 23 n! Spring st. 524 12m
E CAN BUILD COTT AGES AND HOUSES
of all descriptions for less money than
any contractor In town. It will pay you to get
our figures and ideas If yon intend building.
We mean basn :ss and guarantee satisfaction.
Address P. O. box 1452, City. 09-tf
HE FOLLOWING CHILDREN HAVE BEEN
admitted Into the Los Angeles Orphan
Asylnm since the last publication: Half
Orphans—Manuela Bogorques, Francisca Bo
gorques, Charlotte Bogorques, Dora Townsend,
Apolonla Marson, Sara Moralea, Maud Cald
well, Cenzina Franco, Repelta Franco, Mary
Warren, Marcel Ina Canedo, Mary Bernal. Ed
na Ellis, Ada E lis, Mary Keegan, Adelaide'
Montoroveles, Katie Kohler, Josefa Dominguez,
Angelita Urbino, Josefa Urbino, Dot Reading,
Mary Catran, Adellna Mnchado, Elvira
Maohado, Virginia Machado, Eugenic Mou
nlcou, ErolindaGirado. SISTER JOSEPHINE.
028-10t.
EXCURSIONS.
ENVER~aND TrTo
leave Los Angeles November 15th and 29th,
December 13th and 27th Tourist cars com-
Sletely equipped free of charge. Call on or sd
ress F. W. THOMPSON, 110 N. Spring st, Los
Angeles. n4-tl
TTNION PACIFIC OVERLAND EXCUR9IONS,
U via SaU Lake City. Free sleeping cars
through to the Missouri River without change.
First-class equipment; colored porters. Leaving
Los Angeles every Wednesday. For tickets,
berths and other information call on or address
A. J. Hechtman, Freight and Passenger Agent,
No. 236 North Main street, 028-tf
UNION PACIFIC EXCURSIONS - FREE
sleeping-car accommodations. No change
of cars between Los Angeles and Kansas City
stopping en route 24 hours at Salt Lake City
and six hours at Denver. Leave Los Angelea
October 16 and 30, November 13 and 27, De
cember 11 and 26. Give us the names of your
friends coming to California. For tickets,
berths, and all information call on or address
GEO. F. COTTKRAL A CO., No. 236 N. Main
st. n3tf
BURLINGTON ROUTE OVERLAND EXCUR
slons are essentially first class. Leave Los
Angeles September 27, October 11, 25, Novem
ber 8,22, December 6. Free sleeping cars (sep
arate berths for each passenger), equipped with
new mattresses, blankets, pillows, curtains, ta
bles and carpets. Burlington agents and colored
porters accompany each party through. Route
via Salt Lake City (24 hours). Denver and Omaha
or Kansas City to all points East Scenery by
daylight a special feature; Sierra Nevada Moun
tains, Salt Lake City, Black Cation, Marshall's
Pass, Grand Cation, Royal Gorge, etc. Call on
or address J. B. QUIGLEY, agent Burlington
Route. 112 North Spring st, Los Angeles, nltf
FREE CARS TO
Chicago. Only one change to Boston. Con
ductors and porters accompany all parties.
Leave Los Angeles October 11th, November
Ist, 15th and 29th, December 13th and 27th.
A. PHILLIPS A CO., 44 N. Spring at, Los An
geles, Cal. 027-tf
HEtil : LAll PHYMCIAIIS.
"
Office 25 North Main 8t Office Honrs, 9a.
m. to 4 p. m. nltf-d&w
A. DE CAILHOL, M. D.—AT HIV"BANI
. tarium, Pearl, south of Temple. Telephone
891. nl-tf
DR. "Me
ters' Hospital; 7li N. Main st , rooms 1, 2
and 3. 027 tf ,
DR. O. SPRING ST.
Honrs, 10 to 12, 2to 5,7 to 8. Night calls
promptly answered. o24tf
R. BROWN—OFFICE W- FIRSi r BTT
Specialties: All private diseases and dis
eases of women. Consultation free. 026-U
CE. CLACIUB, M. D.. OFFICE, NO. N~
. Spring st, rooms 33 and 34. Hours from
11 A. M. to 2p. M. Specialty—Skin and sexual
diseases and chronic diseases in general. o24tf
Ft. W. W. MURPH V, OCULIST AND AUR
-Ist, 107 S Spring st., Hollenbeck block, Los
Angeles. Office hours, 9a.m.to 12 m. and 2to
4 P. M. o24tf
E ROBBINS. M. D., MEDICAL ELECTRI
, clan, physician and surgeon, 109 W. First
st. Office nours—9 to 12,1 to 5, 7to 9. Con
sultttton free. oSltf
RS. DR. J. MrSMITH (FORMERLY MRS.
C. E. BOURCEY) Infirmary and Lying-in
Hospital, 145 Bellevue aye. Lndi-s cared for
during confinement. Midwifery a specialty.
028 6m
Q 8 M. D..
Q« Office, rooms 11 and 12. Bryson blook. cor.
First and Spring sts. Residence, 538 S. Pearl
st. Office hours, 10 to 12 A. m. and 3tosp. m.
Telephone Nos,: Office 597: residence 577.
o24tt
TißrcT EDGABTsMiTH—DIKE A BES OF WO-
U men a specialty. Dr. Smith has the exclu
sive use of the Brinkerhoff painless system of
treatment for rectal diseases of L. A. city and
county. Office, cor. Spring and Second sts., Hol
lenbeck blook. 024tf
DR. WEST HUGHES, FORMER RESIDENT
Surgeon to the New York Hospital. Snr
fery (including genito urinary diseases) and
laeases of the nose, throat and chest. 75 N.
Spring st. Honrs, 9to 12. 2to 5. o24tf
DORSEY, M D., OFFICE, NO.
7H N. Main st, rooms 8 and 9. Special at
tention said to obstetrics, gynecology, diseases
of chest and throat and children's diseases.
Office hours, 9 to 11 a. m. and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9
p. m. Telephone, No. 513. Night calls prompt y
answered. o24tf
ALLOPATHISTS.
HEALM OFpTciR, NO
7N. Spring St Telephone 605. 026-tf. ,
TUESDAY MORNING. NOVEMBER 6, 1888.—TEN PAGES.
PERSONAL.
ADIES—iV YOt'lfANr A NO. 1 NURSE,
address NURSE, 150 this office. _ n4-3t*
S 1I\—BUDWIFIriWD~NURSE;1 \— BUDWIFlriWD~NURSE; 20 YEARS'
JJjJ U experience Electric P.O. E. HOLMES.
MR. L. B. GABTON, FORMERLY OF THE
Elite Restaurant, 13 W. First St., please
call at this office. olDtf
IVORCE AND CRIMINAL LAW A BPECI
alty. Advice free. W. W. HOLCOMB, At
torney, 11 Temple street. Room 10-12. 020-t(
RB. f ARKER, CLAIRVOYANT, CONSULT
tatlons on business, law suits, mineral spec
ulations, love, marriage, absent friends, dis
eases, life-reading, etc. 28 South Spring streot,
Room 15. 9a. m. to 6 p. m. 029-tf
AY - OX EVENI SIS ~LEBSONS"ItT»HORT
HAND snd typewriting, by practical court
reporter. Typewriters for rent.
B. F. HANSON & CO., 75 North Spring-st.,
room 18, n3-lm*
FURNIBHED ROOMS — THE "IBMOND,"
315V£ 8. Los Angeles St., is now opened by
Mrs. S A. Burnes. Finely furnished 100 ms
rented at reasonable rates. r.6 2t
BOARDING KINDERGARTEN WILL BK
opened iv a lew days for the benefit of par
ents wishing a good home for girls from 5 to 8
years. Every advantage that home can offer
will be given. Everything warranted first-class
Address or call 1002 8. Olive, from 8 a. h. to
2P. M. References given and required n6 2t*
WANIED-lllaLE HELP.
Fernando St. nti It*
WANTED— X BRASS BAND TEACHER AT
San Feruaudo. Address George Buckley,
Secietary. nl-10l*
ANTED—2 GOOD TIN AND SHEET-IRON
workers; also 2 coppersmiths. Can have
a good job by applying or corresponding with
JOHN OLSSON, 32! i Perry st., Ban Francisco.
n6 15f
WANTED-FEISALE HELP.
ANTED
respectable woman as wet nurse. Apply,
J, tf., box 100, this office. n4-3t*
WANTED— A GIRL FOR LIGHT HOU3E
work. Apply at 2Ed st., back of Sisson &
Crocker, on Ban Fernando st. n4-3t*
HOI Si S WAM LU.
WANTED -HOnBE OF 10 ROOMS FOR
private family, thoroughly furnished, in
a good locality. Apply C A. SUMNER & CO ,
54 N. Main st. n6 8t
IINTKV— A FIRST-CLASB 'HOUBE\'~WJ.TIf
8 or 9 rooms, modern improvements, yard
and stable, by good tenant for 0 or 12 months.
Addresß "Army Officer," care C. M Wells &
Burks, cor. Temple and New High sts. ndtf
EfTIPLOYITIENT AUENCY.
JTyoFwant a cook OR situati6n"aB
a cook, free of charge, call at Cooks' Head
quarters, 9 Aliso St. GEO. LACOUR. 013 lm
FOR RENT--ROOItIS.
UNFURNISHED" VroNT
rooms. Apply 339 Yale St., bet. Bernard
and Castelar. n4-3t*
FOR RENT—HOUSES.
FOR RENT-3 HOUSES OF THREE ROOMS
each, from $3 to $12. 219 N. Main st. n4-3t*
F- OR it ENT—CHE A P—A HOUSE OF -TEN
rooms, with closet for each. Will rent al
together or in suites of three rooms each. No.
4 Amelia st. u4-7t*
OR MNT-ioOSE OF 9 ROOMS, WITn
all modern improvements, on Figueroa St.,
bet. Pico and Washington sts.; cars pass the
door. Also a G roomed house on Temple st.
Enquire of owner, 340 S. Main st. u2-lm*
OR~R_NT—BY~LOB ANGELES RENTAL
Agency, cor. Fort and First sts., 7-room cot
tage, Brooklyn, near Main, furnished, $50;
5-room home, Fonrth St., near Hope, $37 50:
5-room house, Hill, near Fifth, furnished, $50:
5-room cottage, modern conveniences, lawn,
flowers, etc., Fuler, near Main, $23; beautiful
cottage, 5 rooms, bath, modern conveniences,
lawn, fruit and flowers, $36; nice 8 room
house, Adele, near Figueroa, modern con
veniences, $40. About 90 other houses and
stores, at reduced rent. JOHN C. FLOURNOY,
Secretary. 028-tf
FOR RENT—MISCELLANEOUS.
! location. Apply, DR. ROBBINS, cor.
Spring and First sts. nl If
tfOR REN^—STORES ~ON MAIN, SPRING,
" Fort aud other streets; hotels, apartments,
houses, etc. A. L. TEELE, corner Second and
Fort sts. n2tf
LOST AND FuUND.
qthay^Tfrom'TrffiT undersign^dTa
O small bay horse. 14 hands high, branded
72, reversed, on thigh; tall In the wethers, well
defined saddle marks, last heard of In Cahuen
ga Pats; about 15 years old. Any information
sent to Santa Monica will be thankfully re
ceived, A liberal reward will be paid for the
recovery of same. K. C. PARRIBH.
n2-st*
TO EXCHANGE.
P~~OR EXCIIaITgE PIECES
of property; tusiness buildings, houses,
lots, ranches, Eastern property, etc., etc. Big
gest list in city. J. C. WILLMON, 128>£ W.
First st. nl-lm
FOR SALE OrIeXCH ANGE—BEST PAYING
livery, boarding, sale and food stable in the
city; small capital required; owner sick. Ad
dress P. O. Box 151. nl-lm.
DENTISTS.
st, McDonald block. 015 tf
DRB. CASE A CARROLL, DENTISTS. OF
flee, 41 S. Spring st. Gold fillings, $3 and
upwards; gold and platina fillings, $1.50;
amalgam fillings, $1; cement, $1. Extracting,
50c.; gas, $1 extra. Gold and porcelain crow rs
and bridge work, cheapest in city. Bets of
teeth, $6 to $10. All work guaranteed, o 115 m
DENTAL INSTITUTE, COR. SPRING AND
Temple streets. Set teeth, $5.00; gold fill
ing, $1.00; amalgam filling, 50c; extracting,
25c. One of the Board of Directors in attend
ance every forenoon. A regular graduate in
constant attendance. C. V. Baldwin, F. M.
Palmer, J. M. White, R. R. Bourne, A, B. Bird.
E. L. Townsend, Board of Directors. oct2l tf
1882—ESTABLISHED—1882.
DR. L. W. WELLS, DENTIST, ROOMS NOS.
6 and 7, No. 23 8. Spring st. Gold filling,
$2 and up; gold and platina alloy, $1.50: com
position, $1; filling root. $3; set teeth on rub
ber, $10; on silver, $25; on aluminum, $30.
My new improved aluminum plate will cure
all diseases olthe mouth caused by rubber. Set
of gold, $50 and np. Gold crown, $10. Filling
teeth and gold work a specialty. Teeth ex
tracted, 50c.; without pain, $1. u4 10m
A DAMS BROS., DENTISTS, 28 8. SPRING
OL street, Rooms 4 and 5,
Gold fillings from $2 up. Amalgam and silver
fillings, $1. Painless extraction of teeth by
vitalized air or nitrons oxide gas, $1. Teeth
extracted without gas or air, 50 cents.
Best set aof teeth from $6 to $10. By onr new
method of making teeth, a misfit is Impossible.
All work guaranteed.
We make a specialty of extracting teeth with
out pain.
Office Honrs from Ba. m., to sp. it. Sundays
from 10 a. m. to 12 m. Night calls answered
office 08-tf,
ARCHITECTS.
CHAS. W. DAVIS, ARCHITECT, 44V 8.
Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. _o23tf
WR. NORTON, ARCHITECT, 80 N. SPRING
.St. ol2tf
COSTERISAN A FORSYTH, ARCHITECTS,
rooms 21 and 22, 23 8. Spring st, Los An
geles. ol2tf
PETERS A BURNS. ARCHITECTS, ROOMB
5 and 6, Howe's block, 128 W. First st. Su
pervising architects, National Soldiers' Home.
Ql2tf
HOAIEOPATHIBTB.
MRS. H. TYLER WILCOX, M. D.-221 8.
Spring st 012-tl
EA. CLARKE, 1L D., OFFICE
. St. Hours Ito4p. M. Telephone 3SB.
Residence. 184 B. Hill St. 014
ISAAC FELLOWS, M. D. —HOMEOP ATHIBT
Office Honrs—ll to 12 A. v., 2to 5 p. m.,
Office—Nos. 2 and 0 Odd Fellows' Building,
Los Angeles, CaL Residence 408 South Main
street. oJ-tf.
FOR SALE.
FOR 8A LE—ON^E^MARBLE TOP B4T, GAS
OLINE Stove, Carpets, etc. Inquire 6
Conter-st n2-7t*
NEW AND SECOND-HAND GOODS BOUGHT
and sold by WM. P. MARTIN & BROS,,
349 S. Spring st. 030 lm
T7IOR SALE—A ~WELL STOcIcED SALOON,
£ low rent, in good location, very cheap. In
quire at Philadelpnia Brewery. nl-tf
BTEIN-
Jj way, $200, upright; greatest bargain yet;
must be sold. 944 S. Grand aye., near Tenth
st 023 lm
FOR SALE—City Property.
li^OR^ALE— NEW
! 4 room cottago. plastered, large lot, on 4
yenrs' time. R. N. WALTERS, at Moffit House,
25 Davis'St. n4-7i*_
oTsalS-$25 cTbHAND $IdTER 40NTH
buys a lot on horse car line; 30 miuutes
from center of sity; prices $290 to $500; pure
water free; cheaper than rent A. L. TEELE,
agent, Second ana Fort srs, u2tf
I~IOR BALE-*1,850, COMFORTABLE" NEW
' cottage, nicely finished; near cars; on large
lot covered with handsome walnut trees; one
of best locations in city; $250 cash, balance
$25 monthly, with interest. BYRAM & POIN
DEXTER, 19 W. First st. 016 lm
THE MOST CONVENL
ont 8-room houses you ever saw; the rroms
are all large; 4 grates in tho house; plenty of
closets; good bath-room; good story.and-a half
barn, and all new; you will say it is well worth
the money we ask, if you see It. MILLER &
HERRIOTT, 34 N. Spring st *^l t _-
FOR SALE—AT A GREAT SACRIFICE—
6-room cottage, good barn and wagon
shed, on Laurel St., bet. Grand aye. and Hope.
Any one wishing for a desirable home at far
below its actual value will do well to call and
examine this property at 222 Laurel st. Must
be sold, owner about to leave the city. Apply
to A. J. BRADISH, 133, W. First Bt., room 3.
n4-3t«
FOR S4LH-Country Property.
F^oTTTTaLE^pTroPERTY
Pasadena and on Vermont aye,, south. For
particulars apply to L. F. QUIMBY, P. O. box
1617. s2O-3m*
TcREB" GOOD ALFALFA
' land, with abundant water supply. Only
$125.00 per ncre.
Also. 80 acres improved alfalfa land, at
$150 00 per acre. All near the city.
BRYAM & POINDEXTER, 19 West Flrst-st.
024-1 m
F~ OR SALE—SS,OOO, ACRES FINEST
alfalfa and fruit land; near R R. station
and close to good school and church; fine flow
ing artesian well; $1,000 cash, balance $1,000
Bqr annum and interest. BYRAM & POIN
EXTER, 19 W. First »t 0161 m
SIOR SALE—SMALL FARMS, 5,10,~20ACR158
P to suit, 1 mile from R. R. station apd
near Ingle wood; finest rult land, and Will
raise any crop without irrigation; $200 per
acre; small cash payment and long time on
balances to parties who will improve. BYRAM
& POINDEXTER, 19 W. First St. 010 lm
BUSINESS CHANCES
"OR —A AND
chicken bnsiness, with good team, oolt
harness, swill wagon and lease on 5 acres with
bouse and water: good location, Address P. O.
box 720. n6 St*
AC. "if EVENS" 10 ST.
■ Business chances of all kinds.
Frnit and grocery centre of city, fine busi
ness, low rent; must sell it once, for best rea
sons.
Fo.ty-roomed lodging house to exchange for
real estate; must sell at once.
n4tf STEVENS & CO.
financial.
dia st. 013-lm
aItERN MONEY 7 WAN-SEETiNDER
at 7 B.Fort-st. 028-lnt»
oNEYTa ix>an~in"sums toTuttT ~¥.~C.
ANDERSON, 28 N. Spring. n2tf
O LOAN—SI,OOO, REASONABLE RATE ON
improved property. L. A. FINANCIAL
AGENCY. 1 N. Fortst_ o3ltf
MONEY TO LOAN ON ~BEBT SECURITY, IN
sums over $1,000. ROBERT HARDIE, 81
and 83 Temple block. o26tf
ffiKilA Ai»7» _ To"~ L OAN-A. J. VIELE,
fDOUUjUUU room 1, new Wilson Build
ing, First and Spring. n3-lm
ONEY~TO TO SUIT, ON
first-class improved ci y property, at cur
rent rates. POMEROY A GATES, 16 Court St.
017 lm
Crawford"* Mccreary still loan
on chattels, real Estate, etc. $10 np. Room
10, over Los Angeles National Bank. Notes
and mortgages discounted. 013-tf
MORTGAGES""™-"
Contracts bought.
Short time loans made
CALIFORNIA LOAN AND TRUST COMPANY.
Rooms 9 and 10, Phillips Block.
027-lm
LOS ANGELES LOAN AND"TRUBT COM
pany (Incorporated capital, $100,000), No.
136 N. Main st, loans Its own money on lends
and city property, buys and sells conservative
securities; also agent for 6 and 7 per cent. San
Francisco money on Inside city property and
large ranches. o26tf
EDUCATIONAL.
MLLE.
French by the natural method. 117 N.
Hopest 031 lm*
China paintingT FIRINGAND gilding!
MYRAE. KINBEY.22I 8. Spring st. Full
lino china colors. n6tf
NIGHT ANGELES BUSINESS
College and English Training Bchool. Tem
ple and New High sts. D. B. WILLIAMS, Prin.
olStf
THE LOS ANGELES CONSERVATORY' OF
Music, No. 406 S. Main st. Complete
course either in music, art, language or elocu
tlon. MRS. EMILY J.VALENTINE, President.
LOS ANGELES BUSINESS COLLEGE AND
English Training School, cor. Temple and
New High sts. Experienced teachers; complete
courses of study. Day and evening sessions.
D. B. WILLIAMS. Prin. o3ot
SiT. PAUL'B SCHOOL TOR BOYS WILL BS
kj gin September 5, 1888, ending June 12,
1889, in the Parish Schoolhouse in resr of 8t
Paul's Church on Olive st. For particulars
apply to MIBS F. R. JOHNSTON, Principal,
435 8. Oilvo St., Los Angeles, Cal. 031-lm
INSTITUTE OF SHORTHAND.
TELEGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING.
24 W. First St., Los Angeles, Cal.
OPEN DAY AND EVENING.
023tf LONGLEY & WAGNER.
BUSINESS COLLEGE
YY —AND—
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
INSTITUTE,
159 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal
SESSIONS DAY AND EVENING.
For particulars, call at office or address.
s2O-ly C. WOODBURY, Principal.^
SOUTHERN SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION AND
ORATORY
—AND—
INSTITUTE FOB STAMMERERS,
Rooms 1, 2 and 3, 205}$ Sonth Spring street,
Los Angeles.
PROF. J. WHITEHORN, Instructor.
Reception hours: 2 to 4 and 7 to 8 p. m.
030
gIG. A. FARINI'S MUSICAL STUDIO,
No. 151 8. Hill Street.
Last Season in Los Angeles.
Pupils prepared for the operatic and concert
stage; alio oratorio.
Class lessons of three and four at reasonable
rates.
Reception hours from 2 to 3 p. m. daily.
oct2l tf
ATTORNEYS^
Titles and Abstractors, Room 35 and 36,
lUips' block. No. 1. n5-tf
Walter"roseT "attorney AND COUN
sellor at Law, room 9 Allen block, corner
Spring and Temple sts. o!4 tf
MERICAN LEGION OF"HONOR, BAFETY
Council, No. 664—Meets second and fourth
Thursday evenings of each month at their Hall,
17 W First st. bet Main and Spring.
LOB F.—
Regular meetings hold on Wednesday even
lng of each week at I. O. 0. F. Hall, Spring st,
near First.
ABOUT THE CITY.
Political Discussions Upon
the Streets.
HOW THE WAGERS WERE MADE.
The Southern Pacific Company Asks
for Additional Privileges From
the City Council.
The excitement over politics, National
and local, reached high water-mark yes
terday, completely engrossing the atten
tion of the public and utterly demoral
izing business. The streets were more
crowded than they have been at any
time since the day of the Odd Fellows
parade. The long strain is becoming
wearisome to every one, and the only
sentiment which seemed to meet with
unanimous approval from both sides was
the one of "Think Heaven, it will soon
be over!"
In the open squares, along the edge of
the sidewalks, and in the doorways of
public buildings voters were soon every
where gathered in little knots discussing
the issues of the campaign. In a slow
stroll of a few blocks one could hear the
pertinent points of the policy of both par
ties pretty well ventilated. At one cor
ner it would be the ruin of the navy by
Republicans and its resuscitation by the
Democracy. Further along some Repub
lican would be found trying to demon
strate the fact that England would own
this country a year or two after the
war tax was cut down. Here would be
heard a lively discussion as to how the
tariff could benefit the workingman, who
bad nothing to sell save his unprotected
labor, and there some mention of the
Murchison fake brought out sneers and
gmans.
The man who wanted to bet but could
find no takers was omnipresent, and his
political complexion was, with a few rare
exceptions, Democratic. For a half an
hour a man stood in front of the Court
House with his hands full of gold offering
$500 straight on the Democratic candidate.
The $300 bet mentioned in the Herald
for the last two days was taken yester
day by another Democrat who had
plunged heavily and wanted to hedge.
D. M. Ireland came into the Herald
office during the day and offered to put
up $400 on Cleveland and $120 on this
State, that it will go Democratic. Later
in tho day he found a victim and the
money was paid down over the counter
of the California Bank. A number of
offers of money in sums varying from
$100 to $500 were made at the Herald
office and the County Central Committee
rooms during the day. At the present
writing there are still recorded at this
office the names of men who have sums
varying from $100 to $500, which they
would like to risk on the Democratic
side.
Yesterday's Tribune contained apropos
of betting, the statement that Ed. tier
main, the brother of the Chairman of the
the County Central Committee, was ask
ing odds of two to one to bet on Califor
nia going Democratic. Mr. Germain
says this is a distortion of the truth. He
was among a crowd of boastful Republi
cans who declared that they were quite
willing to bet 5 to 1 that the
State would go for Harrison. He replied
that they needn't make it any higher
than 2 to 1 and he would put up all the
money they wanted. It stands to reason
that no man will bet even when he can
get odds, and this is the explanation of
his offer.
Among the odd bets recorded thus far
comes one from Uncle Billy Clayton, who
used to serve as custodian of the city's
vags. and drunks. It is a hand organ
bet with Tom Keefe. If Cleveland is
elected Uncle Billy will carry and grind,
at a set time, a hand organ from the
Pico House to the corner of Main and
Fourth and back again by way
of Spring street, taking up a
collection en route for the Orphans'
Home. The forfeit in case of failure to
comply with the contract will be $100 for
the orphans.
A formal ballot was taken by the boys
at the High School yesterday afternoon,
which is supposed by the canvass which
was made beforehand to have gone
Democratic. The ballots were not
counted, as the balloting broke up in a
row and the box was stolen by the Re
publicans.
A straw ballot in the upper tank of the
County Jail gave a small Republican
majority for Harrison and free whisky.
HOW THE BETTING STANDS.
The following bulletins were tele
graphed to this city last night, as hav
ing been tbe ruling figures in the New
York poolrooms at the close of the day.
Even money for the general result,
with the offers in favor of Cleveland.
One hundred to CO that Hill carries
New York.
One hundred to 80 that Cleveland car
ries New York.
One hundred to 00 that Cleveland car
ries Indiana.
One hundred to 90 that Harrison car
ries Connecticut. '
Two to 1 that Cleveland carries New
Jersey.
One hundred to 'JO that. Hugh Grant
will be the next Mayor of New York.
On the local ticket the only betting
offered in this city yesterday was regard
ing the Sheriff's contest, the odds being
100 to 80 in favor of Martin Aguirre.
Betting on the States is avoided, nearly
all of the money being on the grand re
sult. A good deal of money was put up
in the city yesterday, altogether $14,000
being bet from the hour the poolrooms
opened in the morning. There will be
considerable betting to-day, and odds on
the States will be offered until evening
at Rodman's poolrooms.
TflfilaiiiHTOP WAY.
The S). P. It. It. Co. Dealren I'urtber
Privilege*.
While the matter of the right of way of
the Southern Pacific Railroad Company
over streets from San Pedro street to
Alameda, did not come up in the City
Council yesterday, a petition to amend
the franchise asked for was filed by tbe
Railroad Company. The Southern Paci
fic Railroad Company askes for a fran
chise to cross Clement street., Pine
street, Peru street, Paloma street, Wolf
skin street, Tennessee street and Little
Rock avenue. Petitioners ask permis
sion to have their franchise amended so
as to allow them to construct a track
from the intersection of Alameda street
al the point where the right of way ends,
to the depot at Seventh street. The
Company also desires permission to con
struct a second track on Alameda street
south as far as the track goes on that street.
The Company promises to remove its
line from San Pedro streot and to remove
the lumber yards to a point in the vicin
ity of Pine street. It also agrees to
grade Alameda street, between Pine
street and the new depot and to keep the
street in order.
Mr. G. J. Griffith. across whose prop
erty the property owners state they
would rather have the line constructed,
forwarded to Mr. Humphreys an offer of
three routes, designated on a map. The
first route is twenty-five feet wide and
nearly one mile long, which is offered for
$25,000. The second route is fifty feet
wide and is offered for $15,000, and the
third route, also fifty feet wide, is offered
for $10,000. These routes are offered on
the condition that the track be removed
from San Pedro street, and that new
streets may be opened across the right of
way, and that a freight and passenger
depot be erected in ninety days on the
Briswalter estate and an agent be kept
there.
The petition together with Mr. Grif
fith's propositions was referred to the
Board of Public Works, which will act
on the same on Saturday next.
AMUSEMENTS.
Hallen and Hart In Their New
■'lay "Later On."
Hallen and Hart with their company
of artists re-appeared at the Grand Opera
House last night in their new variety
melange entitled Later On. The play is
a decided improvement on the former
potpouri of a year ago. Miss Georgie
Parker who quite divided the honors
with Roland Reed when she appeared
with him here in the "Dutch girl busi
ness" is in the leading role for the ladies
in Later On." She caught on" with
the audience last night again to per
fection. The other girls in the play are
very presentable both in appearance
and as artists. Mr. Bernard Dyllyn is
the one member of the company who
has a fine voice. His singing was greatly
enjoyed. The role of "Sneriff Clutch"
gives Mr. John T. Kelly a fine oppor
tunity to do some clever Irish business.
And the two stars, especially where they
appear in the grossly burlesque roles of
Sprigs of English nobility, do a good
deal of clever acting. They ought to be
called Sackville West and "Murchison."
The play runs all the week.
Four wild snot*.
At 1 o'clock last night a shooting
scrape took place on Commercial street,
between Union and Los Angeles, which
fortunately terminated in no injury to
any one. For some reason the witnesses
would not make known the design of the
row. Fred McCann, a haah-sliuger in
Duggan's restaurant, said he knew
something about it, but would
not tell it now. From others standing
by it was learned that the man who fired
the shots was talking to another in front
of the restaurant, and getting into a dis
pute one struck the other. This one,
who is a Mexican, named F. C. Montijo,
residing on Macy street pulled a
gun and fired at his assailant
who ran away and escaped. Hearing
the shot, Officer J. E. Duignan ran to the'
spot and pinioned Monitijo, drawing his
arms back. In his right hand was the
pistol which was discharged, ti>> ball
passing through the overcoat and
undercoat of Duignan. The officer
then threw Montijo to the ground and
then two more shots were fired. The
Mexican was drunk and probably did not
intend to discharge his pistol, after the
first time. One of the stray balls grazed
Louis Stone, the special officer's leg. and
set him dancing. Another grazed the
wrist of McCann, which may account for
his silence. He may have been too
frightened to recover his voice for a
week.
Montijo was taken to the station and
locked up. He was followed by several
of his compatriots, who wished to bail
him out. Montijo seemed to be wanted
for use at the polls to-day.
Petitions Referred.
Petitions as follows were received by
the Council yesterday, and were referred
to the proper committees: From M, £.
Mathes et al., for the re-numbering of
Bellevue avenue; W. X. Smith et al., for
a sewer on Bellevue avenue; Guisepe
Xrabucco et al., to have the sidewalks on
Bellevue avenue; I. Meyers et al., to
grade Sepulveda street; £. H. Sawyer
for rebate of taxes; H. Boethers et al.,
protesting against the continuance of the
railroad tract on San Pedro street; Ham
mel and Denker for rebate of taxes; H.
Mosgrove et al., to have the Glendale
Railroad tracks put in a good condition
at street crossings; W. S. Harper etal.,
to condemn land for the opening of Morris
street; H. M. Tonner et al., to condemn
property to straighten Second street; W.
J. Richardson for rebate of
taxes; J. W. Leery to be
(allowed to redeem property. C. H.
Kason et al., to have obstructions re
moved from Barbee street; James S.
Dacy et al., to have obstructions removed
from an alley; J. H. Austermell et al.,
to establish the grade of Schieffelin
avenue; J. M. Baldwin, for $67; M. F.
Varley, for rebate of taxes; Hugh Glas
sell et al., to change grade of of Waters
street; A. L, Whitney, for rebate of
taxes; John J. Jones et al., to grade
Seventh street; A. G. Carnes et al., for
an electric light; J. F. Cosby et al.. to
grade Brooklyn street; J. Barbiere, to
rent city land; F. Sabichi et al., to have
poles on Seventh street removed; Fred.
Dtager, for rebate of taxes; D. £.
Thompson, for rebate of taxes; Robt.
Fletcher, same; E. J. Plummer et al.,
for an electric light; A. Bixel et aL, to
improve Lafayette street; F. C. Wolf
etal, for an electric light, and J. M.
(ilass for a rebate of taxes.
San Pedro Democrats.
A rousing Democratic rally was held
last night at San Pedro. The Repub
licans paraded, but despite this fact the
crowd around the Democratic stand was
twice as large as that about the Repub
lican platform. Mr. J. H. Dodeon, the
Chairman, called the meeting to order
and after a brief speech introduced
Major Arbuckle, who lor two hours en
tertained the audience, and judging from
the enthusiasm that prevailed the Dem
ocratic ticket will have a large majority
in this precinct. It was a fitting close to
to the campaign, and the meeting ad
journed with three cheers for the ticket
which were given with a good will.
FIVE CENTS.
CLEVELAND'S ELECTION.
Ttae Republican Papers on Harrl«
son's Defeat.
Los Anoei.es, November 8, ISBB.—The
Associated Press sends us the following
extracts which will appear in the leading
Republican papers of this morning ac
counting for the defeat of Harrison and
Morton:
New York, November B.—The Tri
bune says: We have receiver* sufficient
results from the pivotal States to show
that the Republican party has suffered a
signal defeat. It is profitless, after the
fact, to grieve over the mistakes of a cam
paign. Yet when a party has committed
grave errors they ought to be pointed
out to serve as a warning and a lesson in
the future. The first great crime com
mitted by the Republican party was in
nominating as its standard-bearer a
gentleman who was peculiarly objection
able to the labor element of his own
State, and consequently .to workingmen
all over the Union. It was also warned
in time that Harrison's record on the
Chinese question would lose us the vote
of California, Nevada, and perhaps ail
the Pacific Coast States. The event has
proven that Mr. De Young, a San Fran
cisco journalist of prominence, knew
what he was talking about when he
warned the leaders of the Chicago Con
vention that Harrison could not carry
the Pacific Coast States because of his
pro-Chinese record. Thus has the great
Republican party been again led to the
slaughter by the lack of political acumen
of the men who had it in their power at
the proper time to direct it to a signal
and overwhelming victory.
Chicago, November B:—The Inter-
Ocean: The defeat of the Republican
party is due, first and foremost, to the
weakness and vulnerability, in essential
points, of the candidates given to 11 by
the National Convention. Next to the
inconsistency of a platform that was con
strued as "free whisky" in one part and
prohibition in another, the selection as
head of the ticket of a man who
had been notoriously unfriendly to
the labor organizations of his
own State, and who was strongly on
record as a pro-Chinese United States
Senator, was the blunder of accepting a
plan of campaign from the man whose
smirched character led us to inglorious
defeat in 1884. The war tariff acted as a
Republican boomerang, and was an ele
ment of positive weakness in the strong
Republican Western States. What the
Republican party wants in its leaders is
more brains and less chicane.
Cincinnati, November B.—The Com
mercial Gazette is indignant. It says:
By mismanagement of the campaign the
fatal errors of the National Convention
were continued and accentuated. Quay
might as well have tried to colonize
South Carolina against Cleveland as
New York, and if he had been anything
but an adept in the peculiar politics of
Philadelphia, he would have known so.
Our magnificent organization has been
handicapped by incapacity in its direc
tion from top to bottom. It has been
outgeneraled and outwitted at every
point, and has suffered a defeat which is
more to be regretted from the fact that
victory was clearly ours if we had not
been led by imbeciles.
San Fkancisco, November 8. —The
Chronicle: There seems, at this writing,
not the slightest hope for our ticket. We
told the Convention managers at Chicago
*c couid wii wrtn any
Harrison. They thought they knew bet
ter, and forced him on the party. They
can now see what a pretty mess they
have made of it. It was a hard task for
us to stand up during the campaign
against what we had sincerely said about
Harrison. But whilst we were talking the
loudest and working the hardest for the
ticket, we bet as we.thought and have
therefore made money on the election.
It is to be hoped that our advice will be
heeded at the next National Republican
Convention.
Sacramento, November 8. — Record-
Union : The pro-Chinese record of Har
sion and such speeches as Tom Reed
and Bill Williams made in this State did
the business. The Bcoundrels who
hatched out the Murchison letter lost us
thousands of votes by that miserable and
transparent fake. Everywhere our party
has been made the victim of imbecility,
chicanery and bold-faced lying on the
part of orators find leaders, and the peo
ple have spewed us out.
Los Anoki.es, November 8. —The
Times: We are defeated on account of
the treachery of the Trombone and its
cavalier treatment of the Murchison let
ter. If that letter had been handled in
the interest of the party as the Timet
handled it, it would have secured us the
ignorant Irish vote and enabled us to
carry every doubtful State. That scoun
drelly traitor, the Trombone, is responsi
ble for the defeat of Harrison.
Los Angeles, November B.—The Tri
bune: What else could we expect but
defeat from the wretched manner in
which the campaign was carried oat ?
The Tribune warned the party against
relying on the Murchison letter and the
Times. We were on the high road to
victory on the tariff issue, when the Mur
chison letter was sprung upon the coun
try, and after that the tariff question was
ignored and the campaign was fought out
upon a forgery. The Los Angeles Times
is responsible for the re-election of
Cleveland. That paper is what we have
always known it to be, an enemy in dis
guise—a wolf in sheep's clothing.
Tnc Democratic Party at Santa Ana.
The Democracy of Santa Ana and vi
cinity closed the campaign Saturday
with a grand rally, torchlight procession
and meeting. The procession was a
splendid pageant,and one of the most im
posing ever seen in that city. The meet
ing waß addressed by Hon. R. F. Del
Vallo and Lieutenant Governor White,
who made eloquent and taking speeches,
and carried the vast assemblage with .
them in bursting enthusiasm to the end.
Our reporter at Santa Ana has sent us
synopses of the addresses, but his letter
came too late to be available for this is- -
sue. The Santa Ana Democracy are
greatly elated over the fine demonstra
tion with which they wound up the
campaign.
Colored Independents.
The Independent Colored League met
in Justice Taney's Court-room—Thomas
Pearsons in the chair, W. H. Jukes,
Secretary. The first business was the
consideration of the action of one of its
members, R. 11. Slayton, who was
unanimously expelled. A move was
made to extend a vote of thanks to the
officers of the League for their goad and
great work up to the eve of election,
after which the meeting adjourned.

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