OCR Interpretation


The herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 08, 1893, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1893-07-08/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR THE DISTRICT OP SOUTH
ERN CALIFORNIA: FAIR WEATH
ER; WARMER; WESTERLY
WINDS.
VOL. XL. NO. 88.
BARGAINS!
BARGAINS!
BARGAINS!
»
r ♦»»«>♦»♦»» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
CHILDREN'S L
ALL-WOOL SUITS AT $3 and $4 f
Look at our window and see what we are offering at these prices.
The Grandest Opportunity Ever Offered in Los
Angeles to Clothe Your Little Ones.
SfflSf, At a 10 Per Cent. Disconnt.
Mullen, Bluett & Co.
Corner Spring and First Streets.
GRYSTAL PALACE,
138, 1-40, 1-42 S. Main St.
WE HAVE MADE FURTHER
LARGE REDUCTIONS
On our entire stock, and will keep up our
Immense Clearing Sale
For some weeks yet, to close out our RETAIL DEPARTMENT
MEYBERG BROS.
Dining-Room
FURNITURE,
CHINA CLOSETS
In many sizes and pattern*. Made either for the corner or for the side of tho rooios
SIDEBOARDS
In endless variety and sll prices. A very pretty one for $20.
EXTENSION TABLES
Wo have them round, oval and square, in all sizes, and as cheap as 760 per foot More
patterns shown now than ever before.
BUFFETS. A large line of pretty dcMgni.
CH A I R S In the greatest variety, in Cane seat, Wood seat or Leather seat. We show
many handsome styles aud we can please every one.
| LOS ANGELES FURNITURE COMPANY,
225-227-229 South Broadway, Opp. City Hall.
HELD IN MECHANICS' PAVILION, SAN FRANCISCO, ENDING FEB. IS, 1893.
GRAND SILVER MEDAL
SILVER MEDAL 1^
QTT 17"ET"Q WTTFiAT f OR . t M< >S T ARTISTIC SPECIMENS illustrat-
OJLLf V J-jJLV iVAJTI/ 6J /A I v lug the Placinotype, Aiisto aud other processes.
SILVER MEDAL ~ OST AE ™ TIC *********** of
"Four Medals Out of a Possible Four."
" 220 SOUTH SPRING STREET - igga^.^
WILLIAMSON'S MUSIC STORE.
HENRY F. MILLER r—k I A a. I C> MATHUJHEK
B. 3HOMNUER. ■ SMITH <& BARNES.
N"WMAN I ftANQ NEEDHAM
Air Circulating R <JI A\ IM g» silver "ongusd.
A 1 i AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
S , MACHINES
Standard, Rot Other Long Shuttle Machines, Supplies, Etc
, Bl'fglNG Snt'K'KßX. 4031y
i
H;;J»; Teleph, i
SH A FUU I
Awnings & I
8-
C^SAE
UNDERTAKERS 1
OPIN DAY
530 Booth Spring
Telepnc
The Herald
9 A \ 11 z
♦ : p \
i««>^«>4^«>eA*o<>«)«>««««>«>«>«*»*
i
Canning: of Fruit made an agreea
ble and delightful task. No more
boiling anil no more spoiling.
Saves sujrar, saves fruit, saves
breakage of jars, saves lime and
labor lo>t by the old method.
Try it on your berries, and you will
surely use it ou your later fruits.
If you cannot get It at your grocer's
send to
H . J E V N EI,
Los Angeles, Cal.
IGWT for SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
fWB 3a
LAID WASTE IN A MOMENT.
Appalling Results of the Cy
clone in lowa.
Scores of People Killed in the
Twinkling of an Eye.
The Wind's Awful Execution at the
Village of Pomeroy.
Nearly a Hundred People Dead and ns
Many Injured—Death and Devas
tation Over m Wide Area.
Calls for Aid.
By the Associated Press,
Fort Dodge, la., July 7.—Seventy
four peoplo are dead, at least five more
will die, and over 100 are injured as the
result of the cyclone that atarted at
Quimby and ended with awful results at
Pomeroy laat night. At the latter place
40 are dead and over 100 injured, and
five bloeka of residences demolished,
nothing remaining but kindling-wood.
Two hundred families are homeless, hav
ing lost their all. Business blocks ere
badly damaged, and the new post office,
drug store and eeven chnrchea are com
pletely demolished. The loss in Pome
roy will probably reach $50,00 Q. All ia
cbaoa here. Tho residents atill alive are
in a dazed condition, and it ia very diffi
cult to obtain information.
A MINUTE'S EXECUTION.
The storm camo from the northwest
and did terrible work in literally one
minute's time. An immense amount of
damage waa done to crops, and the path
of the Btorm ia strewn with carcasses of
animala, and in every direction there ia
nothing but wreck and ruin.
Immediately after the storm passed,
the cries and moans of ihe injured and
dying were heart-rending, and willing
ones began the work of roacue. Tbeir
work waa eickening, aa people were Ht
terally torn to pieces—some with lege or
anna drawn and others suffering from
terrible wonnds with life oozing ont.
Many of the dead were ao disfigured
tbat they were unrecognizable. The
old poetoflice was turned into a morgue
and at one time contained 26 bodies.
The Oood Templars' ball and hotels
were turned into hospitals where every
effort waa made to relieve the unfor
tunates.
WO UK. OF RBLIBV AKD BESCUJ9.
.The storm wiped out communication
with the world, and Ed Masterson
started on a horse for Maaon for help.
He waa stopped by a bridge being
washed out, and in attempting to ford
the river wart nearly drowned. He
bailed a special train bearing the offi
cials of the Illinois Central, and tbey
backed to Mason, cent for assistance
and then proceeded with help to Pom
eroy. Another train, with physicians
and help, followed shortly, and soon
the work of relief at Pomeroy waa in
progress. A train left here with nuraea,
bedding, food and coffins thia morning
and the interment of the dead com
menced thia afternoon. A relief com
mittee haa been established in Pomeroy,
and all contributiona and offering* will
bo received with gratitude. It "is iui
poaaible to obtain a list of the injured.
TEE APPALLING DEATH LIST.
Tbe dead are as follows: Mra. Bessie
Banks, Mrs. Djhlgren, Mra. Neory,
Thomas Harmand, Andrew Wilkinson,
Mr, and Mra. John Anderson, Mrs.
Hnghott, Mr. and Mre. Silvaß Boston,
a man named Neiting, wife and son,
Mre. Frank Johnaon, Benjamin Davis,
Willie Keifer, Boy Banka, OUie Frost,
Mr. and Mra. Arnold, Marie Adams,
Mre. Harlon, Mrs. George, Banker Davis,
OUie Lnndgren, Katie Davie, Mra.
O'Brien and child, Mrs. Erlowe, Mrs.
Tabert, John Beckley'a two children,
Mra. Dilmith, J. P. Lnndgren, Silas
Weston, Mr. and Mrs. Havlett, A. For
key, Henry Geike, Mre. Quinlan and
child, Allie Maxwell, Tillie Johnaon,
Bob Dahlgren, Grover Black, George
Black, Delia Black, Samuel Maxwell,
Richarg George and an unknown boy.
The following, were found live milea
from Fonda: Mrs. Mopton and three
children, John Detweiler,
Tbeae were found near Quimby: Mrs.
Molyneux, Mrs. Lester. «
About five miles south of Aurelia the
following fatalitiea occurred: Samuel
Burcb, wife and three children; John
aon, Lillie and Leila Slattery, an un
known servant, John Peters.
Near Storm Lake were found Jacob
Bretter and child, and one Bottinan.
Sonth of Newell a family was killed,
names unknown.
MANY REMARKABLE ESCAPES.
Many remarkable escapes are chron
icled. A year-old babe waa found on the
outskirts of the rains entirely divested
of ita clothing, uninjured. M. F. Mul
len'e family and five neighbors saved
themselves by going into a cyclone
cave, but their homes were completely
demolished. Many dead were found
long distances from residences and
standing houses had boarda driven
through thorn by the force of the wind.
Trees in the path of the storm were
stripped, even to their bark, and nothing
escaped injury. Pomeroy waa a thriving
town of 1000 inhabitants.
THE DEATH LIST INCOMPLETE.
The total number killed at Pomeroy
is 48, ane eight mortally wounded. The
list of dead ia etill incomplete. Reports
coming in from the country will swell
the number of dead to at least 80.
nOBRIDLY MANGLED BODIEB.
Tonight tbe ecene around Pomerov is
heartrending. In the old poetoffice
building tha dead bodies are being
gathered and friends come to identify
tham. The scene ia beyond the powe?
of the moat graphic pen to piotnre.
Some bodies are literally torn
in two. Others have pieces
of boards thrust through them,
headsXemashed, limbs torn off and some
are bo badly disfigured that they can
only be recognized by the clothing or
LOS ANGELES: MORNING, JULY 8, 1893.
some trinket. Tbe wounded are being
well-cared for in the different hotels,
and thoae wbo were fortunate enough to
have their homes spared, have opened
them to tbe injured, and all that careful
nursing and the best medical assistance
can do, is being done for them.
The property destroyed will amount
to $000,000.
Pomeroy, la., July 7.—Governor
Boies, after a personal examination of
the ruin wrought by the atorm, tonight
issued a proclamation to the people of
lowa calling for prompt and liberal aid.
Fonda, la., July 7.—The list of killed
and injured in Cherokee and western
Buena Viata counties ia aa followB:
Killed—S. Burgees, wife and thre;
children ; Mr. Johnson and wife, Miaa
Slater, Mra. Slater's hived man (name
unknown), Mr. Lord, J. Beecher and
child.
Seriously injured—Mr. and Mrs. W.
E. Clemons, Bert Slater, John Petera
and wife, Mias Burgess, Ed Wall, J. H.
Woodruff.
THE WEEK'S CLEARANCES.
Panicky Condition of the Country Re
flected In the Exchanges.
New York, Jnly 7.—Following is
Bradatreet'a tabulated result of the
bank clearancea of the principal' cities of
the United States for the week ending
Thursday, July 6th:
Per ct. Pot ct
Clearances. Inc. Dee..
New York $((02,481,000 .... 5 7
Boston 03.422.000 .... 16.2
Chicago 90,8 50,000 .... 7.5
Puiladelphla 71,723,000 2.4
St. Louis 20,242,000 .... 0 5
Baltimore 15,391,000 . .. 3.7
Kan Francisco.... 13,070,0J0 5.7
Pittaburg 1»,155,000 .... 15 5
Cincinnati 11,429,000 .... 28 0
Minneapolis 0,069,000 .... 87.5
Omaha 6,277,000 .... 1.0
Bt. Psul 4,547,000 19.3
Denver 3,629,000 .... 36.2
Portland, 0re.... 1,408,000 .... 43.1
Helena, Mont.... 690 000 5.3
Seattle... 680,000 .... 54 4
1.'.8 Angeles 428,000 v .... 43 5
(ireat Falls. Mont 300,000
bpokane 221,000 1
Total of the leading cities in the
United States, $1,051,402,382, a de
crease of 8.2 per cent as compared with
the Bame week last year.
CHRISTIAN ENDEAVORS.
PROCEEDINGS OF THE BIG CON
VENTION IN MONTREAL.
A Hindoo Delegate Rouses the Ire of
the French Catholics—Speakers at
an Open Air Meeting Stoned
by Hoodlums,
Montreal, July 7.—Tha Christian
xmaeavorere neia nail » dosen prayer
meetings thia morning. The principal
exercises were held in tbe dril' hall in
the presence of 7000 delegates. A num
ber of papera were .read. Many dele
gatea witnessed a parade of the fire
brigade.
Four Essentials of the Christian En
deavor society waa the basis of the meet
ing of the morning session in the drill
hall.
Rev. Sumantrae Vishnn Karmarthe
of Bombay was the principal speaker in
the tent thia morning. He made the
firat anti-Rome utterance yet heard at
any of the meetings. Said he; "In
India we have not only to contend with
the hydra-headed monster of idolatry,
but alao theoctopue of Humanism."
La Freaa came out thia evening with
an article which declared that Kar
marthe's speech ia a deliberate insult, to
the French people, and they regard it
as eucb.
Several thousand delegates under
cam-as tonight liatened to addressee
from Rev. Bishop B. W. Arnett of Vicka
burg, Miaa., colored, and Rev. 1). J.
Burrell of New York city.
At tbe opening of tbe evening session
in the drill hall, Secretary Baer read a
telegram addressed to T. W, Palmer,
preaident of the World'a Columbian ex
position, congratulating him on the
atand he haa taken regarding Sunday
opening, and expressing the hope that
his views might prevail. A deafening
roar filled the hall when the import of
the dispatch waa understood, and the
nnanimoua uprising of the audience to
signify assent waa followed by more
cheering, which lasted fully five min
utea.
An address was given by Rev. J. Q.
A. Henry of San Franciaco on Tbe Bible
on Outwork, and Rev. M. Boynton of
Boston spoke, closing the exercises for
the day.
A number of delegates held an over
flow open air meeting this evening. A
crowd of toughs Hung stones at tbe
speakers and several "endeavorera"
were struck by missiles. The police
made short work of them. The hostile
demonstration ia attributed to Kar
marthe's attack on Catholicism.
At a committee meeting. Rev. E. R.
Dille of San Francisco wbb elected to the
board of trustees of the united society.
A Belf-Oonfessed Murderer.
Stockton, Cal., July 7.—Late last
night a laboring man named Louis
Henry Schultz entered tbe police station
and to an officer on duty Baid he wanted
to give himself up; that he was the man
who killed Atbanaain at tbe Three-Mile
house, tbe 4th of July. Schultz told a
long story about Arbanasin having
ruined his slater, und said that
he met Arbanasin about 18 months
ago and demanded that he
marry hie Bißter. A week later she
took poison and he resolved to kill
Arbanasin if he ever met him. The
first meeting was Tuesday night and he
shot bim dead. A farm laborer wit
nessed tbe killing, Schultz said, and aa
the self-confeßßed murderer declared he
did not rob the deceased, the officers
hope to arreat the man who is supposed
to have robbed the dead man's pockets.
Sacbamento, Jnly 7.—Governor Mark
ham hae not yet returned from the east,
althougtf his arrival iB looked for at any
time. It ia underetood he is stopping
over at various places along the ronte*.
The world's fair will caueo a rash.
Order eaily. Full stock, good fit, mod>
erate prices. Getz, tine tailoring, V.2
West Third street.
THE GOVERNOR CALLS 808 AID.
ANOTHER LIST OF KILLED.
Bfarbham Not Yet Returned.
A MOB'S MORBID REVENGE
Horrible Lynching Affair at
Bar dwell, Ky.
Awful Vengeance Visited on a
Black Fiend.
The Ravager and Murderer of the
Ray Girls Hanged.
His Body Then Mutilated and Burned
to a Crisp—The Culprit Died Pro
testing: His Innocence.
Was ne Gull")?
By the Associated Press.
Babdwell, Ky., July 7. —Seay J.
Miller, the negro charged with the out
rage! and murder of Mary and Ruby
Ray, waa hanged at 3:27 o'clock thia
afternoon and hia body burned, after
being horribly mutilated. The negro
made a speech proclaiming hia inno
cence, but it is said he afterward made
partial confeeaion.
The steamer Three States, with sev
eral hundred men from Cairo on board,
met the special train from Sikeston at
Bird'a point. The priaoner waa put on
the boat nnd'he was taken to Wickliffe.
Frank Gordon, the fisherman who fer
ried the murderer acroaa the Mississippi
river Wednesday night, identified Miller
aa the aame man. Still Miller pleaded
innocence, and John Ray, father of the
murdered girls, counseled patience.
The mob brought the priaoner to thia
city, arriving at 11:30 o'clock. There
were no.t leaa than 5000 people at the
depot, and the train was crowded.
Previous to this an agreement waa
made by the people to allow the father
of the children to prescribe hia punish
ment. Sheriff Hudson, the priaoner
'and guards mounted a Bcaffald which
waa secreted, and John Ray, father of
of the murdered girls, made a talk, in
which he aaid:
"Thia ia the man who killed my chil
dren, but let ua keep quiet now and at
the proper time burn him."
The negro waa called upon and re
sponded promptly, and with wonderful
nerve, considering the cumstancea under
which he was placed. His voice waa
clear, and he seemed oblivious to hia
aurroundinga. His exact words were
aa follows:
"My name is Seay J. Miller, and I am
I here among you as a etranger and
I looked on by you as the moat hrntal
man that ever stood on God'a vr?«n
earth. lam standing here an innocent
man among excited men who do not
propoae to let the law take ita course.
I have committed no crime to be de
prived of my liberty or Hfe. I am not
guilty."
At this time he was disturbed by
several questions and many called
on him to go on. But Sheriff Hudson
bogged to be permitted to put him in
jail and get aome reat for himaelf, which
he needed so badly. It waa finally
agreed to hang him at 3 o'clock, and
the negro waa placed in jarl to await the
time when he would be called forth.
At 3:20 o.'clock the negro wbb brought
from the jail to the principal atreet. A
chain waa around hia neck, and many
men were pulling at it. The crowd waa
wild, and no one could gnees at the fate
of the negro. He was almost auffocated
when the north end of the depot waa
reached, and the father of the girla re
lented to aome extent and suggested that
he be hanged, rather than burned.
At 3:27 hia body waa swung to a tele
graph pole directly at tbe north end of
the depot, and as he waß drawn np his
clothes were torn from hia body by the
maddened mob. He waa heard to Bay,
just aa they drew him up, "I am an
innocent man;" but there ia a fully
authenticated report that he made a
partial confession aa the mob took him
from the jail. The confession implicates
a partner, but nothing poaitive can be
learned.
The negro waa drawn np, and when
two or three feet from the ground,
come one ehot him from the front, the
ball passing entirely through tbe body.
In a few minutes life waa extinct, it be
ing ascertained be waa dead at 3:45
o'clock. The body waa left hanging un
til 4:25. during which time aome of bia
toea and fingers were cut off. The body
waa finally taken down and the ears cut
off; nearly all the remaining toea and
lingers were severed, and the body
otherwise mutilated.
The body waa then placed between
two kegs and kindling piled upon it,
and then enough wood to complete the
job of burning. The crowd remained
orderly to the last, but very determined.
The men who did the hanging are from
Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois and Mia
souri, but the work waa done in auch a
manner, and the throng waa ao great,
tbat no man can name the ind'viduala
who participated.
Spkihqfielp, 111., July 7.—Seay J.
Miller, the negro lynched today at
Bardßwefl, Ky., for outraging and kill
ing two white girla, haa been living in
this city. He came laat January from
Cairo and went to work in a barber
shop. He went back to Cairo three
weeks ago, but hia wife ia still here.
She ia almost crazed by her husband's
fate. Miller was a mullatto and had
borne a good reputation among the
negrutrS.
Troops Retained et Antlers.
Washington, Jaly 7.—tleneral Scho
field today cent telegraphic instructions
to General Mllea, commanding the de
partment of the Miasouri, directing that
the recent order withdrawing the troops
from Antlers, Oklahoma, be revoked.
While there are not now any indica
tions of trouble, it ia thought best that
the troopa be retained at Antlers for the
present.
For sunburn and freckles uso only
Perfecta Face Cream; safe and sure.
For sale by A. E. Littleboy, druggist,
311 South Spring Btreet.
For bargains in millinery go to Thurs
ton's, 26-i South Main street, opposite
Third. v
THE HEATH TRIAL.
A Feeble Attempt: Jfs !.< to Impeacb Dr.
» Wateou'4 Testimony.
Fresno, July 7.—ln the proceedings
of the trial of Heath today, the dofense
made a rather foeblo attempt at im
peaching the evidence of Dr. Watson,
one of tbe prosecution's strongest wit
nesses. Dr. Watson, it will be remem
bered, testified to having seen Heath
and another man in the alley near the
MeWhi-rter residence shortly before the
killing occurred. Two witnesses were
placed en the atand and told unfavora
ble stories about Watson, but they were
roughly handled by the attorney ior the
prosecution.
Ex-Supervisor William Davison, a
liquor dealer, residing near the Mc-
Whirter residence, testified that he
heard six shots on the night of the mur
der; he put on hia pants and coat and
went to McWhirtor'a yard. There he
found the body lying on the ground; a
woman was leaning over it and a man
waa standing at the head. Witness
went to Dr. Long's house, and after
wardß to Dr. Pedlar'a house. He went
by two ahantiea opposite Mra. Leach's
house and be was rnnniug.
Fred W. I'olley, ihe co-defendant
with Heath, waa called bo the stand.
He aaid he was a native of Canada, 28
years old and had been working on
ranches. He first became acquainted
with Heath two years ago in tne Moss
vineyard, where he waa teaming, and
where Heath waa overeeeing a gang of
Chinamen. He left that place two
yeara thia coming fall; that waa the
last time he ever worked on tbe aame
place with Heath, He waa often in the
Monarch aaloon; could not any whether
he was there the night of the killing or
not. He did not know McWhirter or
where he lived. He waa not with Heath
at any pereon'e houae that night.
Osage orange clubs being shown him,
he said he had never had them in hia
poeeeaeion or been with poraona who
bad. Ha never carried a pistol in hia
life.
The court adjourned before Polley waa
croas-examined.
Silver for Export.
New York, July 7.—Three hundred
and ninety-five ounces of silver will go
out in one steamer tomorrow.
DEATH'S SHINING MARK.
JUSTICE BLATCHFORD REMOVED
TO A HIGHER COURT.
He Was Conscious Almost to the L&lt
and Faased Quietly aud Poaoe
fully Away—A Sketch of
His Career.
Newport, R. 1., Jnly 7. —Aaaoalate
Justice Samuel Blatohford passed
quietly and peacefully from the earth at
7:20 this evening. He retained con
sciousneesa until an hour or two bufore
hie death. There waß no a udden change
in hia condition, aitnply a gradual slip
ping away which had been taking place
for the laßt week. Arrangements for
the funeral have not yet baen com
pleted, but the body will probably be
taken to Washington for interment. For
many seaaona he hae been a quiet visitor
to the city during the summer season,
and while not greatly given to society
following, he was frequently entertained
in the first families.
TSamnel Blatchford was born in New
York city March 1), 1820. His father
was Richard Milford Blatchford, a noted
lawyer and friend of Daniel Webster, bo
young Samuel had the advantage of a
good start in life. He was graduated at
Columbia college in 1837. Two years
later he became private secretary to Gov.
William H. Seward, and 'he was mili
tary aeeretary on the govornor'a staff
till 1843. In 1842 be waa admitted to the
bar, and in 1845 was made a counsellor
of the supreme conrt of New York
state. Daring the latter part of the
came year he settled in Auburn, and
became associated with W. H. Seward
and Christopher Morgan in a law part
nership. In 1854 he removed to New
York city aud reßituied the practice of
hia profession. He waa appointed, in
May, 1807, district judge of the United
States court for the southern district of
New York, and in March, 1882, became
an associate justice of the supreme court
of the United States by appointment by
President Arthur. Hia fatal illness dates
back several months, when he waa first
subject to paralytic shocks.
A FIXE TRAP.
Fatal Flamed In a World's Fair Hotel.
Five Guests Fatally Injured.
Chicago, July 7.—The hotel Lincoln,
near the world's fair grounds, waa badly
damaged by fire thia afternoon and five
people were injured, two of whom may
die. The injured are: Miss Jessie Bige
low, Ogden, Utah, jumped from a third
story window,sustaining concussion of the
snine and may die; J. Cowlea may die;
Mrs. C. H. McAleer, John Powers ono"
an unknown man. The flaniea origi
nated in the kitchen of the hotel, and
the frame building was Boon a mass of
flames, and none of the personal effects
of the gueßts were saved. Miaa Eigelow
jumped, deapite the warning of the fire
men who shouted that they could Bave
her. Loss, $8000.
Flood Granted a Mew Trial.
San Francisco, July 7.—John W.
Flood who was convicted of embezzle
ing $103,700 from the Donohue-Kelly
bank, was granted a new trial by Supe
rior Judge J. M. Seawell, today, and his
bail fixed at $50,000.
The judge held that in the first trial,
the result of which was the conviction
of Flood, he erred in instructing the
jury, and that the prosecution stiould
have introduced evidence other than
Flood's report to show what money was
on hand on February 15th, the day that
the finance committee of tho board of
directors counted the cash, and also
what money was received and paid ont
between that day and tho day of the
discovery of the defalcation. Flood waa
released on bail in the sum of $100,000.
• The Infanta at Home.
Madrid, July 7.—lnlV. i'.i EolaHa a**
lived here U«iV.y.
********************* *-*** 4 ?
THE WORLD'S FAIR TRIP, t
THE CHANCE TO SECURE THE [
HERALD S FKKE TICKET TO :
CHICAGO IS STILL t
THE COUPONS AND VOTH OFTEN, j
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GROVER FEELS BETTER.
The President's! Illness Is Not
Serious.
His Knee Is Lame and His Foot
Is Swollen.
The Yarn About a (Janeeroti3 Growth
in His Mouth Donicd.
He Only Had a Bad Tootli Extracted,
Hia Slater Hastening to lluxaard'a
Bay to Ita Preaent at
a Horning.
By the Associated Press.
Buzzard's Bay, July 7.—President
Cleveland tonight ia feeling better than
thie momin<. Hia knee ia lame and hia
left foot ia swollen ao he ia obliged to
wear a big ahoe. Tho published report
that the president is suffering with can
cer ia denied by Dr. Bryant, who says
the president ia absolutely free from
cancerous or malignant growth of any
deasription, and the report ia absolutely
false. No operation waa performed, ex
opt that a bad tooth waa extracted.
Dr. Bryant is of the opinion that the,
president will be able to go out in a day
or two. The following dispatch w*a
sent tonight to Secretary Gresham, at
Washington:
President laid up with rheumatism in
kne.e and foot aud will be out in day or
two. No occasion for any uneasiness.
I). S. Lamont.
The preaident tonight Bent a message
to Mre. Samuel Blatchford, at Newport,
Baying: 'Tleaee accept my heartfelt
sympathy and condolence on tho death
of your distinguished husband, whoso
long and honorable public aerv'.cea cause
the nation to mourn hia lose."
Joseph Jefferson visited President
Cleveland today, and later said he found
him much improved in genera' health
and very cheerful. He declared hia ill
ncaa was not eerioua—only a slight at
tack of rheumatiam.
NO ALARM FELT AT WASHINGTON.
Washington, July 7.—The mamberis
of the cabinet and friends of the presi
dent aae unwilling to believe that there
ia anything serious or unusual in hie
condition. Private Secretary Thurbet
aayß beyond being overworked he waa
in hia usual robust health when he left
the city. As to the rumor of a cancerous
growth in the prnpidout'B month, the
fact waa the president had a bad tooth
aud Buffered from facial nmiralgia,
caused byexpoeure on inauganation day.
MRS. nOYT SUMMONED.
Kansas City, Juiy 7.—A special from
Omaha says: The departure of Mr,
Hoyt of Beatrice for Buzzard's Bay, I l
see her brother, President Cleveland,
haa aroused fearathat hid illness ie more
serioua than admitted by the physicians.
She had juat returned home and had no
intention of going east, till called by a
d.spatch from Mrs. Cleveland.
THAT OANCISROUB OKOVVTH.
Chicaoo, July 7. —A special from Bos
ton to au afternoon paper says of the j
report in regard to a cancerous growth
in the president's mouth: It waa no
ticed a year or more ago, but gave no
trouble till lately. Last Saturday, un
der the advice of a specialist, it was re
moved. It was a email affair and re
moved without difficulty, though, of
course, very painful, and the physicians:
require perfect reat to insure full and
speedy recovery. No further trouble is
anticipated.
MRS. IIOYT's MISSION.
The same authority states that tha
presence of the president's sister. Mre.
Hoyt, of Beatrice, Neb., waß not de
manded on account of the president's
illneaa, hut iv connection with the cul
mination of on interesting event more
nenrly concerning the president's wife.
ADMISSION Ol' CUINESE.
The Treasury Department Galls on Col
lectors Tor Allnatolnformation.
Washington, July 7. —Acting'Socreta-
ry Hamlin haa instructed the collectors
of customs, in order that the depart
ment might be fully adviaed concerning
the admission of Chinese perßoua
the United States, to prepare and for
ward to the department a statement
showing the number of Chineae persons
admitted by them from January Ist to
June 30, 18113, and the reasonß; the
number to whom admission was refused
and the reasons, and the namber per
mitted to land for transit to
another port for exit from the United
Stataa. Collectors are also directed to
make a weekly report of the Chinese
persona seeking admission into the
United States, giving the namea,
description, occupation and placeH of
destination in the United Stateß; thoae
admitted and the evidence upon which
Buch action waa baaed, and alao the
names, description and occupation of
tho*e to whom admisaion waa rtffuoed,
aud the reaaona for such refusals; also
the names, occupation and description
of such persons permitted to land for
transit through the United States.
Jfot the Kfsht Htarr.
Arkansas Qtrv, Kan., July 7.—A man
who profeEses to know the bandit. Honry
Starr intimately, called at tho Traveler
office today and eaid the Colorado
Springs captive ie not Henry Starr. He
cays Starr is still in the territory with
16 men, ready to repel any attack that
may lie made upon his stronghold by
marshals and Indion police.
Morton's ltecomiuemlatlons.
Washington, July 7. —Tha abolition
of seed distribution through msinbsra
of congress nnd charging tha cost of
meat inspection npom t'le nackers aro
likely to be two of the leading. i«com
rnendations in the annual report of
Secretary .Morton oi the department of
agriculture.
Kedoudo auction today. Tohe the 10:30
tfabi from Uomd aYMtoe depot-

xml | txt