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The herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, September 09, 1893, Image 6

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1893-09-09/ed-1/seq-6/

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J INK AUVEKTISKMKNtS.
• The most direct method ot reaching the
public and making know n your :
*■ — *
WWW A NN N *TTTTT SSSS
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WWWW A A NNN T SSSS
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WW WW A A N N N T 8
W W A AN N N T 8 8
Vf W A A N NN T SSSS
Is through the classified ad. columns ol The
Herald. It is cheap, brings quick returns,
and places the advertiser in direct communi
cation with those ho wishes to reach.
CCOL A R SS„ R SSc 11 FFFII FEE PUD
COL AA § « II F HE D D
0 L A A S SS X h 88 X II IFII KB D I)
C 01, AAA H v X Sl' F HE I> D
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A DDD I. KEF.TTTT K SS„
AA D PL E T S
AA D D L FF. T D SS S
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A A ODD LLLLKKK T °8S 3
Inserted in the columns of The Herald at
*'*
• 6 CENTS PER LINK PER DAY. •
j ffl PER LINE PER MONTH. :
Si-ecial rates for a longer period. :
* *
Persons wanting situations, help or wishing
to rent, buy or sell properly will do well to ad
vertise ln Thk Herald.
OFFICIAL CITY PAPER. j
* *
SPECIAL NOTICES.
TjJAC KNIGHT & FUGARD,
Real Estate
—and—
insurance.
252 S. Broadway.
Telephone 1123.
Loans negoitated.
Houses rented
And rents collected
F"or non-residents.
0-2 tf
ONSIGXMEXT 9ALE~OF CARPETS, RUGS,
portlers, chenille table covers, lace
curtains, quilts, blankets, etc., at 347 South
Spring street. In order to satisfy eastern man
ufacturers $10000 of above lines of goods
must be closed out during the next 30 nays.
700 yards brussels carpet at 45c; 650 yards
brussels carpet at 52Uc; 755 yards brussels
carpet at Hoc; 550 varus extra super brussels
carpet, 65c. By order RICHARD DILLON",
consignee, 347 South spring street, between
Third and Fourth streets. S-.7 2w
XfOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY WATER
company will strictly enforce the follow
ing rule: The hours for sprinkling arc between
(I and 8 o'clock a. m. and (> and S o'clock p. m.
For a violation of the above regulation the
water will be shut off and a fine of $2 will l>e
charged before tho water will be turned on
again. ' 8-17 tf
rpIIESAFE DEPOSIT BOXES OFTHIf.STAIE
X Loan and Trust company are inclosed in a
Are-proof and burglar-proof vault, with time
locks and brilliantly lighted by electricity; al
coves attached for the private examination of
valuables, with writing materials; a young
lady in attendance. 8-1 tf
TItESMIX'S FEMALE PILLS AS A BPECIFIC
iVI monthly medicine for immediate relief for
painful nnd"lrrcgular menses—from whatever
'cause. For sale by FREEMAN" * CARPER, 102
North Spring st. "Price, $2 per box. 5-9 ly
TREE CARRIAGE AX D WAG 0 N
) works: all kinds of painting and repair
ing. 128 Sau Pedro st., between First and Sec
ond sts., Los Angeles. 7-6 tf
ioCHOOL"OF DRESS \I AXING, CUTTING AND
O and fitting: patcrns cut. French tailor sys
tern. Room 87, Potomac block. 8-27 lm
DO" YOU WANT TO REXT YoTfThOUSE ?
Leave your key with HILL &i CO., 121 W.
Second St. 9-1 tf
A~ F7 SLOPEr7"h<VUSE MOVER. OFFICE,
. 112 center place, 1-I.> ti
PERRONA '<^ > _ >/S/ __
I)lfßSO^.g*>^OPFEEs',Fßlv1 )lfRSO^.g*>^OPFEEs',FRlv ! n ROASTED OX
our gisut coffee rujtscer, Java and Mocha,
35c lb; mountain .coffee, 35c; geimca, 20c;
rolled TV«,- l«o; * lbs rice, BOc; 6 lbs rolled
wheat, 2'Se; 8 lbs cornlaten),.lsc; 15 lbs gran
ulated sugar,'sl; iO lbs beansi 25c; i on toma
toes or com, 10c; 3 osns corn beef, 25c: can
baked beans, )0c; box maccaroni,hSc; extract
beef, 25c; 4 bars Dinmore's soap, Vsc: can
coal oil, 80c; 3 lbs lard, 30>; pork, 13',e; bs>
con, 16'jc; hams, 14V. ECONOMIC STORKS,
305 S. Spring si. 7-5 tf
ERIiONAL-RAI.I'H BROS.—GOLD BAR
flour, $1.00; city flour, HOC; granulated
Sugar, 15 lbs ■] ; brown smrar. 20 lbs $1; 6 lbs
rolled oats, 25c; sardines, 5 boxes, 25c; table
fruit, 3 cans, 50e; Midland coffee, 25c lb; east
ern oil, 80c; gasoline, 80c; 2-lb can corned
beef, 15c; lard, It) lbs, 906; 5 lbs, 50c. 601
fcoulh Spring street, corner Sixth.
— £adie*s ,— "SAFEGUARD; PAT
ented; no medicine; no equal; money re
funded If not satisfaetorv. Send 10 cents to
ladies' novelty co., Kansas City, Mo.
8-26 6m
adies, sometTTixg .NEW FOR the com
u plexion— Parisian Toilet Cream. Forsale
SI Parlor A, 2llj S. .Main M. 9-s 71
BIISINKSB OHPOItTU.SiriES.
a-'UE LOS ANGELES DIRECTORY* "oFFICE
keeps a complete list of all business for
Sale or exchange. Parties desiring to either
buy or sell will consult their best interests by
applying at office, 103 South Broadw ay. 8-9
170R~"SALE— RARE CHANCE FOR A MAX
to engage in iarming business and have
salary; $1200 cash required. E. S. FIELD, 189
8. Broadway. S-27U
CHEAP FOR CASH, A FIRST
" class blacksmith business. For particulars
apply to W. A. MORRISON', Redondo Beach,
Cal 8-29 lm
. ■ — -
ATTOUNKYsi.
JAY E. HUNTER, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Bryson-Bonebrake block. Telephone, 528.
Practices in all the courts, state and federal.
7-1 tf
GOODRICH, LAWYER, 121 DEARBORN
• street, Chicago, III.; 20years' experience;
secrecy; special facilities in several states
Goodrich ou Divorce, with laws of all states, lit
press. 6-4 tf
UNSAKER & GOODRICH, LAWYERS,
rooms 103 and 104 Phillips block, corner
Spring aud Franklin streets. Telephone, 1120.
7-6 tf
T) J. ADCOCK, ATTORNEY: SPECIAL AT-
J\« tentioa given to the settlement of estates.
115 West First street. 4-6 tf
K. TRASK, ATTORNEY AT LAW, Yl:'C
• ton block, 207 New High street, Los An
geles. 1-16 tf
IV M. POLLARD, ATTORNEY LAW.
it room 3, Allen block, Temple andSprlng
H reels. 2-21 If
rplIE KAMMERMEYER ORCIIESTRA-
X First-class music furnis"hed for balls, par
ties, concerts, receptions and picnics. Violin,
mandolin, etc., taught, office at Fitzgerald's
music store, corner .North Spring and Franklin
streets. 10-14 ly
L"OS AXGEI.ES CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC
and Art: open all the year. MRS. EMILY
J. VALENTINE, president, V.M.C.A. Building,
Broadway and Second streets. 8-14 ly
BAN.!.). BY \. IS.- V. 1 ac. BURY: 5 AND 8
stringed taught. Studio 51; take elevator
by People's store, Phillips block. 11-12 ly
A~WILXII ARTITZ, MUSH- STUDIO, ROOM
• A, Crocker building, 212 s. Bruudway.
8-'.'i> I f '
ARCHITECTS
I»URGESS J. I'tEE^-ErAltt'HlVECtTehTAl£
X) lished for the last ten years in Los Angeles,
Booms v and 8 second floor, Workman block,
Bprlngst., between Second and 'third, 1-26 y
i~l" H. BROWN, ARCHITECT, 131 8, BROAD.
way, t.elween lii.-i and s-7 tf
OVKKS ,*NI> I'INiaHltUS.
METROPOLITAN "BTEA mT)YE W(IRKB, 241
Franklin st.; line dyeing und cleaning.
1-13 tf
IPARISIAN1 PARISIAN DYE WORKS, 275 SOUTH MAIN
street; best dyeing in I he city. 1-13 1 f
BROKERS.
KW. POIN"DEXTER, BROKER, 306 WEST
• Second st. Confidential business agent
for investors or borrowers. If you wish to
lend or borrow, or invest in uiiy securities,
please call. 8-1 ti
WANTBD-BBLP.
!i w»nt active representative! in all parts of
c the U. 8. to sell an article that Is tiserl by every
one. Goods are warranted. Profits enormous.
Business permanent and legitimate. Exclusive
territory given. Experience not necessary.
Addres. "Manufacturing C 0.," 178-180 Com
. merclal St., Lynn, Mass. 9-2-sat-tucs-thu-12t
TV ANTED—ALL _ N F'EDINO HELP FR EE,
■? rmplovment or any information, address
1 K. NITTINGBR'S BUREAU, established 1880.
Offlce, SW/( 8. Spring St.; residence. 451 S.
Hope St., corner Fifth, Los Angeles, Cal. Tele
phone 118, 8-16 tf
PETTY'" HUMMEL A CO., fTmTTToYMF.NT
agents, 131-133 W. First st. Telephone Soil.
Under the Los Angeles National bank. Help
. of all kinds carefully selected and furnished.
situations of nil kinds furnished. 7-<i ti
WANTED— AGENTS TO REPRESENT THE
Guarantee Investment Company. THOM P
SOX, MITCHELL ,'. SONS, general agents, 107
and 108 Bryson block, Los Angeles, cal. 00 5t
WANTED-MISCICI.LAN-SOUS.
\V ANTED— TO PURCHASE LOT, WEST OR
M south front, between Twenty-second and
Twenty-seventh, Grand avenue and Hoover
streets; must be reasonable in price; state sUe
of lot, give location aud price. Address,
BUYER, box 20, Herald. 8-11 tf
TIT ANTED—WE HAVE APPLICATIONS FOR
H ranches toront; if you wish to let your
place send a description and what voti want
ior it. J. W. FOSTER, 237 W. First St.", Los An
geles. 9-5 7t
TY j ANTED—GENTLEMAN OF LONG EXPE
-1 * rience in publishing business wants posi
tion In any capacity. Address "Competent,"
Box 110, Herald office. 9-9 2t|
TV ANTED—MSS., E'SAYS, SERMONS OR
>> other documents to copy by hand or by
typewriter. GEO. W. BRADFORD, room 8,
242Vj 8. Broadway. 9-3 lm
TVANTELVT- GENTLEMAN WANTS ROOM
TV and board, or both, in exchange for piano
and painting lessons. Address ".Music," Box
20, Herald office. 0-9 2t
TIT ANTED—A COLLECTION OF FOREIGN
VV and United States stamps. Address M. 11.
NEWMARK, 144-151 N. Los Angeles st. It
V\ T ANTED—TEACIIERIi OF'IHEeTsT SIDE
TV schools to know they can get pleasant
rooms and good board at 330 Griffin aye, It
WANTED—FROM 10.000 TO 20,000 PEACH
>> stock by F. C. CHAPMAN, Pomona, Cal.
11-7 lw
QTRAYEP— FROM CORNER OF BROOKLYN
(3 avenue and Bridge street, bay colt 4 months
old; white spot on end ol nose and Whit* spot
between eyes. Tinder notify this office. I. I*
11. ARK. H
I UK RENT— HOtiMBS.
I- Jsf)R BERT—C2O A MONTH—A NEW 6ROOM
" cottage, complete in every particular;
southern part of city.
#3 » a month—A new 2-story, 8-roora house;
fine location, between two car lines; south
west.
$40 ■ month —A handsome 9-room house,
nice lawn, large lot; southwest.
BARNES A- BARNES,
8-27 tf 227 West Second.
I~7OR RENT - FURNISHED OR XTSftSW
-1 pished, one of the handsomest homes in
the city, with beautiful ground, etc. It' desired
will give lease one to three years. WESLEY
CLARK, 127 West Third st. 8-31 tf
I^or're ELEGaxtly furnished
1 10-room house, gas, hot bath, electric tiells,
barn, lawn, flowers, etc.; close to car line.
TAYLOR tt RICHARDS, 102 Broadway. 8-30 tf
1 320 S. Olive st. Call at house, or address
MISS J. C. NEWTON, South Pasadena. 9-3 9t
Ipoß RENT— FUUNISHED~HOUSEC""ro7)MS
' Belmont avenue, near Temple street; barn
—{40. O'llEA A BARR,IO3 S.Broadway. S-^Olf
r<>H KENT- ROOMS.
I '3*oB FUP.XISIIED ROOMS,
1 single or en suite; light housekeeping priv
ileges allowed; the best location in the city;
reasonable rates. 026 South Broadway. Pri
vate family. 8-27-tf
1" 7SOR RENT - TWO FURNISHED FRONT
1 rooms with use of kitchen and dining
room. E. S. FIELD, 139 S. Broadway. 9-7 tf
17 OR BEXT— SEVERAL FURNISHED ROOMS
X for housekeeping, in private iamilv; 820
j S. Hill st. f-3 Bt
FOB KltNT— MI«OEI.V,ANrOUB.
TO LET —A LARGE HALL IN THiTbRY'SON
block, 40x70, for hall purposes; also rooms
for olllees in the same building. Apply on
premises. S-2 I I m
ItDIH) A I lONAI..
THE WOODBURY BUSINESS ( ')LLEGE*HAS
removed to ilir upper ffßlfPof the Stowell
block, i2O South Spring street. It has now the
largest and linest business college rooms in the
state, and the largest attendance of any com
mercial school south of San Francisco." Fine
passenger elevator running direct to tho
school rooms, rendering stair-climbing unnec
cessary. The public is cordially invited to call
and inspect tne college in its new location.
Both day and evening schools in session the
entire summer. Catalogue and College Jour
nal free. C. A. Hough, President; X. G. Felker,
Vice-President; E. C, Wilson, Secy. 5-4 ly
T OS ANGKLES Bl"SIX ESS CoLI.Ei i E
J J AND ENGLISH TRAINING SCHOOL
(Incorporated), 144 South Main street.
Largest and best equipped business training
school on the coast. Thorough and practical
Courses in the commercial, shorthand, type
writing, telegraphy, assaying and alf English
branches. Large, able and mature faculty of
instructors. Day and evening sessions. Terms
reasonable. Call at college office, or write for
elegant catalogue. E. F. SHRADER, President:
F. W. KELSEY, Vice-President; L. N. IXSKEEP,
secretary. 8-IU-l»l-tf
QjSES COLLEGIATE SCHOOL,
4H> W. Tenth St., reopens Sept. 28.
Miss Parsons and Miss Dennen, Prin.
Full courses In English studies, languages,
music, art, physical culture. College prepara
tion. Special students admitted. Boarding
department and pi imarv class just opening.
U-l tin
CHOOL EUR BOYS AND YOUNG'"MEN,
now in session. Bryson block (top, lloor ,
Second and Spring sts. Rooms light and cheer
ful; ventilation perfect. Thorough instruc
tion In all the common English branches.
Special attention to arithmetic, higher mathe
matics and clusstcs. A. B. BROWN, A. M.,
i (Yule), 20 Potomac block. 9-31 m
O~CCIDBNT ALCOLLEGE OFFERS SUPERIOR
advantages. Good board and well fur
nished rooms, lull college course. Able and
experienced faculty. Rates reasonable. Fa.l
term opens Tuesday, September 19th. For
catalogue anil particulars address J, M. Iie-
I'HERRON, President, Los Angeles, Cal.
S-27 lm
M'~ ISS ACK EI.SON S PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR
primary, grammar und high school stud"
ies opens September 4th. Summur school now
in session. 412 W. Second st. 9-0 lm
STBURY, SHORTHAND, TYPEWRITING
and Business Institute. Take elevator by
People's Store, Phillips block; send for eata
j logue. U.-I2 12m
JOS ANGELES TRAINING SCHOOL (INCOR-
J porated) lor kindergartners, Address
MRS. NORA D. .MAYIIEW, 670 West Twenty
third st. 0-29 tf
Cj 116 R TIIAND AND TYPEWRITING—MUST
n advantages. LONGLEY INSTITUTE, Spring
and First sts. 3-7 tf
\~WIIXHARTTTZ, MUSIC STUDIO, BOOM
• A, Crocker building, 212 S. Broadway.
H-29 lm
I'IIVSICIA S
TTRS. DILJ. H.'SMITIL SPECIALTY" MID
-IJL wiiery. Ladies oarad for during confine
ment at 727 licllcvueavenue. Calls promptly
attended to. Telephone 1119. 8-2 tf
17 DI.AKESI.EF.7 M. IK, EYE AND EAR.
li# late ot 111. E\e and Ear Infirmary and
Chicago Opthalmic College. Office S.
Broadway. 9-2 tf
EOROE H.'BEAcirrM. P., OFFICE AND
T residence, 131 North Spring street Office
hours, Bto 1-, 1 to 5, 0 to S p. m. -Telephone
433. 11-3 tf
M RsTITk. WELLS—OFFICE IN HER bTuOk"
block, 127 E. Third st. Specialty, dis
eases of women.
MEDIUMS.
MB-
J diuntl consultations on business, reinov
j uls, marriage, disease, lawsuits, love, mineral
I locations, etc. 402 S. Main st. MRS. PARKER,
8-30 tf
ARSTKAOTS.
INSURAXCE COM
il pany of Los Angeles: northwest corner
of Franklin itml New High sts. ml 7 tl
CtlTttilPOUlSA'.
MIS' C. STAFFER, CHIROPODIST, AND
musseuse, 211 W. First St., opp. Xadeuu.
12-.'4lf
PATENTS, COPY WRIGHTS, ETC.
HAZARD iiTO\VXBEND, RtSoIi^DOWNEY
block. Tel. 317, Los Angeles. 11-22 If
LOS ANGELES HERALD/ SATURDAY MORNING. SEPTEMBER 0. Mm.
TVIGMORE & O'BRIEN,
Commission,
Real Estate,
Insurance.
Agents
Union Assurance Society of London.
Fire Association of Philadelphia,
Granite State and Reading.
Rents collected. Money to loan.
Entire charge taken of property.
231 W. First street,
9-3 tf Telephone 1101.
PM)R SALE—S ROOM COTTAGE, MAPLE
aye, near Twenty-ninth St., $1200.
5 room cottage. Thirtieth st., nesr Main,
*1500.
9 room dwelling, near Adams, .$5OOO.
2 cottages, 519 and 021 Temple, lot (10x150,
$0006..
JpOR SALE—THIRTIETH ST., 5-ROOM COT
tage, barn, carriage house, wood shed, fruit
and walnut trees, beautiful yard. Price $1750;
easy terms.
SALE —TWENTY-EIGHTH STREET,
JT 4-room cottage, chicken yard, etc. Nice
property. Priceslloo; easy terms.
TOOK SALE—S CHOICE ACRES ON MAIX
J? street, south of city; cheap.
FOR SALE—CHOICE RESIDENCE LOTS IN
De Cells tract, between Main and Maple
and Pico snd Seventh sts. Come and make
your selection, on premise*, corner Mala and
Fourteenth, or
J. 8. VAX DOREX,
9-8 tf 101 S. Broadway.
JpOR SALE.
1 KA—NEW 5-ROOM HARD-FINISHED
flrllsnf house near San Pedro and Washing
ton streets. ODEA & BARR,
9-9 tf 103 S. Broadway.
fifcOOfWY- NICE LOT 50X155, TO ALIJSY,
qp—VfuVr on clean side Hope street, near Pico
street. ODEA & BARR.
9-9 tf 103 S. Broadway.
LOT 50X155, TO
TT — ~"'V alley, on Flower street, near Elev
enth street. ODEA * BARR,
9-9 tf 103 S. BfoaSway.
iflM AAA—BUSINESS LOT ON MAIN
•TH'l'.l'V'l/ street, near Second street.
ODEA A BARR,
9-9 tf 103 a Broadway.
t» 1 AA-NEW HOUSE 5 ROOMS, HARD-
finished, bath room, closets; street
graded and sewered; 12 minutes' walk from
Spring and First; 150 feet to electric cars;
Jforjlo cash, balance monthly payments.
aiQAA—NEW HOUSE 0 ROOMS, HARIi
-9) lOl'V finished, bath, closets; southwest,
200 yards from electric cars; $suO cash, bal
ance long time.
tftQKA-H*V? HOUSE 4 ROOMS, HARD
<r»',)U finished: street graded; close in; $150
cash, balance monthly payments.
Also houses ln all parts of the city from $550
tos2o,ojo. JOHN L. PAYK'OVICH,
9-9 3t 208 W. First st.
J7OR SALE—SPECIAL BARGAINS.
A beautiful new 5-room cottage, with all
modern improvements, on First street, Boyle
Heights, $2700.
House of 7 rooms, bath, etc., corner lot on
Boston street, near Pearl street; $1500, worth
$2000; easy terms.
House of 7 rooms, hall, bath, etc., two lots
and fenced, on Twelfth street, west of Pearl
street; $3250, easy terms.
Business property on Main street, close in, at
a sacrifice. Vacant lots ln all parts of the city
at prices and terms to suit purchasers.
9-atf P. A. HUTCHINSON, 213 W. First st.
ADAMS, RO/"SE & MEEK INS,
207 West Second street.
FOR SALE — Improved, unimproved and in
come paying city properties, at bottom
prices, orange and deciduous fruit or
chards, alfalfa lands.vinevardaand ranches
FOR EXCHANGE — Desirable income paying
eastern properties lor city property,
orchards or ranches.
MIXES of merit handled through our eastern
connections.
CAREFULLY'selected lists tor your examina
tion.
RENTS collected and tenants secured. 9-6tl
! ~~ ~
.s7ooo—Lot on FtgueVsaV street.
$SOO-Lot on Bonn.le,Bjae street—
fBOO-Corner on Wlfrfield street"'
$525—Lot on Twelfth street.
$400—Lot on Johnson street.
$300-Lot in l.'maton tract.
#65—Lot on Hill street; $65 per front foot.
$40—Lot on Hope street; a 6nap at $10 per
front foot. ERNEST G. TAY'LOR,
Real estate and investment broker,
9-3 tt 214 N. Spring st.
TTIOR SALE-VERY CHEAP—GOOD IM-
V proved real estate in the south and south
western part of the city; also choice lots at
very low figures and terms satisfactory. 1 want
to see you before you purchase. CHARLES C.
LAMB, 213 W. First st. 9-2 tf
ITiOR"BALE—S» 100—PRETTY, NEW 6-ttOOM
X 1 cottage; hall bath, mantel, etc., southwest;
near electric cars; $3uo cash, balance month
ly. TAYLOR & RICHARDS, 102 Broadway.
7-JOH
I "50R SALE— PASADEXA—3 0x660 FEET,
. Los Robles avenue, opposite Santa Fe de
pot—elegant; will cut it Into 22 lots. This is a
bargain at $7000; terms easy. J. S. VAX DO
REN, 101 S. Broadway. 8-29 If
17OR SALE—$55OO— A BEAUTIFUL 9-ROO.M
modern new house; every convenience,
extra larce lot, southwest; a lovely home; will
take goo<; vacant lot as first payment, balance
3 too years. 1A VI.OR & RICHARDS. 8-6 tt
I7OR BALI!^9SO—S-ROOM HOUSE, NICELY
1 decorated: large lot, fenced for chickens;
good well pump; cash $100, balance $7.5
monthly; near Terminal depot; bargain.
IAY LOR ct RICHARDS, 102 Broadway. 8-4 tf
SALE—SI3OO EACH—2 5-ROOM OOT
tages on Forrester avenue, near electric
car line; monthly payments. BARNES .v.
BARNES, 227 W. Second st. 0-2 tf
17 OR SALE—NEW 5-ROOM COTI AGE, NEAR
X 1 Harper tract, Mrst-chus, $2100.
K. P. CULLEX A- CO ,
9-3 If. 237 West First St.
I7OR SALE — 2-STORY 9-ROO.M HOUSkT
first-class condition, on University electric
car line; ior sale by owner. Inquire'at rooms
4 and 5, New Wilson block. 9-3 tf
a»—/.a—lots" on "maple anevue, bbt.
era Iyv Pico and Sixteenth sts. Cheapest in
the city; with large walnut trees. ODEA A
BARK, JO3 S. Broadway. 8-31 tf
ETrMKAGHER & JAyTor RARGAIXsTx
real estate. 101 8, Broadwuy, Los Angeles.
11-27 tf
I "TOR BALE—CHOICE 2-STOKY 8-ROii.M
1 house 011 Flower, near Adams; install
ments if desired. H. D. LIST, owuer, 127 W.
Second st. 8-25 lm
A-s AAA—FOR SALS—NBW 5-ROOM HOUSE
fPI-rUUcn Victoria street; monthly pay
ments $15. ALLISON BARLOW, 227 West
Second st. 7-21 tf
17 OR SALE—WE HAVB A SUBE BARGAIN
in fine lot ori Incrahamst.; near Seventh
street cable railroad. CRAWFORD ,t LOCK
HART. 9-6 tf
17OR SALE—S26»—LOT 50x150, PRITCH
. arcl st., near cable, E. L. A.; easy payments.
TAYLOR & RICHARDS, 102 Broadway. 7-30H
F- OR SALE—S3OO—LOT NEAR TEMPLE AND
Angeleno Heights; 40x150. ODEA &
BARR, 103 s. Broadway. 8-26 tf
"XV E HAVE "a~CUSTOMER FOR THE BEST
cottage that $2500 will buy. CRAWFORD
& LOCKHART. 9-6 tf
FOB BAI.E— MIWCKI.I.A VKOIJ"i.
T?OR SALE—CHOICE NURSERY s"?OCK
mining, city and country property.
Particular attention paid to patents of all
kind's. Choice property in Azusa valley. Cor
respondence solicited.
W. M. STOVER,
Real F'state and Mining Exchange,
8-33 tf 2t7 W. First st.
I7OR BALE— LADIES' NKW CONVERTIBLE
X 1 pneumatic bicycle; price, $65. 500 SOUTH
MAIN ST. 8-27 tf
I" 7<or~salk-6ld papers in quantities
1 to at this office.
I>EN
1882—Established—1882.
DR. L.W.WELLS. CORNER SPRING AND
First streets, Wilson block; take elevator.
Gold crown and oridge work a specialty; tcuth
extracted without pain. Room 1. m-4 tf
R. S. TolllUßSTi DENTIST, 108><i N
Spring street, rooms 2, 3 and 7. Painless
extraction. 6-20 tf
P-iRANK~STEVENS.324'i SOUTH SPRING BT.
' Open Sunday and eveulng by electric light.
FOX BAI.E—COUNTRY PKOPEBTV.^
ORANGE GROVE OF 20 ACRES
VjilftrUV at Redlands, Cal., with nlco house,
good barn, windmill, tank snd tsnk-house and
other outbuildings, all It. good repair; a team
of good horses and all necessary agricultural
Implements go with the place.
$18,000—Orange grove of 20 acres at South
Riverside, Cat; a beautiful place
$lO.Boo—Orange grove of 18 acres at Men
tone, Cal.; s spt-culstlou.
$1750—10 acres In rlvc-ycar-old English
walnuts.
ERNESTO. TAYLOR,
Real Estate and Investment Broker,
_9-0 lOt 214 N. Spring st
T7OR (fALE -$250,000; ORANGE ORCH
r ards, walnut orchards, deciduous fruit
orchards, olive orchards, dairy or farm
ranches, fine city residences, hotels, lodging
houses, grocciv stores, hardware business,
fruit stands, cigar stands, meat markets, sa
loons, bakeries, restaurants, and all kinds of
mercantile business; prices from $100 to
$200,000; we neither advertise nor try to sell
anything that will not stand the strictest in
vestigation. NOLAN A SMITH, 228 W. Sec
ond st 8-19 tf
SNAP-S»0 ACRES IN AZUSA, OLD WATER
right paid up: will sell in tracts to suit,
fromsloo loslso per acre, partly improved;
sandy soil, suitable tor oranges, lemons, prunes,
apricots, berries, etc.: will take part city prop
erty alt present cash value.
Improved and unimproved lands in all parts
of Southern California.
Wanted, bargains In city and country prop
erty. JOHX"L. PAVKOVICH,
9-7 7t 208 W. First st.
F" OR SALE—A VERY FEW UHOlCst Gov
ernment and school land locations for
sale cheap; or would take part pay ln other
property.
A few choice lots on Seventeenth and Eigh
teenth sts., west of Figueroa; $600 to $:«K).
J. K. MULKKY,
8-22 tf 1140 W. Eighteenth or 213 W. Flrstst
I7OR BALE—I7O ACRES FINK ORANOB.
vlneor olive land, adjoining thecelebrated
Vache winery at Brookside, near Redlands;
this Is the very choicest land in that neighbor
hood ln the market; all or part: price $12,500,
terms easy. For particulars tee A. C. GOLSH,
147 S. Broadway 8-3 ' If
FdRB'ALB— STOCKMEN-.32W ACKKSI'OCK
ranch, on S. P. K. R., north of city; plenty
water; 600 seres in grain; two good houses;
barns, sheds, etc. (Stock on ranch for sale. 1
This is one of the best buys in Southern Cali
fornia. Investigate. TAYLOR it RICHARDS,
102 Broadway. 8 8 tm
tXIR SALE-20 ACRES AT COVINA, BEAU
tiful 0-room house, good barn; 11 acres in
Washington navels 0 years old, 6 acres lemons,
balance alfalfa and lawn; will bear close In
spection. 214 S. Broadway. DORSEY.CHAM
BERLIN' & CO. 9-1 tt
Ir-OR'B~ALE~^SXAP— $2000 25 ACRES XEAR
city; 2 acres bearing orchard, trees around,
small house; frostless belt; choice land for
winter vegetables and early lorries; easy
terms. JOHN L. PAYKOVICH. 208 W. First
" 8-25 tf
FOR S A LE -A BARGAIN—4O-ACRE ORANGE
orchard, 20 acres ln 20-year-old trees; this
is finest property on the market. Come and
see the snap. 244 S. Broadway. DoRSEY",
CHAMBERLIX * CO. 9-1 tt
T7OR SALE - OR EXCHANGE—92 ACRES, 1
V mile northwest of Hurbank, in 10-acre lots
or more, in the fine deciduous fruit belt. In
quire oi D. NEUUARI", 151 s. Broadway, or F.
M. EAGLESTOX, adjoining lands. 7-lOtf
FOR SALE—2O ACRES" NEAR CAHUENGA
Pass, with good water right, $75 per acre;
bargain. TAYLOR A- RICHARDS, 102 Broad
way. 7-30-tf
17OR SALE—A NO. 1 ALFALFA LAND WITH
water, only BIOJ per acre; near city. TAT
LOR & RICHARDS, 102 Broadway. 7-30-tf
FOB~BALE— A BARGAIN, 10 ACRES NEAR
Moncta, Redondo railroad. E. S. FIELD,
139 S. Broadway. 0 9 if
FOX EXCUANOE.
j7 or Tsx (-nTSuK^
8 acres 2 miles from Whitticr: 6 acres ln
walnuts, balance deciduous fruits; good house
and barn; ior good house and lot in city.
3'j acres at South Pasadena, all in bearing
fruit trees and berries; house, barn, chicken
house; line location.
320 acres in Riverside county; S-room hard
finished house, barn, well, windmill; forcity
property, or will sell for small payment down.
P6O-aere stock ranch in Russell county, Kan
sas, well improved, for acreage or city prop
erty.
Good house snd lot ln East Los Angeles for
small ranch.
Large rooming house In city for ranch.
House of 0 rooms, with well improved lot, in
Santa Ana, for city property.
G. f>. BTREETER,
9-8 3t - 110 South Broadway.
ITSOR EXCHANGE—A VERY DESIRABLE
J and highly productive fruit and nut farm
of 70 acres in the beautiful Ojai valley, near
Nordhoff. Ventura county, for good unincum
bered residence property in this city; cash
value $20,000. . -iy early to
J. 8. VAN DOREX,
9-8 tf 101 a Broadway.
170R EXCHANGE—LODGING HOUSE OF 11
X rooms; good location; street graded antl
sewered; on cable line; 52x175; only$H)00;
will trade for good country property. JOHN'
].. PAYKOVICH, 208 W. First st. 9-9 3t
FINANCIAL.
$1,500,000.
7 MOXEY TO LOAN.
LOWEST RATES.
Agent for tho
GERMAN" SAVINGS AXD LOAX
SOCIETY OF a F.
Building loans a specialty.
Bonds purchase*!.
Real estate sold.
Estates managed.
Agent Sun Fire of London,
oldestcomimnv in the world,
R. G. LUNT,
5- 25 Ora 227 W. Second st.
MO XEV' WAXTF.D—2O PER CENT PER A.V
num can be made on ready cash, for one
or two years 1 investment, ln sums from $500
to $100,000, with security equal to government
bonds. Enterprise and associates are of the
highest character. Address ior particulars,
"Investment," P. O. box 88, Los ALgeles, Cal.
9-3 7t
MONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS, JEWEL
ry, watches, pianos, sealskins, live
carriages, bicycles aud all kinds of personal
and collateral security. LEE BROS.,
6- 18 tf 402 S. Spring St.
TF YOU WISH TO LOAN OR BORROW
1 money, call on J. & .1. C. FLOURNOY, Real
Estate and Financial Agents, 130) Broadway.
All business strictly confidential.
8-12-"sq',-M]n-mon-tf
.money to loan.
oacific'''loax Company
1 (incorporated).
Loans money in any amounts on all
kinds of collateral security, dia
monds, jewelry, sealskins, merchan
dise, etc. Also on pianos, iron and
steel safes, and professional libra
ries, without removal; and on furni
ture in lodging, boarding houses and
hotels, without removal. Partial
payment! received. Money quick.
Business confidential. Private of
licisfTor ladies. t
W. E. DEGROOT, Manager,
8-29 ly Rooms 2, 3 A 4, 114 S. Spring at.
(tOLiFbon Ui n yes m en t.
t LIMITED AMOUNT OF THE FIRST MORT-
J. V gage 7 per cent, gold bonds of the Mount
Lowe Railway are now offered to the Investing
public for Hie extension of its lines beyond
Echo Mountain to meet Increasing business,
ond to secure the erection of a great observa
tory upon the highest summit.
For full particulars address the Los Angeles
Safe Deposil it Trust company, Stimson block,
corner Third and Spring streets, Los Angeles;
or at the company's office, Grand Opera-house
block, Pasadena, CaL 9-H 7t
IF YOU WAN T MONEY WITH DELAY,
L no commission, prevailing rates of interest,
see Seeurily Savings Bank. IIHS. Main. W
f XOUitslONh.
Cvi^^sSi'•|Xb'»AY SAVED BY TAKING
I .iVh-\ 'Santa re excursions to Kan-
City, 6t Louis, Chicago, New
York and Boston. Leave Los Aygoles every
Wi oii.- day; personally conducted through to
Chicago and Boston: family sourist sleepers
to Kansas City and Chicago daily. Low rates
and quickest time. Office, 120 N. Spring st.
7-1 Om
1 >11 i I.I.IPS'"EAST BOUND EXCURSION'S—
I i'er.-onallv conducted, via Denver and Rio
Grande and Rock Island routes; leaves Los An
t-.-lea every Tuesday and Friday: crossing the
sierra N'evadas and passing the entire scenery
ou the BioGrsnde by daylight Office, I3BS,
Spring st. 7-1 tf
Jr. JUl'isoX & CO.'S EXCURSION'S EAST
• every Wednesday via Salt Lake City and
Denver. "Tourist carß to Chicago and Boston.
Manager in charge. Office, 212 S. Spring st.
6-1 tf
CONTRACTORS.
C" VONRAD SCHERER, GRANITE, BITUMIN
/ ous and asphalt paving. 227 W. First Bt
A FLOCK OF SHEEP.
Over the field the bright air clings and tingles
In the golden sunset, while the red wind
swoops
Upon the nibbled knolls, and from the dingles
The sheep arc gathering ln frightened groups.
From the wldo field the laggards bleat and fol
low.
A drover hnrls his cry and hooting laugh.
And one young swain, too glad to whoou or
hollo,
Is singing wildly as he whirls his staff.
Now crowding Into little groups and eddies.
They swirl about and charge and try to pass,
she sheep dog yelps and heads them off and
steadies
And rounds and molds them ln a seething
mass.
They stand a moment with their heads uplifted
Till the wise dog barks loudly on the flank.
They all at once roll over snd aro drifted
Down the small hill toward the river bank.
Covered with rusty marks and pnrple blotches
Around the fallen bars they flow and leap.
Tho wary dog stands by and keenly watches
As If he knew tho namo of every sheep.
Now down the noad the nimble Bound de
creases,
Tho drovers cry, the dog delays and whines.
And now with twinkling feet and glimmering
fleeces .
They round and vanish past tho dusky pines.
The drovo Is gone; the rnddy wind grows colder;
Tho singing youth puts up the heavy bars.
Beyond tho pines ho sees tho crimson smolder
And catches in hia eyes the early stars.
—Duncan 0. Scott in Youth's Companion.
AN INSANE TROOPER.
Recently, while wandering through an old
Aztec mountain village in which disabled sol.
dlers were quartered immediately after the
overthrow of tho heathen empire, I found
among some burled camp accouterments an
eld manuscript crumpled up with other papers
in a buttered leather knapsack. My knowl
edge of Spanish soon revealed for me the fol
lowing ourious and weird story, also a short
explanation of It, probably written by the
owner of the knapsack. As It may be of Inter
est to some, though porbaps for no value more
than that of idle curiosity, I will submit the
result of my discovery to public perusal.—Tub
Translator.
Yes, upon that I was resolute—he must
die, hut how.
Why did I cravo his death? you ask.
Waa ho rich, and I poor? Was he noted
for hravery and valor, and I not? Was
there hack in Spain a tender hearted, soft
eyed senorita? No, no, man. I tell you
there was no object. In truth, I loved
him. Together wo commanded a com
pany of Corte3' band. Sido by side we
fought tho Mexicans, and in dividing the
spoils and honor gained we quarreled
only lest tho other should receive too lit
tle. No, my hato was hardly earthly.
It is tmo the Spaniard fights for little
causo, but not even he murders for so
little as did I. Ho would, thoujjh—yes,
and yon, too, could you either fcVl the
motives that impelled me. I? Yes, a
Spaniard, but an exception, not only to
all Spaniards, but to all mankind.
You may call me mad. Perhaps I was
—according to your conception of insap
ity. For 'tis true that no one, unless
moved by an urging no less than super
natural, unless impelled by a craving
more than human, a craving in human
ignorance termed insanity, could be so
sensitive, so finely aurl delicately strung
in all tho fibers of tho soul, as to com
mit the foulest of deeds for what, to the
sane, seems so nmall a cause. But in my
nature, wonderfully webbed as it was
by an abnormal mind, the motive to take
the life of a friend—he was a friend—
was more irreslstable to me than tho
most urgent desire for revenge is to my
countrymen. Any court would convict
me—judges seldom see motives, never
motives supernatural—so that in telling
my story I tlo not, cannot, expect my
reader to acquit me, because to all the
act will outweigh the motive. But,
though criminating myself, I must leave
this record. It is as necessary to my
happiness now as his life was then.
And why was his life necessary? Why
do you ask? Your mind is normal; you
cannot understand. Yet for the sake of
the record I must continue, though sure
to be misunderstood. His life, then,
was necessary to my happiness because
of a look upon his face—an expression,
nothing more. When blood flowed,
as was frequent where we were, or when
a vivid imago of battlo was recalled to
his mind, whether in stories about the
campfiro or in dreams that look like a
specter's shroud, it would settle over his
face. A condition of the countenance,
a phenomena of tho facial muscles and
nerves, a mere look—that was all, but
'twas that which brought his death. It
was centered in tho eye, more especially
in the left one.
Perhaps pity for the slain and living
wounded caused that pallor, but that
was not all; no. I loved him for that.
There was also dark and foreboding mel
ancholy, a chaos of haunting sorrows.
No; not that either. Must I give over
my attempt at justifying myself? Oh,
that I could describe that look, or that
your mind were as mine. But enough;
it is impossible. I must remain con
demned in tho eyes of my fellow men.
To you I can only say that I saw there
upon his faco n soul destroying, living
picture of the grave, which in a nature
such as mine roused a ghastly sensation
of horror. Every cord radiating from
the eye—the left ono—contracted and
tightened in agony. A film such as ono
sometimes sees enveloping th<v*ve of a
cat, of a slight steel blue,
ly unfold itself, as the skin of a toad,
ovm the hideous organ. It drove me to
frenzy—this look. Life in the tomb is
preferable to tho simple recollection.
I could bear it no longer; to me this
was decided. Then with a calm delib
eratoness that would do credit to the
sluggish ease of a Hollander, but with a
scheming determination equaled by no
man, I decided he must die—this friend
of mine. But I must suffer for his mur
der, annihilation of that expression
would bring no happiness, and in this I
schemed. Retribution I knew would
fall upon me if I killed him in battle, for
then there were witnesses—and in camp
when wo were alono together tho look
was not there—then I loved him. You
can perceive the opportunity I needed.
That expression must be upon his face
anlinoono near. And the opportunity
by my ingenuity I must soon possess, for
I felt within me that I could not look
upon his lace ia tuat condition again
unless it be to incite mo to his destruc
tion.
An acute sensibility verges upon in
sanity. To savo my mind 1 must take
his life. That was decided. Ho must
die I But how?
You wwuld not have thought me mad
had you known the oily designing with
which I answered "How?" Cool, keen
deliberation does not characterize a mad
man —not as you picture a madman.
That look must bo upon his face, and
no one near.
But how? I had it. The plan waa
f lear enough, but difficult and very dan
gerous of execution. Others must inno
cently suffer, but what weight has life
to the ease of a madman? I would bring
him into the presence of death—his death
—and I would be alono with him. And
then that lock would surely appear. Ho
■would bb aware that he was to die by
what the Spaniards in Anahnao most
feared—the sacrificial stono. Yes, then
the look must appear.
The sacrificial stone —in the bare
words even there was fascination for
me; around this legalized and sanctified
agent of slaughter my plot centered.
The plan, briefly, was thia: Tho Spanish
forces, in three divisions, were besieging
tho City of Mexico. We made simulta
neous attacks, each time approaching
nearer our goal, the chief temple in the
center of the city, and after each as
sault we withdrew to our respective
camps. Progress was slow; moats sur
rounded the city,the streets were narrow,
and oaclf house was a fortification. The
besiegers could advance no step until
the preceding one was secured for re
treat; each house must be razed, each
moat filled. These were orders and
were obeyed, because capture, we knew,
meant the sacrificial stone, onr hearts a
symbolic food for pagan gods and our
bodies a material one for the religious
feast of cannibalism.
For tomorrow another attack was or
dered—the last one, we hoped. The same
injunctions for security being repeated,
we advanced. He, as usual, was at my
Bide. The first resistance of the natives
was easily overcome, and we entered the
city. House after house was demolished.
The mass of Aztecs before us gave way
as of one accord and broke into retreat.
To me there was something uncanny
about their actions. If retreat at all, it
was premeditated. But to our followers
it meant only tho victory so long striven
and suffered for.
My time had come. The eagerness pf
our followers, which I openly encour
aged, isolated us from the main army.
Worse yet, I had tho bugle sounded and
ordered a charge. All—all but he—forgot
the caution of Cortes und answered the
signal with an onset that his prudence
could not check. The force behind
pushed us both forward. He placed his
hand strongly upon my shoulder to
question my conduct and to romonstrate.
I turned to answer, when there, upon
his face, was that picture of tho grave.
The ruso of the heathen succeeded.
Seeing our position apart from the
others, they turned and came exnltingly
toward us. Tho deafening reverberation
of the gong in the temple, a sound of
woe to tho Spaniards, sounded our death
knell. Then it was I saw that look. I
lost myself, and leaning back in my sad
dle yelled to him in fiendish merriment,
"The sacrificial stone!" He understood,
As my atrocity dawned upon him the
look vanished for one of hatred and fury.
He raised his sword, hissed something
like "Traitor!" and came at me.
Tho Spaniard is quick in anger, bnt'
his stroke never fell. A score of bared
arms of tho snakish color of copper en
circled his body; another score bereft
him of the murderous weapon over
my head; a myriad more dragged him
front his horse. The same fate befell the
rest of our band who survived, myself
included. That night we found our
selves in the dungeon where Montezu
ma had Inn'guiahAl. < The t»r>xt day we
all knew we should ft wilt* <>«? turn at
sacrifice before the drt&jl 'stone. He
knew, it and I rejoiced. Byistj a mad
man can feel the Joy of triumph, can he
not?
But he should not die with the others.
That was not my plan. I groped in the
dark to where he ciouched and whis
pered, "Escape!" He jumped to his feet.
"Where? How?" "Hush; not so loud.
Follow me." He hesitated. "But the
others?" he asked. "It is not possible for
moro than two," I answered. He said
no more, but followed in silence. In
this evidence of his selfishness I felt a
sort of satisfaction. Though content
myself, I cannot help but feel grateful
to anything that may aid in justifying
his death to normal minds.
During the unwelcome stay of the
Spaniards in the city before their ex
pulsion they were given for a residence
the place in which we were then con
fined. Being with Cortes at that time, I
therefore knew our prison house well.
For me escape was easy. Through
many rooms, corridors, passages and
stairs, some known not even to the na
tives, we fled on tiptoe. His confidence
was regained, and he followed mo closely.
Fiually, without hindrance, we reached
the flat roof. Here behind the walls,
extending a few feet above the roof, we
could hide in safety, aud hero indeed wo
waited throughout the next day.
I told him my idea of final escape. It
was intoxication to renew his hope, a
vain hope, for I should blast it. That
night wo were to gain the summit of
the temple and there light a beacon.
The besiogers outside would understand
or think they understood. The Mexi
cans never expect night attacks, due to
a superstition regarding the white man,
so that they could be easily overcome.
Assurance of life brought a smile to the
face of my companion, though at the
time in looking toward the pyramidal
shaped temple or teocalli, he saw our
comrades led up the spiral stops leading
to the summit, saw them one by one
bound by the priests to the sacrificial
stone, saw over each raised the stone
knife, saw it descend into the trembling
breast, saw the quivering heart torn out
and offered to the gods upon a golden
salver.
He saw the gore spattered upon the
walks and upon the dark robes of the
priests. He saw the bodies carried by
slaves to the banqueting hall, there to
supply that night's revel. All this, I say,
passed before his eyes, yet it served only
to deepen the stuilo ns he contrasted
their fato with his own hopes—his hopes!
How I cxultod in tho deception!
Night drew on, and we heard the
sonnds of loathsome revelry, made moro
hideous by our knowledge of its nature.
Tho great temple, or teocalli, though,
was deserted. All were at the feast of
human flesh. Our opportunity had come.
In safety we reached the street and
scaled the walls of the temple. We cau
tiously climbed the stops of the teocalli,
though with difficulty, for we frequently
slipped upon the slimy gore and fell
ftttwsilr into jesla of blood. The stench,
too, was deal Uly, but we kept on, on, nu
til the summit was reached.
We paused after our exertions. 1
looked around. My victim was stand
ing at the foot of tho sacrificial stone,
his buck turned toward it—my oppor
tunity exactly. Horrible? Yes, but I
did it—l was mad, you must remember.
With my entire weight I sprang upon
him. He stopped back and stumbled.
Wo fell together, he underneath, upon
the cold stone, now made soft by pulpy
flesh upon it. With Httlo difficulty I
secured his wrists and ankles by the
manacles fustenod in tho huge block of
jasper.
Tho next thing was to make sure of
safety for myself, and then I could com
plete my work and take pleasure in it.
With tinder we had brought I lighted a
beacon. Each division of the army see
ing it would think the city taken by the
other two divisions and advance to give
aid.
This signal given, nil was safe. My
victim dare not cry out lest the natives
be around. Tho beacon was rendered
unnoticed to the inhabitants by their
nauseous banquet below. No precau
tions remained—nothing except to com
plete my designs. Joyously I tore from
his protruding breast all armor and cov
ering, seized the sacrificial knife and
raised my arm to strike. The firo of the
beacon sputtered upward and cast a
glare over his face. My arm paused,
the glittering blade fell ringing upon the
stono floor, and I trembled, powerless—
the look was not there, nothing but in
tense anguish. I was foiled. I had ex
pected thut look.
But he must die. Yes, that was de
cided. No ouo was near, and why would
that look uot come? But it must appear,
and soon, or the Spaniards would find
him living. He would tell, and they
would kill me.
I soized the knife once more, though
with a weakened grasp, and leaned over
him with intent oxpoctation, waiting so
intently for that look. Not happiness
alone now, but lifo itself was in the bal
unce. Neither could be preserved unless
his tongtto be silenced. Already the
Spaniards must be near tho city, yet
even with exposure so near I could not
kill him unless that look appear. That
which befuvo wrecked my happiness I
now longed for to suvo my life. Would
that look never come?
I now beard the Spaniards entering
the city. They must not approach too
near. I remembered the gong, the ono
Branded to arouse tho city by the priests
in time of peril. I would call the na
tions to arms, and my countrymen would
bo repulsed. I seized the huge hammer,
swung it over Bay head, and frantically
hurled it at tho gong. It sounded for
miles. Tiio banquet became us silent as
its lifeless victims in*fhe caldrons, and
then a tumult louder than the previous
revelry prevailed as the savages hurried
ly sought for weapons. Now the Span
iards would be repulsed, I hoped. They
would not see mo in crime. Further
than that, of my treason or of my fato
afterward, 1 had no thoughts.
The thundering of tho conflict grew
plainer and plainer. Tho Mexicans,
stupefied by drink, fell back and broke
into precipitato retreat. My last hope
was gone; tho city was taken. The clash
of arms was in my ears, the conquerors
were at the temple, upon its stone steps.
Another instant they would reach us,
find me free and him bound. Iv fear
for myself 1 hail forgot tun him; uiuwjire
of the kuife still in my hand, 1 steed
1-Miking iv terror to where the Span:-.-■ls
m i LStVaotafcHirP'a r.
TlnjoiH" off-in blazed ncl cast rr- iy
tbessh*<xitV,*ltj,.t hid his fuc* B&J !
Tho looktttw there, Why hud i 't
thouglitor irbeiorcV -Idootltihed, b ..
lM<ro>tifffflcourcc the look was v.- .
It was no;;!.iu ; bnt a mere expro. •
but 'twas tfytt which brought his (!■ t.
It was centered in the eye, more
cially the left cno. Yes, there, th>
last was that livin;; picture of the g;
Every oord radiating from the eye - j
left one—w;w; drawn und tightened . i
agony. There, Where t,he light fiiflkci !
was the film, of it steel blue hue, Bach i
one sometimes sees enveloping the eye i r
a cat.
I was calm now. That look was Dpn'l
his face, and no one to tell the tai '.
Again my arut was raised; again tho
knife hovered over him. I made as >
forward to drive tho blow, but stop !
in a slushy pool of blood und fell v..c
his body. Tho descomliug knife by in,
weight buried itself to the hilt in hi.;
breast, piercing the heart and forever
annihilating all looks, all expressions.
I was found lying unconscious in his
blood, my head having struck the edge
of the stone in falling. Through my
beacon the city was token. This sorvico
my countrymen remembered and forgot
tho murder.
KOTK TO MBS.
After our capture of the city we hod in our
palace a deranged trooper. Ho had killed a
comrade, but bclug crazy we considered him
irresponsible. Aa ho had also aided ln the Az
tec overthrow, we felt grateful to him aud
made no'attempt to bring him to trial. In
stead, we humored him, giving him the writ
ing materials for which he begged and allow
ing him to roam where he chose.
One day In walking among the ruins of tho
great tcmplo I found a body lying across a
Inng, couch shaped stone of jasper. Burlod In
Uui breast was a stone knife, such as was used
by the Mexleun priests. 1 turned the fuco up
ward and recognized the derunged trooper.
When wo prepared him for Interment we dis
covered In his Jorldn this purchmout manu
script. Antonio del A. G ,
Corporal of the UuaML
-Knusng City Titfii %
Made Miserable for 1.1 fe.
This you may easily be If you fail to remedy
the indigestion and non-asslmllstlon of the
food, which are tbe attendants and originators
of nervousness, that ever present ailment which
no narcotic, mineral sedative or nervine can
ever do more than temporarily relieve. 01
course these remedies hive no effect upon tne
organs of Indigestion and assimilation, except
to disorder and enfeeble them, thus aggravat
ing the original difHcul y. Among the most
alarming and dangerous symptom! of chronlo
nervousness Is lnsotnula, which Is the profes
slonsl term for Inability to sleep. Where this
exists there Is always a tendency to mental
overthrow, paresis sua iventu»l lossnltv. He
gin at the fountain head of alt this dlftleu ty
with Hostotter's Stomach Bitters and avert evil
consequences. No soonerdoes the stomach re
sume its tone, aud the system gain ln vigor
through tho aid of this benign tonic, than sleep
returns and tho nerves grow tranquil. Chl.U
and fever, rheumatism, b ltousnoss and consti
pation yie.d to the Bittern.
Farmers and Horsemen—Hall's Vrssm
Salve for horse! will keep the file* off a sore,
heals barbed wire cuts, cures old sores. Horn—
th ng new, something good. $1. Oil 6
Vaughn's drug store, Fourtu and Spring «v.
Stands a! tbe Head.
The light running Domestic. H. X, Memory.
363 South Spring St.
l'aper Hangers.
You can buy at cost at Kckstroin & Btrasburg's
closing out sale,
SOWERKROWT. , T .!5 P S

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