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The herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, September 12, 1893, Image 1

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TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN
CALIFORNIA: FAIR WEATHER;
NEARLY STATIONARY TEHPER
ATtIRE; WESTERLY WINDS.
VOL. XL. NO. 154
THE I AST CHANGE »!
:>f ZI THE FEW REMAINING
Sflwr Suits For (Mini Ist Go
WE HAVE MARKED THEM TO ABOUT
ONE-HALF THEIR FORMER PRICE
Onr Fall Stock Is Complete and Novelties Abound.
ONE PKICE TO ALL
Mullen, Bluett & Co.
COR- SPRING <Se. FIRST STREETS.
CRYSTAL PALACE
138, 140, 142 S. Main St.
BIG DRIVES THIS WEEK IN
OUR LAMP DEPARTMENT
NIGHT LAMPS, complete, cut from 25c. to 15c.
HAND LAMPS, with burner and chimney, cut from 30c. to 20c.
FINE GLASS LAMPS, complete, cut from 35c. to 25c.
DECORATED STAND LAMPS, with fancy shades, cut from
$1.50 to 95c.
ELEGANT VASE LAMPS, with shades to match, cut from
$2.50 to $1.50.
BANQUET LAMPS, with B. & H. burner and silk fringed
shade, cut from $3.50 to $2.25.
MEYBERG. BROS.
LOOK AT OUR SHOW WINDOW.
SOMETHING NEW
WE ARE SHOWING IN OUR
A Super h an (J Varied Une of Private Pattern. Produced to Meut
tha K.qulrtmeuts of tho Most Bx inilng Tasief. •
r'ADDTTT'C AX MINSTERS, WILTONS. MOQUETTES VELVIT3
LAKr£slO BdUiSlLi, TAr'ESrtiY, INUiUIsV. '
Wo Have Received a Very Dholoa Collection of lUnrttome ßun. Wblcli Hava
Been Carefully Selected and Unit .Special Attention.
RTTfLQ OK J?, N > TA !;v,„ Tt7 ?^ lSrT ' P«BIAH, MPANFSIT, BMYRN*. A \GOR A
rVUUO ANU FUR - AND KKNNIN-WTt.N ART SQfJA RES
A LARUE VAKIKTt' IN ALL SIZES. "^UAUJib.
TFT RTATNQ A .lh"iSl I ff a i" , ii fln Jr a T r, ? ent '° p or»ero., Lace and tllk CurUtm,
Bath SllkMndiaMusllcß, I'iencti Cratons, I'lushes, etc.
LOS &HGELES furniture coipany,
22.V7-1) S. <>IT.':i lV HALL.
' —— ■ ->■■— "- .y
TWO GOLD MEDALS
i Two First Prizes for Large and Small Photographs
-$J WORLD'S FAIRK-
Convention of the Pliotocmpblc Asiwlulnu of Amirlia ovor a->mo of th« m™. .
220 SOUTH SPRING STREET. *»wi«
•w— ■ — — 1 ■ _ I 1 »'''l'..t a llnlt'inbe "k
BARKER BROS.;
Successors to Bailey & Barker Bros.,
-gSaefcatrtiiL ■tf^U X t\.\ moved into their now quarters In th. Sim-
<■"« BloCi, (JOB. TUiaU 6i bPRINQ STi,
.fa",.- wh ; ra they show as drawen of iralj
mi (MUm ai SI Pair.
nm SET < 5 hm > m oik. at m
BED-ROOM SEf, liarJ Wood, at SIG.SJ.
Drawers of Trade. CARPETS—Run id and See How Low.
WILLIAMSON'S MUSIC STORE
Air C=T g ~RGANS" t I,ABN - ES '
,,nM, * , * r^,, * D*.\tr I 1 ) 11 ,J 1 1 IJi I,
A FULL LINK OF MO3IC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT j.
SEWING MACHINES
Standard, Rotary Shuttlr, White and Other Ldu? SliuttH Mwhlner, Supplies, etc
. . ggT SOUTH BP«INQ STIiKB'r. 4niv
ssrsx*. " — 1
§S. CONRADI,
- - OPTICIAN - -
Watchmaker and Jeweler
I*l and 133 M. Spring St.
COR. FRANKJ IN
FIKS LIAMOND BKTTiNG A. SPICC 11 TV
WAICHKB, (U.OnKS AND JkVkLKY
♦jARJUfULLY ttSPAIRKU ANu WaRRASTJID.
tf-7 iy
The Herald
CHAS VICTOR HALL TRACT,
OF ADAM 3 STREET.
Lb b ' homo villi lots for aula In the *omliire*t'
uvei.u-8 bJ lent wine, l'ned with Psl.nf, Mon
terey Plri'S, Oravilli-s, Peppers, thu new bum
ot Algiers aim Magnolias, uic, which will kivo
a park like eft'art to Fix miles of tJtrsew. Lots
>. r.' .-(Is I ."ill lo 11 foul ul lejH.
WW FjK IN.stDKi.OTB: Eloper month till
ont-.-mll is piii], or oua-totrd cash mid unlaces
in live years; or if you build you can have Aye
years'time. Uctone while you can. An lytq
oHu:; T.'J West F.rat sueel. 7-jU Oai
LOS ANGELES: TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER fX, 1893.
CRUSHED BY THE CARS.
Judge B. N. Smith Seriously
Hurt at Chicago.
His Injuries Will Likely Prove
Fatal.
The Chamber of Commerce Excursion
Fraught With 111 Luck.
Silver Day nt the World'! Fair—Conven
ing of the World* Parliament of
Religion—A Remarkable
Assemblage.
By tho Associated Pre*.
Chicago, Sept. 11.—Judge B. N.
Smith of Los Angeles, Cal., was prob
ably fatally injured by an electric car,
near tbe world's fair, tbis afternoon.
He attempted to board a moving car
just as another rapidly approached.
He was caught between the two and
badly used up. His left leg was frac
tured, five ribs were broken, and he
was internally injured. Judge Smith
bad been visiting the fair several days.
He is now lying in the Mercy hospital.
[The first news received in tbe city
yesterday of the sad accident related in
the above dispatch was a telegram re
ceived by Mayor Rowan from H. J.
Woollacott, about 11 a. m., stating that
Judge Smith was run over by an electric
car and badly injured. Later in tbe
day a rumor was current that the judge
was dead, but this eopld not be con
firmed. The news created great excite
ment and expressions of regret were
heard on all sides. There was also
much comment on tbe accident
being a remarkable coincidence,
since it was by a friendly
tussle with the judge that ex-
Mayor Hazard was so badly injured that
he could not go to Chicago with tbe
chamber of commerce excursion, and
now Judge Smith is the victim of a bad
accident after arriving there. It cer
tainly has been an ill-fated expedition
for two prominent citizens. Judge
Smith stands high in the community
both R8 a man aud a jurist, and it is
! HoiTp%VeWaV as the Associated Press
dispatch suggests. Strange to say, his
family had received no notification of
the accident up to a latehourlaßt night.J
A REMARKABLE ASSEMBLAGE.
The World's Parliament of Religion
Convened In Chicago.
Chicago, Sept. 11. —An event of
world wide historic interest, one with
out previous counterpart in the his
tory of the world, took place here
today. It waa the assembling of a
parliament of religions, gathering repre
sentatives of all the great beliefs ot
tbe earth, with the object of showing
how important are tho things on which
they agree; how comparatively unim
portant are the differences of creed.
The result of the parliament is ex
pected to be to emphasize what is fun
damental, and throw into the back
ground differences merely accidental
and superficial. Since the series of
world's congresses began with the
opening of the world's fair no such
immense crowd has gathered at the
Memorial Art institute as assembled
this morning long before the hour
for the exercises to begin. Not only
since the beginning of tbe world'l fair,
but ever since tha foundation
of the world, has Buch a cos
mopolitan assemblage of exponents
of the world's religions taken place.
Tbe Occident, in severely plain gar
ments, touched elbows, not o.nly on the
platform but in the great audience, with
the brilliantly costumed Orient. In
picturesque commingling the followers
of Jehovah and priests of Confucius,
Buddha and Mohammed, with the vari
ous sects thereof, stood ready in turn to
give, without controversy, the reasons
for the faith that is in them.
Learned religious teachers of China,
Japan, India, Turkey, the islands of the
sea, Catholic and protestant Europe,
and of the Hebrews of the wo-ld, as
sumed attitudes of prayer as the leading
representative of the Catholic church
preeent, the cardinal archbishop of Bal
timore, the Most Reverend James Gib
bons, pronounced an invocation to the
Deity.
Then followed addresses of welcome
by the world's fair officials and local
divines, followed by responses by
learned pundits and famous religions
scholars from all parts of tbe world,
practically consuming the entire day. '
It was an inspiring spectacle when
tbe principal party of those who were
to make tbe addresses of tbe day, all
attired in their priestly robes and
wearing the insignia of their office,
marched in company to the platfbrm.
Kven more inspiring was the scene
when the whole vast audience rose
and joined in the song, Praiße God,
From Whom All Blessings Flow, and
later, when Cardinal Gibbons led those
of all nations and all religions in recit
ing the Lord's Prayer.
Rev. August J. Chapman welcomed
the parliament on behalf of the women,
saying tbe assemblage was among the
grandest and most significant that ever
assembled on the face of the earth, and
not the least of its glories was the recog
nition of women.
The secretary of the Chinese legation
at Washington, Pung Ruang Yu, was
accorded a warm welcome, and made a
brief address of thanks in his own
language, which was afterwards trans
lated.
Tonight nearly all the delegates to tbe
congress were present at a magnificent
reception given in their honor at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Baitleti
WORLD'S FAIR NOTES.
Silver Day at th* exposition—Continued
Large Attendance.
CnicAGO, Sept. 11.—There is every in
dication, and the exposition officials
confidently expect, that the attendance
at the fair this week will far exceed that
of any previous week. Every day there
will be special features which it is
honed will tend to cause this increase.
Today the gates were taxed to admit
the gig crowds arriving from all points.
This was silver day. Tuesday will wit
ness the beginning of a series of exor
cises by Kansas people. Colorado and
Maryland will also share the honors of
the day. Governor Brown and John V.
L. Findlay of Maryland and Cardinal
Gibbons of Baltimore will be present.
Silver day was practically abandoned.
Governor Prince, Senator Stewart and a
number of other silveritee of national
reputation were to have delivered ad
dresses but only Dougherty of Texas ap
peared this morning and oulv a small
audience listened to bis address in
music hall.
At the afternoon session Governor
Waite of Colorado delivered an address
in which he characterized the banking
system as n failure and bankers as ras
cals.
Governor Frince of New Mexico made
a brief address and appropriate resolu
tions were adopted.
The total admissions today were 189,
--66'J, of which lOO.Olii paid.
The national commission adjourned
at today's meeting and will not reassem
ble until October 4th. The executive
committee will practically control ali'aire
during the recess.
TOM MORRIS ARRESTED.
THE PEAT LAND SPRINTER, IN
bERIOUS TROUBLE,
Charged With Maiialaughte* at Bloom
lngton, 111.—He Struck a man a Fatal
lllow and Barely Escaped With
Bis Own Lire.
Special to the Hximld.]
Santa Ana, Sept. 11.—Tom Morris,
tho racer, has been arrested and will be
taken to Bloomington, 111., to answer tc
tbe charge of manslaughter. After a
footrace in that city in July, Morris got
in trouble with a fellow who called him
a liar. He hit him in the face and
knocked him down. The row occurred
in a box-stall. In falling the man
struck a nail in the wall with his head,
and died from tho eHecte of hie injury.
The whole mob tried to do Morris, \*ho
pulled a gun, hacked out and got into
a 135-yard handicap footrace won by
Morris, who claims the act was\self-de
fense and that he barely escaped with
his life.
IRON A! ILLS KEOPENED,
Many i<ll<> Hen GJven Employment at
rittsbure.
• Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 11.—A large
number of idle men were given employ
ment today by the resumption of nu
merous iron and steel plants. For the
first time since June 30th every depart
ment of Jones & Lauglilin's American
works in in operation, giving employ
ment to 3350 men. Sixteen additional
furnaces were put in operation at the
National tube and sheet mill of Moor
head, McClane & Co. The Carbon steel
works went on double turn and the bar
mill, two heating furnaces, two pud
dling furnaces and four sheet mills of the
United States iron and tin plate works
started up with full forces. Zng & Co.'s
plant also resumed on single turn.
Other plants arc preparing to start.
TRAIN KOBIIEKS CAPTURED.
The Men Who Held Up the 'Frisco Train
In Custody.
Oswego, Kan., Sept. 11.—The men
who held up and robbed tbe 'Friscoeast
bound train at Mound Valley last Sun
day have been captured. Their names
are George and Charles McCune, diaries
Bahut and W. W. A. Curry. The cap
ture was made at Arkansas City, Kan.,
wheie tbe outlaws had joined tho mul
titude of boomers who swarm about that
city waiting for the openingof the Chero
kee strip. One of the bandits made a
confession of the robbery and admitted
that he fired the shot which killed Ex
press Messenger Chapman. Tbe men
belong to tbe class known as fakirs at
tbe racing grounds at county fairs.
They are not known to the officers.
A SUCCESSION OF QUAKES.
Violent Seismic Disturbances In Central
New Mexico.
Las Lunas, N. M., (Sept. 11.—Central
New Mexico has been subject almost
daily for more than three months to
violent earthquakes. Five commotions
Thursday threw down a score of old
adobe buildings, already shaky from
previous earthquakes. No lives were
lost, but a peculiar feature is the numer
ous cßßis of nervous sickness, even con
vulsions, among tbe inhabitants, as soon
as tbe rumblings commence. The cen
ter of the disturbance is Sabinal, where
a spring has appeared at a place which
always had been dry and barren.
Hrsztllau Rebels Kepnlsed.
Buench Sept. 11. —Advices
from Uio Janeiro, say tbe insurgents
were repulsed with great losb while at
tempting to land at Nitcheroy. The
killed are estimated at 50.
The world's fair will cause a rush.
Order early. Full stock, good fit, mod
erate prices. Get:-., tine tailoring, 112
West Third street.
A sea bath at home with Turk's Island
sea salt is exhilarating. Kecommended
by all physicians. For sale by all drug
gists ; 15c a package.
Ladies' hats cleaned, dyed, reshaped
and trimmed. California Straw Works,
2t34 South Main street, opposite Third.
For Bunharn and freckles use only
Perfecta Face Cream; Bafe and sure,
For sale by A. E. Littlebay, druggist.
311 South Spring street.
, Conn ban! instruments. Agency at
Fiuscrrtld'u.cor. niigandFrauklinats.
A GAME OF THIMBLERIG.
The Attorney-General Again
Reverses His Orders.
Enforcement of the Geary Law
Again Suspended.
The Change Due to the Protests of
the Chinese Minister.
The New Order Mot to Apply to Chinese
Already Sentenced — Judge Ling;
Dolays the Depurtatiou ot
Bli Clients.
By tha Associated Pre«s.
Washington, Sept, 11. — Attorney
General Olney has instructed United
States tnaruhals to take no further steps
for the enforcement of the Geary law
pending specific instructions to the
contrary from Washington. These in
structions clo not apply, however, to Chi
nese already in progress of deportation
by due proceed of law.
Attorney Ashton of counsel for the
Chinese appliod to the treasury depart
ment today for a stay of proceedings in
the case of the Chinese recently ordered
back to China by the district court at
Los Angeles. He was referred to the
department of justice, and there in
formed that the department would not
interfere in canes already passed upon
by the United States courts.
The new Chinese minister to tbis
country, Yang Yu, was at the Btate de
partment today, and it is understood
was informed by Secretary Gresham of
the intention of the administration to
suspend further action under the ex
clusion act pending the action of con
gress on the bill introduced by Repie
sentative Everett to extend to Septem
ber 1,1894, tbe time in which Chinese
may register.
The change in the attitude of tbe ad
ministration, which last week waa con
templating instructions for the enforce
ment of the Geary law, is, it is believed,
due to the Btrong protests of the Ohineee
government, coupled with the intima
tion that in the event of such action,
that government, would no longer as
sume responsibility for the future Bafety
of Americans in Chinese territory.
Hoar introduced a bill in tbe Benate
today amending the Geary Chinese ex
clusion act, extending the time for regis
tration to three months after passage,
tniTC
a witness in cases against the Chinuse
shall be white. The bill continues in
force the first six sections of tbe Geary
act until a treaty can be made with
China for tbe regulation of Chinese im
migration.
Dolpb presented a petition from the
conference of the Methodist Kpiecopal
church of Oregdn for the repeal of the
Geary act. The petition alleged a state
of affairs as to that law which Dolph
said showed that much of the opposition
to the law was the result of ignorance as
to its provisions and effect. Referring
to the bill recently introduced in the
house, extending the time for register
ing one year, he said he would have no
objection to its enactment into law if
such extension were requested by the
Chinese government, or if there were
any assurance that tbe six companies
would permit Chinese' laborers to reg
ister.
lUnited States District Attorney Denis
was interviewed late last night, and
questioned as to bis probable action in
regard to the above dispatch.
Mr. Denis stated that he had received
no instructions from Attorney-General
Olney in regard to suspending the issu
ance of warrants. On the contrary, he
informed the Herald reporter that he
received yesterday a telegram from At
torney-General Olney, instructing him
to carry out tho Geary law to its full ex
tent. Should tbe dispatch from Wash
ington be correct, and tbe Geary law be
euspended, he would take his instruc
tions from Judge Ross as to the further
granting of warrants for tbe arrest of
Chinamen.]
AGITATION AT RIVERSIDE.
It Is Firmly Determined That the Chi
nese Must 00.
Riverside, Sept, 11.— Anti-Chinese
agitation in tbis city is on the increase.
The committee in charge of the matter
has secared the names of several Chi
nese, and they will go to Los Angeles
tomorrow to secure warrants for tbe
arrest of the men. The agitators here,
although earnest, will not countenance
any unlawful measures. There is a de
termination to fully test the vir
tues of the deportation law.
As yet no Chinese labor has
been contracted for by the raisin
men in tho city, and the indications are
that sufficient white labor can be se
cured. No Chinese will be employed.
The Chinese employed in one of the
restaurants here quit work yesterday
and a couple of laundry firms closed.
Vegetable peddlers say they will quit, but
have not as yet. One of the largest
raisin handlers has decided to use whites
only, and has secured all of them be
needs.
THE YING LEE CASE.
Judges Mclvenim aud Morrow Make a
llighteous Declslou.
San Francisco, Sept. 11. —The deci
sion of United States Judges McKenna
and Morrow, in bane, in the case of
Ying Lee, a Chinaman arrested under
the Geary act for being illegally in the
country, were handed down today. The
judg6S decided that under the law, war
rants for tho arrest of Chinese who have
not registered must be ißsued on com
plaint of any private citizens. The
juuges say that United States District
Attorney Garter showed that there was
not enough money available to deport
all the Chinese in the country, but he
did not show that there was not enough
to send Ying Lee away, and he is ac
cordingly ordered deported. The judges
further said that whenever it is shown
that there are no iuuds to deport tbe
Chinese, tbe cases of those on trial will
be dropped at once, but until that is
shown, deportation must go on.
WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS.
Attorney Ling; Delays the Deportation
of the Ooolles.
San Francisco, Sept. 11.— R. A. Ling,
the attorney for the five Los Angeles
Chinese ordered to be deported by Jndge
Robs, today applied to the federal court
for the release of his clients on a writ of
habeas corpus, and the writ being de
nied, Lingappealed to the state supreme
court. This appeal acts as a stay of
judgment, and tbe Chinese will not be
deported on the steamer which sails to
morrow.
Chinese Students.
New York, Sept. 11.—Two China
men, Yung Kee and Gee Dick, irom
Havana by the steamship Saratoga, en
tered as students, but who are said to
be laundrymen, were before the United
States commissioner today. Affidavits
were sent to the custom house by friends
of tbe imprisoned Chinamen, certifying
that they came here for the purpose of
studying. Inspector Scharf eaid Yung
Kee admitted to him that he was a
laundryman. The prisoners were re
manded until tomorrow.
An Exodus from Santa Monica.
Santa Monica, Sept. 11. —Although
no Chinese agitation has taken place
here, there was a complete abandon
ment of the town this morning by all
tbe Chinese laundrymen and vegetable
vendors.
DARING TRAIN ROBBERY.
A LAKE SHOBE EXPRESS HELD
UP NEAR CHICAGO.
The Engineer Shot And the Safe Blown
Open With Dynamite - Twenty
UCen Engaged In the
Robbery.
Kendallville, Ind., Sept. 12, 5.15 a.
m. —The most daring train robbery
probably in the history of railroading,
occurred here laßt night. Train No. 14
on tbe Lake Shore and Michigan which
left the Rock Island depot at Chicago at
7:45 was attacked and held up by 20 men
as it neared the switch at this point.
The story of the robbery as obtained
from a tramp who was riding on the
pilot of the engine, is to the effect that
20-mejLhad turned the switch lamp of
trio switch, leaving the switch in regu
lar position. The engineer stopped the
train, and as soon as it came to a stop
20 men emerged from the darkness,
and, approaching tbe express car, com
menced the work of destruction by
placing dynamite cartridges under it
and blowing it up.
There was a large sum of money in
the safe which it is said the robbers
captured and carried away. Just be
fore tbe robbers blew up the car the
engineer, made a show of resistance
whereupon the robbers fired upon him
and wounded him, but in is not thought
he was fatally injured.
Martin Loop was conductor of the
train.
A POSBE IN PURSUIT.
Chicago, Sept. 12.—Later.—The train
dispatchers here have been notified of
the robbery and a meeting of the officers
of the road is now being held in tbe
Rock Island depot. A special train is
being gotten up and both tbe railroad
and express companies' officials, to
gether with a strong detail of the Cen
tral police station detectives will leave
in a short time for the scene of the rob
bery.
ANOTHER ACCOUNT.
Kbndallvii.le, Ind., Sept. 12. —Fol-
lowing is another account of tbe rob
bery : Lake Shore and Michigan South
ern passenger train No. 24 was held
up by a gang of robbers this morning
at Kesler siding, about five miles we st
of here. The west switch was thrown,
showing a red light, and when Engineer
Knapp stopped his engine he was fired
upon and hit in the shoulder by a bullet
from a Winchester rifle. The robbers
then covered the train crew with rifles,
and after blowing open the door of the
express car three of them entered
and covered the express messenger,
proceeding cooly to blow open the safe.
It took five cartridges to accomplish
tbis. The robbers after taking what
they wished departed. The train was
held about an hour. Engineer
Knapp will recover. The amount taken
from the safe is not known.
JUDGMENT reversed.
Publishing Divorce Proceeding* Is Not
Con tempt of Court.
San Francisco, Sept. 11.—The supreme
court today decided tbe case of Charles
-M. Shortridge, editor oi the San Jose
Mercury, who was fined for contempt of
court for publishing the proceedings of a
divorce case, contrary to the order of the
judge of the superior court of Santa
Clara county, in the divorce case of
Price vs. Price. The judge of the supe
rior court ordered tbe case conducted
behind closed doors. The Mercury
obtained tbe testimony and printed it.
Shortridge was arrested and fined $100.
The supreme court decides that in this
country the principle that the people
have a right to know what is done in
tbe courts, is essential to tbe public
welfare, and tbe judgment of the supe
rior court is overruled. The court also
decides that the act of the state legisla
ture restricting the power of the courts
to punish for contempt to cases only
where the contempt is committed in tbe
presence of the court is unconstitu
tional.
The Six Companies' Orders.
San Francisco, Sept. 11.—The Chinese
Six Companies deny that the exodus
of Chinese from San Bernardino was
caused by their orders. The Chinese
will be ordered back to the place from
whence they fled.
CITY BANK OFFICIALS.
rtESSRS. CHILDRESS, BETTS
AND PARK ARRESTED UNDER
THE RECENT ORAND JURY IN
DICTJIENTS.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
WON'T LAST TILL WINTER.
The End of the Silver De
bate Now in Sight.
Congress May Adjourn by the
First of October.
No Organized Effort to Filibuster
in the Senate.
Still the Opponents or the Bepeal BUI
Hay Talk IndeUnltely-Pngjh and
Teller Speak for the White
Metal.
By the Associated Press.
Washington, Sept. 11.—'While out
ward appearances indicate that the Bit
nation in the senate is unchanged and
that the debate on the repeal bill may
continue indefinitely, there are lacts ap
parent to the initiated which go to show
that the end is in eight. There is a
strong probability that the senate will
be either ready to adjourn or take up
other legislation by the first of October.
Few even of the Btaunchest advocates
any longer claim a majority against un
conditional repeal, but they are hopeful
of procuring the adoption of an amend
ment which will give recognition in
some form to silver and thus avoid the
necessity of taking a vote upon the re
peal bill as it stands. It may be
stated definitely that no organized
determination to filibuster has been
reached, and the probabilities are that
there will be no extended effort after
legitimate debate has been exhausted, to
prolong the session or postpone the time
for action upon the bill. The opponents
of the bill are called npon to face the
fact that they are at the beginning of a
congress, with no possibility of forcing
an adjournment if Ihe majority should
hold out for a continuance until the 4th
of March, 1895. It will rest largely with
the southern opponents of the bill in
the senate to decide whether tbe vote
shall be postponed or taken.
SENATE PROCEEDINGS.
Pugh ami Teller Speak Against the Re
peal BUI.
Washington, Sept. 11. —In tbe senate
today Stewart submitted a resolution
for a committee of five to report whether
any senator waa interested as a stock
holder or otherwise in any national
bask. Hlti objected to it on the ground
that it was a reflection on the senators.
Laid oyer till Tuesday.
The repeal bill was up. Pugh
of Alabama spoke in opposition to it.
Pugh said the message of the president
calling an extra session was a declara
tion in favor of a gold standard. If tho
Sherman law were unconditionally re
pealed, such action would cause discon
tent among tha toiling millions to such
an extent as would shake the country.
He would never vote for unconditional
repeal, but in favor of any substitute
which carried out the platform of the
Democratic party.
Teller then resumed his speech begun
Saturday against the repeal bill. He
asserted that if it had not been for pre
concerted efforts in the money centers
to prevent it, September Ist wonld have
seen better times in tbe finances of the
country than tbe people were experienc
ing today. He recently asked a gentle
man of national reputation when tbe
panic would be over. Tbe gentleman
replied: "When tbe men who called it
on call it off. Tbe bunkers of New York
called it on. When tbey get ready to
call it off it will come off."
Teller said he wonld at some other
time give tbe senate his conception of
the cause of the recent distressed condi - 1
tion. In his opinion it was due to legis
lative misconduct.
Teller next directed himself to stock
operations. A New York paper had
published daily fer some time a depre
ciation in the value ol stock, or de
struction of values, occasioned by the
Sherman law, as the paper said. The
paper bad finally got the amount up to
$700,000,000. In his opinion a great
many stocks were selling on the market
for more than they were worth. He
cited Northern Pacific, which, he said,
had fallen from 70 to 17. It was said all
the great owners connected with it un
loaded when it was 70. That company
had $250,000,000 of indebtedness; $75,
--000,000 was held in Germany, and a
great amount was owned in Holland
and England. "Don't you think,"
asked the Colorado senator, "that when
a great corporation like that collapses
and is left with a debt so great that its
most enthusiastic friends cannot hope
that it can ever pay, that finances in
this country might be disturbed as well
as in Europe?"
Teller then spoke of the Erie, and
said he did not suppose anybody pre
tended that tbe Erie would ever play
out. He also spoke of the Reading,
and again asked if any intelligent man
believed that either of the three great
concerns he had named were solvent.
This disturbance did not come from
tbe Sherman law. It came from tbe
misconduct of the officials. The good
stocks of the country maintain them
selves, with rare exceptions, almost at
par, and many of them were above
par even during the crisis. It be
hooves congress when it comes to leg
islate upon this Bubject to find tl-.e
cause of this evil, and if within its
power to remove the evil. He did. not
claim that congress could touch tbe
condition ot dealing in stocks; that
was one of the evils that had to be
allowed to exist.
After a brief executive session, the
senate adjourned.
TARIFF HEARINGS.
Iron and Steel Manufacturers Have
Their Innings.
Washington, Sept. 11, —The iron and
steel schedules were the subjects of dis
cussion in the ways and means com
mittee today, and a large delegation,
representing nearly every prominent
iron and steel manufactory in the coun
try, was present and endeavored to dem

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