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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, January 09, 1905, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1905-01-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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STATEHOOD BILL
LEAOINC TOPIC
SENATE WILL CONTINUE TO
DISCUSS MEASURE
Opponents Plan to Keep Argumei ta
Going Until it Becomes Nee.
essary to Take Up Ap
propriation Matters
By Associated Press,
WASHINGTON, Jan. B.— The Joint
statehood bill will continue to be the
principal topic of discussion In the oen
ate during the present week, but other
measures will receive attention each
day during the morning houra, Includ
ing the omnibus claims bill, for which
Senator Warren stands sponsor. The
bill comprises more than 200 pages, but
the senator already haa succeeded in
having it read by utilizing odd hours,
and thus has put a large and impor
tant part of the work of consideration
to the rear. An effort will be made to
get through the bill providing for the
compensation of American fishermen
-whose vessels were seized previous to
the arbitration of 1893. This measure Is
In the hands of Senator Fulton, who
will press It as an act of justice to
men whom he thinks have been dis
criminated against.
The pure food bill will remain In the
background for the present, not be
cause the friends of that measure have
abandoned It, but because they con
sider that its chances will be improved
by not pressing for immediate consid
eration. They have been assured by
the Republican leaders that the bill
shall have first place on the calendar,
aside from the appropriation bills, after
the statehood bill is disposed of, and
therefore. they will not antagonize the
statehood bill for the present if at all.
Discussion of the statehood question
will begin on Monday with a speech by
Senator Morgan, and he will be fol
lowed by other opposing senators. The
present plan of the opposition Is to
keep the discussion going until some of
the appropriation bills are reported and
It becomes necessary to take them up,
or If this Is postponed too long to dis
place the bill with the pure food bill.
Failing in all these expedients, they
probably will seek a compromise. Tho
only real fight is against the uniting of
Arizona and New Mexico, and there Is
talk of eliminating those territories en
tirely from the statehood proposition.
It |is believed If this were done the
bill for the consolidation of Oklahoma
and Indian Territory would pass. Thus
far there, has been no conference of
opposing factions on the subject, and
probably little will be done to change
the 'present status so long as the lead
ers are anxious to keep other matters
in the background, as appears to be the
case at present..
PROGRAM OF HOUSE
Active Consideration of Appropriation
Bills to Commence This Week
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, Jan. B.— lt is the In
tention of the house to begin active
consideration of appropriation bills
during the present week. Monday Is
District of Columbia day and the reso
lution providing for the ceremonies of
the Inauguration of President Roose
velt and deciding where the inaugural
ball shall be held will be consid
ered/ Another measure of more than
local importance to be called up Is a
bill granting the American Railway
Appliance exposition authority to use
the monument grounds for an exhibi
tion.
It is expected the resolutions intro
duced by Representative Baker will be
disposed of. They were referred to
the Judiciary committee, and no doubt
•will be reported back Monday for ac
tion by the house. These are the res
olutions criticising President Roose
velt and Secretary Morton.
The pension appropriation bill will be
reported Monday, and possibly taken
up for consideration Tuesday. It will
be followed by the army, the Indian
and the District of Columbia appro
priation bills. While they may not all
be considered during the week, they
■will be ready for action.
The Hill currency bill remains the
unfinished business and Friday will be
devoted to pension bills.
BACK TO THE PADDLE
FOR BAD BOYS' BACKS
NEW YORK, Jan. B.— Strenuous
times are ahead for the pupils of the
public schools in this city if the re
quest of the teachers is approved by
the board of education. A committee
of teachers will appear before the
board and ask that<he rule prohibiting
corporal punishment be rescinded.
All but fifteen of the 269 principals
are In favor of the birch when moral
suasion rails. They argue that the
mild measures of the theorists are of
no use In dealing with unruly young-
Bters. .
City Superintendent Maxwell does not
approve of whipping, and he will ap
pear before the board to oppose the de
mands of the teachers. He declares
that the return to corporal punishment
-would be a backward step.
Members of the board are non-com
mittal, but It is believed that the agi
tation for the return of whipping will
fall.
Whole Municipality Arrested
ÜBKUH, European Turkey, Jan. B.—
Or. December 8, by order of Tllmt
Pasha, the whole municipality of Us
kui>, together with the vicar and cler
gy of the vicaret, were arrested, the
accusation being that they had formed
a revolutionary tribunal. A search of
the homes of the accused was without
result, .but nil efforts to aecure their
'""•ration have been unsuccessful.
STORM AND FIRE
THREATEN CRAFT
BRITISH STEAMER ZAMBES
HAS PERILOUS VOYAGE
Leaves Savannah for Bremen But
Strikes Sunken Wreck and
It Tossed by Heavy
Seas
Bjr Aoanclated Press.
NEW YORK, Jan. B.— The British
steamer Zambesi, from Savannah, for
Bremen, with a cargo of cotton and
phosphate, put Into this port this morn-
Ing after a moat eventful voyage with
her cargo of cotton on fire and with
several of ,her crew sick. Captain
Rooney of the Zambesi reports that he
sailed from Savannah on New Year's
day. The vessel experienced very se
vere weather. All went well, how
ever, until January B, when the steam
er struck a submerged wreck, which
broke the stem and stove in several of
the bow plates under water, causing
the forepeak to fill with water.
The ship was Immediately headed for
port, nearly 800 miles distant.
Heavy weather prevailed and furious
seas flooded the forward decks. .On
January 6 volumes of smoke were seen
pouring from the fore hatches and it
was evident the cotton in the hold was
on fire. The ship's hose was quickly
connected and the fire was soon under
control.
On Saturday morning five firemen
who were asleep In the forecastle were
discovered in an unconscious condition
from the fumes of the burning cotton
and phosphate. They were removed
from the forecastle to the steamer's
cabin, where they revived.
The steamer will discharge the cargo
in her forward holds and will probably
go Into dock for repairs. She hails from
London and is consigned to Fuch, Edye
& Co.
HAZERS PARDONED AT
KINGDON GOULD'S REQUEST
Four Columbia Sophomores Permitted
to Return to Their Class
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Jan. B.— Following the
receipt of a letter from Klngdon
Gould asking clemency for the four
students who were suspended In con
nection with an attempt to seize him
for the sophomores' dinner just be
fore the holidays, announcement has
been made by Dean Hutton of the
school of applied sciences of Columbia
university, that the disciplined men,
Algeltlnger, Cauchois, Doty and Finch,
will be allowed to return to their
work at the reopening of the university
this week.
I Before the announcement was made
there was a conference between Presi
dent Butler, the members of the board
of students' representatives and the
four suspended students. The purpose
of disciplining the four men was to
make plain to the students themselves
and to the public the fact that hazing
would not be tolerated at Columbia,
and that end. It is said, has been ac
complished.
Klngdon Gould, In his letter asking
that the suspended men be allowed to
return, accounted for hla possession of
the revolver which he fired to frighten
off the sophomores and expressed his
wish to finish his course on terms of
good fellowship with the otlier stu
dents of the university.
Regarding the revolver, he wrote:
"I always take long rides in the
country after the college work of the
day, usually returning after dark. I
frequently take with me a pistol. On
the day in question I happened to have
it and when attacked I fired it In the
air, so that by the consequent surprise
of the fellows I might gain time and
opportunity to reach the frat house,
where I was going to get my lunch.
I had not the slightest intent of doing
harm to any one and never supposed
the incident would be taken seriously."
RESTAURANTS ZEALOUS
IN OBSERVANCE OF LAW
Regular Patrons Refused Liquor Yes
terday Except When Pur
chased With Meals
Liquor could not be purchased read
ily yesterday at any of the restaurants
operating under the restaurant liquor
license, and often the regular customer
who knew the ropes was refused the
whisky and its accompanying "chaser."
Liquor was sold only with bona fide
meals in the majority of restaurants.
"We are waiting to me what the new
'commission Is going to do and we are
not anxious to get Into trouble while
we are on the anxious seat," said the
proprietor of one of the restaurants.
Others had excuses of a similar nature
lor the withdrawal of the sale of other
than bottled beer.
"Shove It out to me In a cup and
call It coffee like you use to do," said
one of the old patrons, but his request
met a point blank refusal.
WILL BUILD TWO NEW LINERS
Big Steamers to Ply Between Amerl.
can and Japanese Ports
lly A HH»f lated Frew.
VICTORIA, O. C. Jan. B.— The
ateamer Keemun, which arrived today
from Liverpool via Japan, brought
newt) that the Toyo Kalsha has deter
mined to build two IXOOO ton liners for
the Han Francisco and Yokohama
route.
The material has been ordered In
England. The Japanese foundries are
too busy with government orders to
supply the steel. The Bteamers will
be built at Nufc-aaukl.
LOS ANGELES HERALD? MONDAY MORNING, JANUARY 9, 1905.
NO TITLE TO LAND
HE WON AT CARDS
NEGLECT TO TAKE TRANSFER
COST $12000
In 1828 Gideon Tooker Staked Three
Acres In East New York
for $50; Now Worth
9100,000
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Jan. I.— Because of the
failure of the parties to transfer le
gally a parcel of real estate In Kast
New York which was won In a game
of cards seventy-five years ago It has
cost $12,000 to perfect the title to the
property, compromising with helra In
all parts of the United States. When
It was won by the best hand at cards
the property, which is at Stone ave
nue and McDougal street, was not
worth more than $50. It Is now worth
$100,000.
Gideon Tooker owned the property. In
1828, and the man' who won It was
Theodore Kolyer. From the day of that
game the property was known as Kol
yer's, and for three-quarters of a cen
tury it was believed to have been
owned by him. It was woodland, and
as It brought In no revenue- the taxes
were not paid and It was finally sold
by the city of Brooklyn, With the quit
claim deeds that were passed from
time to time there was no question
raised about the title until twenty
years ago, when the Title Guarantee
and Trust company was asked to
search the title.
Koyler died Intestate in 1829, and in
the Inventory of his estate three acres
of land were scheduled. This was be
lieved to be the property, and after the
heirs had been found a partition action
was begun and at the sale It was be
lieved that the cloud on the title had
been cleared."
Edward R. Vollmer of Manhattan
found no record of a transfer to Kol
yer. He attacked the title, and In an
action which has gone to the court
of appeals he upset the title that was
obtained by the partition action. It
then became necessary for the Title
Guarantee and Trust company to look
up the Gideon Tooker heirs and settle'
with them.
WHITE BEAR WITH PINK
. EYES SLAIN BY HUNTERS
Remarkable Story from Moonshine
Land Is Borne Out by Bruin's
Pale Skin
By Associated Press.
MONTGOMERY, W. Va., Jan. B.—
Here's a bear story better than one
Mayor Harrison of Chicago could tell.
It emanates ' from the mountains of
Nicholas county, where moonshiners
and bears are numerous. It is not an
ordinary story about an ordinary bear,
however. It's about a bear with white
fur and pink eyes. The poor bear Is
dead now, and none of his kin can be
found.
The story was brought from the
mountains by two hunters. They were
out hunting bear (or moonshine), when
the driving rain forced them to take
shelter in a cave.
The bear was in the cave, and when
it discovered the presence of the hun
ters objected seriously to the Intrusion.
It attacked the pair.
The hunters hated to do It, but when
one of them had been wounded, the
other, Wilson Graves, fired the Bhot
that killed the bear with the white
fur and pink eyes.
Now they have skinned the animal
and brought the hide to town to prove
the story.
The skin will be mounted.
Graves and his companion are si
lent on the qualities of the moonshine
In the mountains.
RASULI WOULD PROTECT
. EUROPEANS AT TANGIERS
Brigand Wants to Take Responsibil.
Ity for Safeguarding of
Aliens In Morocco
Special Cable to Th« Herald.
TANGIERS, Jan. B.— The brigand Ita
sult says that he is willing to under
take responsibility for the protection
of the environs of Tanglers and of the
roads in the district. He deplores the
Insecurity to which Europeans are sub
ject, and regrets that the European
representatives apparently ; fail to see
that in the Ferdlcarls affair he was
acting in circumstances over which he
had no control, and his success In the
affair makes him sure that God so
willed it. He thanks God that hla
relation with hla victims have always
been of a most friendly nature, and
feels Bure that In the long run the
European representatives will realise
his honesty and good faith. _,-<
In spite of the stupendous incidents
of Itasuli's communication he doubt
less could materially assist to keep
the neighborhood quiet provided he re
ceived authorization and a pardon. It
is doubtful whether the humiliation In
volved In employing a notorlbus bri
gand would be any greater than the
humiliation of the European powers
and the Moorish government, which ex
ists at present, When almost daily out
rages are occurring under the very
(lags of a dozen legations.
Norwegian Craft Little Damaged
Uy ABwirliiti-il I'renn.
GLOUCESTER, Mass., Jan. 8. —
The 18-foot Norwegian lifeboat Uradd
from Aulesund, Norway, which after
an adventurous voyago of six months
stranded In coming up tho harbor
shortly after midnight, was floated
this noon with only a email hole in
her outer skin. Hlie was towed to a
local wharf and will probably go to
Boston for repairs. |
■ rnwm --* " --*— - i ■ ■■■BWMMi ■
PONTIFF ISSUES
SECRET BULL
RELATES TO CLAIMS OF VETO
POWERS
Cardinals Are Forbidden to Bear Me*.
sages of Intention to Oppose
Election of Member of
College
Br Ansoetattd Pnm.
UOMK, Jan. B.— One of the most Im
portant acts thus far In the pontificate
of Pope Plus X has been embodied In a
seoret bull, the text of which will not
be made public until the pontiff Is dead,
when it will bo read as forming part
of the constitution In the next con
clave that will elect Pope Plus' suc
cessor.
The bull is In connection with the
claims of Austria, t France and Spain
as to their right to veto the election
of any cardinal to the papacy. All the
cardinals have not been Informed as to
the contents of the document, It having
been drawn up In accordance with a
decision reached by the cardinals liv
ing In Rome, with the exception of
Cardinal Rampolla, who Is absent from
the city.
Briefly the bull says that all cardi
nals are absolutely forbidden, under
penalty of exclusion from the con
clave and not being allowed to vote,
to be the bearer of a message of veto,
and that If any cardinal knowing the
Intention of his ruler to object to the
election of a cardinal, communicates
this Intention to his colleagues In the
conclave he also will be excluded and
not allowed to vote.
TALK OF PEACE
RIFE IN RUSSIA
(Continued from Vage One.)
878 officers and 23,491 men, wheroaf
441 officers and 229 orderlies have been
parole so far. Gen. Smyrnoff,
Gen. • Fock, Gen. Gorbatovsky and
Admiral Wllmann preferred to lie sent
to Japan as prisoners, while Swesssl
■will leave Dalny for home on Jan
uary 12."
Could Not Avoid Hospitals
LONDON, Jan. 9.— The correspondent
at Toklo of the Times says:
"The map of Port Arthur which the
Russians produced on December 18 in
support of their complaint that the Jap
anese fire was damaging hospitals
shows seventeen hospitals scattered
throughout the old and new towns. To
avoid hitting these the Japanese bat
teries would have had to refrain from
firing altogether In the direction 6t
both towns."
Japs in New York Celebrate
NEW YORK, Jan. B.— The fall of Port
Arthur was celebrated here today at a
meeting of Japanese residents of the
city, held in Carnegie hall. The affair
was intended to be solely for the Jap
anese residents, 800 of whom attended,
and the only Invited guests were Gen.
Stewart L. Woodford, former minister
to Spain, and Alexander Tison, both of
whom spoke.
Russians Leave Suda Bay
SUDA BAY, Jan. B.— Vice Admiral
Rotrovesky's division of the' Russian
second Pacific squadron, consisting of
the cruisers Oleg, Izumrud, Dnieper
and Rion and the torpedo boat des
troyers Grozny, Gromskl and Rezlty,
which has been delayed In Suda Bay,
left this afternoon for Port Said.
Russian Loss 25,000
TOKIO, Jan. 9, noon.— lt is believed
that the Russian casualties at Port
Arthur will total about 25,000.
Wounded Russians Reach Nagasaki
NAGASAKI, Jan. 9, noon.— One thou
sand wounded Russian prisoners of war
from Port Arthur have arrived at Dal
rel hospital.
HUNGARIAN RUNS AMUCK
Murderous Madman Wounds Several
Persons and Is Shot
Special Cable to The Herald.
VIENNA, Jan. B.— Konradln Chaffar
de Bolyok, a Hungarian land-owner,
held up the railway station at Vadna
this week in a sudden fit of madness.
He first took. up his position on the
street outside the station, and fired re
volver 6hots at every one who passed,
wounding several persons.
Then he entered the station, holding
a loaded revolver in each hand, and
threatened to shoot anyone who did not
at once leave. A pantc ensued, passen
gers and station officials taking to
flight.
Gendarmes were sent for, and as de
Bolyok shot at them on their approach
they fired a volley and killed him.
STOCKMEN WILL CONVENE
Joint Gathering of Cattlemen'- and
Sheep Raisers to Open In Denver
By Auoclated Press.
DENVER, Jan. B.— Everything Is In
readiness for the opening tomorrow of
the Joint .national convention of the
National Livestock association and the
National Wool Growers' association.
Already delegates are flocking Into
Denver to attend the gatherings and
every hotel in the city Is taxed almost
to Us utmost to accommodate the
stockmen.
The wool growers will huve the flrßt
call Into proceeding!*. They will con
vene in the Tabor '*•■<« ml opera house
tomorrow at 10
FREQUENTLY WED
ACTRESS EXPIRES
BETTINA GIRARD IS VICTIM OF
PNEUMONIA
Was Daughter of General Ordway of
Washington and During Stage
Career Had Seven Hus
bands
By Adsocloted Tress.
NEW YORK, Jan. B.— Bettlna Olrard,
daughter of Gnu. Ordway of Washing
ton, died In Hoofovelt hospital today.
Notice of her death was given to the
coroner's office, which began an Inves
tigation. The woman was removed
from her apartments in West Forty
first street Saturday, and at the hospi
tal the name of Elizabeth Witter was
given. It was stated tonight that her
body was claimed under the name of
Ordway. •
The body, It Is understood, will be
taken to Washington.
The last engagement .of Bettlna
Girard was In "The Marriage of Kitty"
company, under the management of
Jules Murray, which showed in the
west.
Her first appearance on the stage wag
in 1880 in "The Seven Ages." In 1892
she appeared at Nlblo's and later was
with Dlxey In "Adonis."
The career of Bettlna Olrard was
one of contrasts. Her life began amid
the refined surroundings of wealthy
and distinguished families In Wash
ington. She was thirty-five years of
age. Soon after her debut In Wash
ington, Arthur Padelford, a member
of a wealthy Baltimore family, met
her, and following a short wooing, they
were married. They at once went
abroad, and three months later came
the report that in Austria the young
husband had applied for and obtained
a divorce. Soon afterward she went
on the stage.
The lists of husbands Bettlna Girard
had is interesting. They were Arthur
J. Padelford, a millionaire; John J.
Raffael, a singer; Harrison J. Wolfe,
an actor;' William G. Beach, an actor;
Philip Schuyler, the well-known the
atrical agent; Frank Turner, a vaude
ville performer, and Francis C. Wit
ter, vaudeville performer.
Mr. Witter, her husband, was with
her at her death. By his direction
the boiy was sent to -Washington for
burial.
The coroner made an examination
and decided that the woman had died
of acute , pneumonia. ...
NO COMPROMISE;
SALOONS MUST GO
(Continued from raise One.)
dlally and earnestly Invited. to Join in
this movement, providing only that they
declare their loyalty to the one declar
ation to which this organization shall
unflinchingly stand. "The beverage li
quor traffic In Los Angeles must die,"
and promise to give us such assistance
in time, influence and money as they
can to secure the Immediate adoption
of such an amendment to the city
charter as shall accomplish the pur
pose.
Ask All to Join
That each W. C. T. U., Prohibition
alliance, Good Templars lodge, Anti
saloon league, young people's society
or organization that stands with us in
our determination to Immediately drive
out the liquor traffic, and who will co
operate with us In this movement, Is
hereby Invited to name one representa
tive on a permanent committee of nf
ty.
That the first fifty persons thus se
lected whoso names shall be duly certi
fied to the secretary of the temporary
executive committee shall be declared
the permanent committee of fifty, wno
shall then be called together and who
shall elect .their own officers and com
mittee, to whom the full charge of the
campaign will be turned over.
The resolutions were adopted and a
nominating committee elected. Thi*
committee consists of James H. Blanch*
ard, Rev. Wiley J. Phillips, Mrs. Hes
ter T. Griffith, Miss G. F. Stlckney,
D. F. K. Moote, Rev. C. 3. Hall ans
M. W. At woo*. y *; '." "
There was hardly standing room left
it. the hall yesterday and the question
of finding a larger meeting place was
brought up but It was decided to make
no change until after the next meet-
Ing.
DEATHS OF THE DAY
Lloyd Lowndes, . Maryland
lly Associated Press.
CUMBERLAND, Md., Jan. B.— Lloyd
Lownctes, former governor of Marylutid,
died suddenly at his home here today.
E. R. Annable, San Bernardino
SAN BERNARDINO, Jan. B.— E. R.
Annable of thla city, one of the most
brllllunt attorneys In Southern Cali
fornia, was found dead ut hla orange
ranch at Kust Highlands this morning.
Annable but recently recovered from a
severe Ulnegß, which weakened the
heart, and lhat organ failed last night.
Richard Derby, San Franclico
lly Associated fnu.
SAN FHANCIBCO, Jan. B.— Richard
Derby, neuretury of the Paclflo lm
provement company, was burled today
from hla 'residence near Redwood City.
The deceased, who has been ill for
some time past, < was an old-time real
dent of California, and has always
been , prominent in local business clr«
\ _i__
JUTASOM OPERA HOUSE J^; T^,.,,
*'* TIIRRM NIOHTfI ANT) WKHNKROAY MATINEK, COMMntfCINM TONIGHT-'
JAMES A. lIEHNE'S FAMOI'S COMEDY DIIAMA-
• .— — Shore Acres — ;..
Now In Its fourteenth ytKt. Kveiilri* rrlccs— 2Se, 50c, 7ro and $1.00. l^opntir*
Trie* M»tln»»>--;r.ff and We. SwU now nn Ml'.
AfASOW OPERA HOUSE . u,,"; Tml..^ '
¥VM. TUItKF! NK4HTB OMLT-THUHSfiAT. FniPAY, RATUimAY. .TANtTARY 12-IMI
-SATURDAY MATINEE-lIENRY W. BAVAUB OFFERS TUB MUSICAL. SATIRE—
.\ V .*. The Sultan of Sulu .\ V .\
Fjr OEOTtCJK ADF., Aulhnr of "Titr! TOUNTY CHAIRMAN," "THF2 STTOOUN," 'TRfXJY
FROM I'AHlfi" and "TUB COM..EUE WITXJW." Mliftln l>y AI.KRRT) O. WATIIAMi-
ATTCJMF.NTF.D OnCHESTRA. Heats on Pule Today at I) a. m. — miCES-GOe, Trie, 11.00 and
lI.Kfl. TKT,H, TO. b
CIMPSOM AUDITORIUM L - E -£^™ ER '
TONIOHT-ONB NIOHT ONLY— JAN. 9-the Celebrated Dramatic Roprnno-
Madame Johanna Gadshi
In Schumann, Schubert and Bralim's Ron* Cycle* nnd Operatic Ar!ni>, a^Klnteti by (TERR
fIBUWATI MEBHOWITZ, I'lnniM. Sent xnle NOW ON at UNION I'ACIFIC TICKET OF'
FICB. 2.V) Pouth Spring Street. Telephone Itt2,
ffEMPLE AUDITORIUM u \™ 11 ™ KR
•* t TWO WEEKS— nEOINNINO NEXT MO.NDAY, JANUARY 16—
Ben Greet Players in Repertoire
Mon. and Tues. fives.. Werl. .Mnt— "EVERYMAN." Wed. nnd Thurs.— "TWELFTH 1
NIOI1T." FH.-"AB YOIT MKE IT." Sat. Aft. and Eve.-"IIAMU,KT" (complete version).
Second Week: "MUCH ADO." "MERCHANT Op VENICE." ITlren-lI.M, 11.00, 75c,
COc. Koiison Tlckets-t7.00, 1.'.n0, M.OO. Beats nw selling, at Union raclflu Ticket O(flc«, 250
South Spring; Street, t'honen— MS. > !
Brf dirrTk TtIV &TI?T> MAIM ST., Between Third and Fourth
E>l*>tt>iL>\J 1 tt L.JT IL, l\. BEL A SCO. MAYER A CO.. Proprietors
rHONES: Sunset. Main 3350; Home, !«. '.
Tonight! Commencing Tonight!
The. Bolsjico Theater Slock Company Presents for the first tlmo Clyde Fitch's Most Suo 1
cessful and Brilliant Play— . •
Captain Jinks of The Horse Marines
Identically as Tlayed by Ethel Barrymore for over two years. Trlcea— Every Nl«ht Me, 33c.
EOc and 75c. Thursday and Baturday Matinees 2oc. Wio and EOc
Next WeeK! Announcement Extraordinary !
The Belaseo Theater Stock Company presents for the first time on any Los Angeles stage
the Greatest Romance tho world haa ever known— . ' ■ ;.;.;,
OLD HEIDELBERG M .Mtl.
• FROM THE OWNERS: New York, Dec. 20.— Belanco, Mayer & Co., Belnsco Theater.
Loa Angeles, Cal. : You have the solo rlßhts to "OLD HEIDELBERG" for Loa Angeles.
Any other announcement unauthorized. Wishing you all success. (Hlfrned)
SIIUBERT BROTHERS.
Sent* for "Old Heidelberg" no on sale this morning;. Notwithstanding the Import-
ance of th« offering mid tlie miignltude of the production, there will bo no advance
In the regular Belanco prices. •
jyfOROSCO'S BUHBWK THEATRE 2^^2225?
The Funniest and Best Play Seen Here In Years. { Ha! Ha! Ha!
Packed to the doors as usual last nlsht and yesterday afternoon. Again tonight — every
night this week-Matlneo Saturday. Go where the crowds (to and see the BUBBANK'
STOCK COMPANY In Edwin Milton noyle's . , ' -
My Wife's Husbands
Matinees Saturday and Sunday— We nnd 25c. Evening prices— loc, 2oc, 3So and 60c.
Starting Next Sunday Afternoon— "lN SOUTH CAB'LINKY." by 11. D. Cottrell. '
RPHEUM ™~ Spring ""•{.o^rh^.'.^SS? "' "^
Commencing Tonight
j THE GREAT ~Bkl
...Orpheum Road Show...
cTVTINTYRE C& HEATH, Perennial Minstrel Favorites; SPESSAR-
DY'S BEARS AND PONIES; GRACE PALOTTA AND THE MIL- '
LINERY MAIDS; THE LATONAS, Music and Comedy; CLARICE >.
VANCE, the Southern Singer; SMIRL & KESSNER, Acrobats;
PROBST, the Great Imitator; ALBERTINA MELICH and Her
Trained Birds. .
Prices Permanent, 10c, 25c, COc. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday. Sunday. - ■ .
J^SCOT PARK Los Angeles Jockey Club
o-sßaces=^Races=Races==^°
111 Dayß' Baclng, Six or More Races Dally. Races start at 1:40 p. m. TUES-
DAYS LADIES' DAYS— Free . admission to ladles. 'Children under 10 year's -
of age not admitted on' Ladles' Day. EVERY FRIDAY GRAND CONCERT
BY PROF. FRANKENSTEIN'S. CELEBRATED ORPHEUM ORCHESTRA
OF 20 PIECES. Admission $l.oi. Private Boxes $3.00 per day or $100 per .
season. San Pedro St., Vernon ave.. Maple ave. and Pacific Electric cars
direct to the main entrance. J. W. BROOKS, Manager.
— ____ *. »♦ *».»•.«■» MAIN ST., Between First and Second
fIRJfXD OPERA HOUSE Homo pluno US; Eunset Main 1967.
** ■ Bccond and Last AVe«k of HOSE MELVILLE In
"Sis HopKins"
Matinees Sunday, Tuesday, Saturday. 10 and 23c. Evenings, 10, 23 and (Oa. SUNDAY, Jan.,
15 Two Performances Only. "YON YONSON." Monday, Jan. 16, and Balance of Week,
BLANCHB BATES In "THE DARLING OF TUB OOPa." •
CASINO THEATER All This WeeK c "SLE?"
:: Pasadena Tournament of Roses ::
Shown by a Series of Moving Pictures Taken Especially for the, CASINO, Jan. t 1305, by J
MUea Bros, of New Tork and San Francisco.
A Great Vaudeville Bill in Conjunction
Prlces-10 and 20 centn-NO HIGHER^ -
f*HUTES Tuesday Afternoon
ORAND OPEN AIR CONCERT AT 2:30 BY THE
. Celebrated Ellery Band •
CONCERTS Tin .Theater this week will be Blven WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY. SIONOU
VALKNZA? EMINENT ITALIAN HARPIST, will be heard WEDNESDAY EVENING. Tlck-
ets on sale at Hlrkel's Munlc Store. 345 H. Spring Street.
I —^ g t f%g Hazard's Pavilion, Tues. Eve Jan. 10
L3S\lllTi*\\ \n f\ tt) World's Fair Prlie Winners. 6howOpen9a.
TiROADWAY THEATER . 6th and Broadway
*^ CONTINUOUS MODERN VAUDEVILLE. Six Big Eastern Acts, and new set of
moving pictures. Matinee every afternoon at 8 o'clock. Price 10c. Children Co. Evening I
"clock. Admission 10c. Reacrved seats 20c. Phones: Main 16W; Home 2285. ■ ■ .
GERMAN MINERS MAY
CALL GENERAL STRIKE
Declare Average Life of Underground
Workers Is Less Than Formerly
and Ask Bhorter Hours _
BERLIN, Jan. B.— Meeting: of the
representatives of 200,000 miners em
ployed In the mines of the Rhenish
Westphallan coal syndicate are belntf
held throughout the dlatrlct regarding
the alienee of the members of the syn
dictate on the workmen's request for a
different system of measuring ths
hours of work. The mines are under
individual company management, the
whole allotted product being marketed
by the syndicate. Two hundred and
fifty men in one mine refused to work
today but a general strike is not yet
Imminent, although the miners are em
bittered by the long controversy.
The miners a«k that the houra of
work shall be measured from the time
of arrival at the pit's mouth until they
reach the pit's mouth on returning, In
stead of from reaching the work gal
lery until ceasing work. The men
affirm that It takes often forty-five
imlnutes each way, going into and leav-
Ing the deep sunk shafts and long gal
leries, so that a nominal eight-hour day
becomes a day of nine and a half hours.
They asked for tho first year a nine
hour day, for the second year eight
and one-quarter hours and for the third
yenr and thereafter eight hours, calcu
lated between getting into and getting
out of the entrance.
The miners uver that the diggings are
more unhealthy than ever and that 65
per cent of the men are now diseased.
According to official reports the aver
uge life of miners is less than formerly.
MUNYON'S
COLD CURE
* WILL HCFUHD YOUR MONK* IF IT FAILS.
MUNVON, Philadelphia.

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