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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, April 18, 1905, Image 1

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Los Angeles Herald.
VOL. XXXII, NO. 199.
MAY NOT LIMIT
HOURS OF LABOR
FAR-REACHING DECISION OF
SUPREME COURT
RIGHT OF CONTRACT DEFINED
New York State Labor Law Prescrlb.
Ing Hours of Labor In Bakeries
Declared to Be Uncon.
■tltutional
By Associated Press.
"WASHINGTON, April 17.— 1n an
opinion by Justice Peckham the su
preme court of the United States held
to be unconstitutional the New York
state law making ten hours a day's
work and sixty hours a week's work In
bakeries In that Btate. Justices Har
lan. White, Day nnd Holmes dissented
and Justice Harlan declared that no
more Important decision had been ren
dered In the last century.
The law Involved In the case Is sec
tion 110 of the New York state labor
law prescribing the hours of labor In
bakeries In the state. Lochner Is a
baker In the city of Utlca and was
found guilty of permitting: an employe
to work in his bakery more than sixty
hours In a week and fined $50. The
Judgment was affirmed by the New
York appellate courts.
Today's opinion dealt entirely with
the constitutional question involved.
Justice Peckham Bald that the law Is
not an act merely fixing the number
of hours which shall constitute a legal
day's work, but an absolute prohibi
tion upon the employer permitting un
der any circumstances more than 10
hours' work to be done more than ten
ment. He continued:
"The employe may desire to earn the
extra money which would arise from
his working more than the prescribed
time, but the statute forbids the em
ployer from permitting the employe
to earn it. It necessarily interferes
with the right of contract between the
employer and employed concerning the
ntimber of hours In which the latter
may labor In the bakery of the em
ployer. ' The general rights to make
a contract In relation to his business
is part of the liberty of the Individual
protected by the fourteenth amendment
to the federal constitution. Under
that provision no state can deprive any
person of life, liberty or property with
out due process of law. The right to
purchase or to sell labor is part of
the liberty protected by this amend
ment unless there are circumstances
which exclude the right."
CLAIMS TO HAVE SURE
- CURE FOR CONSUMPTION
Dr. Alfred Goss of Adams, New York,
Uses Electricity as
Remedy
Epectal to The Herald.
~WATERTOWN, N. T., April 17.—
Dr. Alfred Goss of Adams, N. V., who
has been experimenting for a long
time, has discovered what he believes
to be a sure cure for consumption. The
cure Is made by forcing- electricity Into
the tissues after It has passed through
the germicide that will not affect the
albumen of the blood, and has been
proved to kill tubercle bacilli In lung
tissues. The germicide decomposes
under the action of electricity and
atoms of resultant gas combining with
electrons pass Into the tissues.
Goss' has treated forty-four cases and
has met with excellent results In every
one. He uses In his treatment a six
teen plate electrical machine that de
velops 35,000 volts. The experiment on
a cadaver drove the gas In to a depth
of eight Inches.
SANTA FE TO HAVE NEW
OUTLET FROM COAST
Work Is Begun on Belen Cut-off, to
Cost Several Million
Dollars
Special to The Herald.
ALBUQUERQUE, N. M., April 17.—
The Atchlson, Topeka & Santa Fe rail
road . today began work on the Belen
cut-off In New Mexico, which will be a
line 300 miles In length and will add a
new division to the system.
The object of this new road Is to fur
nlßh a direct outlet for the Santa Fe
from the Pacific- coast to Texas, Mex
ico and the gulf at Galveston to relieve
the congestion of traffic on its pres
ent roundabout gulf connection and
eliminate the heavy grades on Us
through line In New Mexico. The
work will cost several million dollars.
The line runs from Belen, N, M., to
Texico, Tex.
ROLLS IN DUST TO
QUENCH OIL FLAMES
F. A. Coffman, a muchlnist, 32 years
of age was painfully burned yester
day afternoon while attempting to re
pair the machinery in his automobile.
Coffmun was examining the ma
chinery when the gasoline tank ex
ploded and In a flash he was covered
with the flames. With rare presence
of mind, he threw himself In the dum
ii ud rolled pver and extinguished llio
fire. He was treated -ut the receiving
hospital.
IMPORTANT DECISION ON LABOR LEGISLATION
JUSTICE PECKHAM OF THE UNITED STATEO 3UKREME COURT
.». .«. .». .«. -». ■«. ■». .». .«. .». ■♦■ ■«. ■♦. .»■ ■«. .»■ ■»■ .«. .«. ■♦- A A.Jt. .t. J.A .t. .t. .t. ■<■ AA Jfc .t- J>. im.UJi .t. .t. .♦■ ■«■ ■»■ .t. ,t. ,t.«
ASKS BONDS FOR
CITY GAS PLANT
COUNCIL CONSIDERS THIS
RESOLUTION
BIG ISSUE IS PROPOSED
Dr. Houghton Urges His Colleagues
to Try Municipal Ownership
of the Lighting
Plant
That the city should issue bonds to
the amount of $2,500,000 with which
to purchase or construct a municipal
gas plant of sufficient size and of such
equipment that It could furnish . the
city with plenty of gas of good quality
was the proposition put to the coun
cil In the form of a resolution by
Councilman Houghton yesterday.
The resolution calls attention to the
fact that the city charter gives the
council the right to call a special elec
tion for a bond Issue, and Instructs
the city attorney to draw up the nec
essary ordinances Immediately to em
body a bond election In the forthcom
ing anti-saloon Initiative election.
The object of Introducing- the reso
lution at this time was to combine the
bond election with the saloon election,
and thus save the city the expense of
calling and holding two elections. In
stead of one. It is argued that there
Is a popular demand for municipal
ownership and . that It Is bound to
come. According to the charter the
city has still a margin of $4,000,000 of
bonds yet to Issue, while under the
state law it can still issue $18,000,000.
Backed by Committee
The resolution did not come from
the municipal ownership committee,
and, while It caused considerable dis
cussion on the floor of the council
chamber, no one took part In thiß dis
cussion except members of the com
mittee. Chairman Houghton was
backed by Councilman Hummon, and
they put forth every effort to secure
the reference of the resolution to the
municipal ownership Committee. Coun
cilmen Kern and Smith thought that
the question was a financial one and
that It should go to the finance com
mittee. The fifth member of the mu
nicipal ownership committee took no
part In the discussion, but appeared
to favor the reference to the finance
committee, which was finally done.
A question of legality has come up
which has not yet been decided:
Whether or not the city council has
the legal right to combine other issues
in the special election which Is ex
pected to be called soon to decide the
s: loon question. The law has been
Interpreted In the past to mean that
In such Initiative elections only such
Issues as are backed by sufficient peti
tions shall be put on the ballotß.
Councilman Bmlth said he was
strongly in favor of municipal owner
ship when the city was ready for It,
and that the voters Bhould decide the
question for themselves at a general
election, as they have recently done In
Chicago. Councilman Kern agreed
(Oootluaed oo fug* Two.)
LOS ANGELES, CAL., TUESDAY MORNING, APRIL 18, 1905.
ROCKEFELLER IS
SHARPLY SCORED
CRIMES ARE ENOUGH TO MAKE
NATION SHUDDER
GIFTS SHOULD BE REFUSED
San Francisco Minister Proclaims an
Empty Treasury With Honor
. Better Than a Full Treas.
ury With Shame
SAN FRANCISCO, April 17.— Rev.
William Rader, the eloquent pastor of
the Third Congregational church, and
one of the most Influential ministers in
this city, In his sermon last night de
nounced the Standard Oil In unmeas
ured terms and demanded that the
Amerlcart board of foreign missions re
turn the $100,000 gift of Rockefeller.
He said:
"The Standard Oil stands accused,
on the records of the courts, of receiv
ing from the railroads rebates on every
gallon of oil shipped In the United
States, with no other recompense than
the obligation on the part, of the
Standard to ship a certain large number
of cars of oil a day.
"The court records have piled up a
list of crimes high enough to make
the nation shudder, and these Include
assault and battery, assault to kill, ob
taining soods under false pretenses,
arson, forgery, subornation of perjury,
breach of contract and larceny and
murder, but from such a society the
American board receives $100,000!"
He demanded that the money be re
turned and said: "Better have the
heathen wait than sacrifice national
honor. Better an empty treasury, with
honor, than a full treasury with
shame."
YOUNG GIRL FIGHTS
A GIANT ORANG-OUTANG
Special to The Herald.
NEW YORK, April 17.—Eigh
teen year old Lillian Bartels for
un hour and a half tonight fought
a giant orang-outang which had
escaped from Its cage. Her
father, William Bartels, Is an Im
porter of wild animals. The huge
orang-outang stands four feet
six inches In height and weighs
about 110 pounds.
Reinforcements In the shape of
three men, at the end of a fierce
struggle, saved the girl from being
injured, aside from some scratch
es on her hands. Before the apa
surrendered he was severely beat
en with clubs and was carried
back to his cuge In a condition
suggesting his having had an
argument with a spad of police.
MEXICAN MINTB"CLOBED
TO COINAGE OF SILVER
MEXICO CITY, April 17.— The mints
have now been definitely closed to the
free coinage of silver, ,
KAMRANH BAY A
FRENCH PORT
VIOLATION OF NEUTRALITY
KEENLY DISCUSSED
FRENCH RESPONSE AWAITED
If It Is Claimed That the Russians
Are Not In France's Territorial
Waters Togo May Safely
Attack Them
Dy AMndAted Press.
TOKIO, April 17.— 1t Is calculated
here that the Russian squadron arrived
nt Kamranh bay at noon April 12, nnd
therefore had been occupying the port
forty-eight hours when Been at noon
April 14.
The Jnpanese government Is silent on
the subject of Its Intentions, but it Is
expected that it will moke Immediate
representations to Prance. The re
sponse of France Is eagerly awaited,
particularly as to whether France ad
mits the squadron is within territorial
waters.
France denied that the Russian
squadron was within territorial waters
when oft Madagascar. If she denies It
in this instance It will give Japan an
opportunity to attack the Russian ves
sels without violating France's neu
trality.
ENGLISH PAPERS TAKE
PRO.JAPANESE VIEWS
Dy Associated Press.
LONDON, April 17.— 1n the absence
of further information regarding the
position of the Russian and Japanesn
fleets the London morning papers are
keenly discussing the neutrality ques
tion, for the most part In a strong pro-
Japanese tone. The Morning Post
takes the milder view that Kamranh
bay Is a mere fishing port and unable
to provide coal or other supplies to the
Russian squadron, which probably took
shelter there to replenish from Its own
colliers, and that, though a technical
breach of neutrality has been com
mitted, the French authorities could
hardly be held responsible unless It
can be proved that they had previous
knowledge of Rojestvensky's In
tentions.
The Dally Mall's correspondent at
Singapore gives a further report, from
the North Germnn Lloyd steamer
Prlnz Helnrlch, that on Friday, April
14, the Russian cruisers Dmitri Donskol
and Rlon were scouting outside" the
bay, while a tug was bringing colliers
alongside of warships which were coal-
Ing, and that many boats were trans
ferring provisions to Russian vessels.
' NO BATTLE EXPECTED
High Russian Authority Thinks Togo
Will Stay at Home
By Associated Press. •
ST. PETERSBURG, April 17. — No
definite Information Is obtainable as to
the length of the squadron's stay at
Kamranh bay or whether the warships
have already sailed, the admiralty,
even If It knows, being silent on this
point.
A high admiral expressed to the As
sociated Press today the firm convic
tion that Admiral Togo would not give
battle near the Pescadore Islands, For
moaa straits. He said: "It would be
a great tactical error to concentrate his
squadron 80 miles from Japan and run
the risk of having Rojestvensky slip
by, when by remnlnlng in home waters
Rojestvensky must come to him In or
der to reach his only base—Vladivo
stok. All the Tokio dispatches about
the proclamation of martial law in the
Pescadore islands and the probable
presence of a Japanese squadron In
Formosan wnters are sent as blinds."
THE ASIATIC PERIL
Scientists Predict War Will Last Two
Hundred Years
By Associated Press.
ST. PETERSBURG, April 17.— The
Novoe Vremya prints a dispatch from
New York saying that "the yellow
peril" Is not now derided. Far-seeing
business men with their eyes on the
Chinese markets have, according to
this dispatch, lln/illy awakened to the
growing political Influence of the Jap
anese over the Chinese, and the pros
pect of complete Industrial domination
In the future.
Editorializing on the subject, the No
voe Vremya says It Is no longer the
"yellow peril" which Europe and
America nre now facing, and refers to
the words of a French savant who,
when asked how long the war would
last, replied: "About two hundred
years. Europe does not seem to un
derstand the terrible truth."
The Novoe Vremya predicts that the
"enigma of the future hfetorlan will be
the hostility of some European nations
in the greut struggle between Japan
and Russia which renders Inevitable a
conflict between Russia and Europe,"
and quotes the words of the vice gov
ernor of Jerusalem on the awukenlng
of the Arabs In ABlatlo Turkey as
showing the deep-seated hutred of Asia
toward nil Europeuns, and the even
tual menace to Europe from, not the
yellow, but the ABlatlo peril.
Japan Arranges for Fifth Loan
LONDON, April 18.— The correspond
ent at Toklo of the Standard Bays that
a fifth domestic loan of J50,000,000 has
been satisfactorily arranged on the
same terms as the fourth domestlo
loan.
JAPANESE BATTLESHIP ASAHI
COUNCIL FAVORS
PLAN FOR FAIR
INDORSES MOVE FOR GREAT
EXPOSITION HERE
RESOLUTION GETS SUPPORT
City Legislators Are Unanimous In
Declaring That Los Angeles
Should Celebrate In the
Winter of 1909-10
% Resolved, That this council is..
V strongly In favor of the proposed Jj|
{world's fair to be held In Los An. j|
geles in 1909 to commemorate the * 4 \
* inauguration of a mall service be. >•
% tween the east and west In 1859. — • „
{j \ Resolution . unanimously adopted • |
'i » by the cUy council yesterday, i . « .
*| I believe It would be a great^
* '•thing for the city If such a fair..
$ could be given here. It would ".
i' bring thousands upon thousands**
* of visitors here and increase the II
•£ permanent population many thou-*
4> sands. — Councilman Smith. *
% I think such a fair could be X
4* made a great success, for Los^|
1 Angeles is one of the best known Z
T and most talked of cities in the*|
f United States. lam In favor of It.
— Councilman Healy. V,
<Hh{hK' i- » * ♦ * ■fr4"H"H"H"H"H"H"t-i»
The plan outlined In The Herald on
Sunday morning for a,. world's fair to
be held In Los Angeles during the win
ter of 1909-10 has met with the unan
imous approval of the city council.
The scheme originated with two of the
civic organizations in the city and wa3
Introduced Into the council yesterday.
While no organization for the pur
pose of promoting such an exposi
tion has as yet been established, yet
many councllmen yesterday expressed
themselvs as favoring the move and
all showed their appreciation of its
value by voting for a resolution.
Councilman Smith said, "Other cities
of much less Importance hold these
fairs, and I do. not see why Los An
geles should not. The date Is placed
four years off and In that time the
city will Increase In size .and lmport
ence greatly. I do not think it is all
visionary to predict that we will have
a population exceeding 250,000 by that
time.
"The eyes of the country are upon us
and annually trousands of tourists
come this way to see Los Angeles and
the surrounding country. If such an
exposition should be held here I be
lieve it would attract a greater at
tendance than has any other which has
been given under similar circum
stances. People In the east want to
come to California and settle and I be
lieve such an exposition would add
60,000 to the population of the city.
"I think it would be a great thing,"
said Councilman Healy, "Los Angeleß
Is already more In the public eye than
any other city of like size, or even
twice the size In the country. Wu
could give an exposition and make It
different from those given in the east.
"They are pretty much all alike now,
but out here we could depart from
the beaten path and give something
characteristic of the west, and I be
lieve It would be appreciated by the
people of the country."
Other councllmen express them
selves as being In favor of the move
and announced their Intentions of ad
vocating that such a fair be held.
PARISIAN WORKINGMEN
WILL HOLD EXPOSITION
By Associated rr«ss.
PARIS, April 17.— The chamber of
deputies today paused the bill provid
ing for a worklngmen's exposition In
1809.
PRISE: DAILY, BY CARRIER. 65 CTS. PER MONTH
JEFFERSON'S LIFE
NEARING THE END
DEATH NOW ONLY MATTER OF
A FEW HOURS
STEADILY GROWING WEAKER
Physicians Constantly In Attendance
and Members of His Family Have
Been Summoned to the
Bedside
By Associated Press.
""WEST PALM BEACH, Fin., April
17.— Joseph Jefferson is gradually grow
ing weaker and it Is feared the end
Is near. Physicians have been In con
stant attendance at his bedside today
and report him as very weak.
It is reported that the members of his
family who are not already , with him,
have been telegraphed to come. x The
veteran actor's condition Is about the
same at 2:10 this morning.
CHINESE IS BRUTALLY
BEATEN BY NEGRO THUG
Celestial Half Killed by Robber— The
Thief Gets Over $100 From
His Victim
Wong Sing, a Chinese laundryman,
whose place of business is on Fair
Oaks avenue, Pasadena, was the vic
tim of a brutal assault by a negro foot
pad In Ferguson alley last night about
9 o'clock. The highwayman used a
sharp piece of heavy iron to do his
work, and the victim sustained wounds
on the head of a severe nature. The
thief secured $105 and a watch and
chain from his victim.
The laundryman was walking down
Ferguson alley on his way to catch a
Pasadena car when he was suddenly
accosted by the negro. Without giv
ing his victim a chance to hold up
his hands or protect himself in any
way the footpad belabored the China
man over the head with a heavy iron.
He then searched the prostrate man's
pockets and took a sack containing
over $100 and a gold watch and chain.
Sing was rendered unconscious, but
recovered his senses before any assist
ance reached him. He was wandering
around Chinatown in a dazed state
when one of his countrymen found
him. The Injured man was taken to
the receiving hospital.
The doctors who attended Wong Sing
say that had It not been for his hat
acting as a protector the Chinaman
would surely have been. 'killed.
All through the operation Sing bore
the thrusts of the doctor's needle with
out a murmur. An anaesthetic was of
fered, but the nervy oriental said he
did not need it.
STRIKE INHARMONIOUS
Italian Railroad Laborers Disagree
and Some Refuse to Go Out
Ny Associated Presa.
ROME, April 17.— The strike of rall
load men, which began today, was not
as successful as expected. Some of
the men refused to strike and publish
ed a manifesto saying they could not
risk the bread of their families.
The leaders of the movement are
trying to bring about a general strike
of all workmen, but find little sym
pathy. If It occurs the government
has decided to entrust the military
authorities with the maintenance of
order.
Five men-of-war huve been ordered
to Genoa to maintain order.
JOHN W. GATES' FATHER
DIES AT ST. CHARLES
By Associated Vr^d*.
ST. CUAUIjKS, 111., April 17.— Azel
S. Oaten, aged 82, the father of John
W. Gates, the well-known nuiltlinilllon
ulre, Is dead here, lie had been 111
from heart trouble for a long time
STAMPEDED TO
THEIR DEATH
NEWSBOYS MOST CRUELLY
CRUSHED -
FOUR ARE KILLED OUTRIGHT
Twenty.Slx More Are Injured In Panic
on a Stairway of the Masonlo
Temple at Indian*
Oil!
Dy Associated Press.
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., April 17.—
Frenzied by a false alarm of fire sev
eral hundred eager newboys, struggling
to obtain their share of free tickets to
local theater, which were being dis
tributed by a traveling representative
of a patent medicine company, stam
peded In a narrow stairway In the
Masonic temple tonight, crushing tre
life out of four boys. Twenty-six other
boys were Injured, nineteen of them
seriously.
.Long before the time approached for
stairs of the Masonic temple were
crowded with newsboys, each anxious
to be first to receive his pass. When
the distribution began, the excitement
became more Intense and the efforts
of several policemen who had been de
tailed to prevent trouble v^ere un
availing.
It is alleged that one of the news
the distribution of the tickets the
boys, in the endeavor to hasten the
exit of those who had received their
passes, shouted "flre." Immediately
those at the top faced about and with
almost superhuman strength began to
force their way to the bottom of the
stairs. Shrieks and physical encoun
ters followed' for a few Beconds, when
from some cause those near the top
fell headlong on the struggling mass at
the bottom.
Immediately policemen from the Cen
tral station who responded to a riot
call began the work of rescue. Four
of the boys were dead when extricated
from their positions at the bottom of
the stairs. Others, believed to have
been fatally crushed, were taken out as
fast as they could be disentangled from
their frenzied companions^ „who fought
and clung to each other In desperation.
The immense crowd of" people from
the business district, attracted by wild
rumors, Jostled about, the! bottom -of
the stairs and hampered the" 1 work . of
the police and ambulance corps.
BROTHER KILLS BROTHER,
THEN SHOOTS HIMSELF
By Associated Press.
STOCKTON, April 17.— William Mohr,
son of Harry Mohr, a farmer located
four miles from Bethany, in the south
ern part of this county, killed his
brother George with a rifle shortly after
6 o'clock this morning, then locked
himself In his' room and with the same
weapon killed himself.
THE DAIS NEWS
FORECABT
Southern California: Cloudy, un.
settled weather Tuesday; probably
showers; fresh south winds. Max.
Imum temperature In Los Angeles
yesterday, 72 degrees; minimum,
50 degrees.
• m
I_Asks bonds for city gas plant.
2 —Harry Bunkers up for trial. „
3—"Parsifal" draws as magnet. .
4 —Belasco revives "Old Heidelberg."
5— Southern California news.
6—Editorial.
7 —City news.
B.9—Classified advertisements.
10 —Sports.
11—Markets.
12—Attorneys would prove conspiracy.
EASTERN
Newsboys trampled to rtmith In rush after
rife theater tickets In Indianapolis.
Officers and directors of the Panama Rail
way company are elected.
Supreme court declares invalid legislation
limiting hours of labor.
FOREIGN
Tresence of Russians at Kamrenh bay raises
question of infringement of neutrality.
Novoe Vremya declares that Europe Is
facing not yellow but Aslatlo peril.
Russian naval authority does not expect Togo
to accept battle away from his homo waters.
COAST
Trial of former senator Harry Bunkers be
gins at Sacramento.
Convention of State Medical society will be
gin In Riverside today.
San Francisco preacher accuse* Standard OU
of a long category of crimes.
LOCAL
Chinese beaten and robbed by s> negro.
Railroad man found dead by switch near
Suwwlle.
Woodmen of World open their convention to
day.
First passenger train over new rood from
Salt Lake arrives In Lns Angeles.
Automobile speod ordinance adopted which
limit, speed of motor cars to ten miles an hour
In business Boctlon and fifteen miles In resl
°Mayor°McAleer to veto Spring street lighting:
lloughton Introduces resolution for municipal
ownership of gas plants In th. city council, and
proposes to l»ue J2.6W.OUD bonds.
Warm debate over hose contruct, but supply
COSnc l|rpl i..". hr' e«lutton favoring proposed
world's frlrln L«s Angeles In 1908.
Hod. rick McKay to leave for cost tonight to
study garbage destruction for Los Angeles.
Child causes disturbance In court.
Police department gets electrlo automobile
"mS. w2ad"Sf iSfiSTd-lPsmiitnt doln, «c.l. '
'*riook°agent finds it unprofitable to appear be
joro Judge Smith In the superior court.
Pretty L*na L*vy. an W-year-old girl, who
was found in the wilds of Chaves canyon, may
be cared for by the officials of eastern school.

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