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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, April 20, 1905, Image 1

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Los Angeles Herald.
VOL. XXXII, NO. 201
SHONTS WILL BE
ENTIRELY FREE
BUSINESS METHODS THE KEY
TO HIS POLICY -
CONGRESSMEN MUCH PUT OUT
Has Full Support of President In His
Insistence That Isthmian Ap.
polntments Shall Be for
Merit Alone
Speclat to The Herald.
WASHINGTON, April 19.— When
Theodore P. Shonts took hold of the
building of the Panama canal he stip
ulated among other things that politics
should not be allowed to interfere with
his work in any particular. This has
'raised the Ire of seven hundred con
gressmen whose names nppear indors
ing thousands of applications for Jobs
under the Isthmian canal commission.
"Business methods" Ib the announced
policy of the new president of the
canal board and it promises a vast
change In the working of the canal
commission In the near future. Chair
man Shonts' stand is In direct line
with the president's views and it took
them about two minutes to arrive at a
complete understanding on the ques
tion of hiring employes.
Mr. Shonts told the president he
wanted a free hand and the president
told him he should have it. That set
tled matters once for all. As a result,
a big pile of applications for jobs will
be run through by the new chairman,
who will disregard all the political in
dorsements. If, however, he strikes a
man capable of filling any vacancy he
may have in mind, that man will set
the job, despite his political indorse
ments.
DISCUSS PURCHASE OF
CHICAGO STREET LINES
Joint Conference Agreed on Between
Mayor, Traction Interests and
, City Council Committee
By Associated rress.
CHICAGO, April 19.— Negotiations
for the purchase of the Chicago street
railways were opened today between
the traction representatives and the
city of Chicago.
A proposition Is pending under which
the companies at once will proceed to
modernize their lines and sell Ho the
city at a fair profit, thus getting rid of
air legal complications and securing
immediate municipal ownership.
The nearest approach to definite re
sults obtained from the conference was
a practical agreement on a joint con
ference to be held soon by the mayor,
the traction interests and the city
council committee on transportation.
DAUGHTERS OF REVOLUTION
- HONOR MRS. FAIRBANKS
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, April 19.— The most
important work before the congress of
the Daughters of the American
Revolution today was the election of
officers.
Before the balloting began Mrs.
Sarah T. Kenney, state regent of Con
necticut, named Mrs. Charles Warren
Fairbanks as honorary president of the,
D. A. R. Mrs. Fairbanks evidently was
taken by surprise, but she yielded the
chair temporarily to Mrs. Carrey of
Indiana.
The delegates rose as a body and
gave Mrs. Fairbanks an ovation. The
nomination was made an election amid
enthusiastic applause. In resuming the
chair, Mrs. Fairbanks said:
"This is the lnst of many honors
you have conferred upon your presi
dent general and she thanks you from
the bottom of a grateful heart."
SECRETARY OF WAR TAFT
MAY VISIT LOS ANGELES
President Koepfli at the regular
meeting of the board of directors of the
chamber of commerce i yesterday was
authorized to telegraph to Hon. W. H.
Taft, secretary of war, j asking him to
include Los Angeles in his Itinerary
to the Pacific coast. ,
Should a favorable answer be re
ceived special praparattons will be
made to give the secretary an enthus
iastic welcoue.
AGED WOMAN CLINGS TO
ROCKS FOR HER LIFE
'By Annotated I'ress.
OAKLAND, April 19.— 8y cling
ing to the rocks of the seawall at
the Alameda mole last night for
six hours in the drenching rain,
her body half submerged In the
waters of the bay, Mrs. Mary
Wells, .gray haired and enfeebled
by the weight of 64 years, suc
ceeded In saving herself from
drowning. She was discovered at
1 o'clock this morning.
Mrs. Wells arrived In Oakland
about two weeks ago. She had
left her home in Vincennes, Ind.,
a few. months back to go to her
son James, who was dying In tlio
country near San Diego, and who
died about two weeks ago.
CANAL BOARD PRESIDENT IG NORES POLITICAL PULL
THEODORE P. 3HONTS
TONOPAH PLAGUE
IS PNEUMONIA
PHYSICIAN SAYS REPORTS
ARE EXAGGERATED
SICKNESS AFFECTS ADULTS
Peculiar Epidemic In Nevada Mining
Camp Explained by a Victim
Who Is Here Recu
perating
Dr. H. E. Piper, a practicing physi
cian of Tonopah, now in Los Angeles,
says the reports of sickness at that
mining camp have been greatly exag
erated.
"It is not the black plague, nor any
other kind of plague," he said last
night, "but simply an acute pneumonia
of a very severe type. I myself suf
fered from it for three weeks and I
am now in Los Angeles**" recuperaU.
"The sickness is believed to be due
to the lack of sanitary conditions, and
r sufficient sum of money has been
raised by public subscription to thor
oughly cleanse the town.
The disease, strangely enough, at
tacks only grown men. It became
prevalent in the latter part of Feb
ruary, but is now well under control
and the many people who left the
camp are now returning.
"In the early history of Tonopah the
town underwent a similar epidemic,
which failed to affect women and chil
dren. Other camps have not been
affected. Personally I think it Is prob
ably due to some climatic condition
with which we are not familiar."
ANDREW CARNEGIE'S NIECE .
- MARRIES RIDING MASTER
Young Couple Secretly Wed a Year
Ago — Romance Started at
Newport
NEW YORK, April 19.— 1t became
known today that Andrew Carnegie's
niece, Nancy, was secretly married
about a year ago to a riding master
named Heaver, whom she met at
Newport. The story was confirmed by
Mr. Carnegie.
"My niece was married to Mr.
Heaver in New York about a year
ago," he said. "Mr. Heaver was a rid
ing teacher in the family. The family
has no objection to the match. Mr.
Heaver is an honest, upright young
man. I would rather Nancy had mar
red a poor man than a worthless duke.
We want no rich men in the family."
Mr. Carnegie said that Mr. and Mrs.
Heaver went to Europe immediately
after their marriage. They returned
a few days ago and are now on a
visit to New England.
TAKE INITIAL STEP TO
PURIFY FOODSTUFFS
Los Angeles Health Authorities to Ask
Other Cities of the State to Co.
operate With Them
Los Angeles health authorities are
determined to take the lead In' regu
lating the manufacture of food articles.
At a meeting of the board of health
last night the new food ordinance, rec
ommended to the city council, was dis
cussed, after which it was decided to
communicate with other cities through
out the state and ascertain if they will
be willing to co-operate with Los An
geles in enforcing the state law of the
sal ne tenor.
Local manufacturers object to the
ordinance regulating the manufacture
of articles in this city that are to be
shipped elsewhere, on the ground that
they will not be able to compete with
San Francisco and other places. ,
It was flnaly decided to recommend
that the proposed ordinance do not ap
ply outside Los Angelea until commu
nication Is had with the different citleß
and towns of the state,
LOS ANGELES, CAL., THURSDAY MORNING, APRIL ao, 1905.
LAD CRUSHED TO
DEATH BY WAGON
TEAMSTER'S SON KILLED IN
RIVER BED
FELL UNDER HEAVY WHEELS
Little Andre Eastman, Nine Years
Old, Playfully Helping His Fath.
' er, Meets a Horrible
Fate
While his stepfather, J. F. McCul
lough, was urging four horses to their
utmost to climb the steep grade which
lay before them, Andre Eastman, 9
years old, fell beneath the wheels of a
heavy dirt wago^n in the river bed at
Ninth street yesterday afternoon and
was killed instantly. His skull was
crushed into a shapeless mass. A negro
teamatfT employed,., by Contractor
Crary was the only witness to the
tragedy, and the cry of warning which
he gave was too late to save the little
boy's life.
Andre lived with his stepfather and
mother at 127 North Main street. Yes
terday afternoon he accompanied his
stepfather to the river bed for a load
of sand.
Just before the ascent from the river
bottom to Ninth street was made Mc-
Culloußh stopped his horses to give
them a rest before driving up the steep
grade. Little Andre climbed down from
the wagon and ran around In the sand
while he was waiting for his step
father to start again.
McCullough paid no attention to the
boy, thinking him safe in the sand, and
intending to leave him there until the
wagon had reached the top of the
bluff. He gave the horses the word
and they commenced to ascend th 3
steep road. The wagon had not ad
vanced more than a dozen feet bf>
foro McCullough heard a cry of warn
ing from the teamster behind him. Hh
stopped the wagon at once, but It was
too late.
The little fellow's skull had beon
crushed to a pulp by the heavy wheels.
The teamster who had shouted tha
warning sßld that Just when McCul
lough started, his horses Andre ha.l
climbed up on one of the rear wheels,
and when the wagon went forward ne
was pitched under the wheel.
The child's body was removed to
Breese Brothers' morgue, where Deputy
Coroner Summerfield will hold an in
quest.
WEALTHY PIONEER IS DEAD
B. S. Weston, Ranch Owner, Passes
Away In Los An.
geles
B. S. Weston, a wealthy ranch owner
of Los Angeles county, who has been
prominently Identified with the busi
ness life of this section for many years,
died at the home of his nephew, Orrln
Weston, 2112 Thompson street, this
city, Tuesdny. He had been suffering
from apoplexy for some time.
Mr. Weston was 72 years old and a
native of Salem, Mass. He came to
California about forty-five years ago
and of late years had been living on
a ranch near Redondo. The deceased
was unmarried.
Funeral services will be held Friday.
A epeclal car over the San Pedro elec
tric line will convey the remains to
Wilmington for interment.
STODDARD IS BTEADILY
REGAINING HIB HEALTH
11) Aiworlated I'reaa.
GALT, Ont.. April 19,-J. H. Stod
dard, the veteran actor, who was
stricken with nervous prostration here
Home time ego and who It was thought
would die, Is steadily Improving. He
will be removed to his home in New
Jersey in a week or ten days.
RIDER HAGGARD
TALKS ON LABOR
NOTES GROWING SOCIALISTIC
TENDENCIES
COMMENTS ON LABOR UNIONS
Is Not Surprised at Finding Municipal
Ownership Advocated, and Thinks
the Worklngman'a Position
Quite Natural
Special to The Herald.
NEW YORK, April 19.— H. Rider
Haggard, the novelist, who come to this
country to Investigate the Salvation
Army colonies nml similar communi
ties in this country for the British
colonial office, sailed for Liverpool
today on the Majestic, accompanied by
Ms daughter and Comunder Booth-
Tucker, who came to explain the sys
tem to Haggard.
In reply to a question regarding his
opinion on municipal ownership, Hag
gard said that In this country, where
there Is so much freedom from tradi
tion, and so much freedom of thought,
as well as progress, It was not surpris
ing to find municipal ownership ad
vocated.
The conversation got onto the sub
jects of labor unions nnd Socialism.
Mr. Haggard did not attempt to give
the reasons for what he said was the
growing socialistic tendency of this
lountry, but he commented on the
rapadlty with which such Ideas were
gaining ground.
"The conditions as regards labor
unions," he said, "are much tho same
In this country ns in England. You
have thu same questions to face that
we have. They are brought about be
cause the laboring man desires to get
all the money he can. It is natural.
I am for the laboring man."
WATTERSON HAS
ANSWER READY
HENRY WATTERSON
Refuses to Write His Political Auto.
biography, Saying He Cannot
Busy Himself With Affairs
of Yesterday
Sppclal Coble to The Herald.
BERLIN, April I!).— Charles R.
Flint, a New York financier, gave a
dinner list night in honor of Henry
Wattei'Hon, the famous American ed
itor, who is passing a week in Berlin.
Watterson said that during his five
months' wanderings In Europe foreign
publishers bombarded him with re
quests for his political autobiography.
He answered the latest applicant In
these words: "I am Ptlll too much of a
newspaper man to busy myself with
the affairs of yesterday."
U. P. EMPLOYES ARE
TO BE "OSLERIZED"
Special to The Herald.
CHICAGO, April 19.— Employes
of the Union Pacific railroad are
beginning to wonder If the theory
advanced by Dr. Osier Is to be
adopted by the management of the
road. According to a well denned
authority, fifty years has been
fixed as the age limit of useful
ness.
It Is declared that the board of
directors has ordered that young
men are to have the first call when
the list for promotions is made up,
and that those who have reached
the age of 50 must bid good-by to
all chance for advencement.
One sign of this is the recent
appointment of the young super
intendent, W. T. Parks of the Wy
oming division, to be general su
perintendent. It has been believed
the appointment would go to W.
A. Deuel, but he had passed the
fifty-year mark.
As yet there has been no offlclal
announcement of the rule by the
directors.
BRITISH COMMISSIONER COMMENTS ON LABOR PROBLEMS
...'laaj . .....>jl.J.±i.l.Um/j
H. RIDER HAGGARD
PURSUES VISION
OF NAN PATTERSON
THINKS EVERY WOMAN THE
ACCUSED ACTRESS
PANIC IN LODGING HOUSE
When Arrested His Mania Uecomes
More Violent, and He Tries
to Escape From the
Officer
"Leave me alone. I am looking foV
Nan Patterson, and if I don't hurry I
will be too late to help her out of her
trouble," muttered a man as he wan
dered around the corridors of a board
ing house at 509 West First street yes
terday morning.
The man was evidently suffering
from hallucinations, and an officer was
sent for by boarders who feared that
the mild form of Insanity might de
velop dangerous symptoms. Officer
Sam McKenzle responded to the call
and when he walked up to the man he
was greeted with the same warning
which, like the cry of the leper, the
elemented man bestowed upon all who
approached htm.
Still muttering that Nan Paterson
would be bereft of help if the officer
arrested him, the man followed the
officer to the patrol wagon and went
to the station. He gave the name
of John Llllig. Officer McKenzle was
later detailed to take his prisoner to
the court house and apply for papers
charging Insanity.
The officer started out with his pris
oner, but time and again Lillig called
out the name of the woman seen in his
hallucinations. As the couple were
passing the Title Guarantee and Trust
building Llllig suddenly broke away
and clashed Into the building, with the
officer In close pursuit.
Approaches Young Women
Nearly a score of young women were
in tho building at the time and Lilllg
started toward them. Fearing that his
prisoner would make an outcry If he
attempted to take him In charge, Mc-
Kenzle tried to argue with him.
"There Is Nan," muttered Lilllg.
as he attempted to reach a fair young
woman. »
"No, that Isn't Nan," ' answered the
officer, and Lilllg Btarted toward an
other young woman. "I'll tell you
where Nan Is," said the. officer. . "Her
case Is now going on before Judge Wil
bur and I will take you up there so as
to be in time to help her out."
■ Llllig thought the idea a good one
and followed the officer to the county
Jail. Papers charging Insanity were
filed against the man and he will ap
pear before Judge Wilbur within a few
days.
Little is known of Lilllg and officers
are endeavoring to locate his relatives.
He was found wandering on the streets
Tuesday night and arrested on sus
picion, but was released later.
YOUNG MAN DIEB A 8
RESULT OF DOG'B BITE
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, April 19.— Hydrophobia
from a dog bite received seven months
ago has caused the death . of Louis
Bllwinge, 23 years old. In the Orange
county, N. J., hospital. The victim
had entirely forgotten his adventure
with the dog, but investigation now
Bhows that the animal ran away and
was shot to death the next day In a
neighboring town where It was Buffer
ing from rabies, ,
PRISE: DAILY, BY CARRIER, 65 CTS. PER MONTH
ASKS PRESIDENT'S
BEAR FOR POOR
PREACHER MAKES REQUEST
OF ROOSEVELT
GEN. BELL INDORSES PLAN
Vcretary Loeb Starts for Newcastle,
Guided by Elmer Chapman, .
Mr. Roosevelt's
Courier
By Associated Frens.
DENVER. April 19.— Parson Thomas
A. Uzzell of- the Tabernacle In this city
today sent to President Roosevelt, in
care of Secretary Loeb, a message ask
ing that he be given the carcasses of
the bear killed during the president's
hunt, for distribution among the poor
of Denver. A note Indorsing "the mat
ter heartily" was sent the president by
former Adjutant General Sherman M.
Bell.
LOEB LEAVES FOR CAMP
Courier Chapman Is Serving as Guide
to Secretary
By Aiwoclatcd Presa.
OLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo., April
19.— Secretary Loeb left here at 9:40
n. m. today for Newcastle, where ne
will get a horse and ride to the presi
dent's camp. Elmer Chapman, the
courier who brought news of the suc
cess of the hunt, is serving as the sec
retary's guide. Mr. Loeb will remain at
the camp over night and return here
some time tomorrow. He hns taken
with him a number of documents that
require the signature of the president.
The Charlie Penny ranch, where the
hunting party is now encamped, is in
the east divide. The party will move
to the weßt divide on Saturday or Mon
day, as it Is reported game is more
plentiful there. Before the president
moves away too far It Is the desire of
the ranchmen and mountaineers that
he visit Liberty school, where their
children are educated. This school Is
near the present camp and the chil
dren of the ranchers ride for miles to
attend school. The mission of Joe Aus
tin, who came to the Springs last night
with Courier Chapman, was to get Mr.
Loeb to use his good offices In arrang
ing the visit.
P. •B. Stewart of Colorado Springs
will leave the party at the end of this
week. Mr. Loeb then expects to go
to the camp and spend two days with
the president.
Captain Austin told Secretary Loeb
that a patrol has been organized and
it Is now impossible for outsiders to
reach the area over which the party In
hunting.
With President Roosevelt and Secre
tary Loeb In camp twenty miles from
the nearest telegraph office, no news
of the hunt came out of the woods to
day. When Mr. Loeb returns here to
morrow it is expected he will bring
Information of the luck that has at
tended the president's hunt for big
game. The president keeps a personal
diary and consequently the corre
spondents marooned here await tho
return of the secretary with much
impatience. Storms consisting of
snow, hall and rain surged about the
mountains in the direction of tha east
divide nearly all day and Mr. Loeb
must have had a rough, uncomfortable
trip.
WILL SAFEGUARD
OUR NEUTRALITY
AMERICAN WARSHIPS ABLE TO
PROTECT IT
ASIATIC STATION REPORTS
This Country Has at Present Six Vet.
sels Cruising In the Neighbors
hood of Our Eastern
Possessions
Ny AmtocUted frens
WASHINGTON, April 19.— Rear Ad
miral Train, commander-ln-chlef of the
Asiatic station, has reported to tha
navy department by cable that th«
Paragua is at Jolo, the Mlndoro at
Pollok, Mindanao Island, and the Wis
consin at Olongapo, on Sublg bay,
Island of Luzon. He also reports that
the Qulros Is cruising In Llngayen
gulf and that the torpedo boats Dale
and Decatur are cruising off the Island,
of Palawan.
This disposition affords excellent op
portunities for observing the move
ments of the hostile fleets, should they
approach or enter Philippine waters.
While the vessels, with the excep
tion of the Wisconsin, are but small
gunboats which could do no more than
make observances, they, all carry the
flag, which it is believed would be
uufflclent for the purpose of enforcing
neutrality in, the waters contiguous to
the American possessions In the far
east.
RUSSIAN BQUADRON MAY
LINGER AT KAMRANH BAY
By Ansoclated Press.
LONDON, April 19.— A dispatch to
a news agency from Toklo says:
"Information received here is taken
to Indicate that the Russian squadron
proposes staying at Kamranh bay un
til May 7, Admiral Rojestvensky mean
while sending out cruisers to overhaul
merchantmen proceeding along the
trade route to the straits of Formosa,
The transports accompanying the
Russian squadron are reported to bo
plying between Kamranh bay and Sai
gon under the merchant flag of Russia,
INDIGNATION AGAINST
FRANCE STILL GROWING
Special to The Herald. .
TOKIO, April 19.— Although riot re
ported directly, it Is believed that the
Russian second Pacific- j squadron con
tinues the occupation of Kamranh bay
or some other port of Annam, where it
is expected to remain until Joined by
the third Russian Paclflc squadron.
The report that Admiral Rojestven
sky is maintaining patrol and examin
ing neutral shipping off Kamranh bay
increases the irritation towards France
for permitting the use of that port as
a base of operations. The Japanese
government continues silent regard-
Ing the representations on this subject
which have been made to France. The
press, however, continues the agitation
against France, demanding vigorous
action. l
EXPECTS TORPEDO ATTACKB
Russian Admiralty Thinks Togo Will
Decline Open Battle
By Associated Press.
ST. PETERSBURG}, April 19.— Th«
keenest interest is manifested In th«
(Continued on Vago Two.)
THE DAY'S NEWS
FORECAST
Southern California: Fair Thurs
day; fresh west winds. Maximum
temperature In Los Angeles yester
day, 63 degrees; minimum, 47, de
grees.
» *
I—Shonts will bo Ir—. | ,<
2—Doctors hear addresses. ■
3—Head consul to be chosen.
4—Hays gets ball.
5 Southern California news.
6—Editorial.
7— Belasco has new actress.
B.9—Classified advertisement*
10 —Sports. .
11—Markets.
12—To have art gallery.
EASTERN
Secretary Loeb starts to visit President
Roosevelt In his camp.
ratterson Jury la composed nearly all of mar
ried men.
Chicago strike threatens to spread and In
clude other branches.
FOREIGN
Russian troops forbidden to read revolu
tionary proclamations.
American warships able to preserve neu
trality of Philippine waters.
Chinese bandits becomln* continually more
aollVe ' COAST
Alleged Tonopah plague It pneumonia, and
physicians say reports are exaggerated.
Mme. Tettrasenl. grand opera singer, has)
her financial secretary arrested.
Ban Diego oarsmen prepare tor race with,
the Bherman eight.
LOCAL
Lart crushed to death under wagon wheels.
Lost tot found wandering along rasaden*
"sanla Fe passenger train kills two persons at
"^"wSSSi morfcy U con.
"lUuVwomen plan to build art «»"jnr.
Woodmen to elect new oHluers today. -
Demented p»destrlan pursues vision of Nan
P< AMd "woman may lose home a* result of ■»*>
lety to possess sold watoh. ■■''->■
Hays sicuren ball for Chinese witness charge*
•Hh mrjury.

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