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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, May 14, 1905, Image 1

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VOL. XXXII, NO. 225.
LONDON PUZZLED
BY WEIRD TALES
MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT SITS
IN ASTRAL SHAPE - .
QUEER FACTS AUTHENTICATED
Sir Gilbert Parker, Government Whip,
Declares He Saw Absentee Oc.
cupying Customary Seat In
the House
Epeclai Cable to The Herald,
LONDON, May 13.— Believers and
doubters In what Is generally termed
spiritualism had two matters to dis
cuss this week. The first was a paper
on automatic writing read by Pro
fessor Richet to the society for psy
chical research. He told of a woman,
whose genuineness and good faith he
vouched for, who, without the sllgntest
knowledge of Greek, wrlte.3 Greek and
quotes sentences In Greek from a book
she has never seen or heard of.
The second mystery concerns the
appearance In the house of commons
of the astral body of a member of
parliament. Sir Came Basch, member
for Middlesex, has been suffering from
Influenza which developed into neuro
sis. He grew seriously ill but attended
the sessions of the house In order to
help the government whip. Finally,
however, he had to give In and remain
at home.
Sir Gilbert Parker, who saw what he
thought was the baronet, said: "I
was attracted by seeing Basch out Of
1:1s place. I knew he had been ill, so I
nodded my head and said, "I hope you
are better." He made no sign or reply.
His face was remarkably pallid and
he sat hunched up. I thought for a
moment and then turned to him again
but he had disappeared. I was puzzled
and went in search of him. I inquired
about him all over the house, and , In
every corner, but no one had seen
Sir Came."
MAYOR DUNNE ON
GRAFTERS' TRAIL
Declares That He Will Not Be Ham.
pered by Belpg Under Obli. .
gatlons to the Cor.
poratlons
Bpeclal to The Herald.
CHICAGO, May 13.— 1n the unpreten
tious guise of twin bureaus of Informa
tion and complaint. Mayor Dunne and
Commissioner of Public Works Patter
son have organized, ready for operation
Monday morning, a new department of
municipal rule that is looking for the
graft "bogy man."
Commissioner Patterson is to direct
the probing for graft in the city hall.
The suddenly acquired knowledge that
men who have been quietly accepting
presents , from taxpayers and tax
dodgers alike are to be brought up with
a round turn has brought consternation
to many city hall Job holders. To em
phasize his determination, Mayor Dunne
has returned to the railroads and
street car companies all passes sent
him since his election. "I must have a
free hand," he said, "and how can I if
I am under obligation to corporations?"
This means too that ail city employes
passes must return them at once.
AMERICAN VICE CONSUL
WEDS EAST INDIAN GIRL
By Associated Press
LONDON. May 13.— Archibald Mack
lrdy, American vice consul at Muscat,
Arabia, was married at St. Margaret's
church, ■Westminster, today to Olive
Christian Malvery, an East Indian,
who has- spent five years working
among the poor of London. The bishop
of London officiated and Madame Calve
participated In the choral service.
LAST SURVIVOR OF
WAR OF 1812 EXPIRES
By AnoclVed Fres*.
AVA, N. V., May 13.— Hiram Cronk,
the only survivor of the war of 1812,
. dieel today, aged 105 years.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA |;
PEOPLE IN NEW YORK;!
Special to The Herald.
NEW YORK, May 13.— The fol
lowing Southern Callfornlans were
registered here during the week:
From Los Angeles— M. J. Keefe,
K. Young. W. McLellan, W. Nlcol,
F. L. Loftus, W. Elliott, jr., H.
L.'Hahn, Dr. A. M. Smith, T. E.
Teegarden, S. T. Jordan, A. M.
Chaffey, J. V. Baldwin, M. S.
Lazurd, C. E. Ussher, 11. .j.
Wright.
From San Diego— R. E. Graham.
N, McKle.
From San Gabriel— H. Rodel.
From Needles— D.- Murphy.
From Pasadena— E. F. Slratton,
R..H. Gaylord.
Los Angeles Herald.
SIR GILBERT PARKER
MOB VIOLENCE
IS THREATENED
ANGRY CITIZENS SURGE ABOUT
ACCUSED MAN ,
MINISTER LEADS THE CROWD
Demands That Police Make Arrest,
Threatening That Unless Such
Is Done Trouble Will
Mob violence was threatened in the
police station last evening, when a
dozen men crowded around Harry Hol
land, who stood in front of the desk
sergeant's window, and with muttered
threats declared that he might not have
an opportunity to prove his innocence.
As the angry crowd surged around
the accused man and the threats were
uttered, a sharp reprimand and warn
ing rang out from Sergeant Dlxon, as
he stood ready to leap from his position
behind the desk. The cTowd, headed
by Rev. R. L. Windsor of St. Luke's
Episcopal church, fell back at this
warning and slowly filed out of the po
lice station.
Holland, who is a barber at Vernon
and Central avenues, declares that he
was attacked early in the evening by a
crowd of several men led by Rev.
Windsor, who alleged that he assaulted
Caroline Behnka, a 7-year-old girl, a
few days ago. It Is alleged that after
making numerous threats of violence
Patrolman Anderson, who rushed to
the scene of trouble, was requested to
place Holland under arrest.
The policeman refused to make the
arrest, as no warrant had been Issued
and, he said, he had seen Holland do
nothing on which a charge could be
made.
Protect Holland
After remonstrating with the angry
crowd for some time the officer decided
to take Holland to the police station
for protection. Rev. Windsor and a
number of the crowd which had gath
ered followed tbe officer and Holland
to the station, where a demand for the
barber's immediate arrest was made by
the minister.
This demand was refused by Sergeant
Dlxon, who stated that no warrant had
been Issued and the officer who brought
the man to the station was unable to
make out a complaint. The minister
continued to argue with the sergeant,
who made no reply other than a plain
statement of his duty. Then Holland
stepped forward and declared that he
wanted nothing more than an opportu
nity to prove his Innocence.
"You would better take care of him,
officer, as he may not have a chance to
prove his Innocence," said the preacher.
It was at this time that the sergeant
epoke the warning and the crowd filed
out of the door.
Holland is alleged to have made the
assault on May 10, and on the follow
ing day Behnka, father of the girl,
went to the barber shop on Central and
Vernon avenues. A fight ensued in
which it is said Holland waß severely
beaten. On the evening of the same
day Holland was arrested on complaint
of Rev. Windsor and booked at the po
lice station on suspicion. An investi
gation was made the following morning
and his release was ordered, as the dis
trict attorney would not Issue a com
plaint against him.
Much Feeling Aroused
Holland has been the center of much
talk for several days, owing to the feel
ing aroused against him by a number
of citizens in the neighborhood of Cen
tral and Vernon avenues.
He protests Ills innocence, but de
clares that thinga have been made bo
unpleasant for him in the district in
which he lives that he will move from
It at once. He was allowed to go home
last evening, but waa accompunled by
a policeman for protection in case of
any violent outbreaks on the part of
the citizens In his neighborhood.
Rev. Mr. Windsor called at The Her
ald ofilce last night In company with
Albert Behnka, father of the child,
and' made the following statement rel
ative to the attempts at securing the
arrest of the alleged assailant:
I "The action of the police in refusing
to hold tills man until we could get a
warrant Is, I believe, an outrage. I
personally called up the police depart
ment after Mr. Behnka failed to secure
iCoutluutU on fui* Xwa.»
LOS ANGELES. CAU SUNDAY MORNING, MAY 14, 1905.
BRIGHTMAN WAS
MARRIED MAN
WEDDED SECRETLY AND THEN
DESERTED WIFE
NO RECORD OF A DIVORCE
Murderer of Mrs. Gurney, Who Com
mitted Suicide, Identified by One
Who Was Present at His _
: Marriage
Adelbert Brlghtman, who murdered
Mrs. Charles H. Gurney, a bride of
six weeks, Friday morning, and then
turned the muzzle of his revolver to
his own head and fired, was the hus
band of a woman now In San Fran
cisco, whom he married secretly six
years ago and deserted about a year
later. A daughter wns then born to
the deserted wife. The child Is now
living in the north with her mother.
Urlßhtman was never divorced.
This information wns learned last
night from George Clayton of 642 West
Thirtieth street, who called at Brcsee
Bros', morgue find there identified the
body of Brightman as that of a man
he had known for seven years. and at
whose marriage six years ago in Los
Angeles he was present.
Never Secured Divorce
Clayton declares that the murderer
of Mrs. Gurney never secured a di
vorce from his wife, but deserted her
about a year after their marriage,
and soon after the daughter was born,
who is now five years old..
When the marriage was solemnized
It was kept' a deep secret and but a
few of Brightman's closest friends
knew of his wedded life, declared Clay
ton last evening. It Is- said that the
couple lived together on Kohler street,
where the wife continued to live after
Brlghtman deserted her.
"I afterward learned that he had
been married even , before this," said
Clayton, "but I was never able to find
out who the woman was or where she
lived.
"I saw Mrs. Brightman often after
the desertion of her husband and she
had great difficulty in making enough
to support herself nnd child. Three
years ago she went to San 'Francisco,
where she has since been living. • I saw
her in that city a few months ago, and
she still had the daughter, who has
grown to be a beautiful little girl.
Sent Money to Daughter
"Mrs. Brightman told me at that
time that a divorce had never been
granted, either to herself or her hus
band, although she had not seen him
or had any communication from him
since he deserted her In Los Angeles
several years ago. She told me that
he sent money to the daughter occa
sionally to help support her, but never
mentioned his wife's name or asked
after her in his communications."
In one of the letters found in the
dead man's pocket mention was made
of g. former marriage, and this is the
woman to whom he made reference,
it is believed.
PLIGHT OF GIRL'S •
HUSBAND IS SAD
Charles H. Gurney Comes to Los An.
geles to Bury Remains of
Murdered Wife
Stricken to the heart by a calamity
that has wrecked his life and fighting
with all his strength against the temp
tations of despair, Charles H. Gurney,
the young newspaper man whose bride
of a' few weeks was murdered by her
former suitor Friday morning, arrived
In Los Angeles yesterday morning from
San Francisco to take charge of the
remains of all that was dear to him.
The brief spell of torture to the young
man, compelled to sit quietly In a coach
and control himself while the greatest
Borrow of his life awaited him at the
end of the line, had written Its mark
on Gurney's face and he seemed to have
aged at least ten years.
Gurney was preparing to start house
keeping in San Francisco and was mak
ing final arrangements for taking his
wife to the northern city when the
tragedy occurred.
"I had just mailed a letter to my
wife telling her that all was ready,
and things looked fair for our building
a little home, when I received the
news," said Gurney yesterday.
Didn't Fear Brlghtman
"I had gone to San Francisco with
the express purpose of settling there,
and If possible securing a good posi
tion, so as to take my wife to that city
and start housekeeping. I knew that
Brlghtman had loved Donna, but I had
won her and won her fairly and it never
occurred to me that Brlghtman would
even wish to see her, and I thought I
Was perfectly safe In leaving her in
this city."
When Gurney was called up on the
telephone by friends in San Francisco
and the terrible news told him he fell
from the chair on which he was sitting,
and only the quick work of the men in
the office in securing medical aid saved
him from probable death, as the shock
affected his heart.
Since his arrival in Los Angeles Gur
ney has been choosing every word he
utters with care, and will not speak of
the great grief ' that ' has come- to him.
iCuutluutd «■ Fun Twu-i
VIEW MAY DAY
WITH ANXIETY
ST. PETERSBURG NERVOUSLY
AWAITING ISSUE
RADICALS STIR UP TROUBLE
Twenty.Flve Thousand Cossacks Sta
tioned in the City, and Author!,
ties Say They Have Situa
tion Well In Hand
By A««oclat».l rrpcii.
ST. PETERSBURG}, May 13.—Tomor
row, the Russian May Day, Is awaited
with nervousness both by the public
and authorities. The revolutionary
agitators would like to make it another
"Red Sunday" In every city In the em
pire, and everywhere are urging work
men to celebrate the fete with anti
government demonstrations, nnd to re
sist with arms if the police and troops
interfere.
The agitators are covertly nlded by
radicals who have not the courage to
come out In the open and who are
trying to pave the way to set up the
cry of the shooting down of innocents,
In the event of bloodshed, by warning
the authorities that the meetings are
intended to be pacific, but a perusal of
the countless proclamations with which
the St. Petersburg streets are flooded
proves conclusively that they are really
intended to precipitate collisions. Many
workmen are said to be armed with
bombs and revolvers, and a large stock
of pistols of an automatic repeating
type, smuggled in for the revolution
ists, Is being offered for sale to the
Initiated at coat price.
Saner Liberals Counsel Peace
Fortunately saner liberals, and even
those of radical views, realizing the
futility of bloodshed, are counseling
the workmen not to jeopardize their
lives uselessly. The police also have
issued systematic warnings. Never
theless, disdaining the advice of well
wishers and defying the warnings of
the police, the Social Democrats and
Social Revolutionists have called big
meetings to be held at Smolensk Field
on.Vassill island; at the Preobrajnsk
cemetery on the Schusselburg Chausee,
where some of the victims of January
22 are buried; at the Petropavslov park,
In the Viborg quarter; at several
places In the Poutlloff district and at
other Industrial centers. It Is almost
too much to hope the clay will pass
In Russia without collisions or blood
shed.
Anticipate Disorders
Governor General Trepoff and Di
rector of Police Kovalensky, while ex
pressing the hope that all will be quiet
tomorrow, so far as St. Petersburg Is
concerned, admit the possibility of dis
orders. At the same time they In
sisted to the Associated Press that if
blood Is spilled the responsibility must
rest on those who deliberately pro
voke It. ■
Elaborate precautions have been
taken. The garrison of the city was
further reinforced during the week and
a large detachment of Don Cossacks
arrived tonight. They stared open-eyed
at their view of St. Isaac's cathedral
and other sights of the big city as they
rode to their quarters. Twenty-five
thousand Cossacks were stationed to
night in various quarters of the city,
principally In the outskirts, and all of
the guard reglmenta are under arms,
but specific orders from Prince Vassil
chikoff, Grand Duke Vladimir's aide,
who will be in active command, are
that they must not flre unless actually
attacked. Special orders have been
given to the Cossacks, who with the
gendarmerie will be used to. disperse
the crowds, not even to draw their
cutlasses save In the event of a Cossack
being killed or wounded, but to employ
their whips freely if necessary to scat
ter demonstrators.
Peaceful Crowds Will Be Allowed
Peaceful crowds, if not organized for
demonstrating, will be permitted to as
semble.' Today there was no sign of
approaching trouble. The workmen
paid their accustomed Saturdny visits
to the bath houses, went shopping in
the city and otherwise enjoyed the half
holiday.
There was no indication today of the
tension 'that was apparent on the eve
of the trouble of January 2. At Goul
yance park, beyond the Poutlloff indus
trial quarter, there was a traditional
promenade of girls of the poorer classes
before prospective benedicts, and the
merrymaking was as noisy and hearty
as ever.
ADMIT AMERICA'S POWER
Russian Press Recognizes That We
Occupy Commanding Position
By Associated Pre«».
ST. PETERSBURG, May 13.— The
appointment of Baron Rosen to succeed
Count Casßinl as Russian ambassador
to the United States has not yet been
gazetted and the press here gnerally
is in ignorance of his approaching mis
sion to Washington. Commenting upon
Count Casslnl's successor, however, the
press uniformly recognises the Impor
tant role he will play. The Bourse
gazetted and the press here generally
ton one of the most difficult and re
sponsible.
"America," the paper says, "now oc
cuptes a high jposltion In the world's
policies.. Europe must listen to hor f>t
At'oulluucU oil r«jto Twoi
HHARRFn WITH MAINTAINING ORDER IN ST. PETERSBURG
GENERAL TREPOFF
FAVORS CHILDREN;
LIFE THREATENED
CHICAGO ALDERMAN RECEIVES
MENACING LETTER
WRITER EVIDENTLY LANDLORD
City Official Is an Advocate of the
Ordinance Making It a Crime
to Refuse to Rent to Fam
ilies With Babies
Special to The Herald.
CHICAGO, Mny 13.— Alderman Jona
than Ruxton, representative of Presi
dent Roosevelt's anti-race suicide club
in Chicago, and chief enemy of land
lords who close their houses and flats
to families with babies, was threaten
ed with death today unless he dropped
his advocacy of the ordinance in the
city council making it a crime for
landlords to refuse to rent to people
with children.
Alderman Ruxton received an an
nonymous letter In which ' he was
berated and ridiculed and the writer
threatened to shoot him. The writer
evidently is a landlord who will be
sorely hit if the ordinance is passed.
The alderman declares he will urge
the passage of the ordinance more
strongly than ever. After turning the
letter over to the postal authorities he
said such threats would only make
him more bitter against landlords, who
refused to have children in their
buildings. The letter was shown to
several aldermen and they declared
they would vote in favor of the ordi
nance.
"We won't let one of our members
be bluffed that way," said one of the
stock yards city fathers.
MANY STATE UNIVERSITY
PUPILS CANNOT GRADUATE
Nearly One Hundred Seniors Will Not
Be Able to Secure
Degrees
By Associated Press.
BERKELEY, May 13.— Consternation
spread through the ranks of the senior
class of the state university this morn-
Ing -when the news was unofficially 1 an
nounced that nearly 100 seniors, includ
ing some of the most prominent men
and women in the class, had failed to
secure sufficient credits in the current
examination to entitle them to degrees,
making it impossible for them to grad
uate.
DROPS $25,000 PEARL
NECKLACE IN OCEAN
Special to The Herald
SAN FRANCISCO, May 13.—
Somewhere in the bottom of the
Atlantic a *25,000 pearl necklace
belonging to Miss Jennie Crocker,
the California heiress, Is resting
beyond the reach of divers. Miss
Crocker recently visited San Fran
cisco to attend the final settlement
of her estate, valued at about
$9,000,000, and while here bought
the necklace. On returning to New
York she sailed for Europe. News
of the loss of the pearls has just
reached San Francisco.
Miss Crocker wrote to an old
school friend that while she was
showing the pearls to some one on
the steamer they slipped from her
hands into the, sea. ,
PRI3E: DAILY, BY CARRIER. 65 CTS. PER MONTH
FINDS HITHERTO
UNKNOWN RUINS
DR. TOZZER DISCOVERS HOME
- OF MAYA INDIANS
INSCRIPTIONS STILL INTACT
Harvard Professor Penetrates to the
Haunts of a Tribe Whose Record
Dates Br.ck to the Birth
of Christ
Special Cable to The Herald.
MEXICO, May 13.— As a result of five
months Investigation among the little
known sections of southern Mexico
and northern Guatemala, Dr. Tozzer
of Harvard university is able to pre
sent to the world a set of ruins here
tofore absolutely unknown and present-
Ing side lights on the history of the
ancient Maya Indians.
He ' encountered the ruins in the
Thendales region of Chiapas where the
present day Lacandon Indians live
exactly In accord with the traditions
handed down for centuries which have
neither been added to nor taken from
by missionaries of the Christian faith,
the latter never having penetrated Into
the fastnesses where the Indians live.
Regarding the ruins he found, Dr.
Tozzer, on his arrival here, stated that
there could be no reasonable doubt of
their having been the product of an
ancient Maya semi-civilization. Some
of the best preserved walls bear in
scriptions in hieroglyphics which have
been proved, in other cases, to be of
Maya workmanship.
As relative to the antiquity of these
inscriptions, Dr. Tozzer believes they
can be considered, at least, contempor
aneous with the beginning of the Chris
tian era.
HAS NARROW ESCAPE
FROM BEING DROWNED
Mrs. E. C. Crowe of St. Louis Caught
In Swell Near San
Diego
Special to The Herald.
SAN DIEGO, May 13^— Mrs. E. C.
Crowe of St. Louis, who Is spending
several weeks at the Cavft Resort, nar
rowly escaped drowning today.
With a number of others she was
bathing at the cove near Alligator
Head and ventured a little too far out.
She was In about four feet of water
when an extra heavy swell lifted her
from her feet and she came near be
ing carried out in the undertow.
The others bathing with her In the
cove were children, but one or two of
them who could swim went to her as
sistance and held her from being car
ried out until help arrived. She had
swallowed considerable water and was
quite exhausted when finally rescued.
j Mrs. Crowe' is the wife • of a well
known St. Louis attorney, who became
prominent by the stand he took in the
struggle against the trusts.
SLAYER OF GUARD AT
FOLBOM TO BE HANGED
By Artoclattd Preu
SACRAMENTO, May 13,— Joseph
Murphy, one of the convicts who took
part in the great outbreak at the Fol
som prison In July, 1903, and who was
found 'guilty of the murder of Guard
William Cotter, was today sentenced
to hang on July 14 next. Judge Hart
fixed the Folsom prison as the place
for the execution. Murphy had appealed
to the supreme court, which recently
affirmed the decision uf tbe lower court
that he should hang.
ADMIRAL DEWEY
SERIOUSLY ILL
SUDDENLY TAKEN WHILE IN
NEW YORK
NO ONE ALLOWED TO SEE HIM
He Was to Have Made a Speech at
the Dlnrur of the Founders
and Patriots of
America
Special to The Iltiald.
NEW YORK, May 13.— Mrs. Dewey,
wife of Admiral Dewey, sent a note to
the Founders and Patriots' dinner at
Hotel Astor tonight, saying the admiral
had been taken violently 111 at Hotel
Cambridge, where he stays when he Is
In this city.
The admiral and Mrs. Dewey came
here from Washington on Thursday,
and took rooms at the Hotel Cambridge.
Admiral Dewey had a cold when ha
arrived in this city and he kept to his
room. He waa up and around, how
ever, and received callers.
Early this morning Mrs. Dewey noti
fied the clerks of the hotel not to send
any cards or telephone messages to Ad
miral Dewey, as he had taken to his
bed and could not be disturbed. It
was assumed by this that the admiral's
condition had become worse.
Admiral Dewey was to have made a
speech at the dinner of the Founders
and Patriots of America at the Hotel
Astor. At the annual meeting of the
general court of the society today the ■'
admiral was elected governor general. '
MISSING TAX COLLECTOR :;
MET AT BAKERSFIELD
By Associated Press.
BAKERSFIELD, May 13.— When
train No. 3, westbound, Santa Fe
limited, arrived at the Needles at
9:20 this morning, Thomas P. Andrews,
foreman of the grand Jury of San
Franpisco, and a #nan named Smith,
representing ' the National Surety
company of New York, approached
Detective Ed. Wren and Plnkerton
Detective Carter, who had Ed. J.
Smith, the defaulting San Francisco
tax collector. In charge, and • presented
several letters and other credentials
from the authorities in San Francisco.
As a result of the interview which fol
lowed Ed. J. Smith and the officers
left the train at that point and went
into the Harvey house for a consulta
tion.
They will remain on the desert and
take the westbound No. 7 tomorrow for
San Francisco.
THE DAFS NEWS
FORECAST
Southern California: Fair Sun.
day; light east wind, changing to
westerly. Maximum temperature
in Los Angeles yesterday, 69 de
grees; minimum, 49 degrees.
PART I
I—London1 — London puzzled by weird tales.
2 — Situation by no means clear.
3 — Reorganize fire department. .
A — Plight of girl's husband is sad..
s—Southern5 — Southern California news.
6 — Chief's pension held up.
7 — Will deliver annual sermon.
8-9 — Sports.
PART II
I.3— Real estate.
4.7 — Classified advertisements.
9— Markets.
10 — Real estate
PART 111
A — Editorial.
6 — Every dog has his day.
7 — M. & M. opposes no-saloon Idea-
PART IV
Magazine section.
EASTERN
Indications ara that th* Chicago strike win
spread rapidly.
Admiral Dewey la suddenly taken 111 In New
Kansas visited by tvrrlflo tornado, which
narrowly mlwes Mt. Pleasant.
FOREIGN
St. Petersburg nervously apprehensive re
garding onto i ne today.
Japanese land forces pursuing similar tactlci
to those that preceded battle of Mukden.
London preu considers International situation
aa decidedly threatening.
COAST
Large quantities of Japanese goods confis
cated at Port Los Angeles.
Two m:n held up by highwaymen In Long
Beach.
Wife of prominent Missouri attorney bas
narrow escape from drowning at La Julia.
LOCAL
Murderer of Mrs. Qurney waa married roan,
leaving deserted wife and baby.
I'ulillo schools to olose June 30.
Who Is the man who said alrahlp flew from
Lioa Angeles to Oakland yesterday T Is question
asked.
Angry crowd of citizens surges around man
at police station, threatening mob violenoe.
Much of Insanity In Los Angeles believed to
have been caused by use of Hindoo drug. .
Three men arrested on oharge of driving ani
mal down Main street and beating and shout*
Ing at It.
Chief Lips plans reorganisation of Ore d*»
imrtment.
Flower show scores distinct success.
Residents In southern part or city complain
of lack of water.
Straw vote goes agslnst anti-saloon move
ment. ' r r>MiinT~sr fWT~nir"'**~lif*Ti— T" 1 !
Ourney ■ com -a to bury his wife, who was
murdered by rejected suitor.
Merc hunts and Manufacturers' association
appeals to voter* to oppove proposed "iu>-»»
loon" ordinance. !***W«MyNM»^M*WMi*Val |a< *4l
Two . men . arrested In north , charged wttk
numerou* burglaries In Los Angela's ■
' fvUc* offluara study, ju jitsu.

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