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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, May 29, 1905, Image 1

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VOL. XXXII, NO. 240.
RUSSIAN FLEET PRACTICALLY ANNIHILATED
TWELVE OF ROJESTVENSKY'S WARSHIPS ARE SUNK
RUSSIANS SINK AN
AMERICAN
SHIP
Feared Whereabouts
Would Be Told
May Result in Trouble
With United States
Our Minister Instructed
to Investigate
Washington Officials Look Upon the
Situation as Very Serious and
Rojestvensky's Act as
Inexcusable
Special to The Hurald.
•WASHINGTON, May 28.— A serious
situation between Russia and the United
States' Is threatened by the reported
• sinking ■of an- American merchant
steamer by the Russian Baltic fleet off
Formosa about May 20. Ambassador
■ Meyer,' at St. Petersburg, has been in
,: structed to, .make a full investigation
■ there,. obtaining any Information or re
| ports, the Russian admiralty may have
on the affair.;, :,'■' -• >.
•; ', Advices here from Russian
sources, '-but "not . officially confirmed,
say : the "American ■ merchantman was
sunk by the Russian fleet to prevent
herfrom'furnisMing information as to
"; Rojestvensky's whereabouts.
.*' If this statement pr<4vesv! correct, and
Jit comes from.a'quatjtef'Jwnich Indicates
■it is- authentic, tljSOUpiiHdent is even
■'*.fnore. serlpus. TnjL^rst supposition^
: «w»*i{thataho veSfel had probably- 1
■'attempted to run arwayfrrnn'the Rusf-
she had con
•' traband of war aboard Intended for the
.Japanese. But to slnk a vessel flying
the flag of a neutral power .on the
theory she might disclose valuable mili
tary Information to the enemy Is a dif
ferent matter.
The end said to have been desired by
' the Russians might just as well have
been accomplished by making the
> American merchantman a temporary
captive and* attaching her to the Rus
sian fleet. The Indications are . that
'.this new situation will require delicate
..handling to avoid trouble between
America and Russia. / . ■
RUSSIANS TALK ABOUT
"MILITARY NECESSITY"
FOR SINKING SHIP
ST. PETERSBURG, May 28, 11:10 p
m.— Nothing is known at' the admiralty
' of the reported sinking of an unknown
American steamer off Formosa by Vice
Admiral Rojestvensky.
/■.■'; It is. recognized at the admiralty as
quite possible that Rojestvensky' may
have been compelled by mllltary|neces
sity to destroy a neutral. If he feared
'that to allow it to proceed and report
the whereabouts and direction : of the
. Russian fleet would , endanger his
strategic plan he had no alternative ex
cept to take off the crew and sink the
\ ■ ship. Such an incident Is unfortunate,
.but every naval officer must admit that
, ; therlsk of such a crisis iS'too great to
take any chances. If the ship was un
justifiably sunk from the standpoint of
international law Russia, of course, will
have to foot the bill; but any cost is
cheap if it furthered' Rojestvenskys
mission.
ANGELENOS ANXIOUS FOR
NEWS OF GREAT BATTLE
| That the sympathies of the
liberty-loving- public of this great
', nation, especially that portion
'within the borders of Los Angeles
county, are with the "little brown
; men" In their struggle against the
Russian bear, was evidenced by the
continunl ringing of the telephones
In the office of The Herald all day
yesterday and until early this
morning, occasioned by the im
patient anxiety of the public to be
Informed of developments of the
naval battle reported to be In prog
ress between the Ilusso-Japanese
fleets and the exclamations of de
light at the reports of a Japaneso
victory.
The telegraphic reports were read
to those enquiring as fust as they
were received and, doubtless, many
Angelenog slumbered | iribra peace
fully ; ( lv consequence 'than they
would ; otherwise havsbeen able
to '"dp.
Los Angeles Herald.
PLAN IS ON FOOT TO
IMPEACH MAYOR WEAVER
Conspiracy Among Leaders of "Graf.
ters" to Cause His Sus.
. pension •
PHILADELPHIA, , May 28.— A con
pplracy exists among the leaders of the
Republican organization In this city to
have Mayor Weaver suspended from
his office by means of . impeachment
proceedings, which will be brought, not
In good . faith, | but solely to give the
"organization" possession of his office
until It can carry through such schemes
as it now has on hand, according to a
story the Record will print tomorrow.
The city charter , provides that Im
peachment proceedings may be begun
by twenty citizens making charges
against the mayor before a Judge. The
president, of the select council woull
become mayor ad' interim. The Rec
ord's story asserts that a Judge has
been found who has conrented to take
up the charges against the mayor and
to suspend him from office.
SERVIAN RADICALS
1 f FORM NEW MINIBTRY
BELQRADH. May 88.— A new mini*
try,'ln euuceuslon' to that of M, Paslo's.
who resigned May 22. has been formed.
All N the ;iiW ( minister*' Jjtlunjr iv th?
extreme radical' party. .
LOS ANGELES, CAL., MONDAY MORNING, MAY 29, 1905.
HUNTINGTON MAY SUPPLY
THE CITY WITH WATER
Is 11. E. Hunttngton preparing to take
a hand In solving the water problem for
the city of Los Angeles?
A rumor leaked out yesterday to the
effect that a company in Newhall is se
curing the rights to the water of the
Santa Clara river, which Hows on the
opposite side of the mountain from
that city, and when all of the rights
have been secured they are to be turned
over to Huntington, who in turn Is to
sell them, or the water, to the city of
Los Angeles.
.The Santa Clara river flows down
from the coast range mountains and
out of a well watered district.. It. Is
fed by Sespe and Plru creeks, both well
known streams flowing from the Pine
mountains.
The How of the river at a point .di
rectly opposite Newhall Is estimated
at 12,000 miners' Inches. This, it Is
argued, would supply the city of Los
Angeles and meet the Increased de
mands of years to come.
At this particular place there Is a
pass through: the mountains from the
river to Newhall,' South of that place
Is' a range, which the railroad engineers
found so fonuUluble thHt long tunnel
wiis dug beneath the mountain. Just
how this water la to be conveyed to
Loa ' Angeles Is not yet known, .If any
plan has been' adopted. The distance
as the crow Hies Is about forty miles,
but an -aqueduct would, of course, have
to be much longer, owing to the topo
raphy of the: country. Many streams
would have to, be crossed, besides num
erous valleysand divides.
A parallel , case with the proposed
scheme ;wa» ; the proposition to convey
water from Lake Winnlplsogree one
hundred miles over river, valley and
mountain to supply the city of Boston.
This was a tremendous engineering
problem, which would take years In the
solving and eoiit millions in. money. It
was discussed for some time, but at
length dropped and a plan toy secure
water nearer ut-haiui adopted.
It Is known that Mr. Huntington was
at one tlmo interested in a project to
bring wttter to Los Angeles from the
Kern river.' Bo tangled are the titles
to the water uf the Kei'n river, how
over, that the multimillionaire found it
difficult; to even obtain permission to
use the fore? of the stream to generate
power to run his street cars
NO PEACE IN SIGHT
IN CHICAGO STRIKE
It Is Belief of Labor Unions That
Battle Will Be a Long
One
By Amoclattd Prens.
I CHICAGO, May 28.— Nothing devel
oped today that would indicate an im
mediate 'settlement of the teamsters'
strike, which has been in progress for
nearly two months. That the labor
unions nre of the belief that the fight
will be a long one was demonstrated at
the meeting of the Chicago Federation
of Labor today when arrangements
were made for ho'dlng a strike demon
stration on July 6. According to the
present plans it is the Intention to hold
a monster parude of the strikers and
the affiliated unions unless the con
troversy has been ended before that
date. The orHclals of the express com
panies are still obdurate in their declar
ation that no concessions need be looked
for from their side, so the matter of
settlement through this channel seems
as remote us ever.
"In the next few days we will have
nil the help needed to get business
buck to a normal basis," said Superin
tendent Heed of the Employers' Team
ing association tonight.
M*MaiMmOßnnM
PRICE: DAILY, BY CARRIER, 65 CTS. PER MONTH
JAPANESE PURSUING
SCATTERED REMNANT
RUSSIANS' FINEST SHIPS LOST
Among the Vessels Destroyed by Togo Are the
Orel and Borodino, Battleships of 13,600 Tons
Each, and Called Strongest of Squadron
An official announcement from the Japanese navy depart
ment, issued at 2:15 p. m. today (Monday), indicates that Ad
miral Togo has been victorious in one of the greatest naval en
gagements that has been fought in modern times.
Twelve of Admiral Rojestvensky's warships have been
sunk or captured. While the official announcement does not
give the names or types of the ships destroyed, dispatches from
the American consul at Nagasaki indicate that at least two of
the Russians' battleships have been sunk. These ships, the
Borodino and Orel, were the heaviest, both in tonnage and arm
ament, in the squadron which threatened to turn the tide of war
against the Japanese.
Naval experts at Washington believe the battle was fought
at night while the Russian commander was attempting to run
through the narrow passageway between the islands in the en
trance of the Korea/i straits.
A report to the effect that the Japanese have lost one cruiser
and ten torpedo boats goes to support the theory of a night en
gagement. The method of the Japanese naval officers has been
to launch a number of their fearless torpedo boats and destroy
ers at the enemy's lines under cover of darkness. It is also be
lieved that the Japanese cruiser may have been deliberately sac
rificed in a heroic effort to ram one of the heavy battleships of
the Russian fleet.
Dispatches to London papers indicate that a portion of
Rojestvensky's fleet, comprising several of his slower and
weaker vessels, may have been sent into the Pacific with the
hope of running to the eastward of Japan and safely making
port at Vladivostok.
It is now pointed out that in this event Togo will dispatch a
flying squadron to intercept the Russians; at Sangar strait or La
Peroiree strait at the north of Japan.
TOKIO OFFICIALLY \ ,
ANNOUNCES GREAT :■: ■
VICTORY FOR TOGO
By Associated Press. •
TOKIO, May 29,- 2:15 p. m.— lt Is of
ficially announced that Admiral Rojest
yensky's fleet has been practically an
nihilated. Twelve warships have been
sunk or captured and two transports
and two torpedo boat destroyers have
been sunk.
ST. PETERSBURG HEARS
DEPRESSING NEWS
FROM SHANGHAI
By Associated Prena.
ST. PETERSBURG, May 29.— The St.
Petersburg Telegraph agency publishes
the following from Shanghai under
date of May 28:
"From all quarters telegrams are ar
riving here announcing that a naval
battle Is In progress between the Tsu
straits and the Japanese coast. No de
tails are given, but the tone of the
telegrams from Chefoo is favorable to
the Russians. The telegrams say that
the ' Vladivostok squadron participated
in the engagement.
"An English firm in Shanghai has re
ceived a telegram from Toklo to the
effect that the Japanese have been vic
torious, but nobody here believes it.
"There is the greatest excitement In
Shanghai. All the warships In the har
bor have cleared for action.
"The cable to Woosung has been In
terrupted since yesterday, but the
cause is not known.
"Numerous merchantmen have post
poned their departure pending the re
ceipt of further news."
TWO BATTLESHIPS
LOST IN STRUGGLE
IN KOREAN STRAITS
By Auoclated Frees
WASHINGTON, May 28.— From In
formation which has been received in
Washington today It is believed that
two of the nussian ships reported to
have been sunk in the Korean straits
by the Japanese are the Orel and her
sister ship, the Borodino. They are
battleships of 13,600 tons. Three other
vessels reported sunk are believed to
have been cruisers, the remaining one
being a repair ship.
The Orel and Borodino are of 18,600
tons displacement each, heavily armed,
well protected and were designed to
make eighteen knots. They measure
897 feet by 76 feet, with 26 feet draft,
and both have a lofty spar deck fully
30 feet above the water line extending
from the bow to the quarter deck.' For
ward' is mounted a pair of 12.4 Inch
guns In a turret _ protected by eleven
Inches ' of Krupp armor. Another , pair
of ; guns, of the same size is mounted
aft. '■■•■;;■; ;/;..• '-V.c .. : >' '■ " •;■■.; ,"•
, There are thirty other guns of an In- -
termedlate^ battery, ■' "and / the .vessels
carry j two submerged, . torpedo .;■ tubes;,
and two above water. A special • fea
ture of the vessels "is ; their., vertical/
longitudinal . bulkheads of inch armor,/
running throughout the whole length of
the ship at a distance of nine to ten,'
feet pinboard from tjie ship's sides, de-,
signed to localize the. eftact of a blow;
from, torpedoes.';, *..;■' ' '.>.,. . '■.'■'.' '
LONDON HEARS. 't : ■■-'■■: ' v
OF BATTLE* OFF' ♦
r;: island: of oki
By Associated Press.
LONDON, May 29.— The "correspond
ent of the Morning Post' at Shanghai:
says that a telegram has beeii received
there from Peking announcing that Ro-'
Jestvensky's fleet has been defeated off
the' Tsu islands and is fleeing, north
ward, and that four Russian shlps, : In-)
eluding the battleship Borodino, have'
been sunk.
The island of Okl is in the Efea of Ja-^
pan, about 200 miles northeast of the.
Strait of Korea, where the battle be- (
tween the Japanese and Russian fleets (
Is reported to have had its beginning. ; . .
PARIS LEARNS OF
DISASTER TO POWER
OF RUSSIA ON SEA.
Special Cable to The Herald.
PARIS, May 29. 6 a. m.— The Matin
publishes a number of dispatches from
the far east showing that the Russian
squadron under Vice Admiral Rojest
vensky has met with disaster.
la the absence of any word from the
Russian commander the words of Vice
Admiral Rojestvensky are vividly re
called: ;
■"If I am .victorious I shall inform
you; if I am vanquished Togo will in
form you."
RUSSIANS ATTEMPT
TO FORCE PASSAGE
SUNDAY NIGHT
By Associated Prcn.
LONDON. May 28.— The Times' To
kio correspondent says that telegrams
from apparently ' trustworthy sources .
show that [Vice Admiral Ito jestvensky ,'
approached' Tsu island in the fore
noon of May 27, during a fog, which
cleared up In the afternoon, when the
Russians were sighted by the Japanese. t '
The battle commenced between 2 and',
8 o'clock in the afternoon. There was v
strong breese blowing with a high bob.
I •.' A dispatch to the Times | from Paris W
says that ' a' private »: telegram ', from,-;
Chef oo.* probably from Russian sources,':
reports . that - Kojestvensky ' began fto •»'
force ,a i passage : of , the : Korean strait
Sunday night without' lights, in two >

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