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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 27, 1905, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1905-07-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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Fourteen Pages
IN TWO PARTS
VOL. XXXII, NO. 299.
MOSQUITO FEVER
CLAIMS VICTIMS
NEW ORLEANS REPORTS SIX
-> MORE DEATHS
PHYSICIANS FIGHT DISEASE
Texas Declares Quarantine Against
Louisiana— Freight and Pas.
senger Traffic In District
May Be Suspended
By Associated Press.
NEW ORLEANS, July 26.— Six deaths
from yellow fever were recorded today
up to 6 p. m., making a total of 45. The
number of new cases reported yester
day, but compiled today, is eleven, mak
ing all told to date 165. There are now
nineteen foci of infection.
The organization of forces for fight
ing the spread of the Infection and for a
campaign of education and practical ap
plication of the mosquito extermination
plans,, has been completed, and beside
100 men put on as extra to clean gut
ters by the city, 350 men are working as
part of the system of sanitation.
Citizens are being organized in wards,
and these ward clubs will form pre
cincts and a canvass will be made to
insure the screening of every cistern
and the closing 1 of cesspools and water
ponds.
The business men have provided
the funds for this work, and as the
people are now aroused to the necessity
of action there will be no let up. Yield-
Ing to the sentiment of the community
the state board of health Monday
adopted new regulations for the fruit
ships, providing that they should re
main six days at quarantine.
People Blame Fruit Ships
The people are convinced that the in
fection was brought by the fruit steam
ers and if It became necessary to make
the regulations so stringent as to drive
them away, in the present feeling, such
regulations would be enforced. While
handling the present emergency some
thought is being given to the future,
and on all sides there is sentiment that
nothing shall stand in the way of future
Immunity from mosquito fever, as it
is called now.
. iln view of the many quarantine com
plications which have arisen, Or.
sJbuchon has called'a' conference 'here
next-S unday of the health officers of
Texas,' Mississippi and Alabama to
discuss quarantine regulations and de
vise a system by which travelers. can
be admitted with certificates of the
marine hospital service. Surgeon
White, who is in charge of all the gov
ernment work, will be present and
participate. /.•''.:
The work of locating the detention
camps is progressing, though that has
been, slower than at first anticipated.'
; The . infection of the original focus
seems to be dying out, as fewer new
cases : are being reported there, which
is. a; hopeful sign, indicating that the
modern methods have been effective.
. The work now Is to locate the new
foci and treat them in the same man
ner.
REPORTS TEN NEW CASES
Yellow Fever Cases Develop at Bay
St. Louis
By Associated Press.
y SHREVEPORT, L,a., July 26.— A
special from New Orleans to the Times
Bays:
H A' report to the marine hospital ser
vice tonight from Bay St. Louis, Miss.,
states that ten cases of yellow fever
have . developed at Black bay In that
section. A federal surgeon will be sent
there early in the morning. It Is Bali
a lugger load of Italians escaped from
here and went to the bay where Aever
developed.
QUARANTINES LOUISIANA
Texas Sends Physicians and Guards to
"State Border
,; HOUSTON, Tex., July 26.— As a quar
antine has been declared against tho
State of Louisiana, because of her
slowness in quarantining New Orleans,
physicians and guards have been dis
patched to the Louisiana border, Dr.
W. L. Cook of : San Marcos being in
charge of the Sablne river camp.
The Shreveport quarantine may be
removed tomorrow as that city has
quarantined against New Orleans. The
camp for that point has . been estab
lished at Wascom. . / ':'■'
The Southern Pacific has made de
cided changes In Its train service. Two
of the local passenger trains will here,
affer run only to the Texas state line
and will not enter Louisiana. All freight
is to be fumigated at the border anj
formaldehyde machines have been sent
there.
WASHINGTON WATCH E8 FEVER
Government Surgeons Sent to South.
em Cities
WASHINGTON, July 26.-Past Ah
sistant Surgeon Joseph Ooldberger has
been ordered to Vlcksburg, Miss., and
'Shreveport, La. ..
.The officials of the main hospital ser
vice ' are . investigating a reported bus
plclous case of fever : which is said to
have developed "on ■ the Texas Pacific
railroad about 75 miles from New Or
leans.
Los Angeles Herald.
PRESENTED TO THE MIKADO BY AMERICAN MINISTER
MISS ALICE ROOSEVELT
NORWAY SHOULD
STAY IN UNION
DIFFERENCES AT ISSUE ARE
- INSIGNIFICANT
PENINSULA MUST BE UNITED
Count Douglas of Sweden Says Scan
dinavia Must Be One as Against
..the. World and an Equitable ,
Agreement Must Be Reached
By Associated Press.
STOCKHOLM, .Sweden, July 26.—
Count L. Douglas, former minister of
foreign affairs for Sweden and Nor
way, now gevernor general of the
province of Ostergoetland and leader
of the storsvenska or patriotic - party,
whose niune has been mentioned as the
next premier of Sweden,' received the
correspondent of the Associated Press
today while awaiting the publication
of the report of the special . meeting
appointed by the riksdag to deal with
the crisis between Sweden and Nor
way. Count Douglas said:
"In Norway they say, and have
spread broadcast over the world, that
the storsvenska party Is a party of no
bility, the objective of which is to give
the nobility of Sweden the power of
government. This talk is, as all sane
persons know, mere nonsense and child
ishness. They also say that our ob
ject is to give Sweden some kind of
sovereignty over Norway. Such was
never our object, as we know Norway
has, In respect of self government,
been one of the front nations of the
world.' But the fact is that long be
fore the other parties perceived the
duplicity, some Norwegians, who were
working to cause a separation, . were
incessantly searching for seeds of dis
sension, and we worked as hard to
counteract their efforts.
"In the first excitement after the Nor
wegian revolution, and after the Swed
ish people recovered from' the stunning
Insult to It and Its king, many persons
came to the conclusion . that it was
well as it was; If the Norwegians were
unwilling to live In peace with us and
share the apparent blessings of this
union of more than ninety yearß' dura
tion, let them go their j way and we
would go ours. Now. when the first
excitement [ has passed, Sweden ought
to exert herself to the ' Utmost not to
give up In' the union, | because In reali
ty the differences are so -Insignificant
that they could easily be ' overcome.
"New union must be offered by us to
the Norwegians, founded on full liberty,
equality and interior Independence of
both countries, but ' with the principle
that the Scandanavlan peninsula Is
one against the world. .
"We must therefore have, besides a
common king, a common department
of foreign affairs, of commerce and
navigation, of war and of the navy,
and the peninsula must ' be joined In
a commercial union. All the places In
these four departments, from the high
est to the lowest, should be open to
either Swedes of Norwegians. A union
parliament, meeting alternately In
Stockholm and Christiana, should have
control over the common Interests, and
to this parliament the cabinet members
for the common departments should
be responsible."
LOS ANGELES, CAL., THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 27, 1005.
FLOUTING COFFIN
ON EVEN KEEL
BENNINGTON READY TO GO
NORTH
WILL TOW TO MARE ISLAND
Victims of Official Red Tape Now
Number Sixty.two — Admiral Good.
- —^ rich at Sa"n Diego to Make T
Investigation . .
By Associated Press;
SAN DIEGO, July 26.— The gunboat
Bennlngton, termed a "floating coffin"
long before the lives of sixty-two sea
men were sacrificed to . the alleged re
quirements of red tape, Is again afloat on
an even keel and will be towed to the
Mare Island navy yard to be thorough
ly examined and repaired. She will
be taken up by the Iris, escorted by the
powerful naval tug Fortune, but it la
now ' doubtful that she will get away
before the arrival of the Chicago.
Divers are making an examination of
her hull today. • '
Admiral Goodrich Is expected to ar
rive on his flagship 'tonight or early
tomorrow, when an Investigation of the
disaster will be begun. " Much interest
centers on the question of what was the
steam pressure on boiler "B" at the
time of the explosion, it being under
stood that the safety valve had been
set to blow off at 140 pounds. Ten
minutes before the explosion the pres
sure was only 118 pounds and was
rising. The botler had been cleaned
only a short time before and filled with
fresh water. -
Hull Slightly Damaged
Only one boiler exploded. An exam
ination of the inside of the ship shows
that the hull has been damaged but
little, If any. The' water which poured
In and caused the listing came through
the, blow hole and pipes, broken by the
force of the explosion. " The entry of
water Is now under control and no dif
ficulty Is anticipated In making the
vessel sufficiently seaworthy to stand
the trip to Mare Island.
A private dispatch from, Oakland
says that the mother of E. B. Robin
son, one of the Bennington victims, has
lost her mind through grief.
At 4 o'clock this morning S. Tac'ate,
a Japanese attendant, expired, and at
9:30 tonight H. A. Metlus, pay clerk
passed away, j The case of Metlus Is
peculiar, j He was able to walk up town
after the accident and was thought not
to have been badly Injured. After his
wounds had been dressed he was out
in the street. Suddenly •he collapsed
and had to be taken to the hospital on a
stretcher. It Is supposed that the shock
and a weak heart were the cause of
his death.
Surgeon Lewis of the flagship Chi
cago, who left the squadron at Belling
bam Harbor, reached here by train
this afternoon. -■
DIVERB GO TO BAN OIEGO
Experts to Examine Hull of Gunboat
Bennlngton
By Associated Press.
VALLEJO. July It John R. McMil
lan, employed at the Mare Island navy
yard, the most expert diver on the
coast, left for Ban Diego today to ex
amine the bottom of the Bennlngton.
The naval, tug Unadtlla also left with
the necessary apparatus. She will pro
ceed to San Diego ; to assist In' towing
the Bennlngton her*.
MIKADO GREETS
MISS ROOSEVELT
TAFT'S PARTY WELCOMED BY
JAPAN'S RULERS
SPECTACLE MOST GORGEOUS
American Minister Makes the Presen*
tatlons to the Emperor and Those
to the Crown Princess Are
by Mrs. Griscom
By AMOclntPd Prens.
TOKIO, July 26.— The emperor and
crown princess of Japan today received
in audience and entertained at lun
cheon the official members of the party
of Secretary of War Taft. Shortly be
fore noon Secretary Taft was driven to
the imperial palace In the state car
riage.
Lloyd C. Orlscom, the American min
ister to Japan, escorted Miss Alice
Roosevelt to the palace. Crowds of peo
ple lined the streets during the pas
sage of the distinguished visitors along;
the streets to the palace.
Minister Griscom made the presenta
tions to the emperor, while Mrs. Gris
com performed a like office when thu
visitors appeared before the crown
princess. ■ '.'•;,/
The court presented a brilliant spec
tacle during the ceremonies.
| After the presentations all proceede-l
to the banquet hall, where. the emperor
sat at the j head of the large table in
the center, with the crown princess on
his right and Princess' Kanln on his
left. The Princess Fushlml and Kanln
were seated on either side of Secretary
Taft and Miss Roosevelt. Minister
Griscom and Madame Griscom were
seated directly opposite the emperor.
The other members of the party were
seated on the right and left, according
to order of precedence.
A garden party succeeded the lunch
eon. The emperor ordered his private
park, opened and , the Americans wero
driven through the grounds. The park
was j completed 300^ years . ago and no
foreigners were ever before admitted to
it. The party. left. the pala.ee^ at 3:30
"o'clock^" "^-""^""f;.'-""* ""/ ' ■;. ■„•.." '.■•- ■ '■ - ( •■ ' '■'
Miss Roosevelt was accompanied by
the' premier to, the banquet and Secre
tary Taft accompanied Madame Taka
hira. f Premier. Katsura proposed, In a
toast. 1 the 'health of President Roose
velt and Minister Griscom proposed
the health of the emperor, amidst the
,cheers of the Americans. In proposing
the health of Miss Roosevelt and Sec
retary Taft Jointly, the premier stated
that the reception given Secretary Taft
and the members of his party was a
tribute of Japan's respect for President
Roosevelt and referring to the visit of
Commodore Perry to Japan, he said
that America was Japan's sponsor.
LA FOLLETTE IS
HIGHLY INCENSED
WOULD HANG STUYVESANT
V FISH
Governor of Wisconsin Makes Stirring
Speec'i Before Chautauquans —
Scores Railway. Magnates
and John 0. Rockefeller
Special to The Herald.
GAL.ESBURG, 111., July 26.—"1 would
like to have a hand In hanging. Stuy
vesant Fish," Bald
Gov. La Follette of
Wisconsin this
La Fo"ette waX
angry. His sangu
'nary desire came
from wretched
sceneß he said he
hac* w'tneased on a
badly crowded II
llnois Central train,
where women and
children were herded In 1 cars reeking
with smoke, liquor and profanity and
forced to stand for hours.
A large audience heard La Follettc's
Chautauqua i address on railways and
the government, and he was frequently
applauded. He paid his compliments
to Rockefeller as follows:
"Now, you take Rockefeller. He gives
lots of money to missionaries. His
hands reach out In all directions. , They
have been In all Industries and he Is
strangling and throttling them ' one
after another.' There Is nothing that
gets away from him. • - •'
"Charity? Great God! If he lived a
million years he could not expiate th«
crimes he has committed In robbing his
competitors."
Speaking of the law on freight rates
In Illinois, Gov. La Follette said:
"You have a pretty fair law In this
state on th* subject, but It la not being
enforced; - Bring your railroad commis
sioners to time."
RUSSIAN PLENIPOTENTIARY SAILS FOR UNITED STATES
M. WITTE
MORTON ELECTED
TO PRESIDENCY
ALEXANDER. RESIGNS FROM
EQUITABLE
GREAT RETRENCHMENTS MADE
Question of Pensions Referred to Spe-
cial Committee and President's ■ . .-♦
Fixed! ■ at . 'sßo,ooo. ;
Per Annum
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, July j 26.— At a two
hour's session of the directors of the
Equitable Life Assurance society today
the resignations of former President
James W. . Alexander and Nevada B.
Stranahan, as directors, were accepted.
Paul Morton was elected president of
the society, retaining, it Is understood,
the chairmanship as well. '.■]■
A special meeting of the directors will
be held tomorrow at which additional
directors will be elected and amend
ments to the charter of the society
adopted. •
At today's meeting of the directors
George I. Victor of this city, and Ernest
B. Kruttschnitt of New Orleans, were
nominated as directors and will be elec
ted at tomorrow's special meeting. Mr.
Victor, a prominent ■ commission mer
chant of this city, and Mr. Kruttschnitt
is one of the leaders of the bar in the
southwest.
Chairman Morton reported to the di
rectors, that la pursuance of his policy
of retrenchment, the society, would ef
fect a saving of $500,000 a year. He sub
mitted a, financial report for the. first
six months, which was pronounced very
satisfactory , to . the directors. At to
morrow's meeting the position of chair
man may be abolished. • «t -
The matter of pensions to the widow
of H. B. Hyde and others was referred
to a committee consisting of. Directors
McCook. Whitman and Zahander.' who
will probably report thereon tomorrow.
It Is also understood that Mr. Mor
ton's salary as president of the so
ciety will be $80,000. E. B. Thomas
was elected a member of the . execu
tive committee, which has "not been
fully organized.
INVESTIGATORS TO MEET
Senator Armstrong Summons His
Committee for Tuesday
By Associated Press.
ROCHESTER, N. V., July 26.— State
Senator William Armstrong has sent
out announcements to his senatorial
and assembly associates, who are to
serve on the joint legislative committee
which Is to investigate ■ the life In-
Burance business In this state, that the
committee will be at Albany for or
ganization next Tuesday. If Senator
Armstrong's associates agree, the com
mittee will organize at once and Im
mediately proceed to New York/ where
headquarters will be established and
counsel elected.
He has already written let tars to
Governor Hlggtns, State Superinten
dent of Insurance Hendrlcks, ■ Attorney
General Mayer and District Attorney
Jerome, asking that they meet with
the committee at an early date.
MOBERLY HAS $200,000
FIRE IN GRAIN ELEVATOR
By Associated Press.
'MOBERLY. Mo., July 28.— The ele
vator of , the Missouri Grain company
containing a . large '• quantity .; of ' grain,
was burned today. Lois; $200,000
PRICE: DAILY, BY CARRIER, 65 CTS. PERMONTH
PEARY FETED AT
NORTH SYDNEY
EXPLORER FIRMLY CONFIDENT
OF SUCCESS
WIFE AND DAUGHTER RETURN
Canadians Give Arctic Steamer. Roose
:, velt. Hearty Demonstration as . .
„ .. She Swings Clear on Her
Northward Journey
NORTH SYDNEY, C. > 8., July 26.—
The ' Arctic steamer Roosevelt, bearing
Commander Robert E. Peary's latest
expedition, swung clear of the wharf
and headed , toward the north pole at
2 o'clock this afternoon.
By Associated Press.
„ As the . steamer left the wharf jan
immense crowd, which had gathered
to witness her departure, burst Into
cheers, which were mingled with the
whistles of the steamers and the dem»
onstratlon lasted as the steamer pro
ceeded down the harbor. The city had
been gayly decorated for the occasion.
Lieutenant Commander Peary, In
speaking of the expedition shortly.be
fore his departure, showed firm con
fidence that. the outcome would be suc
cessful, [in ' which case he Intends to
return In September, 1906.
■ Mrs. Peary and her daughters, who
have been with Lieutenant Comman
der Peary In this city pending his de
parture, left for New York today.
BUSINESS TROUBLES
CAUSE MAN'S SUICIDE
Reno' Res'dent Bids Daughters Fare.
well and Shoots Himself Through
the Brain
By Associated Press. I
RENO, Nev., July 26.— Worrying over
his business affairs and suffering from
Illness, J. H. Sturgeon, a native of Fol
som, Cal., and until three months ago
a resident, of that place, left ' his two
daughters at noon' today and • three
hours later sent a bullet through his
brain. He was found at 7 o'clock to
night almost dead. There Is no chance
of recovery. Sturgeon had left a note
bidding his two daughters farewell and
willing all his property to them.
VICTORIA GIVES WOMAN '
THE ELECTIVE FRANCHISE
MELBOURNE, Victoria,. July 26.—
The Victorian assembly today passed
a bill granting the elective franchise to
women.
J. P. MORGAN ACQUIRES
„\ GREAT ART TREASURES
By AMOclated Frtu. ' '
LONDON. July 26.— During his ', \
absence from < America, J, Pier- ' '
pont Morgan bag added a whole '. •
Frag-onard . room tq. his London [ \
residence, the Intrinsic value of < •
which Is estimated In hundreds J )
of . thousands of pounds sterling, ' '
besides being of Infinite historical '. !
importance. Some appreciation J |
of the value of the collection may '< <
be gathered , from . the fact that ' [
' while a Fragonard one foot square < >
Is r worth $5000, the largest room \ ',
In Mr. Morgan's house Is walled ' '
with the great artist's , picture*. ! '
In air there are twelve of these \ ;
j paintings, each measuring three • >
I yards high and' two yards wide. "JJ
»♦»♦»»»♦«»»»»»*»«♦<.♦♦♦*♦♦
Main News Section j
JAPAN INSISTS
ON INDEMNITY
WILL AMOUNT TO NEARLY A
BILLION DOLLARS
WITTE LEAVES FOR AMERICA
Further Demands Are Cession of Bak.
halm Island and Llao Tung
Peninsula and Return of.
Manchuria to. China ■
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, July 26.-Who.ther
there is to be peace In the far east'or,':'
a continuance of war will be practically^
decided at the first business meeting of
the Washington- conference, ', whlch'.will ;■;
convene at the navy yard,' Portsmouth,
N. H.; about "August 6.".; Baron Komura 'C
will | on that occasion ■ communicate . to '
M. Witte the essentials of Japan's peace .
terms for further negotiations.'-':'
Although guarding with : great care
the official statement of her terms,; Ja
pan has not kept from several friendly/
governments the character' of these
terms. Official Washington hasibeen^
enabled to form, within certain' limits,'^;
a general Idea of their character. r ; ;
It is known that Japan will demand
an Indemnity : that will • approximately v
cover the cost of the war to date.'; Thlt
was communicated to Russia early in
the preliminary ' negotiations.'. The ,
amount Is still a secret, but it Is based '?•.
upon the most careful estimates of th«j
costs of the war ■ and will be I ac'co'nvV
panled by a more detailed ; statement ■
showing the method ' by which ; ( theTais;^
tual figures were computed. 'lt 'will 'not"'
fall far short of one billion dollars, fad-*
cording to advices reaching here 1 from
well informed sources. " '■*"' l '
Beside the Indemnity, It Is : believed, '■'■>
Japan's other essentials to the contin
uance of the negotiations are the ces-'.
sion to Japan of Sakhalin, the-trans
fer of Russia's lease, the Liaotung'v
peninsula and of the railway as far as .
Harbin, the recognition of Japan's
predominating influence In Korea' and
the return of Manchuria to China;:
; If the Russian plenipotentiaries fare
prepared to accept these / essentialßvHhe£
officials- here/are^ confident}. that the i
basis" will "be'laid'for negotiations sure"
to lead to the signing ; of ' the treatyTof '?,
Washington, bringing peace in ', the ; far' ;
east.
A second subject for the plenipoten-'"
THE DH'S fEWSw
FORECAST
Southern California: Foggy
Thursday morning, becoming ,■ fair
during the day; light west wind.'
Maximum temperature in Los
Angeles yesterday :79 degrees;
minimum 61 degrees! " ::
I— Fever claims many victims.
2— Norway should stay In i uhlonT,
3— Favor enforcing speed law.
s— Meets library board.
B— London may wed Miss, Klttredge
I—City's1 — City's revenue less than needs.
3, 4 — Public Advertising.
EASTERN
Six more deaths from yellow fever re-,
ported from New Orleans. Texas quaran
tines against Louisiana. .. -..-....-
Paul Morton elected president of Kqult- '
able Life Assurance society.. . ■ ■ ■•■ .i'
Lieutenant - Peary given great i farewell •
by Canadians on leaving North * Sydney, '■
FOREIGN
Miss Alice Roosevelt received , by'
mikado and crown princess of Japan. i-.-'>
Japanese demand among other .things 1
indemnity of nearly a billion dollars and :
return of Manchuria to China. : •.. . ~, ..;•'■
Recent advances of Japanese army.re
garded as threatening formidable " at- .
tack. . ■ . i ...-..,.,
COAST
Bakersfleld electrician believed to have ■
been drowned In Kern river.
Gunboat Bonnlngton raised in San ;
Diego harbor and will be towed to Mare
Island for repairs. , »~ ' ,:;f
Norwegian steamer Tricolor, ashore on'
rocks near Eureka, will be total loss.
local y:
Salton sea threatens . devastation to
Southern Pacific property. -, ■■ .;';.''
W. D.. Montgomery, once wealthy. ?, la T
Inmate of Insane ward awaiting. trial- e.m '
to his sanity/ upon complaint preferred:
by foster daughter with „ whom -, he ;■ has ,
lived illegally for years, and Is the ruined'
victim of love, liquor and finance. - v %,{
Chamber of Commerce" adds .fifty -six
new names and decides to advertise Los',
Angeles as summer resort and agltaie '
more boulevards. ; ■ ,- ;
City Attorney Mnthews rults that lib
rary board acted . legally in > removing I
Librarian Miss Mary L. - Jones. >.. . ■
Charles F. Lummla ■ assumes charge of
Los Angeles publlo library and' »ugKesU,
many changes. :/ >'t"MMit^i|Mil|nbH^mj
Friends of Jack London, the author, say
he is to wed Miss Charmlon Klttredge. "
Marshal of Long Beach ordered deposed I
from oftice by local court. •..-..; ■„ ;..-..■; ..-..■ ,
Husband did ' not : take wife out often ■>
enough and she sues for divorce.
Wealthy merchant of Chinatown adopts
baby of own nationality.
Hanccck estate In • Los ' Angeles to ibe -
closed. •- , .....
Amos Herculea 'on trial charged ' with ■
murder. MtMMHHMppNApRMMtuBAQMMI
Gas company and city engage in. legal .
battle over taxation.
Departments' estimates exceed total
city's Income for next year by more than
one million dollars. , ■■
Councilman - Kdward ■ Kern suggests '
method of coping with %p«ed manlao* and
says polio* force Is adequate to • emerge -
ency. ■ ■j- , ■-.-■ ■.■.-•■•=....
Politicians Pick P. ■H. Olmstead, O. O.
Winter and O. UJ. Farlsh as the men who"
will compos* th* purimmeut board of pub- '
lo woru.

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