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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 29, 1905, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042462/1905-07-29/ed-1/seq-2/

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SATO STATEMENT
CAUSES NO STIR
RUSSIAN PAPERS SCARCELY
NOTICE IT
NOVOE VREMYA IS SARCASTIC
Alleged Insistence by Japanese on the
Cession of Sakhalin and Indem.
Rnlty to Cover Cost of War
Causes Little Surprise
By Associated Press.
>>BT. PETERSBURG. Juty 28.— The
substance of the interview In New
York With M. Sato, spokesman of the,
Japanese peace envoys, on the position
of Japan in the peace negotiations was
reproduced In the papers here and
passed almost without comment. The
Novoe Vremya, however, indulging In
a sarcastic fling, says that "Japan has
conducted the war quite economically,
only a million dollars a day, but she
had better~p'resent the bill to those who
are furnishing the sinews of war and
not to the country upon which the war
was forced."
■ A supplementary statement, specify
ing the cession of the Island of Sakha
lin and fixing the amount of the in
demnity for the cost of the war, con
tained no surprises and cruised but lit
tle'flurry except In circles directly in
terested.
The war party is again making head
way,:" drawing capital from General
Llnevitch's optimistic telegrams, one of
which, with the emperor's reply de
claring that the mlstortunes of war
have* not shaken his belief In the cour
age and devotion of the army and con
taining a glowing wish that the troops
may i bring the war to a happy con
clusion, is published In all the papers.
,-, No further news has been received
here; of the landing of Japanese troops
on : the coast of Siberia or of the opera
tions in Korea.
• The papers mention the purchase by
Japan of eight steamers from Russian
and German owners, which vessels are
supposed to be Intended for the trans
portation of prisoners of war.
, LOOKB FOR ARMISTICE
Sato Expects Cessation, of Hostilities
.''While Convention Is Sitting
By Associated Press.
NEW YORK, July 28.— N0 statement
was -given out at the headquarters of
the Japanese peace commission today
relative to the visit to President Roose
velt of Baron Komura and Minister
Takahlra, the Japanese commissioners.
Mr. Sato, minister resident to the em
peror of Japan, who is the official
spokesman for the commission, said,
however, that President Roosevelt made
no request for an armistice.
He was asked as to the attitude of
the Japanese on the question ' of an
armistice and replied: "Japan is per
fectly willing to agree to an armistice
after the credentials of both commis
sions have been examined and verified.
I ' think an armistice will be agreed
upon after the commissions enter
formally upon their work. It has been
the custom in all peace negotiations to
cease hostilities during the convention
of peace plenipotentiaries."
Mr. Sato was asked as to the definite
powers of the members of his commis
sion and said: "They have power to
reject any proposal and commit the
Japanese government to any document
they may sign, subject, of course, to
the sanction of the emperor.'.'
Regarding the reports that China in
tended asking an indemnity, Mr. Sato
said: "China would not ask any In
demnity of Japan. It was her inability
or unwillingness to keep Russia out of
Manchuria that forced us into the war."
Commenting upon the reception to
Secretary Taft in Tokio he said that he
had read the reports with deep Interest.
The fact that the historic chrysanthe
mum gardens had been thrown open to
the secretary, Mr. Sato said, was Indi
cative of the feeling toward Americans
In Japan. These gardens are almost
sacred In our country and this Is the
first time they have been opened to a
foreign citizen. It is a marked distinc
tion and honor. They are opened for
our own people but twice a year."
REJOICING IN TOKIO
Japanese Expect to Be Soon Masters
of Sakhalin
By Associated Press.
TOKIO, July 28.— Lulkoff, on Sakha
lin island, to which point the Russians
have retreated, is some thirty miles
southeast of Alexandrovsky, beyond a
range of hills separating the Alexan
drovaky district from the plain. Here
the Russians are completely isolated.
owing to lack of roads. It Is Impos
sible for them to make a long stand
and It Is expected that they will soon
be subdued. A victory over them will
make the Japanese virtual masters of
the -whole island.
There is great rejoicing In Toklo over
the success of the Sakhalin expedition,
and the landing at Krestkamp light
house Is regarded aa the first entry of
the Japanese army Into Russian ter
ritory proper.
. Admiral Kataoya reports that the
squadron sent to Kastrl bay on July
24 found the lighthouse at Krestkamp
abandoned. The squadron proceeded
to Basalt ; island and observed four
■runs in the direction of the Alexan
drovsfcy postofflee. These guns opened
fjre. but were immediately silenced.. The
city was burned and a building like a
magazine, exploded." _
Kastrt bay is opposite Sakhalin ls
land, sixty miles northeast of Alexan
droveky.
LINEVITCH ISSUES ORDER
Places Naval Detachments and Em.
ployes Under Military Orders
By Associated Press.
VLADIVOSTOK, July IS.— General
Llnevltch has Issued an order, dated
July 25, placing all the employes of the
navy yard here, Including the detach*
ments on certain cruisers, under mili
tary command, and ordering the port
commandant to act as secretary In
command to the military commandant,
who will carry out all naval disposi
tions through the port commandant.;
The order concludes: "The command
ant of the fortress shall entrust the
naval forces with military duties, plac
ing in their hands the maintenance of
order among the men of the navy."
HOPEFUL OF PEACE
Japanese Financial Commissioner
Takes Rosy View
By Associated Press.
LONDON, July 29.— The Statist this
morning publishes an interview with
Koretlyo Takashi, the special finance
commissioner of Japan, who expresses
himself as hopeful that peace will re
sult from the coming negotiations. He
bases this hope on his personal convic
tion that Japan's terms will be reason
able, and that the true interests of
Russia require that she make peace.
The appointment of M. Wltte, he adds,
strengthens this hope. •
Asked whether Japan would have to
borrow should peace be declared, Mr.
Takashi answered In the affirmative,
pointing out that large sums would
be necessary for the development
of Formosa, Korea and Hokkaido.
Should Japan be entrusted with pro
tection over Manchuria until China was
in a position to give effectual protec
tion, he continued, it would be neces
sary to put out a considerable sum.
Besides, It would be of the utmost im«
portance that Japan pay the loans
raised at home, as the return of this
money would result In stimulating
trade and the development of the
country.
Should an Indemnity be paid by Rus
sia, Mr. Takashi concluded, it could be
used to pay off the Internal loans and
provide for the winding up of the war,
but there would still be a large sum
required for the development of Japan
and her dependencies.
HOTEL MEN ARRESTED
FOR SERVING DRINKS
Asbury. Park Proprietors in Trouble
Through Work of a Pretty
Female Detective
By Associated Press.
NEW TORK, July 28.— Asbury Park
hotel men and restaurant proprietors
who were thought to maintain quiet
little rooms where thirsty patrons could
indulge in something stronger than iced
tea despite the prohibition law In the
New Jersey resort, have been thrown
into a state of consternation by the ar
rest yesterday of fourteen of their
number. It was decided that forty more
warrants would be Issued today or to
morrow.
Securing evidence upon which war
rants could be Issued has, up to the
present time, been a difficult problem
for the district attorney.
Thirsty looking detectives sent out
by the prosecutor were greeted with a
blank stare when they hinted that
their lives might be saved by violation
of the Ocean Grove mile limit law.
Sportive looking men who arrived at
the various hotels with a flourish and
began hinting about aridity hinted to
deaf employes. A pretty young woman
detective from New Tork was finally
called in and through her efforts the
needful evidence was easily procured.
All those arrested pleaded not guilty
and were placed under bond for trial.
PIPE LINE TO BE RUN -
TO GULF OF MEXICO
By Associated Press.
INDEPENDENCE, KasT, July 28.— 1t
is announced that negotiations hay*
been completed In Plttsburg, Pa., by the
Melon Bros, and the Cuba Stamp com
pany with the Union Trust company of
that city for the financing of the pro
posed pipe line to the Gulf of Mexico.
The pipe line will extend from Chanut?
to Port Arthur, a distance of 650 miles,
and will cost about $6,000,000. The com
pany holds options on 10,000 barrels a?)d
these expire next week. The plan Is to
close the contract by August 1. Th«
Melons have a 12,000-barrel refinery at
Port Arthur.
CHARTER BTEAMER TO
BUPPLY THETANANA
By Associated Press.
SEATTLE. . Wash., July 28.-The
Northern Commercial company has
chartered the big freight steamer San
Mateo to load cargo for St. Michaels.
The demand for supplies for use in the
Tanana district in the winter made It
necessary for the company to add to
Its ocean fleet. The San Mateo will
carry a full cargo, sailing the first week
in August.
DROWNED IN BIGHT OF
WOMEN COMPANIONS
By Associated Press.
PORTLAND, Ore., July 28.— A dis
patch from Vancouver, Wash., reports
the drowning In the Columbia river, off
Government Island, of Miss Edna
Fisher, Miss Lillian Zeigler and Mlsa
May Zeigler, whose ages ranged from
18 to 28 years. They went In bathing,
got into deep water and drowned in
sight of two women companions,
neither of whom could svlm.
AMBASSADOR PREBENTB
D. OGDEN MILLS TO KINO
Oy Auoclated I'rtmiM.
LONDON, July 28 Whiteluw lteij,
the American ambusaador, pie»eiit«d
V. Ogdea Mills of New York and San
Francisco to Kin* XMward yeuterday at
BuGkingbam palace.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, JULY 99 , 1005.
BOYCOTT WILL
HARDLY SPREAD
NOTED WRITER DISCOURSES
ABOUT CHINA
GOVERNMENT OPPOSED TO IT
Dr. Morrison of the London Times
Says Japanese Are Friendly to
America and Will Act In
Qood Faith
By Associated Press.
VICTORIA, B. C, July 28.— Dr. Mor
rison, Peking correspondent for the
London Times, arrived by the steamer
Tartar today on his way to Washing
ton to attend the peace negotiations.
Interviewed regarding the boycott es
tablished by Chinese agAlnst Amer
ican merchants and merchandise In
China, he said he did not think the
move would assume great proportions.
While It was a boycott on a larger
scale than any previously attempted in
China, it was without government sanc
tion, as had been alleged, and at the
end of June, shortly before he left Pe
king, an imperial edict was sent to thu
governors and viceroys of provinces
ordering them to do what they could to
stop the movement. In the larger Chi
nese cities it was not considered that
the movement was sufficiently serious
to cause alarm.
Regarding the report telegraphed
from Shanghai that Japanese Influ
ences were believed to be behind the
movement, the well known Peking
Journalist Bald he did not believe this
for an instant. Just now, he said, the
tendency was to blame the Japanese
for everything that took place in the
Orient. From his own observations he
has learned thrft the Japanese have the
best feeling toward the United States.
The boycott movement Is being or
ganized by societies of Chinese stu
dents, many of whom were educated in
Japan and abroad. They petitioned the
government to refuse to agree to such
legislation as the exclusion act which
put a stigma upon the Chinese nation,
and the boycott, a weapon used for hun
dreds of years In China, was started to
further their cause.
Regarding China's attitude toward
the forthcoming peace conference, he
said ' a delegation of Chinese wanted
representation for China at the con
ference, but better counsel had pre
vailed on it being shown that the meet
ing was in no sense an international
one, but solely between the belligerents.
The leading Chinese officials are con
fident that Japan will act in good
faith.
He said the feeling in Japan, since the
appointment of M. Witte and Baron
Rosen by Russia, was that the meeting
was to be a bona fide one and that
peace would ensue. The Japanese were
greatly jubilant over what they termed
the recovery, rather than the conquest,
of Saghalin.
MANAGER IMPORTED FOR
NEW CHINESE DAILY PAPER
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 28.— Tong
Hing, formerly one of the editors of
the China Mall and a modern Chinese
journalist, has arrived here to take
charge of the new morning Chinese
daily, which will shortly be established.
Tong Hlng is well acquainted with con
ditions both in his own country and In
America.
DEATH ATTRIBUTED TO
EXCESS IN ATHLETICS
By Associated Press.
CHICAGO, July 28.— A dispatch to
the Tribune from El Paso, Texas, says:
As the result of over-indulgence in ath
letics while a student at Columbia uni
versity Arthur T. Kerr, 22 years old,
1p dead here. In a cross country run
in the month of February Kerr, thinly
clad, contracted a cold which developed
into tuberculosis. He was graduated
from Columbia in 1904.
MEMBER OF THE CREW W
SOLD SMUGGLED GOODS
By Associated Press.
SEATTLE, July 28.— United States
customs Inspectors and eleven officers
from the revenue cutter Grant have
searched the Hill liner Minnesota for
smuggled goods. The articles of mer
chandise found would ' stock a store.
Members of the ship's crew were
caught selling the goods to persons vis
iting the ship.
KOREAN MINISTER'S
SECRETARY 18 DEAD
By Associated Press.
BOSTON, July 28.— Word has been re
ceived by cable of the death In Seoul,
Korea,' Wednesday of Arthur S. Dlxey,
private secretary to United States Min
ister Morgan. He was graduated from
Harvard with the class of 1902 and was
a native of Boston. -, " .'.'■»■:
ARMY TRANBPORT WARREN
ARRIVEB FROM ORIENT
By Associated Press. u(
SAN FRANCISCO. July 28.— T»'«
United Btatei transport Warren arrived
today from the Orient with 446 passen
gers and 8000 tons of coal. During th«
voyage she sustained some damage to
her propeller, which was repaired at
Honolulu.
DISCHARGED FOR USING
OFFICE FOR PRIVATE GAIN
By Associated Press.
WASHINGTON, : July 28.— George T.
Moore, physiologist of the department
of agriculture, today tendered his rrsltf
natlon to Bocrctai-y Wilson anil It tuts
b«en accepted. > This action is the cul
mination of a having at the depart*
; ment yesterday, at which It waa alleged
by two representatives of an Agricul
tural publication that Moore's wife heM
stock In a company manufacturing cul
ture for soil inoculation, while Moore,
who had charge of the preparation and
revision of bulletins regarding the en
richment of coils, referred farmers to
the concern in question for their sup
plies of the culture.
ENTERTAINS TAFT PARTY
IN CELEBRATED GARDENS
Japanese Minister of War Extend*
Hospitalities and Mutually Cor.
dial Toasts Are Drunk
Bjr Associated Press.
TOKIO, July 28.— General Terauehl,
Japanese minister of war, entertained
Secretary Taft nnd party today at a
luncheon and garden party In the fa
mous gardens surrounding the nroonnl.
The cabinet, elder statesmen and many
ofllcers of the army and navy- were
present. .
The party numbered 260. Lunch was
served In a temporary pavilion which
was Almost covered with American and
Japanese lings. General Terauehl es
corted Miss Alice Roosevelt and Ma
dame Terauehl was escorted by Sec
retary Taft. President Roosevelt was
toasted by General Terauehl, who also
led the cheering for him. When Min
ister {3rlscom ■ proposed the health of
the emperor of Japan the Americans
present arose and gave three banzals
and three American cheers.
General Terauehl then proposed the
healths of Secretary Taft and Miss Al
ice Roosevelt. Secretary Taft, In toast-
Ing the Japanese army, dwelt chiefly
on its record in the Chinese war and
Boxer uprising and on questions con
nected with its organization and lead
ership. He did not refer to the pres
ent war.
Both Minister Grlscom and Secretary
Taft heartily thanked the Jnpanrae for
their kindness. The secretary eulo
gized Griscom's services as minister.
Marquis Ito then chanted an original
poem composed in honor of the visit of
the Americans.
After the luncheon an hour was spent
In viewing the extensive gardens.
WRECKED FREIGHT HAS
MIRACULOUS ESCAPE
Accident Occurs at Powder Mill Spur,
Near Three Cars Loaded
With Explosive
By Associated Press.
SANTA CRUZ, July 28.— Southern
Pacific local freight train No. 900 was
wrecked at the powder mill spur last
night, nine cars piling up at the switch,
tearing down telegraph poles and wires
and blocking traffic all night. To add
to the danger of the situation three
cars loaded with powder were in front
of the engine, which miraculously es
caped damage through the breaking
of a coupling. This freed the engine
from the wreck, and enabled Engineer
Crole to run with the powder cars to
Santa Cruz for safety. •
The powder house at the spur was
wrecked and fortune once more f_v
ored the crew, as there was no powder
in the building at the time. Conductor
lUff had a narrow escape from death.
He was standing at the switch when
the cars came tumbling down the
{Trade and became tangled up in a
mass of telegraph wires which the
wreck had caused to fall across the
track. By supreme presence of mind
he pulled himself clear of the track
or he would have been caught In the
wreck.
A San Jose wrecking 'crew with a
large gang of men from^thls city and
Boulder Creek worked all night picking
up the wrecked cars, and the track
was finally cleared. No one was In
jured, but the oil car and several box
cars were totally wrecked.
STRIKES OF TUNGSTEN
EXCITE BAKERSFIELD
First Carload Shipment of Ore to Be
Sent East on Mon.
day Next
By Associated Press.
BAKBRSPIBLD, July 28.— The rich
deposits of tungsten which are being
opened up near Randsburg are exciting
considerable interest among the mining
men and the first carload shipment of
the ore is to be made next Monday.
The shipment, will amount to thirty tons
and will be sent to Wilmington, Del.,
for reduction. ■ . „
The McCarthy-Taylor mine is making
the shipment and has the best showing
of ore at the present time. The owners
have received considerable correepon I
dencc from many of the large steel
plants of the country and also from th?
Krupp works In Germany, . .
The first discovery of tungsten In the
district waa made about two years ago
when a narrow streak of the ore was
found in working a gold-bearing ledge,
but the large deposits which are now
being developed were discovered since
the first of the year. The ore varies In
Value, but In all of the deposits now
being operated by assorting the or*
shipments can be made which will bring
returns of about $175 ' a ton.
The refined article Is worth $1.50 per
pound.
PAWNBROKER MURDERED
AND ROBBED BY THIEVE 3
By Associated Press.
DETROIT, July 28.— Joseph Myer,
aged 60,' a pawnbroker at 42 Monroe
avenue, near police headquarters, was
killed tonight by thieves who caught
him alone In bis office. The thieves got
away with about >800 in money and per
haps $4000 worth of diamonds.
ALLEGED FORGER TO BE
RETURNED FROM KENTUCKY
By Associated Press.
i FRANKFORT, i Ky.. July Jl—Oover
nor, Beekham j today honored a requis
ition vt the Governor 'of California for
W. 11. Buchanan, uuder arrwt in Louis*
vJUa and wmted ,to ; JUdltuidn, . Cttl..
on « charge of forgery.
ENSIGN PERRY'S
FUNERAL IS HELD
LAST RITES OVER VICTIM OF
BENNINGTON
REMAINS TO BE TAKEN EAST
Bodies of Dead Sailors to Be Dlsln.
terred and Bent Home, If Rela.
tlves So Request, at Govern
ment's Expense
By Aftsoclnted Press.
SAN DIEGO, July 28.— N0 mor«
deaths among the injured Bennlngton
men had occurred up to 0:80 tonight,
but there are three or four victims who
the doctors say cannot possibly sur
vive and death is only a matter of
houra or possibly days.
At St. Paul's Episcopal church at 10:80
o'clock this morning was held the
funeral of Ensign Newman K. Perry,
the only officer who lost his life In the
disaster on the gunboat Bennlngton.
Rev. J. A. M. Rtchey was in charge,
assisted by Bishop J. H. Johnson of Los
Angeles and Chaplain Stone of the flag
ship Chicago. Commander Young and
officers and men of the Bennlngton, of
ficers and men from the Chicago, active
and retired army officers, councllmen,
heads of city departments, companions
of the military order of the Loyal
Legion, officers from Fort Rosecrans,
officers of the naval reserves, local
federal officials and officers and mem
bers of the chamber of commerce were
present. The general public waa not
admitted owing to the limited capacity
of the church. The remains will be
taken to Stockbrldge, Mass., for Inter
ment, leaving here tomorrow afternoon.
The bodies of the Bennlngton boys who
were burled in the military cemetery
on Point Loma are not to remain where
they were laid with Impressive cere
monies. Now that they are at rest the
officials have discovered that after the
Maine disaster congress enacted a law
providing for the transmission of the
bodies of dead sailors to their homes.
After the explosion the undertakers
telegraphed to the nearest relatives of
the dead men for Instructions regarding
the disposition of the remains. In many
cases answers were made that tho
bodies should be shipped at the gov
ernment's expense. Accordingly the
bodies of the forty-nine boys were In
terred, unembalmed, In the little burial
ground on the hill. Now Paymaster
Morris is telegraphing to relatives that
upon request the bodies will be disin
terred and sent home at the expense of
the government. So far such request
has come for two of the bodies, and It
Is likely that a majority of them will
be exhumed and sent away.
Among -the bodies not buried, those
of the following have just been sent
away: C. L. Burns, to ' Chicago; An
drew Kamerer, to Londonvllle, Ohio;
Joseph Newcome, to Qulncy, Mass.;
Emil Dresch, to Newark, N. J.; -Olive
W. Brockrrian, to Dcs Molnes, Iowa;
Wm. Fickweller, to La Porte, Ind.;
John C. Barchus, to Clarlnda, lowa,
Charles O. McKoen's remains will be
forwarded to Fenton, Mich., this even
ing.
The condition of the injured at the
private hospitals show little change ex •
cept that C. Schultz has recovered suf
ficiently to be removed to the barracks
hospital and W.A. Holley is Improv
ing. A. J. Worthen is holding his own.
D. Sullivan has a fighting chance and
D. R. McClintock and Harvey C. Dean
are doing well. P. Nieman, G. H. Hal
lett. F. G. Muller and L. A. Grelse are
classed as most seriously HI at pres
ent. Skin grafting will have to be per
formed on ab\rot fifteen of the wounded
men.
HOUSE BOAT SQUATTERS
DEFY THE AUTHORITIES
Colony Near East St. Louis Turn Out
With Shotguns in Resistance
of Eviction
By Associated Press.
BAST ST. LOUIS, 111.. July 28.— Ten
deputy sheriffs who attempted to evict
a colony of house boat squatters, who
have been living for years on a strip
of land known as Sandy Hook, met
with armed resistance today. ' J. E.
Neely held them off with a shotgun,
but was finally overpowered, Mrs.
Neely then attempted to use the gun,
but It was taken from her. She set
their savage dogs upon the deputies
and they fought off the dogs and fin
ally took Neely to the police station.
. Other squatters with guns appeared
and defied the deputies, who departed
after serving notice that the squat
ters must be moved by next Tues
day.
FORMER NEWSPAPER MAN
MURDERED IN OREGON
By Associated Press.
BURNS. Ore., July 28.— Fred An
drews, foreman of the White Horse
ranch, was killed in a saloon at White
Horse in Harney county, near the Ne
vada state line, on Tuesday evening by
a former employe known as "Red,"
who had quit the ranch because of al
leged poor food. Andrews waa formerly
a numspaper man In California,
THIRTEEN SMUGGLED
CHINESE ARE CAUGHT
By Associated Press.
EL PASO, July M.— Thirteen China
men who were smuggled ■ across '■ the
border were discovered today In a Bantu
Fe box car with provisions for a Jour
ney to Los Augi'lts. They w»re place!
under , arrest by ; immigration - offleera
and are being held tor trW. ,
, „; «MUSEMENJS
J)ENICE OF AMERICA ~~~ Venice Assembly
*S SATURDAY, JULT 89th-PLAT DAY
.. AIJDiTOmuM-8:«l P. M., play In three ftctn. "Tha Weaker Bex, 1 ' presented by
the Venice Dramatic Company, The CMt Includes MRB. (». HARnY 'WHICHIf,
JJJJPtI'.y Ml "" M(l « Seymour, -with the Joseph Jpfferson Company: MR. GARNET
HOLMK, and others. To b« followed by DANCING UNTIL 11 :30.
_ AMPHITHHATEn-2 to 6 p. tn. and 7:30 to 9p. m. f grand concert* by AREND'B v
• . Tomorrow, Sondiy, Jnl* 30 •
„ AUDITOnitTM-*:3O A. M., addrewi by the HON. WILLIAM 13. BMYTHB.
10:80 a. m., Interdenominational service with wrmon by tha ItRV. ANNA SHAW,
fnd «p*»eliil mußlo by MMR, GENRVItA JOHNSTONE-BIBHOP, BTIJNHT LLOYD
WIUOHTSON «nd FRANK 11. COLUY. 11:30 p. _m.. grand organ rncital. 8 p. m.,
itereoptlcon exhibition and address by COL. GEORGE) FRENCH of the Salvation
. ,r., r . VENICE i LAKB-J:*o p. tn., CAPT. OEOIIOH WHISTLER In his wonderful ex-
hibition, "Wrecked at Bm." Grand Illumination In the evening.
AMPWITHKATKn-J to 6 p. m. and 7:30 to 9:30 p. m., grand concerts by the
arrnd's venicm hanix
Next Tuesday. The only appearance In Southern California of Mia* Simnn
11. Anthony. i
f\RPIJFUM srniNO STREET, «•»« Second «nd Third
fl*™*"**!/^ . Both- Phonw 144 T.
AN EXTRAORDINARY BILL
MAX FtOOTAW AND Anm.Aim? MANOI.A COMPANY In "Catehlnß ft Hu»«
band"; OODFnm ANn iii.m>i,hson In "A Batißhter of the Oods"; iiaiut.h,
IH'JHMOimii ANn liMiiav. Colored Entertainers; FnnnnniO Voki.kioii, Amer-
ica's Moat BUtlngiiUhed Violinist. ARRlnted by MllK, \(ii;i,!i i;i« nt the Piano;
XAZRI.Ij AND vrinivoiv COMPANY In Comedy Pantomime; IMJIIRPP'S nnan
Aivn rojtiKSi onpin:in»t motioih piOTitnnsi flricriAi. attiiactiow — tiiw
HAKAl«noir« «l,onß—Clrcllnor the Interior of a Transparent Globe With
Llghtntnr Ttnplfllly on a Motor Cycle,
PRICES — 10c, 26a, BOc. Matinees Werineßday, Saturday, Sunday,
/^U^Vn nVFRJt HfitTtP MAIN ST., Betw««« rtrat and fl«oosa.
MjJfSS JVU VHIi.KJt rtUUJti rhon«i: M«ln I»S7i Horn. 411.
** THB FAMILY THE3ATER-THB ULRICH STOCK COMPANY IN
D^~ Lighthouse by the Sea "SB
Herolam on New England's rock bound coast. Matinees Sunday, Tuesday, Satur-
day, 100 and 25c. Evenings, 10c, 26c, 60c. Next Week— "QUEEN OF TUB WHITE
BLAVES." ■
MOROSCO'S BURBJiNK THEATER BIX p^ n « d m * m
— -..-..,;,.; PERFORMANCE TONIGHT— LAST TIMES OF "MY PART-
MATINEE NIOR." WEEK STARTING TOMOUROW (SUNDAY AFTER-
tupat NOON) Matinees every Saturday and Sunday.
•— — AT PINEY RIDGE
A splendid love story of the Tennessee mountains.' Prices— Matinees 100 and Bto,'
no higher. Evenings, 10c, 25c, 35c, 60c. "The beat company and best plays In Amar-
Ica for the money."
•npr a tffl THff /tTFft ■ delasco, mater a co., Propn«to»
J£til~/rJLU ititLJf IC.K Phon«i: Main UU; Horn* JIT
Tonight— Matinee Today
The Belasco Theater Stock. Company presents Mary Mannerlng's Comedy Success,
The Stubbornness of Geraldine
Next Week— The Greatest I>aughlng Farce, "NIOBB."
ffhTCHT f/T THTf JfTRXf MAIN STREET, Bet. Third and Fourth.
£LJ\/Ut.L.UJ inc.JtfC.K Phones: Home 1372; Main 6185.
l/ * MATINEE TODAY— THB ANOBLUS STOCK COMPANY in an elaborate
production of Marie Corelli's , : .
' THELMA — |
Every evening at 8:15. Prices 16c, 25c, 35c. Matinees Wednesday, Saturday and
Sunday, at 2:15. Prices 10c, 20c. Box of flee open from 10 a. m. to 10 p. m. Seats
reserved one week In advance. Coolest and best ventilated playhouse In Los An-
Keleg. Next Week-"HOME. SWEET HOME." .
foASEBJiLL-CHUTES PARK Pacific Coast League
Oakland vs. Los Angeles
Today and every day this week. Including Sunday. Games called week days ' 8 ■
p. m., Sundays 2:30. Ladles free Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Admission 380.
Grand Stand 25c: Tlcketß on sale at Morley's Billiard Pallor, 252 South Main St.
CHUTES Saturday Speciai
DONATBLLI'S ITALIAN BAND CONCERTS AFTERNOON AND EVEN-
ING. Children free. Shaw & Clifton's Blgr Minstrel Jubilee. Fireworks: Second,
(jdltion bombardment of Port Arthur. New features. Adults 100. TUESDAY, Aug-.'
ust First— Grand opening in Theater by Chutes Stock Company, under the manage- ■ '
ment of R. Q. Sloane.
Great Observation Car Trips
With Many Free Features
OUR TWO GREAT TRIPS to the Valleys and the Seashore. One dollar each All
seats reserved. Run daily. Cars start from P. E. depot, Sixth and Malr
THE ORANGE GROVE ROUTE— Starts et 9:40 a. m.; runs to San Gabriel Mission,
- Baldwin's Ranch, etc. Includes free Tally-ho ride around Monrovia and free
admission to Ostrich Farm.
THE SURF ROUTE— Starts at 10 a. m.J runs to Long Beach, Alamltos Bay, Hunt-
ington Beach, etc., right along the seashore. Free ocean ride of thirty miles
about the government pier and free plunge bath at Long Beach. '
50c Trips About the City
Observation cars twloe a day (10 a. m. and 2 p. m.) leave Fourth and Spring on
thirty-mile trip to points of interest about the city.
The Seeing California Traffic Bureau
Office P. E. Bldrf Sixth and Main Tel. Main 900.
Or Ac Mountain... jjj
Our fast cars connect with all Catallna Steamers. Satar-
day cars leave 6th and Main at 7:50 and 9:13 A. M. and
' 12:30 and 5:25 P. M. Sunday 9:15 A. M.
Through tickets sold and baggage checked at our depot.
To Mt. Lowe
. The special "week end" rate of $2.00 for the round trip to ?
Alpine is In effect today.' Cars leave depot at 8, 9, 10
Am —j i ..j an ■ m ■'"' ■ ' '■ •■ '■ '.'* ■■ ■
• JVI.i 800 1 aflfl 4 r- rflm
The Pacific Electric Railway
DOCTORS AT NEW
ORLEANS HtJPEFUL
Continued From Pace One.
Is progressive, intelligent, law-abiding
and self-supporting, and that we have
men able and willing .to meet emer
gencies of any kind." •
Mayor Bohrman has received a tele
graphlo offer of funds from President
Tyler of the Hpward , association of
Charleston. He has replied, thanking
the people of Charleston for their sym
pathy, but saying that i the situation
la well in hand here, and that no finan
cial aid Is needed from ; the I outside.
Other tenders of help have been re
ceived. *
Novel Screening Scheme
Rev. Dr. Beverely Warner, who re
cently returned here from Philadelphia,
today opened offices la one of the prom"
lnent office buildings. He has been
made superintendent of cleaning and
sanitation. All the wards In the city
made reports to him. ■ Screening Is to
be accomplished In a novel way. But
tons have been given out by the board
of health. The buttons era plain white,
with a life site etegomyia faselata pic
tured in the center, and surrounded
with the words "my . olsterns are all
right » how are yours?" ,
• The mosquito ordinance to be passed
by the council has been amended so as
to require that landlords shall bear, the
expense of screening cisterns. New Or
leans' modem sewage system has not
been completed and cistern water is
practically the only drinking supply, V
Tanglpahoe has put on a quarantine
against leather goods, cotton, woolen
and. fur goods, bagging paper, coffee
and rice la sacks and fruits of any des
cription, believing these articles may
carry the infection.. '
Magnolia, Miss., has barred fresh
meats from New Orleans.
The Crescent City Jockey club has
offered Oakland park, which is situated
in high ground In the rear of the city;
as an additional emergency hospital;'.
e» e» • ' '-
JUDGE DENOUNCES THE
BUBINESB OF TICKET SCALPING
By Associated Press.
PORTLAND, Ore.. July 28.— Presiding
Judge Fraser denounced the business
of ticket scalping from the bench of
the state circuit court today in no un
certain language. He declared that ' it
is an occupation given to lying and de
ceit and to encouraging others to the
commission of the name practice. This
opinion by the court of ticket scalping
and ticket scalpers was delivered ■at
the conclusion of an argument on ap
plication for a writ of habeas corpus
in ', the case of , Charles J. Murray,
charged . with violation of the antl
scalping law, passed at the last session
of the ' legislature.", , •
■ I'l'uvlutf I'uitulur
The Craf ton tours , via the Salt ' Lake
route to Yellowstone* park, Portland »x- j
position and Alauku.. Next party leave* ~
1..08 AiujuUm August 8. Only a few book
ings left. . Information 250 -South Spring
street. Both phoues 868.

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