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Los Angeles herald [microform]. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, July 30, 1905, Image 1

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Forty-Two Pages
IN FIVE PARTB
VOL. XXXII, NO. 303.
BIG DEAL
IN WATER
City Gets Unlimited
Vast Tract Secured by
Board
Amount Adequate for
Years to Come
Officials Take Option and Plan to
Conduct Big Stream Over Two
Hundred Miles to Los
Angeles
BY MAYOR McALEER
This proposition Is the best
solution of the water problem
which has yet been advanced, and
I believe It to be the most practi
cal and feasible. I have been over
the ground and It is simply great.
There Is enough water In that
shed to supply the city forever.
To bring to the citizens of Greater
Los Angeles an abundance of pure
mountain water from the Owens river,
'which flows along the eastern base of
the Sierra Nevada mountains, Is • the
proposition which the board of water
commissioners Is now considering.
■V; They believe they have found the
solution of the serious water question
which confronts them. For four years
Superintendent of the Water Depart
ment Mulholland has labored night and
day to supply the city's needs and has
succeeded, j but has found no surplus,
has had nothing to fall back on.
■"; .The proposition includes the con
struction of one of the greatest water
supply systems In the world. For 240
miles, over the desert and through
valleys and at last under the Sierra
Madre mountains, this water must be
carried by aqueduct and emptied Into
huge 1 reservoirs constructed "at the
point where the water of the Los An
geles river is now taken out and piped
Into the cfty. „. • -, . ■ •
i?{ Thus it Is proposed to supply Los
Angeles and many of . the • suburban
towns' and cities with the purest water
for, many decades to come.
Scheme Is Practicable
.; Superintendent of the Water Depart
ment Mulholland says the scheme Is
perfectly, practicable and feasible and
should It be carried out, Los Angeles
will never face a water shortage
again. , . .
1 -Engineers say that the Owens river
was once, a few centuries ago, a trib
utary to the Los Angeles river and
that a great earthquake threw up the
•wall of mountains which now separate
the San* Fernando valley from the
desert 'and that the Owens river then
emptied into a depression in the desert,
forming Owens lake." For hundreds of
years the river has flowed Into this
lake, which has no outlet. The heat of
the sun. on the desert has evaporated
the water and kept the lake at an es
tablished level, but the water of the
lake is soda and not fit for use.
9 | Owens river flows less In winter than
■ In "summer, for then the never-ending
"sriow of the Sierras is not melting. In
} -winter ,[ the Los Angeles river amply
supplies the city and with the addition
| of about 15,000 miner's inches from the
;■ Owens,' there 'will be more water than
'the city can find use for.
Great Summer Flow
' In the summer, when the Los Angeles
Is flowing upside down, the Owens is
a roaring torrent, for then the snows
on the lofty slopes of' Mount Whitney,
the highest mountain In the United
States, Sheep mountain and Mount
Williamson, both higher than Pike's
peak, and from the- miles of peaks of
the Sierra Nevadas are melting and
the hundreds of creeks come boiling
down. the slopes of the mountains into
the river..
The present flow of the Los Angeles
river, both surface and underground,
amounts to about 2500 miner's Inches.
The surface flow of the Owens river at
the -point where the water would be
taken out Is over 20,000 miner's inches,
or. eight times the flow of the Los An
jgeles altogether.
"To bring the water from the Owens
river to the city would require a con
duit,of sufficient size, to carry 25,000
inches. It la proposed to build this
conduit on a grade, that is, so that
the water will be brought into Los An
greles.by gravity alone. Two hundred
miles of this conduit will be in the
open desert or through /valleys, while a
few miles will be built vy means of the
"open cut" through eidehllls and about
twenty miles of tunnel.
' 'The ' longest tunnel is estimated to
be four miles in length and another
one. three miles in length. Both these
tunnels are under mountains and must
bo. dug or bored from each end, while
the other tunnels will be near enough
to the surface to allow the sinking of
•hafts every mile or so and thus facili
tate* the work , .
Survey Is Made
A preliminary survey haa been made
and It has been found that the gravity
tunnel scheme Is practical and also the
cheapest way to get the water \ to] the
(Coutluued vu I'tttf* Vive)
Los Angeles Herald.
FORMER INSURGENT LEADER ON WITNESS STAND
EMILIO AQUINALOO
ROCKEFELLER FOR
MAYOR IS SLOGAN
PROPOSE HE PAY ALL TAXES
OF CLEVELAND
TOM JOHNSON IS AGHAST
John D. Is Willing but Fears That His
. Enthusiastic Followers Will
Trample Flowers on
Front Lawn , .
Special to Ths Herald.
CLEVELAND, 0., July 29.— The
boomlet of John D. Rockefeller for
mayor of Cleveland on the Republican
ticket grew several inches during the
night. The plan to have the main plank
in the platform an agreement of Mr.
Rockefeller to pay all the taxes- of
Cleveland strikes the popular chord, and
Mayor Johnson is aghast, j Mr. Rocke
feller Is hesitating over one thing only.
He : fears that torchlight j processions
will wind up at his house and his en
thusiastic henchmen will trample down
his flower beds around the front stoop.
Already the battle cry has been
adopted, and "Rah for Rocky.'! is heard
on all Bides. It has been suggested that
If 'Mr. Rockefeller runs he should make
a canvas on an economical business
man's platform. He is being advised
also to say some cutting things about
the advisability of the mayor of Cleve
land "Staying home ' and minding | his
own municipal business ' and letting
other cities run thelrn." \.' '; ' ■ ' . " "
A large delegation of prominent citi
zens called upon Mr. Rockefeller today.
The delegation told Mr. Rockefeller of
his long life among- them and how
esteemed he Is, after -which the mayor
alty business came on. They told him
he was the only man in Cleveland who
would dare to run against Johnson and
be In the race at the finish. Mr. Rocke
feller blushed to the top of his hairless
head and made an appropriate reply.
HILL'S SON TO BECOME
VICE PRESIDENT OF ROAD
Father's Victory In Recent Northern
Securities Litigation Gives Rise
to Credited Rumor
By Associated Press.
ST. PAUL, Minn., July 29.— The Pion
eer Press tomorrow will say: "It . is
rumored in railway circles that James
N. Hill, eldest son of James J. Hill, will
become first vice president of the Nor
thern Paclflo railway to succeed Dan
iel S. Lamont. Mr. Hill was vice presl •
dent of his father's road from 1893 until
three years ago, when he resigned on
account, of falling health. It Is said
that his health is much Improved.
The recent victory of James J,' Hill in
the litigation over distributing the
stock of the Northern Securities com
pany has glve.i rise to the belief th.it
the new vice president will be a Hill
man.
CHINESE REFORMERS
CONGRATULATE EMPEROR
By Associated Press.
VICTORIA, B. C. July 2».—The Chi
nese Reform association of Victoria to
day sent a lengthy cable to the Chinese
emperor in care of the British minister
at Pekin, congratulating him upon hlu
birthday 'and, wishing him an "early
restoration of powerful, royal China." *
LOS ANGELES, CAL., SUNDAY MORNING, JULY 30, 1905.
OFFICERS RAID
DOWNTOWN CLUB
HABITUES OF THE LILY FALL
UNDER BAN
CONFISCATE LIQUOR; STOCK
Seventy-five Persons': Arrested; Ma.
Jorlty of . Whom Are Released,
- ! Officers Convey Beverages
to Station
Sergeant Williams, " at the head of a
squad of police, raided the Lily, club at
402 North Los . Angeles street at 2
o'clock this morning and arrested
about seventy-five persons. Of this
number, more, than sixty were re
leased. Six women . and seven men,
including "Choo-Choo" Morris, the al
leged proprietor of the • place, were
among those held for trial. -
Three patrol wagons were used in
conveying the prisoners and confiscated
stock of liquors jto the station • . ;
; The police descended; on the club
-without warning., Many attempted to
escape by windows and the rear stair
way, but all exits were guarded. The
police expected to capture a large num
ber of prominent people, but when the
{•aid was over only those whose records
were known to the police were carried
to the station, all others being released.
Most of those under arrest are young
boys and ■ young women. All \ per
sons caught in the house at the time of
arrest were forced- to undergo the In
spection jof . the detectives.
The amount of liquor., captured in
the raid is unknown but it is thought
It •will amount to several hundred dol
lars. ■ ' ■:' i ■, ■ ' .'. ,;
STATE LIFE INSURANCE
PRESIDENT ARRESTED
George W. Phelps Taken Into Custody
In San Francisco on Warrant
From Los Angeles
By Associated Press.
SAN FRANCISCO/ July 29.— George
W. Phelps, president , and manager of
the State Life Insurance company, was
arrested today on a warrant from Los
Angeles ' charging him with obtaining
money by false pretenses.
Phelps explains the warrant by say
ing that some time ago one of the
company's agents, C. D. Chase, went
into Southern California to sell stock;
that he made certain misrepresenta
tions in regard to 1t,., and that when the
purchasers nailed him down he offered
as an excuse that he had been author
ised to make the misrepresentations by
Phelps himself. , .
SHOOTSHERSELF AFTER
SCOLDING BY MOTHER
Thlrteen.Yesx.Old Girl Commits BuU
old* Upon Being Reprimanded
for Forging Check ■
NORTH YAKIM A. Wash:, July 19.—
Elsie Doherty, thirteen years old, died
today ' after shooting herself, in the
head. Yesterday the child forged her
mother's name to a chuck fur 12. The
bank sent the , check '■ back stamped
"no funds." ' The , mother scolded the
child, who walked. into 'a bedroom,
picked up a revolver and shot herself.
The girl's father committed suicide a
year ago and her grandfather al»o
killed hluuelf.
AGUINALDO SEES
MAIMED VICTIMS
CONFRONTED WITH TORTURED
FILIPINOS -
'RATTLED' ON WITNESS STAND
Testifies In Libel Case Drought
Against the Renaclmento, ths
Most Influential Native
Newspaper
Special to The Herald.
MANILA, July 19.— Emlllo Agulnaldo
testified today in the Renaclmento libel
case. The former insurgent leader de
scribed himself os a farmer.
Three editors of the Henaclmento, the
most Influential Filipino newspaper,
were arrested on a charge of llbeilnsr
C'npt. Baker of the constabulary, whom
they charged with great cruelty In the
Cuvlte campKlK." 1 . Agulnaldo testlflul
tc gross outrages by the contabulary
and said ladronlsm was diminishing.
When Prosecuting Attorney Sn.lih
cross-examlnj'l Agulnaldo, the former
insurgent leader became pitifully rat
tled. He' abonnoned the attempt' to
speak In Spanish and testified In the
Tagalog dla'.cc: through an Interpreter.
He was for34i to admit he had been
familiar with the raids of Fellzardo
and Montoloii.
Just at this moment Agulnaldo was
dramatically and suddenly confronted
with five horribly ' tortured Filipinos
who had been rescued and succored
by constabulary. One of these, 73 years
of age, had had his tongue sliced, one
had been hamstrung, two others had
been hamstrung and their lips horribly
cut up, and one had his legs hacked oft
by the Cavlte ladrones. This scene
created an extraordinary sensation.
TWO KILLED IN TRAIN
- WRECK IN ARKANSAS
MISPLACED SWITCH IS CAUSE OF
DISASTER
Southbound Express on St. Louis, Iron
Mountain & Southern Railway Is
Wrecked a and ' Cars Are Turned
Over and, Burned,
By Associated Press.
DIAZ, Ark., July 29.— Fast train No.
6, southbound on the Iron Mountain &
Southern railway, was wrecked here
today by running into a misplaced
switch. Two employes were killed and
several persons Injured.
The dead:
WILLIAM HOUSTON, engineer, of
Little Rock.
A. N. DOOLIN, fireman, of Poplar
Bluff.
- The injured: , .''■"' . !..}. '
J. D. McLoughlin, mall clerk, of St.
Louis, seriously.
J. E. Payne, man clerk, of St Louis,
seriously. ,-f
M. Fowler, Chicago.'
J. P. Martin, St. Louis.
E. L. Kruger, St. Louis, express mes
senger.
W. L. McGee, Austin, Ark.
> Max Meyer, Little Rock..
j Mrs. Carl Hoepler, Germany. |
Win. M. Graves, conductor, Malvern,
Ark. .... . .
J. , N. Haukins, brakeman, Arkadel
phla, Ark. ; '.. .
Margaret Staples.
I C. L. Harper.
Rosa Chalnesky.
> The train is known as the "Cannon
Ball" and left St. Louis last night for
Texas points. When the engine struck
the misplaced switch it rolled over and
the cars crashed upon it. j The wrecked
cars caught fire and were burned. A
relief train arrived from Little Rock
and conveyed the Injured to this city.
RUSSIANS BELIEVED TO
HAVE SUNK BEALERS
By Associated Press.
VICTORIA, B C. July 29.— Advices
from Hakodate state that the Japanese
sealing schooners Hokusel and Koyei,
last reported in May off Oshlma island
and ' engaged in pelagic sealing, are
long overdue and believed to have been
sunk by Russians. There were four
Canadians and one Norwegian hunter
from the Paciflo coast on the Hokusei.
Their .names were Robert Flnlay,
Charles Grant and William Williams
of Victoria, B. C.j Fred Cochrane of
Toronto, and H. Jacobson of San Fran
cisco.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA";
PEOPLE IN NEW YORK
Special to The Herald.
NEW YORK, July t9.— The fol
lowing Southern Callfornlans were
registered at the leading hotels here
during the week:
From Los Angeles— J. B. Lev!.
B. A. Woodford, Q. Mitchell, H. J.
O'Connor, W. Daubenspeck. T. , ~R\
Wheeler, W. Lleknow, A. A.
Sturges, J. K. Cook, J. D. Spls, A.
W. Ballard, A. C. Harris, , C. ,\ h.
Wilde, J. W. Cousins and J. H.
Mac Lean.
From Santa Barbara— O. M, Me-
Quire. '"
SCENES IN FEVER STRICKEN NEW ORLEANS
* AT THE TOP, THE ARCHBISHOP'B PALACE.THE OLDEST HOUSE *
% IN LOUISIANA. IN THE CENTER, THE CATHEDRAL AND THE |
$■' STATUE OF ANDREW JACKSON. AT THE I BOTTOM, THE |
% CABILDO ,".;■;'■;,;;:■;•' vv- ; 'v'< -•>'■. [ } .i-. : :.^ '-• :'■ ■■■';•■ /'■■ .;r. ;r - %
LOS ANGELES : iX4K 75
OBSERVED At PORTLAND
THRONGS SWARM CALIFORNIA BUILDING
Wine Flows Like Water and Oranges Are Given Away to
Ten Thousand People— Frank Wiggins, California
: Commissioner, Is Complimented:
That California Commissioner Frank Wiggins was fully satisfied *
with the way his constituents turned out to make Los Angeles day at the J|
Portland exposition one of the features of the fair Is shown by the follow- „
ing telegraphic dispatch, which was received last night by Director A. B.«>
Cass of the chamber of commerce: , - . • ;;
"A. B. Cass, Los Angeles:. Southern California and Los Angeles day •>
a grand success. Building crowded to the limit. We have made the hit T
of the fair. : ;•••' • "WIGGINS.". X
Special to The Herald. . ■ ■ ■ . >
PORTLAND, Ore., July 29.— Los An
geles had her inning at the Lewis and
Clark exposition today. ! All the other
cities in Southern California merged
their official exercises in Los Angeles
day and the event was one of the most
memorable of the fair. The California
state building was the center of interest
throughout the day. Thousands of peo
ple wore the yellow badges bearing the
words "Southern \ California" and still
more thousands carried ' the yellow
oranges from Los Angeles county which
were given away to the number of 10,
000. The Angelenos began dispensing
this sort of hospitality by the basketful
early In the morning, sending the fruit
to the various ' administration offices
and the other state buildings with their
compliments. ' From 10 o'clock until the
state building closed at 6 o'clock people
were to be seen crowding into the bi«
mission structure and filing out carry-
Ing glorious golden oranges.
Ventura county distributed thousands
of small bags of refined beet sugar an«l
lima beans during the day. Loaded
with oranges and sugar, beans nnj
badges, people from all parts of the
United States strolled about the grounds
hurrahing for California, and particu
larly for ' Los Angeles, which' city to
the average tourist from • the j east,
whether he has been there or not, ap
pears to be an earthly substitute for
heaven.
Wine Flows Like Water „
"Wine is flowing like water in the
California building," yelled a man go
ing in that direction and a crowd
quickly gathered, following , him. His
statement was literally true. The cat
aract'of red wine from California, a
rich claret, near the main entrance to
the building, was turned on this morn*
Ing for the first time. It Is a reproduc
tlon in miniature of the far famed
Vernal falls In the Yosemlte valley.
Down over the cliffs pours the claret
at the . rate of 2400 gallons an hour.
This novel moving picture of real wine
caught the crowd and many people ex
pressed the desire to dip cups Into the
cataract, j but the visitors were re
quested to watt until the afternoon
when their . thirst might be appeased
by . California ' claret punch at the re
ception ' on ; the , upper, landing.
President Hj : ; W. Gode of the ex
PRICE: DAILY, BY CARRIER, 65 CTS. PER MONTH
position • opened the exercises at 10
o'clock with an address of welcome in
which he ' thanked Southern California
for the hearty support that section has
given the fair. The <■ Oregon " line, he
said, la only an imaginary line and the
Interests of the Pacific coast states are
Identical. :.• ■' .
W.A. Lamb, officially j representing
the mayor of Los Angeles, responded.
He spoke words of. high praise and ap
preciation of the matchless climate and
the lovely 'land in the midst of which
Los Angeles is situated and was fre
quently cheered by his auditors.
•' Mayors Praise Their Towns
Mayor. C. L. McFarland of Riverside
also spoke about his city.
Commissioner J. L. Fltcher sang the
praises of San Bernardino. Robert M.
Clarke made an eloquent address . in
praise of Ventura ', city and county,
representing Mayor Lewis of Ventura,
Following the speaking, there ' was a
reception at the California building, to
which all persons wearing Southern
California badges were welcomed. Sev
eral thousand people ' partook of the
hospitality | during , the afternoon. The
crowd was so large, that the spacious
quarters were overtaxed and it was
found ' necessary to wait for the van
guard to depart before bringing up the
main body and the rear. Lakes of
punch were served, together with light
luncheon, including . California nuts,
oranges and other dainties.*.
State Commissioner Frank Wiggins
of Los Angeles was in charge of the
arrangements and tonight he is a very
weary ' man, but he Is receiving the
congratulations of all his frlends^or
the success which 'he has made of Eos
Angeles and Southern California day.
EJECTED FROM STORE
AND DIEB FROM FALL
By Associated Press.
MARYSVILLB, July 29. — Joseph
Louslgnont went into the second-hand
store of A. Abrams last evening to
collect a' small ' amount due him for
wood. An argument ensued between
him and Abrams " and, as Louslgnont
was about to leave the place, Joseph
Abrams, ' a clerk,' pushed him through
the door. \
Louslgnont was picked up uncon
scious and ' died before morning!
Abrams is under arrest,': accused of
killing , him.
Main News Section
SEVEN DIE
OF FEVER
Yesterday's Victims at
New Orleans
Number of New Cases Is
Decreasing
Railroads Are Hampered
by Quarantines
Panicky Feeling Outside of City It
. General, and Little Towns Are
Continually Added to List
of Closed Places
By Associated Press.
NEW ORLEANS. July 29.— The fol
lowing is the report of the health au
thorities on yellow fever up to 6 p.m.
today:
New cases, 29; cases to- date, 260;
deaths today, 7; deaths to date, 54; new
foci, 2.
Deducting the number of deaths and
the number of recoveries It is believed
that there are not more than 75 cases
now under treatment, If that many.
Much encouragement is drawn from
the fact that only two new foci hay«
developed. One of these is a nurse who
attended a patient at a hospital, i- and
the other is in the vicinity, of,'Milne
burg, where there had ' been a susplc.
lous case recently which had been spir
ited away before the authorities got
hold of it.
The railroads continue to be seriously
hampered by quarantines. ; The' decls*'
lon of the conference of health author
ities at Memphis to recommend a'quarV
antine of the entire state of Tennessee
against infected points Is evidence ;oi
the spread of panicky feeling , outsld«
of New Orleans.; Every day some hall
dozen little ' towns .. are •; suddenly
scratched . off : the list •of open'j.towni
and very, often the embargo Is clapped
on so suddenly that passengers are left
there with tickets' already, purchased.' ;:
Barred ' From ,' Texas
• It * was ; said 'at the ; marine \ hospital
that passengers from New Orleans were
no longer permitted to travel in* Texas,
and only/ the most insignificant ' sta
tions are^open in Louisiana. :'. Quaran
tines . have -been established : soVthor
oughly ■ along the line of j some roads
that big cards, bearing bold,- black let-"
(Continued on Paore Two)
THE DAY'S NEWS
FORECAST
Southern California: Foggy Sun;
day morning, becoming. fair during
the day; light west wind. Maxl.
mum temperature In . Los Angeles
yesterday, 75 degrees; minimum, 61
degrees.
I—Big1 — Big deal In water.
2 — War advocates gaining.:
3 — Speed mania claims victim.
4— Southern California news.
s— City water problem solved.
6— Editorial.
7^-Cables.
9.10 — Sports.
11— Markets.
1-4 — Society.
5— Dove ordinance Is Invalid.
6— Masons lay corner stone.
PART 111
1-6 — Real estate.
7 — Testy earl opposes match.
8.11 — Classified advertisements.
PART IV
. Magazine section.
PART V
Colored comic supplement.
EASTERN
Depew arrives from Europe and ) win :
Issue full public statement. .. b ■
Rockefeller la boomed for mayor of
Cleveland. ■ . .■. ■ >•?< - .. .■> jr.? • ■•«.v*c;J<r«M|S
Seven die of yellow fever In New Or
leans but number of new cases decreases.
FOREIGN
Agulnaldo is confronted with tortured.
Filipinos and becomes "rattled" on . wit
ness stand, v .■..,. . .
Japanese terms, as outlined, give im
petus to war party In Japan.
Delegations line the streets of Toklo to
bid Tuft party farewell.
COABT
Florence Button defeats her sister in .
tennis tournament at Coronado. -■•>■,
Two more of the Uennington's wounded
die at San Diego.
1 Creamery employe near Tracy, Cal.','
tails into fly wheel and meets terrible
death. _ ( --*iA-?*, WtHMMBBSA
LOCAL
Hensley breaks ■ auto record between
San Francisco . and Los Angeles.
City officials are furthering scheme to
obtain water • supply > by . - purchase . of
Owens river ■in Central • California '■ and
riparian rights Into Los Angelei at a
cost of 123.000.000. Tho •upply will ,i be
sufficient for the city : for all time to ,
come. ■..."■■ ■
IJoyle Heights Masons lay corner, ttone <
for new temple. 1 , . -■■.
Aged bicyclist Is struck by automobile
on South Main street, Busialnlng nevtre >
if not fatal Injuries. ■ : Chauffeur stopt ■
momentarily and resumes ■ mad ■ race
down street ■ • ' •„„.',_' ■•«*'
Superintendent of Schools Foshay re
turn* from vacation ' with new , Ideas re
garding children's playgrounds.
Work begun on erection . of city gar
bage incinerator. : ' ;
Local division of Southern . Paclflo to '■
be 'equipped with telcgraphon*.
. Widow of Milton Hancock ■ tears ray- -
ages of yellow (ever and will not return
to thu south until tall. .
Court . of appeals decide* county dove
ordinance is , unconstitutional.

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